Tag Archives: TensorFlow

Open Sourcing BERT: State-of-the-Art Pre-training for Natural Language Processing



One of the biggest challenges in natural language processing (NLP) is the shortage of training data. Because NLP is a diversified field with many distinct tasks, most task-specific datasets contain only a few thousand or a few hundred thousand human-labeled training examples. However, modern deep learning-based NLP models see benefits from much larger amounts of data, improving when trained on millions, or billions, of annotated training examples. To help close this gap in data, researchers have developed a variety of techniques for training general purpose language representation models using the enormous amount of unannotated text on the web (known as pre-training). The pre-trained model can then be fine-tuned on small-data NLP tasks like question answering and sentiment analysis, resulting in substantial accuracy improvements compared to training on these datasets from scratch.

This week, we open sourced a new technique for NLP pre-training called Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers, or BERT. With this release, anyone in the world can train their own state-of-the-art question answering system (or a variety of other models) in about 30 minutes on a single Cloud TPU, or in a few hours using a single GPU. The release includes source code built on top of TensorFlow and a number of pre-trained language representation models. In our associated paper, we demonstrate state-of-the-art results on 11 NLP tasks, including the very competitive Stanford Question Answering Dataset (SQuAD v1.1).

What Makes BERT Different?
BERT builds upon recent work in pre-training contextual representations — including Semi-supervised Sequence Learning, Generative Pre-Training, ELMo, and ULMFit. However, unlike these previous models, BERT is the first deeply bidirectional, unsupervised language representation, pre-trained using only a plain text corpus (in this case, Wikipedia).

Why does this matter? Pre-trained representations can either be context-free or contextual, and contextual representations can further be unidirectional or bidirectional. Context-free models such as word2vec or GloVe generate a single word embedding representation for each word in the vocabulary. For example, the word “bank” would have the same context-free representation in “bank account” and “bank of the river.” Contextual models instead generate a representation of each word that is based on the other words in the sentence. For example, in the sentence “I accessed the bank account,” a unidirectional contextual model would represent “bank” based on “I accessed the” but not “account.” However, BERT represents “bank” using both its previous and next context — “I accessed the ... account” — starting from the very bottom of a deep neural network, making it deeply bidirectional.

A visualization of BERT’s neural network architecture compared to previous state-of-the-art contextual pre-training methods is shown below. The arrows indicate the information flow from one layer to the next. The green boxes at the top indicate the final contextualized representation of each input word:
BERT is deeply bidirectional, OpenAI GPT is unidirectional, and ELMo is shallowly bidirectional.
The Strength of Bidirectionality
If bidirectionality is so powerful, why hasn’t it been done before? To understand why, consider that unidirectional models are efficiently trained by predicting each word conditioned on the previous words in the sentence. However, it is not possible to train bidirectional models by simply conditioning each word on its previous and next words, since this would allow the word that’s being predicted to indirectly “see itself” in a multi-layer model.

To solve this problem, we use the straightforward technique of masking out some of the words in the input and then condition each word bidirectionally to predict the masked words. For example:
While this idea has been around for a very long time, BERT is the first time it was successfully used to pre-train a deep neural network.

BERT also learns to model relationships between sentences by pre-training on a very simple task that can be generated from any text corpus: Given two sentences A and B, is B the actual next sentence that comes after A in the corpus, or just a random sentence? For example:
Training with Cloud TPUs
Everything that we’ve described so far might seem fairly straightforward, so what’s the missing piece that made it work so well? Cloud TPUs. Cloud TPUs gave us the freedom to quickly experiment, debug, and tweak our models, which was critical in allowing us to move beyond existing pre-training techniques. The Transformer model architecture, developed by researchers at Google in 2017, also gave us the foundation we needed to make BERT successful. The Transformer is implemented in our open source release, as well as the tensor2tensor library.

Results with BERT
To evaluate performance, we compared BERT to other state-of-the-art NLP systems. Importantly, BERT achieved all of its results with almost no task-specific changes to the neural network architecture. On SQuAD v1.1, BERT achieves 93.2% F1 score (a measure of accuracy), surpassing the previous state-of-the-art score of 91.6% and human-level score of 91.2%:
BERT also improves the state-of-the-art by 7.6% absolute on the very challenging GLUE benchmark, a set of 9 diverse Natural Language Understanding (NLU) tasks. The amount of human-labeled training data in these tasks ranges from 2,500 examples to 400,000 examples, and BERT substantially improves upon the state-of-the-art accuracy on all of them:
Making BERT Work for You
The models that we are releasing can be fine-tuned on a wide variety of NLP tasks in a few hours or less. The open source release also includes code to run pre-training, although we believe the majority of NLP researchers who use BERT will never need to pre-train their own models from scratch. The BERT models that we are releasing today are English-only, but we hope to release models which have been pre-trained on a variety of languages in the near future.

The open source TensorFlow implementation and pointers to pre-trained BERT models can be found at http://goo.gl/language/bert. Alternatively, you can get started using BERT through Colab with the notebook “BERT FineTuning with Cloud TPUs.”

You can also read our paper "BERT: Pre-training of Deep Bidirectional Transformers for Language Understanding" for more details.

Source: Google AI Blog


Introducing AdaNet: Fast and Flexible AutoML with Learning Guarantees



Ensemble learning, the art of combining different machine learning (ML) model predictions, is widely used with neural networks to achieve state-of-the-art performance, benefitting from a rich history and theoretical guarantees to enable success at challenges such as the Netflix Prize and various Kaggle competitions. However, they aren’t used much in practice due to long training times, and the ML model candidate selection requires its own domain expertise. But as computational power and specialized deep learning hardware such as TPUs become more readily available, machine learning models will grow larger and ensembles will become more prominent. Now, imagine a tool that automatically searches over neural architectures, and learns to combine the best ones into a high-quality model.

Today, we’re excited to share AdaNet, a lightweight TensorFlow-based framework for automatically learning high-quality models with minimal expert intervention. AdaNet builds on our recent reinforcement learning and evolutionary-based AutoML efforts to be fast and flexible while providing learning guarantees. Importantly, AdaNet provides a general framework for not only learning a neural network architecture, but also for learning to ensemble to obtain even better models.

AdaNet is easy to use, and creates high-quality models, saving ML practitioners the time normally spent selecting optimal neural network architectures, implementing an adaptive algorithm for learning a neural architecture as an ensemble of subnetworks. AdaNet is capable of adding subnetworks of different depths and widths to create a diverse ensemble, and trade off performance improvement with the number of parameters.
AdaNet adaptively growing an ensemble of neural networks. At each iteration, it measures the ensemble loss for each candidate, and selects the best one to move onto the next iteration.
Fast and Easy to Use
AdaNet implements the TensorFlow Estimator interface, which greatly simplifies machine learning programming by encapsulating training, evaluation, prediction and export for serving. It integrates with open-source tools like TensorFlow Hub modules, TensorFlow Model Analysis, and Google Cloud’s Hyperparameter Tuner. Distributed training support significantly reduces training time, and scales linearly with available CPUs and accelerators (e.g. GPUs).
AdaNet’s accuracy (y-axis) per train step (x-axis) on CIFAR-100. The blue line is accuracy on the training set, and red line is performance on the test set. A new subnetwork begins training every million steps, and eventually improves the performance of the ensemble. The grey and green lines are the accuracies of the ensemble before adding the new subnetwork.
Because TensorBoard is one of the best TensorFlow features for visualizing model metrics during training, AdaNet integrates seamlessly with it in order to monitor subnetwork training, ensemble composition, and performance. When AdaNet is done training, it exports a SavedModel that can be deployed with TensorFlow Serving.

Learning Guarantees
Building an ensemble of neural networks has several challenges: What are the best subnetwork architectures to consider? Is it best to reuse the same architectures or encourage diversity? While complex subnetworks with more parameters will tend to perform better on the training set, they may not generalize to unseen data due to their greater complexity. These challenges stem from evaluating model performance. We could evaluate performance on a hold-out set split from the training set, but in doing so would reduce the number of examples one can use for training the neural network.

Instead, AdaNet’s approach (presented in “AdaNet: Adaptive Structural Learning of Artificial Neural Networks” at ICML 2017) is to optimize an objective that balances the trade-offs between the ensemble’s performance on the training set and its ability to generalize to unseen data. The intuition is for the ensemble to include a candidate subnetwork only when it improves the ensemble’s training loss more than it affects its ability to generalize. This guarantees that:
  1. The generalization error of the ensemble is bounded by its training error and complexity.
  2. By optimizing this objective, we are directly minimizing this bound.
A practical benefit of optimizing this objective is that it eliminates the need for a hold-out set for choosing which candidate subnetworks to add to the ensemble. This has the added benefit of enabling the use of more training data for training the subnetworks. To learn more, please walk through our tutorial about the AdaNet objective.

Extensible
We believe that the key to making a useful AutoML framework for both research and production use is to not only provide sensible defaults, but to also allow users to try their own subnetwork/model definitions. As a result, machine learning researchers, practitioners, and enthusiasts are invited to define their own AdaNet adanet.subnetwork.Builder using high level TensorFlow APIs like tf.layers.

Users who have already integrated a TensorFlow model in their system can easily convert their TensorFlow code into an AdaNet subnetwork, and use the adanet.Estimator to boost model performance while obtaining learning guarantees. AdaNet will explore their defined search space of candidate subnetworks and learn to ensemble the subnetworks. For instance, we took an open-source implementation of a NASNet-A CIFAR architecture, transformed it into a subnetwork, and improved upon CIFAR-10 state-of-the-art results after eight AdaNet iterations. Furthermore, our model achieves this result with fewer parameters:
Performance of a NASNet-A model as presented in Zoph et al., 2018 versus AdaNet learning to combine small NASNet-A subnetworks on CIFAR-10.
Users are also invited to use their own custom loss functions as part of the AdaNet objective via canned or custom tf.contrib.estimator.Heads in order to train regression, classification, and multi-task learning problems.

Users can also fully define the search space of candidate subnetworks to explore by extending the adanet.subnetwork.Generator class. This allows them to grow or reduce their search space based on their available hardware. The search space of subnetworks can be as simple as duplicating the same subnetwork configuration with different random seeds, to training dozens of subnetworks with different hyperparameter combinations, and letting AdaNet choose the one to include in the final ensemble.

If you’re interested in trying AdaNet for yourself, please check out our Github repo, and walk through the tutorial notebooks. We’ve included a few working examples using dense layers and convolutions to get you started. AdaNet is an ongoing research project, and we welcome contributions. We’re excited to see how AdaNet can help the research community.

Acknowledgements
This project was only possible thanks to the members of the core team including Corinna Cortes, Mehryar Mohri, Xavi Gonzalvo, Charles Weill, Vitaly Kuznetsov, Scott Yak, and Hanna Mazzawi. We also extend a special thanks to our collaborators, residents and interns Gus Kristiansen, Galen Chuang, Ghassen Jerfel, Vladimir Macko, Ben Adlam, Scott Yang and the many others at Google who helped us test it out.

Source: Google AI Blog


Open Sourcing Active Question Reformulation with Reinforcement Learning



Natural language understanding is a significant ongoing focus of Google’s AI research, with application to machine translation, syntactic and semantic parsing, and much more. Importantly, as conversational technology increasingly requires the ability to directly answer users’ questions, one of the most active areas of research we pursue is question answering (QA), a fundamental building block of human dialogue.

Because open sourcing code is a critical component of reproducible research, we are releasing a TensorFlow package for Active Question Answering (ActiveQA), a research project that investigates using reinforcement learning to train artificial agents for question answering. Introduced for the first time in our ICLR 2018 paper “Ask the Right Questions: Active Question Reformulation with Reinforcement Learning”, ActiveQA interacts with QA systems using natural language with the goal of providing better answers.

Active Question Answering
In traditional QA, supervised learning techniques are used in combination with labeled data to train a system that answers arbitrary input questions. While this is effective, it suffers from a lack of ability to deal with uncertainty like humans would, by reformulating questions, issuing multiple searches, evaluating and aggregating responses. Inspired by humans’ ability to "ask the right questions", ActiveQA introduces an agent that repeatedly consults the QA system. In doing so, the agent may reformulate the original question multiple times in order to find the best possible answer. We call this approach active because the agent engages in a dynamic interaction with the QA system, with the goal of improving the quality of the answers returned.

For example, consider the question “When was Tesla born?”. The agent reformulates the question in two different ways: “When is Tesla’s birthday” and “Which year was Tesla born”, retrieving answers to both questions from the QA system. Using all this information it decides to return “July 10 1856”.
What characterizes an ActiveQA system is that it learns to ask questions that lead to good answers. However, because training data in the form of question pairs, with an original question and a more successful variant, is not readily available, ActiveQA uses reinforcement learning, an approach to machine learning concerned with training agents so that they take actions that maximize a reward, while interacting with an environment.

The learning takes place as the ActiveQA agent interacts with the QA system; each question reformulation is evaluated in terms of how good the corresponding answer is, which constitutes the reward. If the answer is good, then the learning algorithm will adjust the model’s parameters so that the question reformulation that lead to the answer is more likely to be generated again, or otherwise less likely, if the answer was bad.

In our paper, we show that it is possible to train such agents to outperform the underlying QA system, the one used to provide answers to reformulations, by asking better questions. This is an important result, as the QA system is already trained with supervised learning to solve the same task. Another compelling finding of our research is that the ActiveQA agent can learn a fairly sophisticated, and still somewhat interpretable, reformulation strategy (the policy in reinforcement learning). The learned policy uses well-known information retrieval techniques such as tf-idf query term re-weighting, the process by which more informative terms are weighted more than generic ones, and word stemming.

Build Your Own ActiveQA System
The TensorFlow ActiveQA package we are releasing consists of three main components, and contains all the code necessary to train and run the ActiveQA agent.
  • A pretrained sequence to sequence model that takes as input a question and returns its reformulations. This task is similar to machine translation, translating from English to English, and indeed the initial model can be used for general paraphrasing. For its implementation we use and customize the TensorFlow Neural Machine Translation Tutorial code. We adapted the code to support training with reinforcement learning, using policy gradient methods.*
  • An answer selection model. The answer selector uses a convolutional neural network and assigns a score to each triplet of original question, reformulation and answer. The selector uses pre-trained, publicly available word embeddings (GloVe).
  • A question answering system (the environment). For this purpose we use BiDAF, a popular question answering system, described in Seo et al. (2017).
We also provide pointers to checkpoints for all the trained models.

Google’s mission is to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful, and we believe that ActiveQA is an important step in realizing that mission. We envision that this research will help us design systems that provide better and more interpretable answers, and hope it will help others develop systems that can interact with the world using natural language.

Acknowledgments
Contributors to this research and release include Alham Fikri Aji, Christian Buck, Jannis Bulian, Massimiliano Ciaramita, Wojciech Gajewski, Andrea Gesmundo, Alexey Gronskiy, Neil Houlsby, Yannic Kilcher, and Wei Wang.



* The system we reported on in our paper used the TensorFlow sequence-to-sequence code used in Britz et al. (2017). Later, an open source version of the Google Translation model (GNMT) was published as a tutorial. The ActiveQA version released today is based on this more recent, and actively developed implementation. For this reason the released system varies slightly from the paper’s. Nevertheless, the performance and behavior are qualitatively and quantitatively comparable.

Source: Google AI Blog


Moving Beyond Translation with the Universal Transformer



Last year we released the Transformer, a new machine learning model that showed remarkable success over existing algorithms for machine translation and other language understanding tasks. Before the Transformer, most neural network based approaches to machine translation relied on recurrent neural networks (RNNs) which operate sequentially (e.g. translating words in a sentence one-after-the-other) using recurrence (i.e. the output of each step feeds into the next). While RNNs are very powerful at modeling sequences, their sequential nature means that they are quite slow to train, as longer sentences need more processing steps, and their recurrent structure also makes them notoriously difficult to train properly.

In contrast to RNN-based approaches, the Transformer used no recurrence, instead processing all words or symbols in the sequence in parallel while making use of a self-attention mechanism to incorporate context from words farther away. By processing all words in parallel and letting each word attend to other words in the sentence over multiple processing steps, the Transformer was much faster to train than recurrent models. Remarkably, it also yielded much better translation results than RNNs. However, on smaller and more structured language understanding tasks, or even simple algorithmic tasks such as copying a string (e.g. to transform an input of “abc” to “abcabc”), the Transformer does not perform very well. In contrast, models that perform well on these tasks, like the Neural GPU and Neural Turing Machine, fail on large-scale language understanding tasks like translation.

In “Universal Transformers” we extend the standard Transformer to be computationally universal (Turing complete) using a novel, efficient flavor of parallel-in-time recurrence which yields stronger results across a wider range of tasks. We built on the parallel structure of the Transformer to retain its fast training speed, but we replaced the Transformer’s fixed stack of different transformation functions with several applications of a single, parallel-in-time recurrent transformation function (i.e. the same learned transformation function is applied to all symbols in parallel over multiple processing steps, where the output of each step feeds into the next). Crucially, where an RNN processes a sequence symbol-by-symbol (left to right), the Universal Transformer processes all symbols at the same time (like the Transformer), but then refines its interpretation of every symbol in parallel over a variable number of recurrent processing steps using self-attention. This parallel-in-time recurrence mechanism is both faster than the serial recurrence used in RNNs, and also makes the Universal Transformer more powerful than the standard feedforward Transformer.
The Universal Transformer repeatedly refines a series of vector representations (shown as h1 to hm) for each position of the sequence in parallel, by combining information from different positions using self-attention and applying a recurrent transition function. Arrows denote dependencies between operations.
At each step, information is communicated from each symbol (e.g. word in the sentence) to all other symbols using self-attention, just like in the original Transformer. However, now the number of times this transformation is applied to each symbol (i.e. the number of recurrent steps) can either be manually set ahead of time (e.g. to some fixed number or to the input length), or it can be decided dynamically by the Universal Transformer itself. To achieve the latter, we added an adaptive computation mechanism to each position which can allocate more processing steps to symbols that are more ambiguous or require more computations.

As an intuitive example of how this could be useful, consider the sentence “I arrived at the bank after crossing the river”. In this case, more context is required to infer the most likely meaning of the word “bank” compared to the less ambiguous meaning of “I” or “river”. When we encode this sentence using the standard Transformer, the same amount of computation is applied unconditionally to each word. However, the Universal Transformer’s adaptive mechanism allows the model to spend increased computation only on the more ambiguous words, e.g. to use more steps to integrate the additional contextual information needed to disambiguate the word “bank”, while spending potentially fewer steps on less ambiguous words.

At first it might seem restrictive to allow the Universal Transformer to only apply a single learned function repeatedly to process its input, especially when compared to the standard Transformer which learns to apply a fixed sequence of distinct functions. But learning how to apply a single function repeatedly means the number of applications (processing steps) can now be variable, and this is the crucial difference. Beyond allowing the Universal Transformer to apply more computation to more ambiguous symbols, as explained above, it further allows the model to scale the number of function applications with the overall size of the input (more steps for longer sequences), or to decide dynamically how often to apply the function to any given part of the input based on other characteristics learned during training. This makes the Universal Transformer more powerful in a theoretical sense, as it can effectively learn to apply different transformations to different parts of the input. This is something that the standard Transformer cannot do, as it consists of fixed stacks of learned Transformation blocks applied only once.

But while increased theoretical power is desirable, we also care about empirical performance. Our experiments confirm that Universal Transformers are indeed able to learn from examples how to copy and reverse strings and how to perform integer addition much better than a Transformer or an RNN (although not quite as well as Neural GPUs). Furthermore, on a diverse set of challenging language understanding tasks the Universal Transformer generalizes significantly better and achieves a new state of the art on the bAbI linguistic reasoning task and the challenging LAMBADA language modeling task. But perhaps of most interest is that the Universal Transformer also improves translation quality by 0.9 BLEU1 over a base Transformer with the same number of parameters, trained in the same way on the same training data. Putting things in perspective, this almost adds another 50% relative improvement on top of the previous 2.0 BLEU improvement that the original Transformer showed over earlier models when it was released last year.

The Universal Transformer thus closes the gap between practical sequence models competitive on large-scale language understanding tasks such as machine translation, and computationally universal models such as the Neural Turing Machine or the Neural GPU, which can be trained using gradient descent to perform arbitrary algorithmic tasks. We are enthusiastic about recent developments on parallel-in-time sequence models, and in addition to adding computational capacity and recurrence in processing depth, we hope that further improvements to the basic Universal Transformer presented here will help us build learning algorithms that are both more powerful, more data efficient, and that generalize beyond the current state-of-the-art.

If you’d like to try this for yourself, the code used to train and evaluate Universal Transformers can be found here in the open-source Tensor2Tensor repository.

Acknowledgements
This research was conducted by Mostafa Dehghani, Stephan Gouws, Oriol Vinyals, Jakob Uszkoreit, and Łukasz Kaiser. Additional thanks go to Ashish Vaswani, Douglas Eck, and David Dohan for their fruitful comments and inspiration.



1 A translation quality benchmark widely used in the machine translation community, computed on the standard WMT newstest2014 English to German translation test data set.

Source: Google AI Blog


The Machine Learning Behind Android Smart Linkify



Earlier this week we launched Android 9 Pie, the latest release of Android that uses machine learning to make your phone simpler to use. One of the features in Android 9 is Smart Linkify, a new API that adds clickable links when certain types of entities are detected in text. This is useful when, for example, you receive an address from a friend in a messaging app and want to look it up on a map. With a Smart Linkify-annotated text, it’s a lot easier!
Smart Linkify is a new version of the existing Android Linkify API. It is powered by a small feed-forward neural network (500kB per language) with low latency (less than 20ms on Google Pixel phones) and small inference code (250kB), and uses essentially the same machine learning technology that powers Smart Text Selection (released as part of Android Oreo) to now also create links.

Smart Linkify is available as an open-source TextClassifier API in Android (as the generateLinks method). The models were trained using TensorFlow and exported to a custom inference library backed by TensorFlow Lite and FlatBuffers. The C++ inference library for the models is available as part of Android Open-Source framework here, and runs on each text selection and Smart Linkify API calls.

Finding Entities
Looking for phone numbers and postal addresses in text is a difficult problem. Not only are there many variations in how people write them, but it’s also often ambiguous what type of entity is being represented (e.g. “Confirmation number: 857-555-3556” is not a phone number even though it it takes a similar form to one). As a solution, we designed an inference algorithm with two small feedforward neural networks at its heart. This algorithm is general enough to perform all kinds of entity chunking beyond just addresses and phone numbers.

Overall, the system architecture is as follows: A given input text is first split into words (based on space separation), then all possible word subsequences of certain maximum length (15 words in our case) are generated, and for each candidate the scoring neural net assigns a value (between 0 and 1) based on whether it represents a valid entity:
For the given text string, the first network assigns low scores to non-entities and a high score for the candidate that correctly selects the whole phone number.
Next, the generated entities that overlap are removed, favoring the ones with the higher score over the conflicting ones with a lower score. Now, we have a set of entities, but still don’t know their types. So now the second neural network is used to classify the type of the entity, as either a phone number, address or in some cases, a non-entity.

In our example, the only non-conflicting entities are “And call 857 555 3556tomorrow.” (with “857 555 3556” classified as a phone number), and “And call 857 555 3556 tomorrow.” (with “And” classified as a non-entity).

Now that we have the only non-conflicting entities, “And call 857 555 3556 tomorrow.” (with “857 555 3556” classified as a phone number) and “And call 857 555 3556 tomorrow.” (with “And” classified as a non-entity), we are easily able to underline them in the displayed text on the screen, and run the right app when clicked.

Textual Features
So far, we’ve given a general description of the way Smart Linkify locates and classifies entities in a string of text. Here, we go into more detail on how the text is processed and fed to the network.

The task of the networks, given an entity candidate in the input text, is to determine whether the entity is valid, and then to classify it. To do this, the networks need to know the context surrounding the entity (in addition to the text string of the entity itself). In machine learning this is done by representing these parts as separate features. Effectively, the input text is split into several parts that are fed to the network separately:
Given a candidate entity span, we extract: Left context: five words before the entity, Entity start: first three words of the entity, Entity end: last three words of the entity (they can be duplicated with the previous feature if they overlap, or padded if there are not that many), Right context: five words after the entity, Entity content: bag of words inside the entity and Entity length: size of the entity in number of words. They are then concatenated together and fed as an input to the neural network.
The feature extraction operates with words, and we use character n-grams and a capitalization feature to represent the individual words as real vectors suitable as an input of the neural network:
  • Character N-grams. Instead of using the standard word embedding technique for representing words, which keeps a separate vector for each word in the model and thus would be infeasible for mobile devices because of their large storage size, we use the hashed charactergram embedding. This technique represents the word as a set of all character subsequences of certain length. We use lengths 1 to 5. These strings are additionally hashed and mapped to a fixed number of buckets (see here for more details on the technique). As a result, the final model only stores vectors for each of the hash buckets, not each word/character subsequence, and can be kept small. The embedding matrix for the hashed charactergrams that we use has 20,000 buckets and 12 dimensions.
  • A binary feature that indicates whether the word starts with a capital letter. This is important for the network to know because the capitalization in postal addresses is quite distinct, and helps the networks to discriminate.
A Training Dataset
There is no obvious dataset for this task on which we could readily train the networks, so we came up with a training algorithm that generates synthetic examples out of realistic pieces. Concretely, we gathered lists of addresses, phone numbers and named entities (like product, place and business names) and other random words from the Web (using Schema.org annotations), and use them to synthesize the training data for the neural networks. We take the entities as they are and generate random textual contexts around them (from the list of random words on Web). Additionally, we add phrases like “Confirmation number:” or “ID:” to the negative training data for phone numbers, to teach the network to suppress phone number matches in these contexts.

Making it Work
There are a number of additional techniques that we had to use for training the network and making a practical mobile deployment:
  • Quantizing the embedding matrix to 8 bits. We found that we could reduce the size of the model almost 4x without compromising the performance, by quantizing the embedding matrix values to 8-bit integers.
  • Sharing embedding matrices between the selection and classification networks. This brings almost no loss and makes the model 2x smaller.
  • Varying the size of the context before/after the entities. On mobile screens text is often short, with not enough context, so the network needs to be exposed to this during training as well.
  • Creating artificial negative examples out of the positive ones for the classification network. For example for the positive example: “call me 857 555-3556 today” with a label “phone” we generate “call me 857 555-3556 today” as a negative example with a label “other”. This teaches the classification network to be more precise about the entity span. Without doing this, the network would be merely a detector whether there is a phone number somewhere in the input, regardless of the span.
Internationalization is Important
The automatic data extraction we use makes it easier to train language-specific models. However, making them work for all languages is a challenge, requiring careful checking of language nuance by experts, as well as having an acceptable amount of training data. We found that having one model for all Latin-script languages works well (e.g. Czech, Polish, German, English), with individual models for each of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Thai, Arabic and Russian. While Smark Linkify currently supports 16 languages, we are experimenting with models that support even more languages, which is especially challenging given the mobile model size constraints and trickiness with languages that do not split words on spaces.

Next Steps
While the technique described in this post enables the fast and accurate annotation of phone numbers and postal addresses in text, the recognition of flight numbers, date and time, or IBAN, is currently implemented with a more traditional technique using standard regular expressions. However, we are looking into creating ML models for date and time as well, particularly for recognizing informal relative date/time specifications prevalent in messaging context, like “next Thursday” or “in 3 weeks”.

The small model and binary size as well as low latency are very important for mobile deployment. The models and the code we developed are available open-source as part of Android framework. We believe that the architecture could extend to other on-device text annotation problems and we look forward to seeing new use cases from our developer community!

Source: Google AI Blog


New AIY Edge TPU Boards

Posted by Billy Rutledge, Director of AIY Projects

Over the past year and a half, we've seen more than 200K people build, modify, and create with our Voice Kit and Vision Kit products. Today at Cloud Next we announced two new devices to help professional engineers build new products with on-device machine learning(ML) at their core: the AIY Edge TPU Dev Board and the AIY Edge TPU Accelerator. Both are powered by Google's Edge TPU and represent our first steps towards expanding AIY into a platform for experimentation with on-device ML.

The Edge TPU is Google's purpose-built ASIC chip designed to run TensorFlow Lite ML models on your device. We've learned that performance-per-watt and performance-per-dollar are critical benchmarks when processing neural networks within a small footprint. The Edge TPU delivers both in a package that's smaller than the head of a penny. It can accelerate ML inferencing on device, or can pair with Google Cloud to create a full cloud-to-edge ML stack. In either configuration, by processing data directly on-device, a local ML accelerator increases privacy, removes the need for persistent connections, reduces latency, and allows for high performance using less power.

The AIY Edge TPU Dev Board is an all-in-one development board that allows you to prototype embedded systems that demand fast ML inferencing. The baseboard provides all the peripheral connections you need to effectively prototype your device — including a 40-pin GPIO header to integrate with various electrical components. The board also features a removable System-on-module (SOM) daughter board can be directly integrated into your own hardware once you're ready to scale.

The AIY Edge TPU Accelerator is a neural network coprocessor for your existing system. This small USB-C stick can connect to any Linux-based system to perform accelerated ML inferencing. The casing includes mounting holes for attachment to host boards such as a Raspberry Pi Zero or your custom device.

On-device ML is still in its early days, and we're excited to see how these two products can be applied to solve real world problems — such as increasing manufacturing equipment reliability, detecting quality control issues in products, tracking retail foot-traffic, building adaptive automotive sensing systems, and more applications that haven't been imagined yet.

Both devices will be available online this fall in the US with other countries to follow shortly.

For more product information visit g.co/aiy and sign up to be notified as products become available.

Accelerated Training and Inference with the Tensorflow Object Detection API



Last year we announced the TensorFlow Object Detection API, and since then we’ve released a number of new features, such as models learned via Neural Architecture Search, instance segmentation support and models trained on new datasets such as Open Images. We have been amazed at how it is being used – from finding scofflaws on the streets of NYC to diagnosing diseases on cassava plants in Tanzania.
Today, as part of Google’s commitment to democratizing computer vision, and using feedback from the research community on how to make this codebase even more useful, we’re excited to announce a number of additions to our API. Highlights of this release include:
  • Support for accelerated training of object detection models via Cloud TPUs
  • Improving the mobile deployment process by accelerating inference and making it easy to export a model to mobile with the TensorFlow Lite format
  • Several new model architecture definitions including:
Additionally, we are releasing pre-trained weights for each of the above models based on the COCO dataset.

Accelerated Training via Cloud TPUs
Users spend a great deal of time on optimizing hyperparameters and retraining object detection models, therefore having fast turnaround times on experiments is critical. The models released today belong to the single shot detector (SSD) class of architectures that are optimized for training on Cloud TPUs. For example, we can now train a ResNet-50 based RetinaNet model to achieve 35% mean Average Precision (mAP) on the COCO dataset in < 3.5 hrs.
Accelerated Inference via Quantization and TensorFlow Lite 
To better support low-latency requirements on mobile and embedded devices, the models we are providing are now natively compatible with TensorFlow Lite, which enables on-device machine learning inference with low latency and a small binary size. As part of this, we have implemented: (1) model quantization and (2) detection-specific operations natively in TensorFlow Lite. Our model quantization follows the strategy outlined in Jacob et al. (2018) and the whitepaper by Krishnamoorthi (2018) which applies quantization to both model weights and activations at training and inference time, yielding smaller models that run faster.
Quantized detection models are faster and smaller (e.g., a quantized 75% depth-reduced SSD Mobilenet model runs at >15 fps on a Pixel 2 CPU with a 4.2 Mb footprint) with minimal loss in detection accuracy compared to the full floating point model.
Try it Yourself with a New Tutorial!
To get started training your own model on Cloud TPUs, check out our new tutorial! This walkthrough will take you through the process of training a quantized pet face detector on Cloud TPU then exporting it to an Android phone for inference via TensorFlow Lite conversion.

We hope that these new additions will help make high-quality computer vision models accessible to anyone wishing to solve an object detection problem, and provide a more seamless user experience, from training a model with quantization to exporting to a TensorFlow Lite model ready for on-device deployment. We would like to thank everyone in the community who have contributed features and bug fixes. As always, contributions to the codebase are welcome, and please stay tuned for more updates!

Acknowledgements
This post reflects the work of the following group of core contributors: Derek Chow, Aakanksha Chowdhery, Jonathan Huang, Pengchong Jin, Zhichao Lu, Vivek Rathod, Ronny Votel and Xiangxin Zhu. We would also like to thank the following colleagues: Vasu Agrawal, Sourabh Bajaj, Chiachen Chou, Tom Jablin, Wenzhe Li, Tsung-Yi Lin, Hernan Moraldo, Kevin Murphy, Sara Robinson, Andrew Selle, Shashi Shekhar, Yash Sonthalia, Zak Stone, Pete Warden and Menglong Zhu.

Source: Google AI Blog


Googlers on the road: CLS and OSCON 2018

Next week a veritable who’s who of free and open source software luminaries, maintainers and developers will gather to celebrate the 20th annual OSCON and the 20th anniversary of the Open Source Definition. Naturally, the Google Open Source and Google Cloud teams will be there too!

Program chairs at OSCON 2017, left to right:
Rachel Roumeliotis, Kelsey Hightower, Scott Hanselman.
Photo used with permission from O'Reilly Media.
This year OSCON returns to Portland, Oregon and runs from July 16-19. As usual, it is preceded by the free-to-attend Community Leadership Summit on July 14-15.

If you’re curious about our outreach programs, our approach to open source, or any of the open source projects we’ve released, please find us! We’re eager to chat. You’ll find us and many other Googlers throughout the week on stage, in the expo hall, and at several special events that we’re running, including:
Here’s a rundown of the sessions we’re hosting this year:

Sunday, July 15th (Community Leadership Summit)

11:45am   Asking for time and/or money by Cat Allman

Monday, July 16th (Tutorials)

9:00am    Getting started with TensorFlow by Josh Gordon
1:30pm    Introduction to natural language processing with Python by Barbara Fusinska

Tuesday, July 17th (Tutorials)

9:00am    Istio Day opening remarks by Kelsey Hightower
9:00am    TensorFlow Day opening remarks by Edd Wilder-James
9:05am    Sailing to 1.0: Istio community update by April Nassi
9:05am    The state of TensorFlow by Sandeep Gupta
9:30am    Introduction to fairness in machine learning by Hallie Benjamin
9:55am    Farm to table: A TensorFlow story by Gunhan Gulsoy
11:00am  Hassle-free, scalable machine learning with Kubeflow by Barbara Fusinska
11:05am  Istio: Zero-trust communication security for production services by Samrat Ray, Tao Li, and Mak Ahmad
12:00pm  Project Magenta: Machine learning for music and art by Sherol Chen
1:35pm    Istio à la carte by Daniel Ciruli

Wednesday, July 18th (Sessions)

9:00am    Wednesday opening welcome by Kelsey Hightower
11:50am  Machine learning for continuous integration by Joseph Gregorio
1:45pm    Live-coding a beautiful, performant mobile app from scratch by Emily Fortuna and Matt Sullivan
2:35pm    Powering TensorFlow with big data using Apache Beam, Flink, and Spark by Holden Karau
5:25pm    Teaching the Next Generation to FLOSS by Josh Simmons

Thursday, July 19th (Sessions)

9:00am    Thursday opening welcome by Kelsey Hightower
9:40am    20 years later, open source is as important as ever by Sarah Novotny
11:50am  Google’s approach to distributed systems observability by Jaana B. Dogan
2:35pm    gRPC versus REST: Let the battle begin with Alex Borysov
5:05pm    Shenzhen Go: A visual Go environment for everybody, even professionals by Josh Deprez

We look forward to seeing you and the rest of the community there!

By Josh Simmons, Google Open Source

The Machine Learning Crash Course (MLCC) Study Jam series comes to India

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/2k1bZslf950IXN-bbAwpNQPq-ax9fQtVdTwdMm8vIXUL4FmaI0jybUMkJBpVH-Jae10t-UGM_He79bILjGPlTw=w1340-h646-c
Looking for an inroad into the world of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning? Now you can access practical -- and free -- training from Google experts


From helping farmers detect the onset of crop infections to enabling doctors diagnose the occurrence of diabetic blindness among millions, Artificial Intelligence is helping tackle challenges inventively across a range of sectors. At Google, we believe that AI has the potential to make apps and services more useful, while helping innovation among businesses and developers, be it in their own field or while taking on humanity’s big challenges.


In India the AI ecosystem is nascent but is developing rapidly. With companies of all sizes adopting AI in their solutions, there is a clear and present need for trained and technically-equipped developers to drive these AI-related challenges and projects. To help facilitate this, Google signed a Statement of Intent with NITI Aayog earlier this year to jointly work towards building the AI ecosystem in India.


One of the key initiatives of this collaboration is to train Indian developers in the field of Machine Learning. With this as the objective we are excited to  bring the Machine Learning Crash Course (MLCC) Study Jam series to India this July.



This course intends to improve developers’ technical proficiency in machine learning, enabling them to apply cutting-edge techniques to help take on a range of practical challenges.


About MLCC


MLCC is Google’s flagship machine learning course, initially created for Google engineers. This course was taken up by more than 18,000 Googlers, and was recently made publicly available.  MLCC provides exercises, interactive visualizations, and instructional videos that anyone can use to learn and practice ML concepts.


What does the course cover?


MLCC covers numerous machine learning fundamentals, from  basic concepts such as loss function and gradient descent, then building through more advanced theories like classification models and neural networks. The programming exercises include the basics of TensorFlow -- our open-source machine learning framework -- and also feature succinct videos from Google machine learning experts. Participants will be able to read short text lessons, and play with educational gadgets devised by Google’s instructional designers and engineers.


Who should take this (free!) course?


MLCC is intended for those who wish to learn about ML from a practical, applied perspective that will enable them to gain a deeper understanding of the power of TensorFlow, and incorporate best practices into their everyday projects. This course is ideally suited to developers with basic machine learning knowledge, who are keen to gain experience in ML and TensorFlow.



Posted by Chetan Krishnaswamy, Director - Public Policy, Google India

Realtime tSNE Visualizations with TensorFlow.js



In recent years, the t-distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding (tSNE) algorithm has become one of the most used and insightful techniques for exploratory data analysis of high-dimensional data. Used to interpret deep neural network outputs in tools such as the TensorFlow Embedding Projector and TensorBoard, a powerful feature of tSNE is that it reveals clusters of high-dimensional data points at different scales while requiring only minimal tuning of its parameters. Despite these advantages, the computational complexity of the tSNE algorithm limits its application to relatively small datasets. While several evolutions of tSNE have been developed to address this issue (mainly focusing on the scalability of the similarity computations between data points), they have so far not been enough to provide a truly interactive experience when visualizing the evolution of the tSNE embedding for large datasets.

In “Linear tSNE Optimization for the Web”, we present a novel approach to tSNE that heavily relies on modern graphics hardware. Given the linear complexity of the new approach, our method generates embeddings faster than comparable techniques and can even be executed on the client side in a web browser by leveraging GPU capabilities through WebGL. The combination of these two factors allows for real-time interactive visualization of large, high-dimensional datasets. Furthermore, we are releasing this work as an open source library in the TensorFlow.js family in the hopes that the broader research community finds it useful.
Real-time evolution of the tSNE embedding for the complete MNIST dataset with our technique. The dataset contains images of 60,000 handwritten digits. You can find a live demo here.
The aim of tSNE is to cluster small “neighborhoods” of similar data points while also reducing the overall dimensionality of the data so it is more easily visualized. In other words, the tSNE objective function measures how well these neighborhoods of similar data are preserved in the 2 or 3-dimensional space, and arranges them into clusters accordingly.

In previous work, the minimization of the tSNE objective was performed as a N-body simulation problem, in which points are randomly placed in the embedding space and two different types of forces are applied on each point. Attractive forces bring the points closer to the points that are most similar in the high-dimensional space, while repulsive forces push them away from all the neighbors in the embedding.

While the attractive forces are acting on a small subset of points (i.e., similar neighbors), repulsive forces are in effect from all pairs of points. Due to this, tSNE requires significant computation and many iterations of the objective function, which limits the possible dataset size to just a few hundred data points. To improve over a brute force solution, the Barnes-Hut algorithm was used to approximate the repulsive forces and the gradient of the objective function. This allows scaling of the computation to tens of thousand data points, but it requires more than 15 minutes to compute the MNIST embedding in a C++ implementation.

In our paper, we propose a solution to this scaling problem by approximating the gradient of the objective function using textures that are generated in WebGL. Our technique draws a “repulsive field” at every minimization iteration using a three channel texture, with the 3 components treated as colors and drawn in the RGB channels. The repulsive field is obtained for every point to represent both the horizontal and vertical repulsive force created by the point, and a third component used for normalization. Intuitively, the normalization term ensures that the magnitude of the shifts matches the similarity measure in the high-dimensional space. In addition, the resolution of the texture is adaptively changed to keep the number of pixels drawn constant.
Rendering of the three functions used to approximate the repulsive effect created by a single point. In the above figure the repulsive forces show a point in a blue area is pushed to the left/bottom, while a point in the red area is pushed to the right/top while a point in the white region will not move.
The contribution of every point is then added on the GPU, resulting in a texture similar to those presented in the GIF below, that approximate the repulsive fields. This innovative repulsive field approach turns out to be much more GPU friendly than more commonly used calculation of point-to-point interactions. This is because repulsion for multiple points can be computed at once and in a very fast way in the GPU. In addition, we implemented the computation of the attraction between points in the GPU.
This animation shows the evolution of the tSNE embedding (upper left) and of the scalar fields used to approximate its gradient with normalization term (upper right), horizontal shift (bottom left) and vertical shift (bottom right).
We additionally revised the update of the embedding from an ad-hoc implementation to a series of standard tensor operations that are computed in TensorFlow.js, a JavaScript library to perform tensor computations in the web browser. Our approach, which is released as an open source library in the TensorFlow.js family, allows us to compute the evolution of the tSNE embedding entirely on the GPU while having better computational complexity.

With this implementation, what used to take 15 minutes to calculate (on the MNIST dataset) can now be visualized in real-time and in the web browser. Furthermore this allows real-time visualizations of much larger datasets, a feature that is particularly useful when deep neural output is analyzed. One main limitation of our work is that this technique currently only works for 2D embeddings. However, 2D visualizations are often preferred over 3D ones as they require more interaction to effectively understand cluster results.

Future Work
We believe that having a fast and interactive tSNE implementation that runs in the browser will empower developers of data analytics systems. We are particularly interested in exploring how our implementation can be used for the interpretation of deep neural networks. Additionally, our implementation shows how lateral thinking in using GPU computations (approximating the gradient using RGB texture) can be used to significantly speed up algorithmic computations. In the future we will be exploring how this kind of gradient approximation can be applied not only to speed-up other dimensionality reduction algorithms, but also to implement other N-body simulations in the web browser using TensorFlow.js.

Acknowledgements
We would like to thank Alexander Mordvintsev, Yannick Assogba, Matt Sharifi, Anna Vilanova, Elmar Eisemann, Nikhil Thorat, Daniel Smilkov, Martin Wattenberg, Fernanda Viegas, Alessio Bazzica, Boudewijn Lelieveldt, Thomas Höllt, Baldur van Lew, Julian Thijssen and Marvin Ritter.

Source: Google AI Blog