Monthly Archives: January 2020

Encode, Tag and Realize: A Controllable and Efficient Approach for Text Generation



Sequence-to-sequence (seq2seq) models have revolutionized the field of machine translation and have become the tool of choice for various text-generation tasks, such as summarization, sentence fusion and grammatical error correction. Improvements in model architecture (e.g., Transformer) and the ability to leverage large corpora of unannotated text via unsupervised pre-training have enabled the quality gains in neural network approaches we have seen in recent years.

Yet, the use of seq2seq models for text generation can come with a number of substantial drawbacks depending on the use case, such as producing outputs that are not supported by the input text (known as hallucination) and requiring large amounts of training data to reach good performance. Furthermore, seq2seq models are inherently slow at inference time, since they typically generate the output word-by-word.

In “Encode, Tag, Realize: High-Precision Text Editing,” we present a novel, open sourced method for text generation, which is designed to specifically address these three shortcomings. This method is called LaserTagger, owing to the speed and precision of the method. Instead of generating the output text from scratch, LaserTagger produces output by tagging words with predicted edit operations that are then applied to the input words in a separate realization step. This is a less error-prone way of tackling text generation, which can be handled by an easier to train and faster to execute model architecture.

Design and Functionality of LaserTagger
A distinct characteristic of many text-generation tasks is that there is often a high overlap between the input and the output. For instance, when detecting and fixing grammatical mistakes or when fusing sentences, most of the input text can remain unchanged, and only a small fraction of the words needs to be modified. For this reason, LaserTagger produces a sequence of edit operations instead of actual words. The four types of edit operations we use are: Keep (copies a word to the output), Delete (removes a word) and Keep-AddX / Delete-AddX (adds phrase X before the tagged word and optionally deletes the tagged word). This process is illustrated in the figure below, which shows an application of LaserTagger to sentence fusion.
LaserTagger applied to sentence fusion. The predicted edit operations correspond to deleting “. Turing" and adding "and he" before it. Notice the high overlap between the input and output text.
All added phrases come from a restricted vocabulary. This vocabulary is the result of an optimization process that has two goals: (1) minimizing the vocabulary size and (2) maximizing the number of training examples, where the only words necessary to add to the target text come from the vocabulary alone. Having a restricted phrase vocabulary makes the space of output decisions smaller and prevents the model from adding arbitrary words, hence mitigating the problem of hallucination. A corollary of the high-overlap property of input and output texts is that required modifications tend to be local and independent from one another. This means that the edit operations can be predicted in parallel with high accuracy, enabling a significant end-to-end speed up compared to autoregressive seq2seq models, which perform the predictions sequentially, conditioning on the previous predictions.

Results
We evaluated LaserTagger on four tasks: sentence fusion, split and rephrase, abstractive summarization, and grammar correction. Across the tasks, LaserTagger performs comparably to a strong BERT-based seq2seq baseline that uses a large number of training examples, and clearly outperforms this baseline when the number of training examples is limited. Below we show the results on the WikiSplit dataset, where the task is to rephrase a long sentence into two coherent short sentences.
When training the models on the full dataset of 1 million examples, both LaserTagger and a BERT-based seq2seq baseline model perform comparably, but when training on a subsample of 10,000 examples or less, LaserTagger clearly outperforms the baseline model (the higher the SARI score the better).
Key Advantages of LaserTagger
Compared to traditional seq2seq methods, LaserTagger has the following advantages:
  1. Control: By controlling the output phrase vocabulary, which we can also manually edit or curate, LaserTagger is less susceptible to hallucination than the seq2seq baseline.
  2. Inference speed: LaserTagger computes predictions up to 100 times faster than the seq2seq baseline, making it suitable for real-time applications.
  3. Data efficiency: LaserTagger produces reasonable outputs, even when trained using only a few hundred or a few thousand training examples. In our experiments, a competitive seq2seq baseline required tens of thousands of examples to obtain comparable performance.
Why This Matters
The advantages of LaserTagger become even more pronounced when applied at large scale, such as improving the formulation of voice answers in some services by reducing the length of the responses and making them less repetitive. The high inference speed allows the model to be plugged into an existing technology stack, without adding any noticeable latency on the user side, while the improved data efficiency enables the collection of training data for many languages, thus benefiting users from different language backgrounds.

In our current work, we strive to bring similar improvements to other Google technologies that produce natural language. Furthermore, we are exploring how the editing of texts (instead of their generation from scratch) can help us to better understand user queries as they grow longer, become more complex, and come as part of a dialogue discourse. The code for LaserTagger is open-sourced to the community through our GitHub repo.

Acknowledgements
This research was conducted by Eric Malmi, Sebastian Krause, Sascha Rothe, Daniil Mirylenka, and Aliaksei Severyn. We are grateful for useful discussions with Enrique Alfonseca, Idan Szpektor, and Orgad Keller.

Source: Google AI Blog


ICYMI: A monthly roundup of stuff developers want to know

Posted by Natalie Dao, Google Developers Social TeamHappy New Year … is something we won’t say again until next January, promise. Still. There’s a lot to be thrilled about in 2020. Check out our Top Ten list of videos, blogs, and events to find out why we’re already excited for next month, the month after that, and beyond. It’s been a bit of a slow start, but one thing is for sure: 2020 is going to rule. Let’s get into it.



1. Game On 🎮



Gamers rejoice! The annual Indie Games Festival from Google Play will hit Europe, Japan, and South Korea on April 25th. Whether you’re an indie game developer or a devoted gamer, this is your chance to showcase your unique skills. Submissions close on March 2nd, so get to it!

Learn more about it on the official website.

2. It’s A Dirty Job 🧹

Finally, a vacuum cleaner that doesn’t suck! Wait. Ecovacs Robotics manufactures robotic vacuum cleaners powered by a TensorFlow Lite model to help detect and avoid obstacles.

Read the blog to learn more.

3. Take The DSC Challenge 🏆

Developer Student Clubs from 800+ universities across the globe will use technology to solve local problems within their communities. 10 winning teams (up to 4 members) will be chosen and receive prizes including a curated experience with Googlers to celebrate! Submissions will be accepted between March 15-30, 2020.

Up for the challenge? Learn how you can enter here.

4. You Gotta Check Out This New Podcast 🎙

Sound up! The Assistant on Air podcast from Actions on Google is now streaming. Tune in to listen to your favorite couch-friendly series, where guests chat about building for the Google Assistant.

Get to listening on Google Podcasts, Google Play Music, Apple, and Spotify!

5. Flutter/Dart Do Design And They Do It Well 🎨

Photo courtesy of Fast Company

Look Ma, we made it! Our favorite UI toolkit and the programming language that powers it have been listed in Fast Company’s most important design ideas of the decade. Flutter and Dart allow developers to build beautiful experiences that can be seamlessly deployed across all platforms.

Check out the star-studded lineup on Fast Company.

6. Summit Season Starts Now 🙌

The time is now to register for the TensorFlow Dev Summit! Join the machine learning community in Sunnyvale, CA this March for two full days of highly technical talks, demos, sessions, and networking with the TensorFlow team.

See how you can witness that ML magic on the official event website.

7. Registration Open For Google Cloud Next '20 ⏩

SO. MANY. EVENTS. Registration for Google Cloud Next ‘20 has been announced! Taking place in the charming city of San Francisco, this epic conference brings together some of the brightest minds in tech for three days of networking, learning, and collaboration. Get the scoop on all the latest products, learn how leading brands use Cloud to solve challenges, immerse yourself in exhibits, and more.

Get your registration locked down on the official event website.

8. New Coral Products For 2020 👍

Coral is a platform of hardware components and software tools that makes prototyping and scaling local AI products easier. Launched last year, this portfolio of products has been used for many applications across different industries ranging from healthcare to agriculture. To kick off the new year, Coral has released new products to expand the possibilities of local AI!

Get all the details on the blog here.

9. SERIES SPOTLIGHT: Get To Know Cloud Firestore 🔥

In this episode of Get to Know Cloud Firestore from Firebase, Todd Kerpelman tackles Cloud Functions and five interesting scenarios you might come across when implementing them in your app.

Watch the full video here and don’t forget to subscribe to the Firebase YT channel.

10. Countdown to IO 🕛

#GoogleIO is returning to Mountain View in May! To announce the event, Google launched a collaborative game where users worked together to repair an intergalactic satellite network. Although the date has been decoded by savvy internet detectives, you can still embark on the mission for fun!

More event details are coming soon on the official event website. See you at Shoreline.





Stay connected!

Follow and subscribe to get all the latest news and updates from the Google Developer ecosystem.

Twitter
Instagram
Facebook
Youtube

ICYMI: A monthly roundup of stuff developers want to know

Posted by Natalie Dao, Google Developers Social TeamHappy New Year … is something we won’t say again until next January, promise. Still. There’s a lot to be thrilled about in 2020. Check out our Top Ten list of videos, blogs, and events to find out why we’re already excited for next month, the month after that, and beyond. It’s been a bit of a slow start, but one thing is for sure: 2020 is going to rule. Let’s get into it.



1. Game On 🎮



Gamers rejoice! The annual Indie Games Festival from Google Play will hit Europe, Japan, and South Korea on April 25th. Whether you’re an indie game developer or a devoted gamer, this is your chance to showcase your unique skills. Submissions close on March 2nd, so get to it!

Learn more about it on the official website.

2. It’s A Dirty Job 🧹

Finally, a vacuum cleaner that doesn’t suck! Wait. Ecovacs Robotics manufactures robotic vacuum cleaners powered by a TensorFlow Lite model to help detect and avoid obstacles.

Read the blog to learn more.

3. Take The DSC Challenge 🏆

Developer Student Clubs from 800+ universities across the globe will use technology to solve local problems within their communities. 10 winning teams (up to 4 members) will be chosen and receive prizes including a curated experience with Googlers to celebrate! Submissions will be accepted between March 15-30, 2020.

Up for the challenge? Learn how you can enter here.

4. You Gotta Check Out This New Podcast 🎙

Sound up! The Assistant on Air podcast from Actions on Google is now streaming. Tune in to listen to your favorite couch-friendly series, where guests chat about building for the Google Assistant.

Get to listening on Google Podcasts, Google Play Music, Apple, and Spotify!

5. Flutter/Dart Do Design And They Do It Well 🎨

Photo courtesy of Fast Company

Look Ma, we made it! Our favorite UI toolkit and the programming language that powers it have been listed in Fast Company’s most important design ideas of the decade. Flutter and Dart allow developers to build beautiful experiences that can be seamlessly deployed across all platforms.

Check out the star-studded lineup on Fast Company.

6. Summit Season Starts Now 🙌

The time is now to register for the TensorFlow Dev Summit! Join the machine learning community in Sunnyvale, CA this March for two full days of highly technical talks, demos, sessions, and networking with the TensorFlow team.

See how you can witness that ML magic on the official event website.

7. Registration Open For Google Cloud Next '20 ⏩

SO. MANY. EVENTS. Registration for Google Cloud Next ‘20 has been announced! Taking place in the charming city of San Francisco, this epic conference brings together some of the brightest minds in tech for three days of networking, learning, and collaboration. Get the scoop on all the latest products, learn how leading brands use Cloud to solve challenges, immerse yourself in exhibits, and more.

Get your registration locked down on the official event website.

8. New Coral Products For 2020 👍

Coral is a platform of hardware components and software tools that makes prototyping and scaling local AI products easier. Launched last year, this portfolio of products has been used for many applications across different industries ranging from healthcare to agriculture. To kick off the new year, Coral has released new products to expand the possibilities of local AI!

Get all the details on the blog here.

9. SERIES SPOTLIGHT: Get To Know Cloud Firestore 🔥

In this episode of Get to Know Cloud Firestore from Firebase, Todd Kerpelman tackles Cloud Functions and five interesting scenarios you might come across when implementing them in your app.

Watch the full video here and don’t forget to subscribe to the Firebase YT channel.

10. Countdown to IO 🕛

#GoogleIO is returning to Mountain View in May! To announce the event, Google launched a collaborative game where users worked together to repair an intergalactic satellite network. Although the date has been decoded by savvy internet detectives, you can still embark on the mission for fun!

More event details are coming soon on the official event website. See you at Shoreline.





Stay connected!

Follow and subscribe to get all the latest news and updates from the Google Developer ecosystem.

Twitter
Instagram
Facebook
Youtube

Google Search News for January 2020

We hope the year 2020 has started off well for you, and wanted to bring a brief update of some of the changes around Google Search since our last episode. We aim to do this in our YouTube Series called Google Search News.

In the January 2020 episode, we cover:

We hope you find these updates useful! Let us know in the video comments, or on Twitter, if there's something we can improve on.

Watch This Way: Streaming your favorite live sports

This is the second installment in our series Watch This Way, aimed at making watching TV over the Internet easier. If you missed the first one, you can find it here.



The beers are cold, the wings are hot, the guac is fresh — there’s just one thing left to figure out: How are you going to watch that college basketball game, big football spectacular or tennis match Down Under this weekend on the big, new TV you picked up over the holidays?

First, you don’t need cable. (What? Yes. Really.) In fact, if you’re a cord-cutter — or you have gigabit Internet and prefer a superior watching experience — you can watch most games, matches, and championships in real time over the Internet. Consider this your three-step plan to becoming the ultimate watch party host.

  • Choose your cable substitute. Some channels will let you watch for free over the web or their apps, and there are also channels that have their own apps, like ESPN+. Most cable alternatives — like YouTubeTV, fuboTV, AT&T Now, Sling TV, or Hulu+Live TV — carry local broadcast affiliates, which means you’ll be able to watch games and matches there, too. (Be sure to check listings in advance, so you’re not disappointed.) Got a digital antenna? You can also use that to watch sports broadcast over-the-air for free.
  • Pick your device. You can watch on your computer, tablet, or phone, but assuming you’re making a party out of it, you’ll want to connect your TV to the Internet. You can do so by using a streaming device such as a Roku Player, Google Chromecast, Fire TV, XBox One, Android TV, or Apple TV (Gen 4 or above). And with many smart TVs, you can watch directly by using the app of your choice. 
  • Decide if you’ll be watching in 4K Ultra HD. Sports are often the first events to take advantage of the biggest, brightest resolution — and yes, that includes live broadcasts, too. When you watch in 4K UHD, you get four times the pixels than you’d get with standard HD, which makes it four times clearer.) You just need a 4K TV to take advantage of that superior viewing experience. 

Watching in 4K requires more bandwidth than watching in standard definition (SD) or HD,  so make sure that your Internet’s high speed and comes with unlimited data. That way, you don’t have to worry about any limitations or frustrations (other than your team making you sweat the outcome!). With gigabit Internet, you should be good to go.

Now you’re set to be the ultimate watch party host, no matter the sport … provided your food game is as strong as your TV game. Go [insert your team here]!

~~~~

author: Google Fiber Marketing Team

title:

category: product_news

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 80.0.3987.76 (Platform version: 12739.52.0) for most Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Changes can be viewed here.


If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 vertical dots in the upper right corner of the browser).

Daniel Gagnon
Google Chrome

Announcing the Third Workshop and Challenge on Learned Image Compression



With the large amount of media content being downloaded and streamed across the internet, minimizing bandwidth while maintaining quality remains a constant challenge. In 2015, researchers demonstrated that neural network-based image compression could yield significant improvements to image resolution while retaining good quality and high compression speed. Continued advances in compression and bandwidth optimization techniques were stimulated in part by two successful workshops that we hosted at CVPR in 2018 and 2019.

Today, we are excited to announce the Third Workshop and Challenge On Learned Image Compression (CLIC) at CVPR 2020. This workshop challenges researchers to use machine learning, neural networks and other computer vision approaches to increase the quality and lower the bandwidth needed for multimedia transmission. This year’s workshop will also include two challenges: a low-rate image compression challenge and a P-Frame video compression challenge.

Similar to previous years, the goal of the low-rate image compression challenge is to compress an image dataset to 0.15 bits per pixel while maintaining the highest possible quality. Finalists will be selected by measuring their performance against the PSNR and MS-SSIM evaluation metrics. The final ranking will then be determined by a human evaluated rating task.

This year we are also introducing a P-Frame compression track, the first video compression task in this series. In this challenge, participants must first generate a transformation between two adjacent video frames. In the decompression part of the task, participants then use the first frame and their compressed representation to reconstruct the second frame. This challenge will be ranked based solely on the MS-SSIM performance score.

If you are doing research in the field of learned image compression or video compression, we encourage you to participate in CLIC, whether in the two competitions or the paper-only track for publications to be presented at the workshop at CVPR 2020. The validation server is currently available for submissions. The deadline for the final submission of the test set is March 23rd, 2020. For more details on the competition and an up-to-date schedule, please refer to compression.cc. Additional announcements and answers to questions can be found on our Google Groups page.

Acknowledgements
This workshop is being jointly hosted by researchers at Google, Twitter and ETH Zurich. We’d like to thank: George Toderici (Google), Nick Johnston (Google), Johannes Ballé (Google), Eirikur Agustsson (Google), Lucas Theis (Google), Wenzhe Shi (Twitter), Radu Timofte (ETH Zurich) and Fabian Mentzer (ETH Zurich) for their contributions.

Source: Google AI Blog


Say hello to OpenSK: a fully open-source security key implementation



Today, FIDO security keys are reshaping the way online accounts are protected by providing an easy, phishing-resistant form of two-factor authentication (2FA) that is trusted by a growing number of websites, including Google, social networks, cloud providers, and many others. To help advance and improve access to FIDO authenticator implementations, we are excited, following other open-source projects like Solo and Somu, to announce the release of OpenSK, an open-source implementation for security keys written in Rust that supports both FIDO U2F and FIDO2 standards.

Photo of OpenSK developer edition: a Nordic Dongle running the OpenSK firmware on DIY case

By opening up OpenSK as a research platform, our hope is that it will be used by researchers, security key manufacturers, and enthusiasts to help develop innovative features and accelerate security key adoption.

With this early release of OpenSK, you can make your own developer key by flashing the OpenSK firmware on a Nordic chip dongle. In addition to being affordable, we chose Nordic as initial reference hardware because it supports all major transport protocols mentioned by FIDO2: NFC, Bluetooth Low Energy, USB, and a dedicated hardware crypto core. To protect and carry your key, we are also providing a custom, 3D-printable case that works on a variety of printers.

“We’re excited to collaborate with Google and the open source community on the new OpenSK research platform,” said Kjetil Holstad, Director of Product Management at Nordic Semiconductor. “We hope that our industry leading nRF52840’s native support for secure cryptographic acceleration combined with new features and testing in OpenSK will help the industry gain mainstream adoption of security keys.”

While you can make your own fully functional FIDO authenticator today, as showcased in the video above, this release should be considered as an experimental research project to be used for testing and research purposes.


Under the hood, OpenSK is written in Rust and runs on TockOS to provide better isolation and cleaner OS abstractions in support of security. Rust’s strong memory safety and zero-cost abstractions makes the code less vulnerable to logical attacks. TockOS, with its sandboxed architecture, offers the isolation between the security key applet, the drivers, and kernel that is needed to build defense-in-depth. Our TockOS contributions, including our flash-friendly storage system and patches, have all been upstreamed to the TockOS repository. We’ve done this to encourage everyone to build upon the work.


How to get involved and contribute to OpenSK 

To learn more about OpenSK and how to experiment with making your own security key, you can check out our GitHub repository today. With the help of the research and developer communities, we hope OpenSK over time will bring innovative features, stronger embedded crypto, and encourage widespread adoption of trusted phishing-resistant tokens and a passwordless web.

Acknowledgements

We also want to thank our OpenSK collaborators: Adam Langley, Alexei Czeskis, Arnar Birgisson, Borbala Benko, Christiaan Brand, Dirk Balfanz, Dominic Rizzo, Fabian Kaczmarczyck, Guillaume Endignoux, Jeff Hodges, Julien Cretin, Mark Risher, Oxana Comanescu, Tadek Pietraszek

From pop quiz to final exam: Chromebooks pass the test

Chromebooks help teachers stay organized, jazz up their lesson plans, and collaborate with students. But did you know they can improve the way schools administer assessments? With a secure platform, Chromebooks are ideal for formative assessments, like state exams, or pop quizzes throughout the year. While testing is key in tracking students’ progress, it often only happens at the end of the year, semester, or unit. While that's often too late to fix a concept that students don’t understand, educators can help by using Chromebooks to check in along the way.

Many testing solutions, one device

Let’s check out three ways instructors and schools can use Chromebooks for better assessments - and how you can now use accessibility apps and extensions to support all learners while test taking.

1. Helping to cut distractions during test time 

Many instructors use Google Forms Quizzes for formative assessments and understanding student progress. But we've heard instructors worry it's too easy for students to get distracted, browse the web for answers, or chat with classmates on Hangouts. To keep pupils focused on the assessment—and put educators at ease—we created locked mode in Quizzes. Locked mode takes over the screen so students can't navigate away until they submit their answers. And if a student exits the quiz, or opens any other tab, the teacher receives an email letting them know. Once the student hits the submit button, they can resume normal use of their Chromebook.

“Locked mode allows me to assign a quiz to a set of students and then not worry about them going to other sites or access content that they shouldn't,” says Chris Webb, High School Math teacher in Montreal, QC and Google Certified Trainer and Innovator. “It has exceeded my expectations and has allowed me to administer math quizzes without worrying that students will try to use Google or other tools to find the answer.”

958-GDU-Locked-Mode-Still-Wrapper-needed.png

Locked mode in Quizzes in Google Forms, only on managed Chromebooks

2. Turning devices into secure high stakes testing tools

Kiosk mode lets administrators use Chromebooks for high stakes testing by enabling the exam app to run in full-screen mode on the device. And kiosk mode is simple to set up - once enabled, it stops students from accessing the web or external storage, taking screenshots, or printing. Learn more about using Chromebooks for assessments. 

3. Supporting better testing for all types of learners

All students learn, and show what they know, in different ways. Last year, we shared that you can use apps and extensions like Texthelp and Don Johnston, as well as Chromebook accessibility features like Speech To Text and Word Prediction, when using locked mode in Quizzes in Google Forms. And today, we’re partnering with Pearson to provide integrated extensions for its online test delivery platform, TestNav. 

Texthelp® works in Google Forms Quizzes as well as Pearson’s TestNav so students can use Read&Write for Google Chrome and EquatIO® for Google. These tools help with reading, writing, and creating mathematical equations. They give students a little extra support if they need it, so they’re empowered to demonstrate their knowledge. 

Don Johnston's apps Co:Writer and Snap&Read integrate with Chrome, even in locked mode, and with Pearson’s TestNav. Co:Writer provides word prediction, translation, and speech recognition, while Snap&Read offers read aloud, highlighting, and note-taking. These integrations allow students to get real-time writing and reading help while taking tests. 

Locked-Mode-Snap-600x600-R0.gif

So whether you’re giving an exit ticket, formative assessment, or final exam, Chromebooks can help. Get started with Quizzes in Google Classroom, locked mode, accessibility tools, and Chrome kiosk appstoday.  

Five (of many) new emoji coming to Android this year

Each year, the Unicode Consortium reviews a seemingly infinite number of proposals that result in a list of emoji to be added to smartphones. Then companies like Google design the emoji for their operating systems like Android. 


This week, Unicode announced their 62 new emoji, along with skin tone and gender variants, for 2020. The list has us feeling 🤗, because five of the approved designs were proposed by the Android team. They’re also part of our ongoing effort to create an emoji keyboard that’s more inclusive. Here’s a look at all five:


More representation for a variety of families

Until this year, the only emoji that depicts childcare is the “breastfeeding” emoji. Since an inability to breastfeed doesn't preclude you from nurturing your child, we proposed First, “person feeding baby with a bottle”—an emoji that everyone can use. (Though in my opinion, as a mother of twins, parenthood is already representable with🌪️💩.)


Bottle Feeding emoji

Emoji design for "person feeding baby with bottle" 

We also proposed support for all gender variants for “person in veil” and “person in tuxedo,” because our technology should be inclusive of people’s experiences around the world ❤️🧡💛💚💙💜

YWtzamRmbGthc2RmLmdpZg==.gif

"Person in veil" and "person in tuxedo"

More ways to show empathy

With a new appreciation of how people use emoji, we’ve also been looking into emoji that can communicate empathy, which is often lost when not speaking face to face. That’s part of the thinking behind “two people hugging” and a “slightly smiling face with tear.” 


BINK_GoogleSocial_Emoji_V1_emoji3.png

New emoji to show empathy

“Slightly smiling face with tear” is a visual metaphor for feeling simultaneous appreciation and relief—goodness with a dash of sadness. It might come in handy when thinking fondly of the past (#tbt), experiencing the present and not taking moments for granted, or looking hopefully into the future.  


Visibility for the transgender flag 

In addition to the five emoji above, we also lent support to the Transgender flag proposal alongside Googler Tea Uglow and many dedicated individuals. We hope this addition gives the trans community a way to be out and proud, and others a way to provide visible support. 


transflag.png

These five emoji, along with the other new emoji approved by Unicode, will become available for Android users later this year 🥳

Source: Android