Tag Archives: angular

How is Dev Library useful to the open-source community?

Posted by Ankita Tripathi, Community Manager (Dev Library)


Witnessing a plethora of open-source enthusiasts in the developer ecosystem in recent years gave birth to the idea of Google’s Dev Library. The inception of the platform happened in June 2021 with the only objective of giving visibility to developers who have been creating and building projects relentlessly using Google technologies. But why the Dev Library?

Why Dev Library?

Open-source communities are currently at a boom. The past 3 years have seen a surge of folks constantly building in public, talking about open-source contributions, digging into opportunities, and carving out a valuable portfolio for themselves. The idea behind the Dev Library as a whole was also to capture these open-source projects and leverage them for the benefit of other developers.

This platform acted as a gold mine for projects created using Google technologies (Android, Angular, Flutter, Firebase, Machine Learning, Google Assistant, Google Cloud).

With the platform, we also catered to the burning issue – creating a central place for the huge number of projects and articles scattered across various platforms. Therefore, the Dev Library became a one-source platform for all the open source projects and articles for Google technologies.

How can you use the Dev Library?

“It is a library full of quality projects and articles.”

External developers cannot construe Dev Library as the first platform for blog posts or projects, but the vision is bigger than being a mere platform for the display of content. It envisages the growth of developers along with tech content creation. The uniqueness of the platform lies in the curation of its submissions. Unlike other platforms, you don’t get your submitted work on the site by just clicking ‘Submit’. Behind the scenes, Dev Library has internal Google engineers for each product area who:

  • thoroughly assess each submission,
  • check for relevancy, freshness, and quality,
  • approve the ones that pass the check, and reject the others with a note.

It is a painstaking process, and Dev Library requires a 4-6 week turnaround time to complete the entire curation procedure and get your work on the site.

What we aim to do with the platform:

  • Provide visibility: Developers create open-source projects and write articles on platforms to bring visibility to their work and attract more contributions. Dev Library’s intention is to continue to provide this amplification for the efforts and time spent by external contributors.
  • Kickstart a beginner’s open-source contribution journey: The biggest challenge for a beginner to start applying their learnings to build Android or Flutter applications is ‘Where do I start my contributions from’? While we see an open-source placard unfurled everywhere, beginners still struggle to find their right place. With the Dev Library, you get a stack of quality projects hand-picked for you keeping the freshness of the tech and content quality intact. For example, Tomas Trajan, a Dev Library contributor created an Angular material starter project where they have ‘good first issues’ to start your contributions with.
  • Recognition: Your selection of the content on the Dev Library acts as recognition to the tiring hours you’ve put in to build a running open-source project and explain it well. Dev Library also delivers hero content in their monthly newsletter, features top contributors, and is in the process to gamify the developer efforts. As an example, one of our contributors created a Weather application using Android and added a badge ‘Part of Dev Library’.

    With your contributions at one place under the Author page, you can use it as a portfolio for your work while simultaneously increasing your chances to become the next Google Developer Expert (GDE).

Features on the platform

Keeping developers in mind, we’ve updated features on the platform as follows:

  • Added a new product category; Google Assistant – All Google Assistant and Smart home projects now have a designated category on the Dev Library.
  • Integrated a new way to make submissions across product areas via the Advocu form.
  • Introduced a special section to submit Cloud Champion articles on Google Cloud.
  • Included displays on each Author page indicating the expertise of individual contributors
  • Upcoming: An expertise filter to help you segment out content based on Beginner, Intermediate, or Expert levels.

To submit your idea or suggestion, refer to this form, and put down your suggestions.

Contributor Love

Dev Library as a platform is more about the contributors who lie on the cusp of creation and consumption of the available content. Here are some contributors who have utilized the platform their way. Here's how the Dev Library has helped along their journey:

Roaa Khaddam: Roaa is a Senior Flutter Mobile Developer and Co-Founder at MultiCaret Inc.

How has the Dev Library helped you?

“It gave me the opportunity to share what I created with an incredible community and look at the projects my fellow Flutter mates have created. It acts as a great learning resource.”


Somkiat Khitwongwattana: Somkiat is an Android GDE and a consistent user of Android technology from Thailand.

How has the Dev Library helped you?

“I used to discover new open source libraries and helpful articles for Android development in many places and it took me longer than necessary. But the Dev Library allows me to explore these useful resources in one place.”


Kevin Kreuzer: Kevin is an Angular developer and contributes to the community in various ways.

How has the Dev Library helped you?

“Dev Library is a great tool to find excellent Angular articles or open source projects. Dev Library offers a great filtering function and therefore makes it much easier to find the right open source library for your use case.”



What started as a platform to highlight and showcase some open-source projects has grown into a product where developers can share their learnings, inspire others, and contribute to the ecosystem at large.

Do you have an Open Source learning or project in the form of a blog or GitHub repo you'd like to share? Please submit it to the Dev Library platform. We'd love to add you to our ever growing list of developer contributors!

#IamaGDE: Katerina Skroumpelou (Athens, Greece)

The Google Developers Experts program is a global network of highly experienced technology experts, influencers, and thought leaders who actively support developers, companies, and tech communities by speaking at events and publishing content.

Katerina Skroumpelou, who is based in Athens, Greece, is a Senior Software Engineer at Narwhal Technologies, a consulting firm whose product Nx lets developers build multiple full-stack applications and share code among them in the same workspace. She is a Google Developer Expert in Maps and Angular.

Image shows  Katerina Skroumpelou looking straight ahead at the camera. She is seated behind a laptop with a red cover covered in stickers

Becoming a Google Maps Platform developer

Skroumpelou has always had a deep love of maps.

“My father used to have old maps books, and I’ve always been obsessed with knowing where I am and having an understanding of my surroundings, so I’ve always liked maps,” she says.

After learning to code in high school, Skroumpelou decided she wanted to be a programmer and spent a year studying computer engineering at the National Technical School of Athens, but she wasn’t excited about it, so she pursued a Master’s in architectural engineering there, instead. Then she earned her master’s degree in spatial analysis at University College London.

“They have a Center for Advanced Spatial Analysis--everything to do with maps, spatial data, and analysis, which combined my love of maps, space, and programming,” she says. “My master’s combined my passions, and I got into programming and maps--we created them with code.”

Skroumpelou returned to Greece after her master’s and took postgraduate courses at the National Technical School of Athens to get a more solid foundation in programming. She landed a job as a web developer at the National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos,” which works on European Union-funded security and safety research projects. Her first project was to build a system to help manage a fire department fleet.

“I had to work with maps and annotate on the map where a fire could break out, and how the fleet would be distributed to put it out, so I started working with Google Maps then,” she says. “For another research project on airport security, I imported information into a Google Map of the airport.”

She also learned Angular on the job. Skroumpelou moved on to several software engineering jobs after that and continued to work with Angular and build Google Maps projects in her spare time.

Getting involved in the developer community

Skroumpelou’s first foray into the Google developer community began when she was learning Angular for her job at the research center and watching conference talks on Angular online.

“I thought, hey, I can do that too, and I started thinking about how to get involved,” she says. “I reached out to the Angular Connect London conference, and my talk was accepted. It wasn’t strictly technical; it was “From Buildings to Software,” describing my journey from architectural engineering to software engineering.”

Since then, Skroumeplou has spoken at Google Developer Groups events, local meetups, and DevFest. She became a GDE in 2018 in Angular, Web Technologies, and Google Maps Platform and finds it incentivizes her to use Google tools for new projects.

“Apart from the feeling that you’re giving back to the community, you gain things for yourself on a personal level, and it’s an incentive to do even more,” she says.

She appreciated meeting other developers who shared her passion.

“I’m a very social person, and it really feels like we have common ground,” she says.

Image shows Katerina Skroumpelou presenting onstage at a conference. Behind her is a podium and a wall covered in a planetary theme

Favorite Google Maps Platform features

Skroumpelo’s favorite Google Maps Platform features are Cloud-based Maps styling, the drawing library, and the drawing manager.

“I used the drawing library a lot when I was working at the research institute, drawing things on the map,” she says. “Being able to export the data as JSON and import it again is cool.”

She used the styling feature while building a friend’s website and styled a map to go with the brand colors.

“It looks neat to have your brand colors on the map,” she says. “You can remove things from the map and add them back, add geometries, points, and other things, and draw it as you want.”

She speaks highly of Google Maps Platform’s out-of-the-box interactive features for users, like the JS repository, which has examples developers can clone, or they can use NPM to generate a new Map application.”

“It makes building a map or using it much easier,” she says, adding, “The Google Maps Platform docs are very good and detailed.”

Image shows a map of London illustrating loneliness in people over the age of 65

Future plans

Skroumpelou plans to stay with Narwhal Technologies for the long term and continue to work with Google Maps Platform as much as possible.

“I really like the company I’m working for, so I hope I stay at this company and progress up,” she says.

Image shows Katerina Skroumpelou looking off-camera with a smile. She is standing behind a podium with a laptop with a red cover covered in stickers

Follow Katerina on Twitter at @psybercity | Check out Katerina’s projects on GitHub

For more information on Google Maps Platform, visit our website or learn more about our GDE program.

#IamaGDE: Josue Gutierrez

Posted by Alicja Heisig

#IamaGDE series presents: Google Maps

The Google Developers Experts program is a global network of highly experienced technology experts, influencers, and thought leaders who actively support developers, companies, and tech communities by speaking at events and publishing content.

Meet Josue Gutierrez — Maps, Web, Identity and Angular Google Developer Expert.

Josue currently works at the German company Boehringer Ingelheim and lives near Frankfurt. Before moving to Germany, Josue was working as a software engineer in Mexico, and before that, he spent almost a year in San Francisco as a senior front-end developer at Sutter Health.

Image of Josue Gutierrez

Josue Gutierrez

Josue studied computer science and engineering as an undergraduate and learned algorithms and programming. His first language was C++, and he learned C and Python, but was drawn to web technologies.

“When I saw a web browser for the first time, it stuck with me,” he says, “It was changing in real time as you’re developing. That feeling is really cool. That’s why I went into frontend development.”

Josue has worked on multiple ecommerce projects focused on improving customers’ trade experience. He sees his role as creating something from scratch to help people improve lives.

“These opportunities we have as developers are great — to travel, work for many verticals, and learn many businesses,” he says. “In my previous job, I developed tech-oriented trade tools for research companies, to manipulate strings or formulas. I was on the team involved in writing these kinds of tools, so it was more about the trade experience for doctors.”

Getting involved in the developer community

Josue’s first trip outside Mexico, to San Francisco, exposed him to the many developer communities in the area, and he appreciated the supportive communities of people trying to learn together. Several of the people he met suggested he start his own meetup in Mexico City, to get more involved in Google technologies, so he launched an Angular community there. As he hunted for speakers to come to his Angular meetup, Josue found himself giving talks, too.

Then, the GDG Mexico leader invited Josue to give talks on Google for startups.

“That helped me get involved in the ecosystem,” Josue says. “I met a lot of people, and now many of them are good friends. It’s really exciting because you get connected with people with the same interests as you, and you all learn together.”

“I’m really happy to be part of the Google Maps ecosystem,” Josue says. “It’s super connected, with kind people, and now I know more colleagues in my area, who work for different companies and have different challenges. Seeing how they solve them is a good part of being connected to the product. I try to share my knowledge with other people and exchange points of view.”

Josue says 2020 provided interesting opportunities.

“This year was weird, but we also discovered more tools that are evolving with us, more functionalities in Hangouts and Meetup,” Josue says. “It’s interesting how people are curious to get connected. If I speak from Germany, I get comments from countries like Bolivia and Argentina. We are disconnected but increasing the number of people we engage with.”

He notes that the one missing piece is the face-to-face, spontaneous interactions of in-person workshops, but that there are still positives to video workshops.

“I think as communities, we are always trying to get information to our members, and having videos is also cool for posterity,” he says.

He is starting a Maps developer community in Germany.

“I have colleagues interested in trying to get a community here with a solid foundation,” he says. “We hope we can engage people to get connected in the same place, if all goes well.”

Favorite Maps features and current projects

As a frontend developer, Josue regards Google Maps Platform as an indispensable tool for brands, ecommerce companies, and even trucking companies.

“Once you start learning how to plant coordinates inside a map, how to convert information and utilize it inside a map, it’s easy to implement,” he says.

In 2021, Josue is working on some experiments with Maps, trying to make more real-time actualization, using currently available tools.

“Many of the projects I’ve been working on aren’t connected with ecommerce,” he says. “Many customers want to see products inside a map, like trucking products. I’ve been working in directories, where you can see the places related to categories — like food in Mexico. You can use Google Maps functionalities and extend the diversification of maps and map whatever you want.”

“Submission ID is really cool,” he adds. “You can do it reading the documentation, a key part of the product, with examples, references, and a live demo in the browser.”

Future plans

Josue says his goal going forward is to be as successful as he can at his current role.

“Also, sharing is super important,” he says. “My company encourages developer communities. It’s important to work in a place that matches your interests.”

Image of Josue Gutierrez

Follow Josue on Twitter at @eusoj |Check out Josue’s projects on GitHub.

For more information on Google Maps Platform, visit our website or learn more about our GDE program.

Angular, version 2: proprioception-reinforcement

Originally posted on the Angular Blog

Today, at a special meetup at Google HQ, we announced the final release version of Angular 2, the full-platform successor to Angular 1.

What does "final" mean? Stability that's been validated across a wide range of use cases, and a framework that's been optimized for developer productivity, small payload size, and performance. With ahead-of-time compilation and built-in lazy-loading, we’ve made sure that you can deploy the fastest, smallest applications across the browser, desktop, and mobile environments. This release also represents huge improvements to developer productivity with the Angular CLI and styleguide.

Angular 1 first solved the problem of how to develop for an emerging web. Six years later, the challenges faced by today’s application developers, and the sophistication of the devices that applications must support, have both changed immensely. With this release, and its more capable versions of the Router, Forms, and other core APIs, today you can build amazing apps for any platform. If you prefer your own approach, Angular is also modular and flexible, so you can use your favorite third-party library or write your own.

From the beginning, we built Angular in collaboration with the open source development community. We are grateful to the large number of contributors who dedicated time to submitting pull requests, issues, and repro cases, who discussed and debated design decisions, and validated (and pushed back on) our RCs. We wish we could have brought every one of you in person to our meetup so you could celebrate this milestone with us tonight!


What’s next?

Angular is now ready for the world, and we’re excited for you to join the thousands of developers already building with Angular 2.  But what’s coming next for Angular?

A few of the things you can expect in the near future from the Angular team:

  • Bug fixes and non-breaking features for APIs marked as stable
  • More guides and live examples specific to your use cases
  • More work on animations
  • Angular Material 2
  • Moving WebWorkers out of experimental
  • More features and more languages for Angular Universal
  • Even more speed and payload size improvements

Semantic Versioning

We heard loud and clear that our RC labeling was confusing. To make it easy to manage dependencies on stable Angular releases, starting today with Angular 2.0.0, we will move to semantic versioning.  Angular versioning will then follow the MAJOR.MINOR.PATCH scheme as described by semver:

  1. the MAJOR version gets incremented when incompatible API changes are made to stable APIs,
  2. the MINOR version gets incremented when backwards-compatible functionality are added,
  3. the PATCH version gets incremented when backwards-compatible bug are fixed.

Moving Angular to semantic versioning ensures rapid access to the newest features for our component and tooling ecosystem, while preserving a consistent and reliable development environment for production applications that depend on stability between major releases, but still benefit from bug fixes and new APIs.

Contributors

Aaron Frost, Aaron (Ron) Tsui, Adam Bradley, Adil Mourahi, agpreynolds, Ajay Ambre, Alberto Santini, Alec Wiseman, Alejandro Caravaca Puchades, Alex Castillo, Alex Eagle, Alex Rickabaugh, Alex Wolfe, Alexander Bachmann, Alfonso Presa, Ali Johnson, Aliaksei Palkanau, Almero Steyn, Alyssa Nicoll, Alxandr, André Gil, Andreas Argelius, Andreas Wissel, Andrei Alecu, Andrei Tserakhau, Andrew, Andrii Nechytailov, Ansel Rosenberg, Anthony Zotti, Anton Moiseev, Artur Meyster, asukaleido, Aysegul Yonet, Aziz Abbas, Basarat Ali Syed, BeastCode, Ben Nadel, Bertrand Laporte, Blake La Pierre, Bo Guo, Bob Nystrom, Borys Semerenko, Bradley Heinz, Brandon Roberts, Brendan Wyse, Brian Clark, Brian Ford, Brian Hsu, dozingcat, Brian Yarger, Bryce Johnson, CJ Avilla, cjc343, Caitlin Potter, Cédric Exbrayat, Chirayu Krishnappa, Christian Weyer, Christoph Burgdorf, Christoph Guttandin, Christoph Hoeller, Christoffer Noring, Chuck Jazdzewski, Cindy, Ciro Nunes, Codebacca, Cody Lundquist, Cody-Nicholson, Cole R Lawrence, Constantin Gavrilete, Cory Bateman, Craig Doremus, crisbeto, Cuel, Cyril Balit, Cyrille Tuzi, Damien Cassan, Dan Grove, Dan Wahlin, Daniel Leib, Daniel Rasmuson, dapperAuteur, Daria Jung, David East, David Fuka, David Reher, David-Emmanuel Divernois, Davy Engone, Deborah Kurata, Derek Van Dyke, DevVersion, Dima Kuzmich, Dimitrios Loukadakis, Dmitriy Shekhovtsov, Dmitry Patsura, Dmitry Zamula, Dmytro Kulyk, Donald Spencer, Douglas Duteil, dozingcat, Drew Moore, Dylan Johnson, Edd Hannay, Edouard Coissy, eggers, elimach, Elliott Davis, Eric Jimenez, Eric Lee Carraway, Eric Martinez, Eric Mendes Dantas, Eric Tsang, Essam Al Joubori, Evan Martin, Fabian Raetz, Fahimnur Alam, Fatima Remtullah, Federico Caselli, Felipe Batista, Felix Itzenplitz, Felix Yan, Filip Bruun, Filipe Silva, Flavio Corpa, Florian Knop, Foxandxss, Gabe Johnson, Gabe Scholz, GabrielBico, Gautam krishna.R, Georgii Dolzhykov, Georgios Kalpakas, Gerd Jungbluth, Gerard Sans, Gion Kunz, Gonzalo Ruiz de Villa, Grégory Bataille, Günter Zöchbauer, Hank Duan, Hannah Howard, Hans Larsen, Harry Terkelsen, Harry Wolff, Henrique Limas, Henry Wong, Hiroto Fukui, Hongbo Miao, Huston Hedinger, Ian Riley, Idir Ouhab Meskine, Igor Minar, Ioannis Pinakoulakis, The Ionic Team, Isaac Park, Istvan Novak, Itay Radotzki, Ivan Gabriele, Ivey Padgett, Ivo Gabe de Wolff, J. Andrew Brassington, Jack Franklin, Jacob Eggers, Jacob MacDonald, Jacob Richman, Jake Garelick, James Blacklock, James Ward, Jason Choi, Jason Kurian, Jason Teplitz, Javier Ros, Jay Kan, Jay Phelps, Jay Traband, Jeff Cross, Jeff Whelpley, Jennifer Bland, jennyraj, Jeremy Attali, Jeremy Elbourn, Jeremy Wilken, Jerome Velociter, Jesper Rønn-Jensen, Jesse Palmer, Jesús Rodríguez, Jesús Rodríguez, Jimmy Gong, Joe Eames, Joel Brewer, John Arstingstall, John Jelinek IV, John Lindquist, John Papa, John-David Dalton, Jonathan Miles, Joost de Vries, Jorge Cruz, Josef Meier, Josh Brown, Josh Gerdes, Josh Kurz, Josh Olson, Josh Thomas, Joseph Perrott, Joshua Otis, Josu Guiterrez, Julian Motz, Julie Ralph, Jules Kremer, Justin DuJardin, Kai Ruhnau, Kapunahele Wong, Kara Erickson, Kathy Walrath, Keerti Parthasarathy, Kenneth Hahn, Kevin Huang, Kevin Kirsche, Kevin Merckx, Kevin Moore, Kevin Western, Konstantin Shcheglov, Kurt Hong, Levente Morva, laiso, Lina Lu, LongYinan, Lucas Mirelmann, Luka Pejovic, Lukas Ruebbelke, Marc Fisher, Marc Laval, Marcel Good, Marcy Sutton, Marcus Krahl, Marek Buko, Mark Ethan Trostler, Martin Gontovnikas, Martin Probst, Martin Staffa, Matan Lurey, Mathias Raacke, Matias Niemelä, Matt Follett, Matt Greenland, Matt Wheatley, Matteo Suppo, Matthew Hill, Matthew Schranz, Matthew Windwer, Max Sills, Maxim Salnikov, Melinda Sarnicki Bernardo, Michael Giambalvo, Michael Goderbauer, Michael Mrowetz, Michael-Rainabba Richardson, Michał Gołębiowski, Mikael Morlund, Mike Ryan, Minko Gechev, Miško Hevery, Mohamed Hegazy, Nan Schweiger, Naomi Black, Nathan Walker, The NativeScript Team, Nicholas Hydock, Nick Mann, Nick Raphael, Nick Van Dyck, Ning Xia, Olivier Chafik, Olivier Combe, Oto Dočkal, Pablo Villoslada Puigcerber, Pascal Precht, Patrice Chalin, Patrick Stapleton, Paul Gschwendtner, Pawel Kozlowski, Pengfei Yang, Pete Bacon Darwin, Pete Boere, Pete Mertz, Philip Harrison, Phillip Alexander, Phong Huynh, Polvista, Pouja, Pouria Alimirzaei, Prakal, Prayag Verma, Rado Kirov, Raul Jimenez, Razvan Moraru, Rene Weber, Rex Ye, Richard Harrington, Richard Kho, Richard Sentino, Rob Eisenberg, Rob Richardson, Rob Wormald, Robert Ferentz, Robert Messerle, Roberto Simonetti, Rodolfo Yabut, Sam Herrmann, Sam Julien, Sam Lin, Sam Rawlins, Sammy Jelin, Sander Elias, Scott Hatcher, Scott Hyndman, Scott Little, ScottSWu, Sebastian Hillig, Sebastian Müller, Sebastián Duque, Sekib Omazic, Shahar Talmi, Shai Reznik, Sharon DiOrio, Shannon Ayres, Shefali Sinha, Shlomi Assaf, Shuhei Kagawa, Sigmund Cherem, Simon Hürlimann (CyT), Simon Ramsay, Stacy Gay, Stephen Adams, Stephen Fluin, Steve Mao, Steve Schmitt, Suguru Inatomi, Tamas Csaba, Ted Sander, Tero Parviainen, Thierry Chatel, Thierry Templier, Thomas Burleson, Thomas Henley, Tim Blasi, Tim Ruffles, Timur Meyster, Tobias Bosch, Tony Childs, Tom Ingebretsen, Tom Schoener, Tommy Odom, Torgeir Helgevold, Travis Kaufman, Trotyl Yu, Tycho Grouwstra, The Typescript Team, Uli Köhler, Uri Shaked, Utsav Shah, Valter Júnior, Vamsi V, Vamsi Varikuti, Vanga Sasidhar, Veikko Karsikko, Victor Berchet, Victor Mejia, Victor Savkin, Vinci Rufus, Vijay Menon, Vikram Subramanian, Vivek Ghaisas, Vladislav Zarakovsky, Vojta Jina, Ward Bell, Wassim Chegham, Wenqian Guo, Wesley Cho, Will Ngo, William Johnson, William Welling, Wilson Mendes Neto, Wojciech Kwiatek, Yang Lin, Yegor Jbanov, Zach Bjornson, Zhicheng Wang, and many more...

With gratitude and appreciation, and anticipation to see what you'll build next, welcome to the next stage of Angular.

By Jules Kremer, Angular Team