Category Archives: Google Chrome Blog

The latest news from the Google Chrome team

Experiment with AR and VR made for the web

Augmented and virtual reality are opening up the possibilities of how we interact with the world and information around us. WebXR brings together AR and VR on the web to make them more convenient and widely accessible.

Today on the Experiments with Google platform, we’re launching the new WebXR collection to showcase what is possible with this technology — from helpful utilities to get things done, to playful and immersive experiences:

From left to right: Sodar, Measure Up, Floom and Picturescape

Sodar helps to visualize social distancing. By activating a personal augmented reality radar from your browser, you can see what six feet (or two meters) looks like in any environment.

With Measure Up, you can calculate the length, area and volume of the things around you without using a tape measure. 

Floom is a fun new way to explore the planet, built with WebXR and Google Maps. Open your browser to tunnel through the earth and see what’s on the other side.

And coming soon, Picturescape turns your Google Photos library into an immersive gallery so you can explore your memories in augmented reality.

All you need to try these experiments is a supported Android device and the latest Chrome browser.

Check them out now and submit your own at g.co/webXR.

Source: Google Chrome


Create a space for yourself in Chrome

If you're one of the many families who share a computer in your home, or someone who uses their computer for both work and personal browsing, these stories may be familiar: You spent the previous day hand-picking your favorite browser colors and theme, only to discover that someone changed everything up. Or, you're trying to login to a retailer site to buy a saved pair of shoes, but autofill keeps suggesting the wrong password (your partner's, you guess?). It can be frustrating and messy, and that's why Chrome is revamping its profiles experience, making it even easier to create, customize or switch to your personal space within Chrome.

Choose the profile you want to use when you restart Chrome.

Choose the profile you want to use when you restart Chrome.

You can easily give everyone with whom you share a computer a space that’s just for them, including a color scheme and background (check out the new theme series by Black artists for inspiration), bookmarks organized just the way they want them, and their saved passwords. Also new in this update: for all those articles you want to read later, you can now add them to your reading list in Chrome on Android and desktop.

Once everyone's set up, it's easy to select the right profile for the right moment, switch to another profile as needed or instantly create a new one. Using different colors for different profiles makes it easy to distinguish them at a glance.

Customize your profile, so you easily recognize “your space”.

Customize your profile, so you easily recognize “your space”.

You can also access your Chrome profile on your other devices. Just turn on sync and get that theme you’ve selected, along with anything else you’ve saved such as your new reading list, your favorite bookmarks and your saved passwords across your devices.

We hope Chrome's new profiles experience brings you more structure and ease, and helps you better separate work from personal activities for each member of the household. Keep an eye out for these new features as they roll out on desktop over the coming weeks.

Source: Google Chrome


Create a space for yourself in Chrome

If you're one of the many families who share a computer in your home, or someone who uses their computer for both work and personal browsing, these stories may be familiar: You spent the previous day hand-picking your favorite browser colors and theme, only to discover that someone changed everything up. Or, you're trying to login to a retailer site to buy a saved pair of shoes, but autofill keeps suggesting the wrong password (your partner's, you guess?). It can be frustrating and messy, and that's why Chrome is revamping its profiles experience, making it even easier to create, customize or switch to your personal space within Chrome.

Choose the profile you want to use when you restart Chrome.

Choose the profile you want to use when you restart Chrome.

You can easily give everyone with whom you share a computer a space that’s just for them, including a color scheme and background (check out the new theme series by Black artists for inspiration), bookmarks organized just the way they want them, and their saved passwords. Also new in this update: for all those articles you want to read later, you can now add them to your reading list in Chrome on Android and desktop.

Once everyone's set up, it's easy to select the right profile for the right moment, switch to another profile as needed or instantly create a new one. Using different colors for different profiles makes it easy to distinguish them at a glance.

Customize your profile, so you easily recognize “your space”.

Customize your profile, so you easily recognize “your space”.

You can also access your Chrome profile on your other devices. Just turn on sync and get that theme you’ve selected, along with anything else you’ve saved such as your new reading list, your favorite bookmarks and your saved passwords across your devices.

We hope Chrome's new profiles experience brings you more structure and ease, and helps you better separate work from personal activities for each member of the household. Keep an eye out for these new features as they roll out on desktop over the coming weeks.

Source: Google Chrome


Extending enterprise zero trust models to the web

For over a decade, Chrome has been committed to advancing security on the web, and we’re proud of the end-user and customer safety improvements we’ve delivered over the years. We take our responsibility seriously, and we continue to work on ways to better protect billions of users around the world, whether it’s driving the industry towards HTTPS, introducing and then advancing the concept of a browser sandbox, improving phishing and malware detection via Safe Browsing improvements or working alongside Google’s Project Zero team to build innovative exploit mitigations. 


To continue our work of making a safer web for everyone, we’ve partnered with Google’s Cloud Security team to expand what enterprises should expect from Chrome and web security. Today the Cloud Security team is announcing BeyondCorp Enterprise, our new zero trust product offering, built around the principle of zero trust: that access must be secured, authorized and granted based on knowledge of identities and devices, and with no assumed trust in the network. With Chrome, BeyondCorp Enterprise is able to deliver customers a zero trust solution that protects data, better safeguards users against threats in real time and provides critical device information to inform access decisions, all without the need for added agents or extra software. These benefits are built right into Chrome, where users are already spending much of their workday accessing the apps and resources they need to be productive, and IT teams can easily manage these controls right through our Chrome Browser Cloud Management offering.


By extending zero trust principles to Chrome, we’re introducing the following advanced security capabilities that will help keep users and their company data safer than ever before:


Enhanced malware and phishing prevention: BeyondCorp Enterprise allows for real-time URL checks and deep scanning of files for malware.


Notification that reads "sample.zip is dangerous, so Chrome has blocked it."

Sensitive data protection across the web:IT teams can enforce a company’s customized rules for what types of data can be uploaded, downloaded or copied and pasted across sites.


Notification that reads "This file has sensitive or dangerous content. Remove this content and try again.

Visibility and insights: Organizations can get more insights into potential risks or suspicious activity through cloud-based reporting, including tracking of malicious downloads on corporate devices or employees entering passwords on known phishing sites. 


Three bar charts labeled "Chrome high risk users," "Chrome high risk domains," and "Chrome data protection summary."

Including Chrome in your zero trust strategy is critical not only because your employees spend much of the working day in the browser, but also because Chrome is in a unique position to identify and prevent threats across multiple web-based apps. Enhanced capabilities surrounding data protection and loss prevention protects organizations from both external threats and internal leak risks, many of which may be unintentional. We’ve built these capabilities into Chrome in a way that gives IT and security teams flexibility around how to configure policies and set restrictions, while also giving administrators more visibility into potentially harmful or suspicious activities. Naturally, these threat and data protections are also extended to Chrome OS devices, which offer additional proactive and built-in security protections.  


As with many of the major security advances Chrome has introduced in the past, we know it takes time to adopt new approaches. We’re here to help with a solution that is both simple and more secure for IT teams and their users. As you look at 2021 and where your security plans will take you, check out BeyondCorp Enterprise


Chrome will host a webinar on Thursday, January 28, highlighting some of our recent enterprise enhancements, and offering a preview of what’s to come in 2021. We’ll also talk more about the Chrome-specific capabilities of BeyondCorp Enterprise. We hope you can join us!

Source: Google Chrome


4 reasons to set Chrome as your default browser on iOS

With iOS 14, you can now change your default browser (the browser that automatically opens links) to Chrome on your iPhone or iPad. If you already use Chrome on your computer, Chrome on iOS delivers the same familiar and easy-to-use experience, with a look and feel that’s right at home on your iPhone or iPad. Here are four reasons you should try it—including a couple of recently released features and some new ones coming soon.


1. Your Chrome on any device

When you’re signed in to your Google account you can sync Chrome across your phone, tablet or computer so your passwords, payment details, autofill information and bookmarks are automatically available on all of those devices. No need to take out your credit card or type in your address if you need to buy something while you’re on the go. 


Chrome also makes switching between devices really easy. From the search bar of Chrome for desktop or the sharing menu of Chrome for iOS, you can send a tab to another signed-in device with just a click. If you find a recipe on your computer, you can easily pull up your recent tabs and open it up on your phone to check the ingredient list while you're out shopping. 

Chrome on any device
2. Get organized and be productive

The tab grid in Chrome for iOS already gives you an easy way to view and organize your tabs, and you can save a tab to your Reading List to read later, even if you’re offline. If you want to quickly share one of those tabs with a friend, we’re adding the ability to generate QR code that will take them right to that website. We’re also adding a download manager—one of our most-requested features—so you have a download folder to store and find files you’ve saved from Chrome.


If you have an iPad, you can now drag and drop links from Chrome to another app (and vice versa) when you’re in Split View. We’re also working on a feature that will let you open multiple windows in Chrome on iPad so you can view two tabs at one time. Chrome already supports mouse usage on iPadOS, and soon we’re adding support for Scribble integrations with the Apple Pencil for those who prefer writing over typing or tapping. 


Get organized and be productive
3. Feel safe browsing the web 

Chrome keeps your information secure, so you don’t have to be a security expert to feel safe on the web. Its built-in password manager generates unique passwords, securely stores them, and helps you identify and fix compromised passwords. For an added layer of protection, soon you will be able to use your fingerprint to confirm your identity when filling in passwords in Chrome. Plus, the password manager can now autofill saved Chrome login details into other apps or browsers. In addition to helping you with your passwords, Chrome on iOS now includes Google Safe Browsing, which alerts you with a warning before you open a potentially dangerous site. 

Stay safe on the web
4. The browser with Google built in

Chrome is built with Google Search at the core, which means you get answers quickly with personalized search results and instant answers that appear as you type. Google Translate is also integrated into Chrome so you can automatically translate sites in over 100 languages with a single click. And the “Articles for You” section of the Chrome new tab page brings you articles, stories and blogs from around the web, tailored to your interests.

Google built in

To set Chrome as your default browser, you’ll need to first make sure your iPhone or iPad is running iOS 14 and you have Chrome installed. Then complete the following steps:

  1. Visit iPhone Settings, scroll down until you see “Chrome” and tap on it

  2. Tap on “Default Browser App”

  3. Choose “Chrome”

Source: Google Chrome


Easier access to Search, Chrome and Gmail in iOS 14

iOS 14 has launched, and with it comes new features that make it easier to access some of the Google apps you use most often. Starting today, you can add a Google Search Widget to your Home Screen to let you find information even faster. You can also set Chrome as your default browser app on your iPhone or iPad, and in the coming days, you’ll be able to set Gmail as your default email app. 

Find it even faster with new iOS Home Screen Widget for the Google app

In iOS 14, you can add Widgets to your Home Screen so you can access apps more quickly or get information at a glance. Starting today, we're giving you lightning-fast access to Search with a Widget in two sizes: one with just Search, and one with shortcuts to three additional ways to search, depending on your preference.

The Google app is a great way to find relevant and helpful information on your iPhone or iPad-- from web pages and quick answers to images, products, news, even life-size AR animals. And you can choose from several different ways to search, including typing, talking, or using your camera with Lens. 

With the Quick Search Widget, you can search for anything, right from your Home Screen. The Shortcuts Widget includes a quick Search bar and additional search modes: Lens, which lets you search what you see through your camera; Voice Search if you don’t feel like typing; and Incognito mode for an extra layer of privacy. 

iOS Homescreen Google Search Widget

To set up Search as a Home Screen Widget, first make sure you have the Google app downloaded from the App Store. Then follow these steps:


  1. Press and hold on the home screen of your iPhone or iPad

  2. Tap the plus icon on the upper left corner to open the widget gallery

  3. Search for & tap the Google app

  4. Swipe right/left to select the widget size

  5. Tap “Add Widget”

  6. Place the widget and tap “Done” at the upper right corner

Google Search Widget

Set Chrome and Gmail as your default browser and email app 

If you set Chrome as your default browser, when you open a link from another app, it will open in Chrome. Similarly, if you set Gmail as your default email app, any time you tap on an email icon on the web, it will open the Gmail app. 


With Chrome and Gmail, you can:


Chrome

  • Sync Chrome on your computer or tablet to automatically access your bookmarks, saved passwords and payment methods, settings, and recently opened tabs

  • Get answers quickly with personalized search results from Google that instantly appear as you type

  • Browse safely with advanced protection from threats like phishing and dangerous websites

  • Easily view and open your tabs with an uncluttered tab grid design

Gmail

  • Easily retract an email right after you send it with undo send

  • Write emails faster with Smart Compose or respond to emails quickly with Smart Reply

  • Schedule emails to send at a later time or date with schedule send

  • Protect sensitive information from unauthorized access, set an expiration date for messages or remove options to forward, copy, print, and download with confidential mode 

To set Chrome and Gmail as your default browser and email apps, first, make sure you have both Chrome and Gmail downloaded from the App Store. Then follow these steps:


Chrome

1. Open the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad, scroll down until you see “Chrome” and tap on it

2. Tap on “Default Browser App”

3. Choose “Chrome”

How to make Chrome your default browser in iOS

Gmail

1. Open the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad, scroll down until you see “Gmail” and tap on it

2. Tap on “Default Mail App”

3. Choose “Gmail”

How to make Gmail your default email app in iOS

Now that you’re set up with Google on iOS 14, take it for a spin! And stay tuned for more Google Widgets in the coming weeks to make your iPhone even more helpful. 

Source: Google Chrome


More intuitive privacy and security controls in Chrome

Keeping you safe and secure online is part of Chrome’s DNA. Along with providing strong default protections, we aim to give you accessible, intuitive, and useful controls so you can make choices that are right for you. So, today we’ve started rolling out new tools and a redesign of Chrome’s privacy and security settings on desktop, to help you control your safety on the web. 

Easy to understand controls

With this redesign, we’ve made the controls even easier to find and understand, with simplified language and visuals:

  • It’s easier to manage cookies. You can choose if and how cookies are used by websites you visit, with options to block third-party cookies in regular or Incognito mode, and to block all cookies on some or all websites. 
  • In Site Settings, we’ve reorganized the controls into two distinct sections to make it easier to find the most sensitive website permissions: access to your location, camera or microphone, and notifications. A new section also highlights the most recent permissions activity.
  • At the top of Chrome settings, you’ll see “You and Google” (previously “People”), where you can find sync controls. These controls put you in charge of what data is shared with Google to store in your Google Account  and made available across all your devices.
  • Because many people regularly delete their browsing history, we’ve moved that control, “Clear browsing data”, to the top of the Privacy & Security section. 
01 Settings_small size.gif

Clearer, more accessible controls to help you manage cookies.

Safety check in Chrome 

With our new safety check in settings, you can quickly confirm the safety of your experience in Chrome.

  • The new tool will tell you if the passwords you’ve asked Chrome to remember have been compromised, and if so, how to fix them. 
  • It will flag if Safe Browsing, Google’s technology to warn before you visit a dangerous site or download a harmful app or extension, is turned off. 
  • The safety check tool also has a new additional way to quickly see if your version of Chrome is up to date, i.e. if it’s updated with the latest security protections. 
  • If malicious extensions are installed, it will tell you how and where to remove them.

02 Safety check.gif

Check if your passwords have been compromised and if so, fix them with Chrome’s help.

Third-party cookie controls in Incognito mode 

In Incognito mode, where people come for a more private browsing experience, Chrome doesn’t save your browsing history, information entered in forms or browser cookies. While we continue to work on our long-term effort to make the web more private and secure with Privacy Sandbox, we want to strengthen the Incognito protections in the meantime. In addition to deleting cookies every time you close the browser window in Incognito, we will also start blocking third-party cookies by default within each Incognito session and include a prominent control on the New Tab Page. You can allow third-party cookies for specific sites by clicking the “eye” icon in the address bar. This feature will gradually roll out, starting on desktop operating systems and on Android.

03 Incognito.gif

Incognito mode blocks third-party cookies within each session.

A new home for your extensions

Starting today you’ll start to see a new puzzle icon for your extensions on your toolbar. It’s a neat way to tidy up your toolbar, and gives you more control over what data extensions can access on sites you visit. With this addition, you’ll still be able to pin your favorite extensions to the toolbar.

04 Extensions.gif

Opening menu displays your extensions and shows you what data they can currently access.

Upgraded security with Enhanced Safe Browsing protection and Secure DNS

We’re bringing you two major security upgrades that you can opt in to. First, Enhanced Safe Browsing gives you more proactive and tailored protections from phishing, malware and other web-based threats. If you turn on Enhanced Safe Browsing, Chrome proactively checks whether pages and downloads are dangerous by sending information about them to Google Safe Browsing.  If you’re signed in to Chrome, then Chrome and other Google apps you use (Gmail, Drive, etc.) will further protect you based on a holistic view of threats you encounter on the web and attacks against your Google Account. Over the next year, we’ll be adding even more protections to this mode including tailored warnings for phishing sites and file downloads, and cross-product alerts.

02 Enhanced Safe Browsing_small size.gif

Enhanced Safe Browsing offers the highest-level of security.

We’re also launching Secure DNS, a feature designed to improve your security and privacy while browsing the web. When you access a website, your browser first needs to determine which server is hosting it, using a step known as a "DNS (Domain Name System) lookup." Chrome's Secure DNS feature uses DNS-over-HTTPS to encrypt this step, thereby helping prevent attackers from observing what sites you visit or sending you to phishing websites. By default, Chrome will automatically upgrade you to DNS-over-HTTPS if your current service provider supports it. You can also configure a different secure DNS provider in the Advanced security section, or disable the feature altogether. 

DoH_Option 2.png

Secure DNS can be configured to use your current ISP's service if available (default), another provider from a list, or a custom provider.

These new updates and features, including our redesigned Privacy and Security settings, will be coming to Chrome on desktop platforms in upcoming weeks. We’ll continue to focus on features that protect your privacy and security as you’re browsing the web with Chrome, in addition to giving you clear and useful choices around managing your data.

Source: Google Chrome


Keep tabs on your tabs in Google Chrome

Coming to Chrome: a new way to use tabs


There are two types of people in the world: tab minimalists who have just a few tabs open at a time and tab collectors who have...significantly more. For minimalists and collectors alike, we’re bringing a new way to organize your tabs to Chrome: tab groups. This feature is available now in Chrome Beta. 


Chrome_Tab-Groups_In-Line-Image-v7.gif

Tab groups in Chrome help you organize your tabs.

Now, with a simple right click, you can group your tabs together and label them with a custom name and color. Once the tabs are grouped together, you can move and reorder them on the tab strip.  

We’ve been testing out tab groups for several months now (as have some of you), and we’re finding new ways to stay organized. Through our own usage and early user research, we’ve found that some people like to group their Chrome tabs by topic. For instance, it helps if you're working on several projects, or looking through multiple shopping and review sites. 

Others have been grouping their tabs by how urgent they are-- “ASAP,” “this week” and “later.” Similarly, tab groups can help keep track of your progress on certain tasks: “haven’t started,” “in progress,” “need to follow up” and “completed.” My pro tip is that you can use an emoji as a group name such as ❤️ for inspiration or 📖 for articles to read. Tab groups are customizable so you can decide how to use them. And just like regular tabs, your groups are saved when you close and reopen Chrome.

Tab-Groups-Organization-Example_v1r1.gif

Group tabs by topic, urgency, progress, etc. It’s up to you how to group them.

Chrome’s stability and performance are important to us, so we’re releasing tab groups slowly in our upcoming version of Chrome, which begins rolling out next week. Tab groups will be available for Chrome on desktop across Chrome OS, Windows, Mac and Linux. If you want to preview tab groups today, it’s available in the latest version of Google Chrome Beta. (Note: if you don’t see tab groups in Chrome Beta, try restarting your browser.)

Source: Google Chrome


Keep tabs on your tabs in Google Chrome

There are two types of people in the world: tab minimalists who have just a few tabs open at a time and tab collectors who have...significantly more. For minimalists and collectors alike, we’re bringing a new way to organize your tabs to Chrome: tab groups. This feature is available now in Chrome Beta. 

Chrome_Tab-Groups_In-Line-Image-v7.gif

Tab groups in Chrome help you organize your tabs.

Now, with a simple right click, you can group your tabs together and label them with a custom name and color. Once the tabs are grouped together, you can move and reorder them on the tab strip.  

We’ve been testing out tab groups for several months now (as have some of you), and we’re finding new ways to stay organized. Through our own usage and early user research, we’ve found that some people like to group their Chrome tabs by topic. For instance, it helps if you're working on several projects, or looking through multiple shopping and review sites. 

Others have been grouping their tabs by how urgent they are-- “ASAP,” “this week” and “later.” Similarly, tab groups can help keep track of your progress on certain tasks: “haven’t started,” “in progress,” “need to follow up” and “completed.” My pro tip is that you can use an emoji as a group name such as ❤️ for inspiration or 📖 for articles to read. Tab groups are customizable so you can decide how to use them. And just like regular tabs, your groups are saved when you close and reopen Chrome.

Tab-Groups-Organization-Example_v1r1.gif

Group tabs by topic, urgency, progress, etc. It’s up to you how to group them.

Chrome’s stability and performance are important to us, so we’re releasing tab groups slowly in our upcoming version of Chrome, which begins rolling out next week. Tab groups will be available for Chrome on desktop across Chrome OS, Windows, Mac and Linux. If you want to preview tab groups today, it’s available in the latest version of Google Chrome Beta. (Note: if you don’t see tab groups in Chrome Beta, try restarting your browser.)

Source: Google Chrome


New malware protections for Advanced Protection users

Advanced Protection safeguards the personal or business Google Accounts of anyone at risk of targeted attacks—like political campaign teams, journalists, activists and business leaders. It’s Google's strongest security for those who need it most, and is available across desktops, laptops, smartphones and tablets. 

One of the many benefits of Advanced Protection is that it constantly evolves to defend against emerging threats, automatically protecting your personal information from potential attackers. Today we're announcing new ways that Advanced Protection is defending you from malware on Android devices. 

Play Protect app scanning is automatically turned on

Google Play Protect is Google's built-in malware protection for Android. It scans and verifies 100 billion apps each day to keep your device, data and apps safe. Backed by Google's machine learning algorithms, it’s constantly evolving to match changing threats. To ensure that people enrolled in our Advanced Protection Program benefit from the added security that Google Play Protect provides, we’re now automatically turning it on for all devices with a Google Account enrolled in Advanced Protection and will require that it remain enabled. 

Limiting apps from outside the Play Store

Advanced Protection is committed to keeping harmful apps off of enrolled users’ devices. All apps on the Google Play Store undergo rigorous testing, but apps outside of Google Play can potentially pose a risk to users’ devices. As an added protection, we’re now blocking the majority of these non-Play apps from being installed on any devices with a Google Account enrolled in Advanced Protection. You can still install non-Play apps through app stores that were pre-installed by the device manufacturer and through Android Debug Bridge. Any apps that you’ve already installed from sources outside of Google Play will not be removed and can still be updated.

G Suite users enrolled in the Advanced Protection Program will not get these new Android  protections for now; however, equivalent protections are available as part of endpoint management. See this help center article for a full list of Android device policies, specifically: “Verify apps,” which prevent users from turning off Google Play Protect, and “Unknown apps,” which prevent users from installing apps from outside the Play Store.

When will these changes roll out?

Starting today, these changes for Android will gradually roll out for Google Accounts that are enrolled in Advanced Protection. We’ll also be rolling out new malware protections for Chrome later this year, building upon the risky download protections we announced in 2019. 

You can learn more about Advanced Protection on Android here, and to enroll in Google's Advanced Protection, visit g.co/advancedprotection.

Source: Google Chrome