Category Archives: Official Gmail Blog

News, tips and tricks from Google’s Gmail team and friends

New settings for smart features and personalization in Gmail


People have come to expect a lot from their email. But whether you’re an inbox zero master or a never-archiver, you want your email experience to be easy and secure. Since 2004, many have grown to love Gmail for its time-saving and security features. From assistive writing capabilities to high priority notifications to blocking more than 99.9 percent of spam, phishing and malware from reaching your inbox, we built Gmail to make communication less of a chore.


In the same way, people have come to expect easier control of their data—and here too, we’ve been on a mission to take the work out of managing your privacy. That’s why our engineers at the Google Safety Engineering Center in Europe developed Privacy Checkup as an easy way to review key settings and see (and delete) the data that Google collects to provide you with helpful experiences. And it’s why we introduced auto-delete as the default this year to make control over your data even more automatic. 

In the coming weeks, we’re launching yet another way to put you in control of your data and the Google experience, with a new setting for smart features and personalization in Gmail.

Option to continue with smart features
Option to personalize other Google products with Gmail, Chat and Meet data

New setting for Smart features

Soon, you’ll see a new setting for controlling whether your data in Gmail, Meet and Chat can be used to offer “smart” features in these and other Google products. Think: tabbed inbox, Smart Compose and Smart Reply in Gmail; reminders when your bills are due in the Google Assistant; and restaurant reservations in Google Maps.


The ability to turn on (or not) some of these individual smart features is not new. What’s new is a clearer choice over the data processing that makes them possible. This new setting is designed to reduce the work of understanding and managing that process, in view of what we’ve learned from user experience research and regulators’ emphasis on comprehensible, actionable user choices over data.


We’ll continue evolving controls in our products to align with these trends. Because smart features rely on your data to save you time and provide a more helpful experience, we want you to use them because you find value in using them, not because they’re simply there.

Continuing to protect your privacy

As with all Google products, Gmail, Meet and Chat are secure-by-design to help protect your data and safeguard your privacy. As before, these smart features are provided by using automated algorithms, not manual review. And, Google ads are not based on your personal data in Gmail, no matter which choice you make. You remain in control of your data, whether you’re an individual Gmail user or a Google Workspace administrator.


If you decide not to use smart features and personalization, you will still be able to use Gmail and our other products. And if you decide later on that these features are helpful and you’d like to turn them on, you can do so in your Gmail settings. At home or at work, the choice should be yours. And we’re always working to keep it simple.

Source: Gmail Blog


Stay connected more easily with Meet in Gmail on mobile

On a given day, I'm joining a dozen video calls—some are for work and others are scheduled times to catch up with friends (virtual trivia has become a quarantine favorite!). With video calling being an integral part of our lives, we made Google Meet free and available for everyone last month, and also brought it into Gmail on the web. Today, we’re bringing Meet to Gmail on Android and iOS, so that you can easily join video meetings from your inbox.

1. Join_With_Email.gif

In the coming weeks, you’ll soon notice a new Meet tab on your phone’s Gmail app where you can see upcoming meetings scheduled in Google Calendar, and easily join them with a single tap.

2. Join_Scheduled_Meeting.gif

In the Meet tab, tap on “New meeting” to start a meeting instantly, get a meeting link to share, or to schedule a meeting in Calendar. If you tap on “Join with a code,” you can join meetings shared with you by entering a meeting code. 

If you don’t want Meet to appear as a tab in the Gmail app, access the Settings from the hamburger menu in the top left corner of your inbox, tap on your account, scroll down and uncheck Meet.

Check out this handy product guide to get started with Meet in Gmail. If you’re interested in learning more about how you can use these new updates for work, check out this article for more.

Source: Gmail Blog


Stay connected more easily with Meet in Gmail on mobile

On a given day, I'm joining a dozen video calls—some are for work and others are scheduled times to catch up with friends (virtual trivia has become a quarantine favorite!). With video calling being an integral part of our lives, we made Google Meet free and available for everyone last month, and also brought it into Gmail on the web. Today, we’re bringing Meet to Gmail on Android and iOS, so that you can easily join video meetings from your inbox.

1. Join_With_Email.gif

In the coming weeks, you’ll soon notice a new Meet tab on your phone’s Gmail app where you can see upcoming meetings scheduled in Google Calendar, and easily join them with a single tap.

2. Join_Scheduled_Meeting.gif

In the Meet tab, tap on “New meeting” to start a meeting instantly, get a meeting link to share, or to schedule a meeting in Calendar. If you tap on “Join with a code,” you can join meetings shared with you by entering a meeting code. 

If you don’t want Meet to appear as a tab in the Gmail app, access the Settings from the hamburger menu in the top left corner of your inbox, tap on your account, scroll down and uncheck Meet.

Check out this handy product guide to get started with Meet in Gmail. If you’re interested in learning more about how you can use these new updates for work, check out this article for more.

Source: Gmail Blog


Stay connected more easily with Meet in Gmail on mobile

On a given day, I'm joining a dozen video calls—some are for work and others are scheduled times to catch up with friends (virtual trivia has become a quarantine favorite!). With video calling being an integral part of our lives, we made Google Meet free and available for everyone last month, and also brought it into Gmail on the web. Today, we’re bringing Meet to Gmail on Android and iOS, so that you can easily join video meetings from your inbox.

1. Join_With_Email.gif

In the coming weeks, you’ll soon notice a new Meet tab on your phone’s Gmail app where you can see upcoming meetings scheduled in Google Calendar, and easily join them with a single tap.

2. Join_Scheduled_Meeting.gif

In the Meet tab, tap on “New meeting” to start a meeting instantly, get a meeting link to share, or to schedule a meeting in Calendar. If you tap on “Join with a code,” you can join meetings shared with you by entering a meeting code. 

If you don’t want Meet to appear as a tab in the Gmail app, access the Settings from the hamburger menu in the top left corner of your inbox, tap on your account, scroll down and uncheck Meet.

Check out this handy product guide to get started with Meet in Gmail. If you’re interested in learning more about how you can use these new updates for work, check out this article for more.

Source: Gmail Blog


Google Meet is here to host your video meetings, for free

When I joined Google last year to lead G Suite, I couldn’t have imagined how the world was about to change. But in a few short months, working together took on a whole new meaning, and meetings became about so much more than getting things done. From doctor check-up meetings, to meetings with financial advisors, to study meetings, workout meetings, and birthday meetings. They may not look or feel like traditional meetings, but they’re the most important meetings happening right now.

That’s why we’ve re-engineered Google Meet, originally built for secure business meetings, to make it free and available to all. Since making Meet's advanced features free for all G Suite and G Suite for Education users in March, we've seen daily usage grow by 30x, with Meet hosting 3 billion minutes of video meetings daily. Last month, we were adding roughly 3 million new users every day. That's why we're expanding the offering to more people around the world.

Now that the rollout we announced two weeks ago is complete, anyone with an email address can sign up and get started at meet.google.com, for free. And to make meetings even more accessible and helpful, in the coming days you’ll also be able to use Meet directly in Gmail.

Click “Start a meeting" and a new window opens with a unique, secure meeting for you to join and then share with others. You can also easily join meetings shared with you by entering a meeting code. And you can plan video meetings and invite others directly from Google Calendar.

Because video meetings have never been more important, we’ve been fast-tracking the most requested features for Meet, and are now making them available to all. Anyone can use Meet’s simple scheduling and screen sharing, real-time captions, and layouts that adapt to your preference, including an expanded tiled view—all built on Google’s secure, reliable global infrastructure. Speaking from my own experience, the new features in Meet are already making our team (and my family) meetings better. We love how tiled view makes us feel more connected—and the occasional surprise visits from kids and family pets! 

And we’re continuing to look for ways to make Google Meet more accessible and useful. For example, we know video meetings can be challenging to follow for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, which is why we made sure AI-powered automatic live captioning was available to everyone. One of the most meaningful emails I’ve received was from a parent whose child was able to feel more included thanks to live captioning. Google AI has also made it possible to provide helpful features like low-light mode, which can automatically adjust your video to make you more visible to others.

Meet is available for free for everyone at meet.google.com and on iOS or Android. If you have an existing Google Account (for example, if you’re a @gmail.com user), you can sign in at meet.google.com to get started. If you don’t have a free Google Account, it only takes a minute to create one using your work or personal email address of choice (we require this step as a security measure, and you’ll only need to do this once). Or look for Meet right in Gmail.  

We hope Meet will help you connect to all your important meetings—from work meetings, to graduation meetings, to wedding meetings, and everything in between.

Source: Gmail Blog


Google Meet is here to host your video meetings, for free

When I joined Google last year to lead G Suite, I couldn’t have imagined how the world was about to change. But in a few short months, working together took on a whole new meaning, and meetings became about so much more than getting things done. From doctor check-up meetings, to meetings with financial advisors, to study meetings, workout meetings, and birthday meetings. They may not look or feel like traditional meetings, but they’re the most important meetings happening right now.

That’s why we’ve re-engineered Google Meet, originally built for secure business meetings, to make it free and available to all. Since making Meet's advanced features free for all G Suite and G Suite for Education users in March, we've seen daily usage grow by 30x, with Meet hosting 3 billion minutes of video meetings daily. Last month, we were adding roughly 3 million new users every day. That's why we're expanding the offering to more people around the world.

Now that the rollout we announced two weeks ago is complete, anyone with an email address can sign up and get started at meet.google.com, for free. And to make meetings even more accessible and helpful, in the coming days you’ll also be able to use Meet directly in Gmail.

Click “Start a meeting" and a new window opens with a unique, secure meeting for you to join and then share with others. You can also easily join meetings shared with you by entering a meeting code. And you can plan video meetings and invite others directly from Google Calendar.

Because video meetings have never been more important, we’ve been fast-tracking the most requested features for Meet, and are now making them available to all. Anyone can use Meet’s simple scheduling and screen sharing, real-time captions, and layouts that adapt to your preference, including an expanded tiled view—all built on Google’s secure, reliable global infrastructure. Speaking from my own experience, the new features in Meet are already making our team (and my family) meetings better. We love how tiled view makes us feel more connected—and the occasional surprise visits from kids and family pets! 

And we’re continuing to look for ways to make Google Meet more accessible and useful. For example, we know video meetings can be challenging to follow for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, which is why we made sure AI-powered automatic live captioning was available to everyone. One of the most meaningful emails I’ve received was from a parent whose child was able to feel more included thanks to live captioning. Google AI has also made it possible to provide helpful features like low-light mode, which can automatically adjust your video to make you more visible to others.

Meet is available for free for everyone at meet.google.com and on iOS or Android. If you have an existing Google Account (for example, if you’re a @gmail.com user), you can sign in at meet.google.com to get started. If you don’t have a free Google Account, it only takes a minute to create one using your work or personal email address of choice (we require this step as a security measure, and you’ll only need to do this once). Or look for Meet right in Gmail.  

We hope Meet will help you connect to all your important meetings—from work meetings, to graduation meetings, to wedding meetings, and everything in between.

Source: Gmail Blog


The Suite Life: 4 tips for a more manageable Gmail inbox

The average person receives 120 emails a day, which means keeping your inbox under control can feel like an impossible task. Fortunately, G Suite gives you the tools you need to stay focused and organized. Welcome to the Gmail edition of The Suite Life, a series that brings you tips and tricks to get the most out of G Suite. In this post, we’ll provide advice to help you save time and get more done—right from your Gmail inbox.

Tip 1: Write now, send later with Schedule send

Whether you’re firing off a reply outside of normal work hours, collaborating with teammates across time zones, or want to send your future self a reminder, there are lots of reasons to schedule an email instead of hitting send right away. With Schedule send, you can plan exactly when your email will be sent in Gmail. This means your emails can reach teammates at a time that's convenient for them.

the suite life - schedule send.png

Here’s how:

  1. When you’re done writing your email, click the arrow to the right of the Send button in Gmail.

  2. Select “Schedule send.”

  3. Choose a date and time that works for you.

  4. Once you’ve scheduled at least one email, you’ll see a new box called Scheduled where you can view emails set to be sent, change times, or cancel the send.


Pro-tip: Curious to know how Googlers stay on top of things? Try out these tips.


Tip 2: Turn emails into Tasks in one step

A lot of emails require some sort of follow-up. With Google Tasks, you can quickly turn that email into an item on your to-do list without ever leaving your inbox.

the suite life - drag email to task.png

Here’s how:

  1. Click and drag your email into the Tasks list located in the Gmail companion bar. 

  2. Type the text that describes your task, and a link to the email is attached to the bottom. You can also press SHIFT + K when you’re in an email to automatically add it to your Tasks list.

If you’re new to Tasks, check out this article to help you get started. Or if you’re used to using Google Keep, try out some of these tricks of the trade.

Tip 3: Send and archive emails at the same time

The secret to a tidy inbox is archiving emails when they’re no longer needed. Gmail gives you the option to reply to an email and archive it in the same step, which means you can get to Inbox Zero faster than ever.

the suite life - send and archive.png

Here’s how: 

  1. In Gmail settings, click the General tab, then click the “Show ‘Send & Archive’” button.

  2. Scroll to the bottom of the page and click Save Changes. Now, when you write an email, you’ll see the “Send & Archive” button at the bottom of the page; clicking on it will complete both actions at the same time.

Tip 4: Create a Google Calendar event in one click

Ever find yourself thinking “I should set up a meeting about this” after reading an email? Schedule it right from Gmail—no need to open Calendar separately.

the suite life create an event in gmail.png

Here’s how to create Calendar events from emails in one single step:

  1. When you’re in an email, navigate to the three dots and click Create Event. This will open a new Calendar tab. The subject of the email becomes the event title, anyone in the “To” or “Cc” line is added as a guest to the event, and the most recent reply to the thread is embedded in the description. 

  2. Click “Save,” and you’re done! 

We’ve got plenty more tips to help you better use G Suite tools like Gmail, Docs, Calendar, and more. Check out all the videos from The Suite Life.

Source: Gmail Blog


The Suite Life: 4 tips for a more manageable Gmail inbox

The average person receives 120 emails a day, which means keeping your inbox under control can feel like an impossible task. Fortunately, G Suite gives you the tools you need to stay focused and organized. Welcome to the Gmail edition of The Suite Life, a series that brings you tips and tricks to get the most out of G Suite. In this post, we’ll provide advice to help you save time and get more done—right from your Gmail inbox.

Tip 1: Write now, send later with Schedule send

Whether you’re firing off a reply outside of normal work hours, collaborating with teammates across time zones, or want to send your future self a reminder, there are lots of reasons to schedule an email instead of hitting send right away. With Schedule send, you can plan exactly when your email will be sent in Gmail. This means your emails can reach teammates at a time that's convenient for them.

the suite life - schedule send.png

Here’s how:

  1. When you’re done writing your email, click the arrow to the right of the Send button in Gmail.

  2. Select “Schedule send.”

  3. Choose a date and time that works for you.

  4. Once you’ve scheduled at least one email, you’ll see a new box called Scheduled where you can view emails set to be sent, change times, or cancel the send.


Pro-tip: Curious to know how Googlers stay on top of things? Try out these tips.


Tip 2: Turn emails into Tasks in one step

A lot of emails require some sort of follow-up. With Google Tasks, you can quickly turn that email into an item on your to-do list without ever leaving your inbox.

the suite life - drag email to task.png

Here’s how:

  1. Click and drag your email into the Tasks list located in the Gmail companion bar. 

  2. Type the text that describes your task, and a link to the email is attached to the bottom. You can also press SHIFT + K when you’re in an email to automatically add it to your Tasks list.

If you’re new to Tasks, check out this article to help you get started. Or if you’re used to using Google Keep, try out some of these tricks of the trade.

Tip 3: Send and archive emails at the same time

The secret to a tidy inbox is archiving emails when they’re no longer needed. Gmail gives you the option to reply to an email and archive it in the same step, which means you can get to Inbox Zero faster than ever.

the suite life - send and archive.png

Here’s how: 

  1. In Gmail settings, click the General tab, then click the “Show ‘Send & Archive’” button.

  2. Scroll to the bottom of the page and click Save Changes. Now, when you write an email, you’ll see the “Send & Archive” button at the bottom of the page; clicking on it will complete both actions at the same time.

Tip 4: Create a Google Calendar event in one click

Ever find yourself thinking “I should set up a meeting about this” after reading an email? Schedule it right from Gmail—no need to open Calendar separately.

the suite life create an event in gmail.png

Here’s how to create Calendar events from emails in one single step:

  1. When you’re in an email, navigate to the three dots and click Create Event. This will open a new Calendar tab. The subject of the email becomes the event title, anyone in the “To” or “Cc” line is added as a guest to the event, and the most recent reply to the thread is embedded in the description. 

  2. Click “Save,” and you’re done! 

We’ve got plenty more tips to help you better use G Suite tools like Gmail, Docs, Calendar, and more. Check out all the videos from The Suite Life.

Source: Gmail Blog


Making our tech spill-proof, crash-proof—thank you, IT

They keep our laptops humming and our work flowing, and they’re often the first people we contact when there’s a problem: I’m talking about tech support. At Google, these folks offer a range of services to help us handle damage control for issues—troubleshooting the simplest to the most complex of problems every day—just like at your jobs. When we need help, we turn to our tech support service called Techstop.

Google Tech Stop

To commemorate SysAdmin Appreciation Day (That’s today, by the way.), we stopped by our San Francisco Techstop office to say thank you to our own tech support folks, and to ask them a few questions. Much to their surprise, they didn’t have to fix an issue for us.

What’s one thing you wish people would do before they came to IT?

Emma: Basic troubleshooting, like restarting a machine. You’d be surprised how many problems are resolved with a simple reboot.

Charles: Another tip would be to clear your cache and cookies before stopping by. This can help if you force a shutdown while a program is trying to update. If the program closes before it saves whatever it was doing, it can cause issues—clearing cache can help sometimes.

If you could wave a wand and eliminate a recurring problem that you deal with, what would it be?

Emma: The blue screen of death when machines don’t run on a modern OS. It causes disruption and takes entirely too long to remediate. I wish it would just go away.

Charles: Resetting passwords or sign-in credentials, in general. I’d love it if we didn’t have to do this, but I understand that people forget. 

What’s your favorite Google product hack or tip?

Emma: If you type “chrome://restart” into your Chrome browser, it’ll restart your browser and re-open tabs. I use this if my connection is slow or if my browser doesn’t load properly.  

Charles: I like to save time with Gmail shortcuts. If you want to learn what shortcuts are available, click Shift + ? and you’ll see a list of shortcuts appear on your screen. Just make sure to enable keyboard shortcuts in your Gmail settings first! If you’re working on a Chromebook with Chrome OS, you can click CTRL + ALT + ? and they’ll appear.

What's the weirdest or funniest laptop mishap you've encountered at Google?

Emma: I once had someone come in with a clicking noise on their laptop. I opened the bottom case of their computer and found a piece of a plastic arm from a toy stuck within the base. The person laughed and said, “oh kids…”

Charles: Do you know those little silicon packets that come in packaging or new clothing items? We’ve had dozens of people come into Techstop because their headphone ports stop working. Apparently, these packets get left within backpacks, the beads burst and they jam headphone jacks. Look out for those pesky things.

If you could describe working in IT in just 3 words, what would they be? (Feel free to make them fun!)

Emma: Unpredictable. Exciting. Gratifying.

Charles: Fluid. Inquisical. Magical.

What do you think your job will look like in 5 years? 

Emma: In five years, almost all of our IT systems will be cloud-based. Since troubleshooting systems will be a thing of the past, I think we’ll work tighter with product and data analytics teams to suggest and test new systems and environments. 

Charles: We help thousands of employees fix IT issues, and we're able to do this efficiently by focusing on how to address problems that happen over and over again. We call this "root reduction.” Root reduction helps us scale our IT services, and it also frees up our schedules so that we can focus on more strategic work. In five years, I think we’ll use the time we save through root reduction to become internal IT consultants for teams. We’ll embed with individual departments to help them solve trickier problems or workflows specific to their needs. 

From resetting our passwords to debugging and fixing a system crash, we salute you “IT guy” (or gal!). Thanks for keeping us online, even when we drown our computers in coffee.

Source: Gmail Blog


Making our tech spill-proof, crash-proof—thank you, IT

They keep our laptops humming and our work flowing, and they’re often the first people we contact when there’s a problem: I’m talking about tech support. At Google, these folks offer a range of services to help us handle damage control for issues—troubleshooting the simplest to the most complex of problems every day—just like at your jobs. When we need help, we turn to our tech support service called Techstop.

Google Tech Stop

To commemorate SysAdmin Appreciation Day (That’s today, by the way.), we stopped by our San Francisco Techstop office to say thank you to our own tech support folks, and to ask them a few questions. Much to their surprise, they didn’t have to fix an issue for us.

What’s one thing you wish people would do before they came to IT?

Emma: Basic troubleshooting, like restarting a machine. You’d be surprised how many problems are resolved with a simple reboot.

Charles: Another tip would be to clear your cache and cookies before stopping by. This can help if you force a shutdown while a program is trying to update. If the program closes before it saves whatever it was doing, it can cause issues—clearing cache can help sometimes.

If you could wave a wand and eliminate a recurring problem that you deal with, what would it be?

Emma: The blue screen of death when machines don’t run on a modern OS. It causes disruption and takes entirely too long to remediate. I wish it would just go away.

Charles: Resetting passwords or sign-in credentials, in general. I’d love it if we didn’t have to do this, but I understand that people forget. 

What’s your favorite Google product hack or tip?

Emma: If you type “chrome://restart” into your Chrome browser, it’ll restart your browser and re-open tabs. I use this if my connection is slow or if my browser doesn’t load properly.  

Charles: I like to save time with Gmail shortcuts. If you want to learn what shortcuts are available, click Shift + ? and you’ll see a list of shortcuts appear on your screen. Just make sure to enable keyboard shortcuts in your Gmail settings first! If you’re working on a Chromebook with Chrome OS, you can click CTRL + ALT + ? and they’ll appear.

What's the weirdest or funniest laptop mishap you've encountered at Google?

Emma: I once had someone come in with a clicking noise on their laptop. I opened the bottom case of their computer and found a piece of a plastic arm from a toy stuck within the base. The person laughed and said, “oh kids…”

Charles: Do you know those little silicon packets that come in packaging or new clothing items? We’ve had dozens of people come into Techstop because their headphone ports stop working. Apparently, these packets get left within backpacks, the beads burst and they jam headphone jacks. Look out for those pesky things.

If you could describe working in IT in just 3 words, what would they be? (Feel free to make them fun!)

Emma: Unpredictable. Exciting. Gratifying.

Charles: Fluid. Inquisical. Magical.

What do you think your job will look like in 5 years? 

Emma: In five years, almost all of our IT systems will be cloud-based. Since troubleshooting systems will be a thing of the past, I think we’ll work tighter with product and data analytics teams to suggest and test new systems and environments. 

Charles: We help thousands of employees fix IT issues, and we're able to do this efficiently by focusing on how to address problems that happen over and over again. We call this "root reduction.” Root reduction helps us scale our IT services, and it also frees up our schedules so that we can focus on more strategic work. In five years, I think we’ll use the time we save through root reduction to become internal IT consultants for teams. We’ll embed with individual departments to help them solve trickier problems or workflows specific to their needs. 

From resetting our passwords to debugging and fixing a system crash, we salute you “IT guy” (or gal!). Thanks for keeping us online, even when we drown our computers in coffee.

Source: Gmail Blog