Tag Archives: google cloud

Automatic Deployment of Hugo Sites on Firebase Hosting and Drafts on Cloud Run

Posted by James Ward, Developer Advocate

Recently I completed the migration of my blog from Wordpress to Hugo and I wanted to take advantage of it now being a static site by hosting it on a Content Delivery Network (CDN). With Hugo the source content is plain files instead of rows in a database. In the case of my blog those files are in git on GitHub. But when the source files change, the site needs to be regenerated and redeployed to the CDN. Also, sometimes it is nice to have drafts available for review. I setup a continuous delivery pipeline which deploys changes to my prod site on Firebase Hosting and drafts on Cloud Run, using Cloud Build. Read on for instructions for how to set all this up.

Step 1a) Setup A New Hugo Project

If you do not have an existing Hugo project you can create a GitHub copy (i.e. fork) of my Hugo starter repo:

Step 1b) Setup Existing Hugo Project

If you have an existing Hugo project you'll need to add some files to it:

.firebaserc

{
"projects": {
"production": "hello-hugo"
}
}

cloudbuild-draft.yaml

steps:
- name: 'gcr.io/cloud-builders/git'
entrypoint: '/bin/sh'
args:
- '-c'
- |
# Get the theme git submodule
THEME_URL=$(git config -f .gitmodules --get-regexp '^submodule\..*\.url$' | awk '{ print $2 }')
THEME_DIR=$(git config -f .gitmodules --get-regexp '^submodule\..*\.path$' | awk '{ print $2 }')
rm -rf themes
git clone $$THEME_URL $$THEME_DIR

- name: 'gcr.io/cloud-builders/docker'
entrypoint: '/bin/sh'
args:
- '-c'
- |
docker build -t gcr.io/$PROJECT_ID/$REPO_NAME-$BRANCH_NAME:$COMMIT_SHA -f - . << EOF
FROM klakegg/hugo:latest
WORKDIR /workspace
COPY . /workspace
ENTRYPOINT hugo -D -p \$$PORT --bind \$$HUGO_BIND --renderToDisk --disableLiveReload --watch=false serve
EOF
docker push gcr.io/$PROJECT_ID/$REPO_NAME-$BRANCH_NAME:$COMMIT_SHA

- name: 'gcr.io/cloud-builders/gcloud'
args:
- run
- deploy
- --image=gcr.io/$PROJECT_ID/$REPO_NAME-$BRANCH_NAME:$COMMIT_SHA
- --platform=managed
- --project=$PROJECT_ID
- --region=us-central1
- --memory=512Mi
- --allow-unauthenticated
- $REPO_NAME-$BRANCH_NAME

cloudbuild.yaml

steps:
- name: 'gcr.io/cloud-builders/git'
entrypoint: '/bin/sh'
args:
- '-c'
- |
# Get the theme git submodule
THEME_URL=$(git config -f .gitmodules --get-regexp '^submodule\..*\.url$' | awk '{ print $2 }')
THEME_DIR=$(git config -f .gitmodules --get-regexp '^submodule\..*\.path$' | awk '{ print $2 }')
rm -rf themes
git clone $$THEME_URL $$THEME_DIR

- name: 'gcr.io/cloud-builders/curl'
entrypoint: '/bin/sh'
args:
- '-c'
- |
curl -sL https://github.com/gohugoio/hugo/releases/download/v0.69.2/hugo_0.69.2_Linux-64bit.tar.gz | tar -zxv
./hugo

- name: 'gcr.io/cloud-builders/wget'
entrypoint: '/bin/sh'
args:
- '-c'
- |
# Get firebase CLI
wget -O firebase https://firebase.tools/bin/linux/latest
chmod +x firebase
# Deploy site
./firebase deploy --project=$PROJECT_ID --only=hosting

firebase.json

{
"hosting": {
"public": "public"
}
}


Step 2) Setup Cloud Build Triggers

In the Google Cloud Build console, connect to your newly forked repo: Select the newly forked repo: Create the default push trigger: Edit the new trigger: Set the trigger to only fire on changes to the ^master$ branch: Create a new trigger: Give it a name like drafts-trigger, specify the branch selector as .* (i.e. any branch), and the build configuration file type to "Cloud Build configuration file" with a value of cloudbuild-draft.yaml Setup permissions for the Cloud Build process to manage Cloud Run and Firebase Hosting by visiting the IAM management page, locate the member with the name ending with @cloudbuild.gserviceaccount.com, and select the "pencil" / edit button: Add a role for "Cloud Run Admin" and another for "Firebase Hosting Admin": Your default "prod" trigger isn't read to test yet, but you can test the drafts on Cloud Run by going back to the Cloud Build Triggers page, and clicking the "Run Trigger" button on the "drafts-trigger" line. Check the build logs by finding the build in the Cloud Build History. Once the build completes visit the Cloud Run console to find your newly created service which hosts the drafts version of your new blog. Note that the service name includes the branch so that you can see drafts from different branches.

Step 3) Setup Firebase Hosting

To setup your production / CDN'd site, login to the firebase console and select your project:

Now you'll need your project id, which can be found in the URL on the Firebase Project Overview page. The URL for my project is:

console.firebase.google.com/project/jw-demo/overview

Which means my project id is: jw-demo

Now copy your project id go into your GitHub fork, select the .firebaserc file and click the "pencil" / edit button:

Replace the hello-hugo string with your project id and commit the changes. This commit will trigger two new builds, one for the production site and one for the drafts site on Cloud Run. You can check the status of those builds on the Cloud Build History page. Once the default trigger (the one for Firebase hosting) finishes, check out your Hugo site running on Firebase Hosting by navigating to (replacing YOUR_PROJECT_ID with the project id you used above): https://YOUR_PROJECT_ID.web.app/

Your prod and drafts sites are now automatically deploying on new commits!

Step 4) (Optional) Change Hugo Theme

There are many themes for Hugo and they are easy to change. Typically themes are pulled into Hugo sites using git submodules. To change the theme, edit your .gitmodules file and set the subdirectories and url. As an example, here is the content when using the mainroad theme:

[submodule "themes/mainroad"]
path = themes/mainroad
url = https://github.com/vimux/mainroad.git

You will also need to change the theme value in your config.toml file to match the directory name in the themes directory. For example:

theme = "mainroad"

Note: At the time of writing this, Cloud Build does not clone git submodules so the cloudbuild.yaml does the cloning instead.

Step 5) (Optional) Setup Local Editing

To setup local editing you will first need to clone your fork. You can do this with the GitHub desktop app. Or from the command line:

git clone --recurse-submodules https://github.com/USER/REPO.git

Once you have the files locally, install Hugo, and from inside the repo's directory, run:

hugo -D serve

This will serve the drafts in the site. You can check out the site at: localhost:1313

Committing non-draft changes to master and pushing those changes to GitHub will kick off the build which will deploy them on your prod site. Committing draft to any branch will kick off the build which will deploy them on a Cloud Run site.

Hopefully that all helps you with hosting your Hugo sites! Let me know if you run into any problems.

Get inspired by five Google Cloud Next ‘20: OnAir sessions

Yesterday we kicked off Google Cloud Next ‘20: OnAir, a free, nine-week, in-depth digital event series covering all things cloud computing. While many Next ‘20: OnAir sessions will cover topics near and dear to the hearts of developers, businesses and startups, there are a number of interesting and inspiring sessions that don’t require deep cloud knowledge. Here’s a look at a few of our favorites, ranging from the least to most technical:

1. Google's Diversity Strategy and How It Works
Six years ago Google announced its Diversity Annual Report, and since then we’ve been scaling up and evolving our diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) strategies. In this session, Chief Diversity Officer Melonie Parker discusses how Google is continuing to build a workforce that reflects all communities, sharing more on our efforts to better understand our global workforce and tackle the challenges to advancing DEI in this unique time. Available to watch on demand now. Learn more

2. Communication in G Suite: The Future of Gmail, Chat, Meet and More
Over the past year we’ve made a lot of improvements to our communication tools across the web, Android and iOS to address the needs of the modern worker. Join us to hear the latest updates on and vision for these tools in G Suite—we'll show you what's new today, what's coming tomorrow and why we're more excited than ever about the future of these products. Available to watch on demand beginning July 21. Learn more.

3. G Suite Accessibility Features to Empower Inclusion
When we’re talking about connecting digitally, we need to make sure everyone can connect. Emails, calendar invites, video conferences, presentations, documents and spreadsheets are all important tools, and G Suite’s accessibility features are designed so that anyone can use them to get more done. That means they’re inclusive of those who have audio, visual or motor impairment. Check out this session to get an overview of these features and how to use them on mobile or web. Available to watch on demand beginning July 21. Learn more.

4. How Certification Impacted My Career
Becoming Google Cloud-certified has the power to boost careers, and the experience is unique for each person. Solution Engineer Jewel Langevine, who has three certification badges, will discuss her path to certification and how it plays a role in her career. Jewel will also talk about her journey from growing up in Guyana to her present position at Google Cloud. Along the way, she’ll describe how she was introduced to cloud computing, her experiences in mentorship, how she maximized networking opportunities and how she continues to give back to underrepresented communities. Available to watch on demand beginning August 4. Learn more.

5. Data Driven Responses to COVID-19 Using Looker & BigQuery
As governments and businesses plan their near and long term strategic responses to COVID-19, data is central to their decision-making processes. But with that data rapidly growing and evolving, it’s not always easy to understand which tools can help develop actionable and timely insights. This session examines how Google Cloud data analytics technologies like BigQuery and Looker can support organizations as part of their efforts to respond to the pandemic. Available to watch on demand beginning August 11. Learn more.

Google Cloud Next ’20: OnAir is running from now until Sept. 8, with new on-demand content available each week on Tuesdays. Haven’t registered yet? Get started at g.co/cloudnext.

30 years of family videos in an AI archive

My dad got his first video camera the day I was born nearly three decades ago. “Say hello to the camera!” are the first words he caught on tape, as he pointed it at a red, puffy baby (me) in a hospital bassinet. The clips got more embarrassing from there, as he continued to film through many diaper changes, temper tantrums and—worst of all—puberty.

Most of those potential blackmail tokens sat trapped on miniDV tapes or scattered across SD cards until two years ago when my dad uploaded them all to Google Drive. Theoretically, since they were now stored in the cloud, my family and I could watch them whenever we wanted. But with more than 456 hours of footage, watching it all would have been a herculean effort. You can only watch old family friends open Christmas gifts so many times. So, as an Applied AI Engineer, I got down to business and built an AI-powered searchable archive of our family videos.

If you’ve ever used Google Photos, you’ve seen the power of using AI to search and organize images and videos. The app uses machine learning to identify people and pets, as well as objects and text in images. So, if I search “pool” in the Google Photos app, it’ll show me all the pictures and videos I ever took of pools.

But for this project, I needed a couple of features Photos doesn’t (yet!) support. First, because my dad’s first camera recorded footage to miniDV tapes, those videos were uploaded as meaty, two-hour-long movies with no useful metadata. Instead, my dad would start a clip by saying, “let me put a date on the screen here...” and a little white text snippet would appear in the bottom right corner of the frame. In between shots on a single reel, he’d say: “Say goodbye, I’m going to fade out now.” I would scream, “NO, DON’T FADE OUT,” while the screen faded to black. So, my first step was to use machine learning to automatically parse the date shown on the screen, and split the single long video into shorter clips after each fade out.

video screenshot

In this picture, you can see the timestamp shown on screen. Using the Vision API, I could extract it to sort my videos by date.

For this, I turned the Video intelligence API, a Google Cloud tool that lets developers analyze videos with machine learning. It allows you to replicate many of the features found in the Google Photos app—like tagging objects in images and recognizing on-screen text—and a whole lot more. For example, the API’s shot change detection feature automatically finds the timestamps in videos where a scene changes, this allowed me to split those longs videos into smaller chunks. 

Using the label detection feature, I could search for all sorts of different events, like “bridal shower,” “wedding,” “bat and ball games” and “baby.” By searching “performance,” I was able to finally find one of my life’s proudest accomplishments on tape—a starring role singing “It’s Not Easy Being Green” in my kindergarten’s production of the Sesame Street musical.

home video 2

My starring role as Kermit the Frog in my school’s Sesame Street musical. The Video Intelligence API tagged it as “performance”.  

The Video Intelligence API’s real “killer feature” for me was its ability to do audio transcription. By transcribing my videos, I was able to query clips by what people said in them. I could search for specific names (“Scott,” “Dale,” “grandma”), proper nouns (“Chuck E Cheese”, “Pokemon”), and for unique phrases. By searching “first steps,” I found a clip of my dad saying, “Here she comes… plunk. That’s the first time she’s taken major steps” alongside a video of my managing, just barely, to waddle along.

homevideo3

My first steps that I was able to find with the Video Intelligence API’s Transcription feature. Here, my dad says, “...this is the first time she’s taken major steps.”

In the end, machine learning helped me build exactly the kind of archive I wanted—one that let me search my family videos by memories, not timestamps.

P.S. Want to see how I built it? Check out my technical blog post or catch the video on the Cloud Youtube Channel

Cloud Covered: What was new in Google Cloud in June

Summer arrived here in the U.S. last month, so school's out—but people are still using technology to connect, play and learn. Here’s what was new.

Find time to play (not just work) at home.

Remote fun, not just remote work, is essential these days. Last month, we announced that our gaming solution for Google Maps Platform is now open to all mobile game developers to create immersive games. You can now quickly build mobile games with Google Maps Platform using easy-to-access developer tools to create games with real-world locations and gameplay. There are already some fun real-world games created that include hatching dinosaurs, birdwatching and more.

Discover more ways to Meet with new features.

Our premium video conferencing product Google Meet is still available for free to anyone with an email address. Last month, we announced new features as we keep improving Meet, including availability on the Nest Hub Max, layout improvements so you can see up to 16 participants and content being shared, and hardware updates. Other upcoming features include Hey Google voice control so you can start meetings without touching hardware, and replaceable backgrounds.

Learn new things at home, whether for grown-ups or kids.

New Meet features specifically for educators are slated to launch later this year. More than 140 million educators and students use G Suite for Education, and these new features are designed to improve capabilities for moderating meetings, and engagement in remote or hybrid learning environments. These new features include hand raising, attendance tracking, and many more.

Digital cloud learning continues all summer.

Our Google Cloud training and certifications team launched several new initiatives, including Google Cloud skill badges, new certification prep learning journeys, and remote certification exam availability. You can get the first month of the certification prep training at no cost, and 30 days of unlimited Qwiklabs access too. If you’re looking for more ways to learn this summer, check out our Next ‘20: OnAir lineup, starting July 14. New content arrives each week, with themed weeks on cloud topics from application modernization and data analytics to diversity and inclusion in technology.

How does your cloud grow? With new regions.

We virtually celebrated the launch of Google Cloud’s new physical Jakarta region last month. It’s the first Google Cloud region in Indonesia—one of the fastest growing economies in the world—and ninth in Asia Pacific. A region means that those storing and using data in that region can access it faster than if it was stored farther away.

That’s all for June. Keep up to date on the Google Cloud blog any time.

One percent of Googlers get to visit a data center, but I did

For years I’ve wondered what it’s like behind the protected walls of a Google data center, and I’m not alone. In my job at Google, I spend my days working with developers. Our data centers are crucial to the work that they do, but most have never actually set foot inside a data center. And until recently, neither had I. I went on a mission to find answers to common questions like: Why are visits so tightly restricted? How secure is a Google data center? How do we meet regulatory requirements? Here's what I found out.

To keep our customers' data safe, we need to make sure the physical structure of the data center is absolutely secure. Each data center is protected with six layers of physical security designed to thwart unauthorized access. Watch the video above to follow my journey through these layers to the core of a data center, and read on to learn even more.

“Least privilege” is the rule to live by

badge swipe

There are two rules strictly enforced at all Google data centers. The “least privilege” protocol is the idea that someone should have only the bare minimum privileges necessary to perform their job. If your least privilege is to enter Layer 2, you won’t have luck moving to Layer 3. Each person’s access permissions are checked at badge readers that exist at every access point in a data center facility. Authorization measures happen everywhere using this protocol. 


Another rule exists that prevents a vehicle or individual closely following another to gain entry into a restricted area without a badge swipe. If the system detects a door open for too long, it immediately alerts security personnel. Any gate or door must close before the next vehicle or person can badge in and gain access.

Two security checks: badge first, then circle lock

circle lock

You’ve probably seen dual-authentication when you try to sign into an account and a one-time password is sent to your phone. We take a similar approach at the data centers to verify a person’s identity and access. At some layers in the data center, you’re required to swipe your badge, then enter a circle lock, or tubular doorway. You walk into a special "half portal" that checks your badge and scans your eyes to gain access to the next layer of the data center. It prevents tailgating because only one person is allowed in the circle lock at a time.

Shipments are received through a secure loading dock

The facility loading docks are a special section of Layer 3, used to receive and send shipments of materials, such as new hardware. Truck deliveries must be approved for access to Layer 3 to enter the dock. For further security, the loading dock room is physically isolated from the rest of the data center, and guard presence is required when a shipment is received or sent.

All hard drives are meticulously tracked

hard drive

Hard drive tracking is important to the security of your data because hard drives contain encrypted sensitive information. Google meticulously tracks the location and status of every hard drive within our data centers—from acquisition to destruction—using barcodes and asset tags. These asset tags are scanned throughout a hard drive's lifecycle in a data center from the time it’s installed to the time it's removed from circulation. Tracking hard drives closely ensures they don’t go missing or end up in the wrong hands.


We also make sure hard drives are properly functioning by doing frequent performance tests. If a component fails to pass a performance test, it’s deemed no longer usable. To prevent any sensitive information from living on that disk, we remove it from inventory to be erased and destroyed in Layer 6, Disk Erase. There, the disk erase formatter uses a multi-step process that wipes the disk data and replaces each bit of data with zeros. If the drive can’t be erased for any reason, it’s stored securely until it can be physically destroyed. 

Layered security extends into the tech itself

Our layered security approach isn’t just a physical safeguard for entering our data centers. It’s also how we protect the hardware and software that live in our data centers. At the deepest layer, most of our server boards and networking equipment are custom-designed by Google. For example, we design chips, such as the Titan hardware security chip, to securely identify and authenticate legitimate Google hardware. 

At the storage layer, data is encrypted while it travels in and out of the data center and when it’s stored at the data center. This means whether data is traveling over the internet moving between Google’s facilities, or stored on our servers, it’s protected. Google Cloud customers can even supply their own encryption keys and manage them in a third-party key management system deployed outside Google’s infrastructure. This defense-in-depth approach helps to expand our ability to mitigate potential vulnerabilities at every point

To learn more about our global data centers, visit our Data and Security page. We will also be sharing more about our security best practices during the upcoming Google Cloud Next ’20: OnAir event.

Join 24 Hours of Google Cloud Talks by DevRel

Posted by Greg Wilson, Director of Cloud Developer Advocacy

Google Cloud is excited to announce a global, 24-hour event as part of our new Google Cloud Talks by DevRel Series. The event will begin on June 22 at 5:00 PM Pacific Time (June 23 at 10:00am UTC) and run through June 23 5:00 PM Pacific Time.

This 24-hour event will be a way for cloud developers, admins, operators, and analysts globally to participate in interactive sessions, panels, demos, and Q&As with Google Cloud Developer Relations and experts from the community.

We all miss gathering in person to learn, stay updated on new ideas, and connect, which is why no matter what time it is where you are, you can join and share this virtual experience with developers from around the world.

Organized into three regional segments, the event will include live streamed content with everything from Dialogflow and Cloud AI to serverless and Cloud Run. Check out the agenda and register here.

Cloud Covered: What was new in Google Cloud in May

In the last month, we’ve all faced challenges on a global scale. As we look for ways to heal and find hope, we remain inspired by technology’s ability to keep us connected to each other.

Summer school is in session online with Next ‘20 OnAir.

Mark your calendars for Google Cloud Next ‘20: OnAir from July 14 to September 8, where you’ll hear from customers and can access keynotes, hundreds of sessions, developer programs—all free of charge. Each week you’ll find programming on a different topic, including infrastructure, security, app modernization, and cloud AI. Register and get more details on speakers and topics now.

Groups and teams now have an easier way to get started with G Suite.

G Suite Essentials launched last month, giving groups and teams a faster, easier way to get started with G Suite. G Suite Essentials includes premium video conferencing with Google Meet, real-time collaboration and content management with Google Docs, Sheets, Slides, and Drive, and enterprise-grade security and reliability. For many businesses, this is great for teams that aren’t ready to replace their current email or calendar tools, and it’s completely free through September 30.

We learned how financial services are staying ahead of demand.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, financial services organizations have been essential to many people and businesses, as well as governments around the world. We heard from some of these companies last month about how they’re using cloud technology to safely support employees’ work remotely. We also shared one of the ways we’re assisting loan servicers and lenders--by launching our PPP Lending AI Solution to help process and manage the huge influx of loan applications received under the Small Business Associations’s (SBA’s) Paycheck Protection Program.

When time is of the essence, AI can help.

With all kinds of new challenges arising from the coronavirus pandemic, AI has emerged as a way to answer big questions. Read about some of the useful ways AI has been deployed, such as to sift through huge research databases, forecast the spread of COVID-19, and more. 

Using cloud resources wisely is more important than ever.

Over the past few months, many businesses have re-evaluated how to use their resources. This post on understanding the principles of cloud cost optimization offers an overview of how businesses can make sure they’re being efficient with the money they spend on IT systems in the cloud. There are concepts to consider, like breaking down value vs. cost when choosing or using a certain type of technology, and tips on creating processes and working across teams.

That’s a wrap for May. Stay tuned to the Google Cloud blog for all the latest.

Strengthen your cloud skills with Google Cloud training

Posted by Yuri Grinshteyn, Site Reliability Engineer

We know many of you are looking for ways to keep learning and connecting with other developers virtually right now, and we want to help. Below you can check out our top on-demand Google Cloud training webinars and resources where you can take hands-on labs and learn, at no charge, more about everything from the basics of Google Cloud to more advanced topics like building robust cloud architecture.

Starting with the basics

You can tune in from May 19-20 to watch instructors in Cloud OnBoard break down what it takes to migrate to Google Cloud and explain the basics of the Google Kubernetes Engine, a managed, production-ready environment for running containerized applications. After the sessions, you’ll have a chance to test what you’ve learned by participating in hands-on labs and challenges with the Cloud Hero Online Challenge. Missed the live recording on May 19-20? No worries! You can view it on-demand starting May 21 and still participate in hands-on labs.

Gaining more hands-on experience and a deeper understanding of Google Cloud products

Ready to gain more hands-on cloud experience and deeper product knowledge? We have webinars where Googlers will walk you through more hands-on labs on Qwiklabs and share product tips and tricks.

If you’re interested in big data and machine learning, you can do a lab I recorded in the Baseline: Data, ML, AI webinar to get more experience using tools like Big Query, Cloud Speech API, and Cloud ML Engine. You can also learn how to use BigQuery and other Google tools to draw insights and visualize data from the public health data sets Google released to support the COVID-19 research process in our Data science for public health: Working with public COVID-19 datasets webinar.

Getting role-based training and preparing for certification

For those of you who are already cloud professionals, our top webinars this year so far are Professional Cloud DevOps and Professional Cloud Architect.

You can learn how to improve the way you build software delivery pipelines, deploy and monitor services, and manage incidents in the DevOps webinar. The Cloud Architect webinar will discuss how to ensure you’re designing, developing, and managing effective solutions.

Both webinars will also help prepare you to earn Google Cloud certifications. If you’d like to learn more about the certification program, you can attend our on-demand webinar Why Certify? Everything to know about Google Cloud Certification.

More no-cost resources to check out

We’re also offering our extensive catalog of Google Cloud on-demand training courses on Pluralsight and Qwiklabs at no cost when you sign up by May 31, 20201. You can learn how to prototype an app, build prediction models, and more—at your own pace by registering here.

We hope these webinars and resources help you continue learning new skills and stay connected with the broader Google developer community.

1. Your 30-days access to these Google Cloud training courses at no cost starts when you enroll for your courses. These offers are valid until May 31, 2020. After your 30-days, you will incur charges on Pluralsight; for Qwiklabs, you will need to purchase credits to continue taking labs.

Google Meet is here to host your video meetings, for free

When I joined Google last year to lead G Suite, I couldn’t have imagined how the world was about to change. But in a few short months, working together took on a whole new meaning, and meetings became about so much more than getting things done. From doctor check-up meetings, to meetings with financial advisors, to study meetings, workout meetings, and birthday meetings. They may not look or feel like traditional meetings, but they’re the most important meetings happening right now.

That’s why we’ve re-engineered Google Meet, originally built for secure business meetings, to make it free and available to all. Since making Meet's advanced features free for all G Suite and G Suite for Education users in March, we've seen daily usage grow by 30x, with Meet hosting 3 billion minutes of video meetings daily. Last month, we were adding roughly 3 million new users every day. That's why we're expanding the offering to more people around the world.

Now that the rollout we announced two weeks ago is complete, anyone with an email address can sign up and get started at meet.google.com, for free. And to make meetings even more accessible and helpful, in the coming days you’ll also be able to use Meet directly in Gmail.

Click “Start a meeting" and a new window opens with a unique, secure meeting for you to join and then share with others. You can also easily join meetings shared with you by entering a meeting code. And you can plan video meetings and invite others directly from Google Calendar.

Because video meetings have never been more important, we’ve been fast-tracking the most requested features for Meet, and are now making them available to all. Anyone can use Meet’s simple scheduling and screen sharing, real-time captions, and layouts that adapt to your preference, including an expanded tiled view—all built on Google’s secure, reliable global infrastructure. Speaking from my own experience, the new features in Meet are already making our team (and my family) meetings better. We love how tiled view makes us feel more connected—and the occasional surprise visits from kids and family pets! 

And we’re continuing to look for ways to make Google Meet more accessible and useful. For example, we know video meetings can be challenging to follow for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, which is why we made sure AI-powered automatic live captioning was available to everyone. One of the most meaningful emails I’ve received was from a parent whose child was able to feel more included thanks to live captioning. Google AI has also made it possible to provide helpful features like low-light mode, which can automatically adjust your video to make you more visible to others.

Meet is available for free for everyone at meet.google.com and on iOS or Android. If you have an existing Google Account (for example, if you’re a @gmail.com user), you can sign in at meet.google.com to get started. If you don’t have a free Google Account, it only takes a minute to create one using your work or personal email address of choice (we require this step as a security measure, and you’ll only need to do this once). Or look for Meet right in Gmail.  

We hope Meet will help you connect to all your important meetings—from work meetings, to graduation meetings, to wedding meetings, and everything in between.

Source: Gmail Blog


Google Meet is here to host your video meetings, for free

When I joined Google last year to lead G Suite, I couldn’t have imagined how the world was about to change. But in a few short months, working together took on a whole new meaning, and meetings became about so much more than getting things done. From doctor check-up meetings, to meetings with financial advisors, to study meetings, workout meetings, and birthday meetings. They may not look or feel like traditional meetings, but they’re the most important meetings happening right now.

That’s why we’ve re-engineered Google Meet, originally built for secure business meetings, to make it free and available to all. Since making Meet's advanced features free for all G Suite and G Suite for Education users in March, we've seen daily usage grow by 30x, with Meet hosting 3 billion minutes of video meetings daily. Last month, we were adding roughly 3 million new users every day. That's why we're expanding the offering to more people around the world.

Now that the rollout we announced two weeks ago is complete, anyone with an email address can sign up and get started at meet.google.com, for free. And to make meetings even more accessible and helpful, in the coming days you’ll also be able to use Meet directly in Gmail.

Click “Start a meeting" and a new window opens with a unique, secure meeting for you to join and then share with others. You can also easily join meetings shared with you by entering a meeting code. And you can plan video meetings and invite others directly from Google Calendar.

Because video meetings have never been more important, we’ve been fast-tracking the most requested features for Meet, and are now making them available to all. Anyone can use Meet’s simple scheduling and screen sharing, real-time captions, and layouts that adapt to your preference, including an expanded tiled view—all built on Google’s secure, reliable global infrastructure. Speaking from my own experience, the new features in Meet are already making our team (and my family) meetings better. We love how tiled view makes us feel more connected—and the occasional surprise visits from kids and family pets! 

And we’re continuing to look for ways to make Google Meet more accessible and useful. For example, we know video meetings can be challenging to follow for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, which is why we made sure AI-powered automatic live captioning was available to everyone. One of the most meaningful emails I’ve received was from a parent whose child was able to feel more included thanks to live captioning. Google AI has also made it possible to provide helpful features like low-light mode, which can automatically adjust your video to make you more visible to others.

Meet is available for free for everyone at meet.google.com and on iOS or Android. If you have an existing Google Account (for example, if you’re a @gmail.com user), you can sign in at meet.google.com to get started. If you don’t have a free Google Account, it only takes a minute to create one using your work or personal email address of choice (we require this step as a security measure, and you’ll only need to do this once). Or look for Meet right in Gmail.  

We hope Meet will help you connect to all your important meetings—from work meetings, to graduation meetings, to wedding meetings, and everything in between.

Source: Gmail Blog