Tag Archives: Google+

Local students team up to help small businesses go online

Posted by Erica Hanson, Global Program Manager, Google Developer Student Clubs

Recently young developers in Saudi Arabia from Google Developer Student Clubs, a program of university based community groups for students interested in Google technologies, came together to help local small businesses. As more companies across the globe rely on online sales, these students noticed that many of their favorite local stores did not have a presence on the web.

So to help these local shops compete, these up-and-coming developers went into the community and began running workshops to teach local store owners the basics of building a website. Inspired by Google’s fundamentals of digital marketing course, these learning sessions focused on giving small business owners basic front-end skills, while introducing them to easy to use coding tools.

Front-end skills for small business owners

Image of Chrome Devtools

The first goal of these student-run workshops was to teach local store owners the basics of building web interfaces. In particular, they focused on websites that made it easy for customers to make purchases. To do this, the students first taught store owners the basics of HTML, CSS, and JS code. Then, they showed them how to deploy Chrome DevTools, a collection of web developer tools built directly into the Google Chrome browser that allows programmers to inspect and edit HTML, CSS, and JS code to optimize user experience.

Next, the students challenged participants to put their knowledge to use by creating demos of their businesses' new websites. The young developers again used Chrome DevTools to highlight the best practices for testing the demo sites on different devices and screen sizes.

Introduction to coding toolkits

Image of demo created and maintained in workshop.

With the basics of HTML, CSS, JS code, and Chrome DevTools covered, the students also wanted to give the store owners tools to help maintain their new websites. To do this, they introduced the small businesses to three toolkits:

  1. Bootstrap, to help templatize future workflow for the websites.
  2. Codepen, to make testing new features and aspects of the websites easier.
  3. Figma, to assist in the development of initial mockups.

With these basic coding skills, access to intuitive toolkits, and completed website demos, the local businesses owners now had everything they needed to launch their sites to the public - all thanks to a few dedicated students.

Ready to join a Google Developer Student Club near you?

All over the world, students are coming together to learn programming and make a difference in their community as members of local Google Developer Student Clubs. Learn more on how to get involved in projects like this one, here.

Local students team up to help small businesses go online

Posted by Erica Hanson, Global Program Manager, Google Developer Student Clubs

Recently young developers in Saudi Arabia from Google Developer Student Clubs, a program of university based community groups for students interested in Google technologies, came together to help local small businesses. As more companies across the globe rely on online sales, these students noticed that many of their favorite local stores did not have a presence on the web.

So to help these local shops compete, these up-and-coming developers went into the community and began running workshops to teach local store owners the basics of building a website. Inspired by Google’s fundamentals of digital marketing course, these learning sessions focused on giving small business owners basic front-end skills, while introducing them to easy to use coding tools.

Front-end skills for small business owners

Image of Chrome Devtools

The first goal of these student-run workshops was to teach local store owners the basics of building web interfaces. In particular, they focused on websites that made it easy for customers to make purchases. To do this, the students first taught store owners the basics of HTML, CSS, and JS code. Then, they showed them how to deploy Chrome DevTools, a collection of web developer tools built directly into the Google Chrome browser that allows programmers to inspect and edit HTML, CSS, and JS code to optimize user experience.

Next, the students challenged participants to put their knowledge to use by creating demos of their businesses' new websites. The young developers again used Chrome DevTools to highlight the best practices for testing the demo sites on different devices and screen sizes.

Introduction to coding toolkits

Image of demo created and maintained in workshop.

With the basics of HTML, CSS, JS code, and Chrome DevTools covered, the students also wanted to give the store owners tools to help maintain their new websites. To do this, they introduced the small businesses to three toolkits:

  1. Bootstrap, to help templatize future workflow for the websites.
  2. Codepen, to make testing new features and aspects of the websites easier.
  3. Figma, to assist in the development of initial mockups.

With these basic coding skills, access to intuitive toolkits, and completed website demos, the local businesses owners now had everything they needed to launch their sites to the public - all thanks to a few dedicated students.

Ready to join a Google Developer Student Club near you?

All over the world, students are coming together to learn programming and make a difference in their community as members of local Google Developer Student Clubs. Learn more on how to get involved in projects like this one, here.

Google and Debian work together to make COVID-19 researchers’ lives easier

Posted by Joe Hicks, Yun Peng, Olek Wojnar

debian logo

Google and Debian work together to make COVID-19 researchers’ lives easier

  • Bazel is now available as an easy to install package distributed on Debian and Ubuntu.
  • Tensorflow packaging for Debian is progressing.

Olek Wojnar, Debian Developer, reached out to the Bazel team about packaging and distributing Bazel on Debian (and other Linux distributions such as Ubuntu) in service of delivering Tensorflow Machine Learning functionality for COVID-19 researchers:

“I'm working with the Debian Med team right now to get some much-needed software packaged and available for users in the medical community to help with the COVID-19 pandemic. At least one of the packages we desperately need requires Bazel to build. Clearly this is an unusual and very critical situation. I don't think it's an exaggeration to say that lives may literally depend on us getting better tools to the medical professionals out there, and quickly. The entire international community would be extraordinarily grateful if @google and the @bazelbuild team could prioritize helping with this!”

The Bazel team jumped in to help Olek and the COVID-19 research community. Yun Peng, Software Engineer at Google with Olek Wojnar led the team of Bazel and Debian volunteers to move the project forward. The joint effort between Debian and Google has produced some great results, including packaging the Bazel bootstrap variant in 6 months time (Debian 11 -- released in Late 2021; Ubuntu 21.04 -- 22 April 2021). Bazel is now available as an easy to install package distributed on Debian and Ubuntu. The extended Google team continues to work with Debian towards the next step of packaging and distributing Tensorflow on Debian and other Linux distributions.

In addition to Yun and Olek, other contributors to this project include Michael R. Crusoe of Debian, Joe Hicks, John Field, Philipp Wollermann, and Tobias Werth of Google.

Solving for the Indian Public Sector with Google Cloud


At Google Cloud, our mission is to help enterprises digitally transform so they can better serve their customers, empower their employees, and build what’s next for their businesses. Businesses depend on Google Cloud to stay connected and get work done. No matter where they are on their cloud journey, we strive to accelerate every organisation’s ability to transform through data-powered innovation with leading infrastructure, industry solutions, and expertise. 

Today, many of the largest organisations in India trust Google Cloud, including Wipro, Sharechat,, TVS ASL, ICICI Prudential, Nobroker.com, Cleartrip and many others. We are also gearing up to launch our GCP region in Delhi this year, which will be our second cloud region in India since our technical infrastructure in Mumbai was launched in 2017. 

The next phase of our commitment to customers in India sees us working to deliver on the needs of public sector organisations. And so it gives me great pleasure to announce our achieving a full Cloud Service Provider (CSP) empanelment, successfully completing the STQC (Standardisation Testing and Quality Certification) audit from the Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (MeitY). This empanelment will enable the Indian Public Sector to deploy on Google Cloud, including government agencies at the Central and state level, and PSUs across sectors like Power, BFSI, Transportation, Oil & Gas, Public Finance, etc.

Google Cloud is designed, built, and operated with security at its core. Government and Enterprises want to work with us because we’re focused on the best service and technologynot because they don’t have choice or agility. As we continue to invest in further evolving our infrastructure and expanding our reach into regulated industries; public sector organisations in India can now leverage the power of the cloud to accelerate digital services and to drive innovation.

-Bikram SIngh Bedi, Managing Director, Google Cloud India


Google Summer of Code 2021 is open for mentor organization applications!

GSoC logo
With the new year comes the start of our 17th edition of Google Summer of Code (GSoC)! Right now open source projects and organizations can apply to participate as mentoring organizations for the students in the 2021 program. GSoC is a global program that draws student developers (18 years old and over) from around the world to contribute to open source projects. This year, from June 7th to August 16th, each student will spend 10 weeks working on a coding project with the support of volunteer mentors from participating open source organizations.

Does your open source project want to learn more about becoming a mentoring organization? Visit the program site and read the mentor guide to learn about what it means to be a mentor organization, how to prepare your community (hint: have plenty of enthusiastic mentors!), creating appropriate project ideas (that will be ~175 hour projects for the student), and tips for preparing your application.

We welcome all types of organizations and are very eager to involve first-time organizations with a 2021 goal of accepting 40 new orgs. We encourage veteran organizations to refer other organizations they think would be a good fit to participate in GSoC as well.

Last year, 1,106 students completed the program under the guidance of over 2,000 mentors from 198 open source organizations. Many types of open source organizations are involved in GSoC, from small and medium sized open source organizations to larger, umbrella organizations with many sub-projects under them (Python Software Foundation, Apache Software Foundation, etc.). Some organizations are relatively young (less than 2 years old), while other organizations have been around for 20+ years.

You can apply to be a mentoring organization for GSoC starting today on the program site. The deadline to apply is February 19th at 19:00 UTC. We will publicly announce the organizations chosen for GSoC 2021 on March 9th.

Please visit the program site for more information on how to apply and review the detailed timeline of important deadlines. We also encourage you to check out the Mentor Guide and our short video on why open source projects want to be a part of the GSoC program.

Good luck to all open source mentoring organization applicants!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2021 is open for mentor organization applications!

GSoC logo
With the new year comes the start of our 17th edition of Google Summer of Code (GSoC)! Right now open source projects and organizations can apply to participate as mentoring organizations for the students in the 2021 program. GSoC is a global program that draws student developers (18 years old and over) from around the world to contribute to open source projects. This year, from June 7th to August 16th, each student will spend 10 weeks working on a coding project with the support of volunteer mentors from participating open source organizations.

Does your open source project want to learn more about becoming a mentoring organization? Visit the program site and read the mentor guide to learn about what it means to be a mentor organization, how to prepare your community (hint: have plenty of enthusiastic mentors!), creating appropriate project ideas (that will be ~175 hour projects for the student), and tips for preparing your application.

We welcome all types of organizations and are very eager to involve first-time organizations with a 2021 goal of accepting 40 new orgs. We encourage veteran organizations to refer other organizations they think would be a good fit to participate in GSoC as well.

Last year, 1,106 students completed the program under the guidance of over 2,000 mentors from 198 open source organizations. Many types of open source organizations are involved in GSoC, from small and medium sized open source organizations to larger, umbrella organizations with many sub-projects under them (Python Software Foundation, Apache Software Foundation, etc.). Some organizations are relatively young (less than 2 years old), while other organizations have been around for 20+ years.

You can apply to be a mentoring organization for GSoC starting today on the program site. The deadline to apply is February 19th at 19:00 UTC. We will publicly announce the organizations chosen for GSoC 2021 on March 9th.

Please visit the program site for more information on how to apply and review the detailed timeline of important deadlines. We also encourage you to check out the Mentor Guide and our short video on why open source projects want to be a part of the GSoC program.

Good luck to all open source mentoring organization applicants!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2021 is open for mentor organization applications!

GSoC logo
With the new year comes the start of our 17th edition of Google Summer of Code (GSoC)! Right now open source projects and organizations can apply to participate as mentoring organizations for the students in the 2021 program. GSoC is a global program that draws student developers (18 years old and over) from around the world to contribute to open source projects. This year, from June 7th to August 16th, each student will spend 10 weeks working on a coding project with the support of volunteer mentors from participating open source organizations.

Does your open source project want to learn more about becoming a mentoring organization? Visit the program site and read the mentor guide to learn about what it means to be a mentor organization, how to prepare your community (hint: have plenty of enthusiastic mentors!), creating appropriate project ideas (that will be ~175 hour projects for the student), and tips for preparing your application.

We welcome all types of organizations and are very eager to involve first-time organizations with a 2021 goal of accepting 40 new orgs. We encourage veteran organizations to refer other organizations they think would be a good fit to participate in GSoC as well.

Last year, 1,106 students completed the program under the guidance of over 2,000 mentors from 198 open source organizations. Many types of open source organizations are involved in GSoC, from small and medium sized open source organizations to larger, umbrella organizations with many sub-projects under them (Python Software Foundation, Apache Software Foundation, etc.). Some organizations are relatively young (less than 2 years old), while other organizations have been around for 20+ years.

You can apply to be a mentoring organization for GSoC starting today on the program site. The deadline to apply is February 19th at 19:00 UTC. We will publicly announce the organizations chosen for GSoC 2021 on March 9th.

Please visit the program site for more information on how to apply and review the detailed timeline of important deadlines. We also encourage you to check out the Mentor Guide and our short video on why open source projects want to be a part of the GSoC program.

Good luck to all open source mentoring organization applicants!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2021 is open for mentor organization applications!

GSoC logo
With the new year comes the start of our 17th edition of Google Summer of Code (GSoC)! Right now open source projects and organizations can apply to participate as mentoring organizations for the students in the 2021 program. GSoC is a global program that draws student developers (18 years old and over) from around the world to contribute to open source projects. This year, from June 7th to August 16th, each student will spend 10 weeks working on a coding project with the support of volunteer mentors from participating open source organizations.

Does your open source project want to learn more about becoming a mentoring organization? Visit the program site and read the mentor guide to learn about what it means to be a mentor organization, how to prepare your community (hint: have plenty of enthusiastic mentors!), creating appropriate project ideas (that will be ~175 hour projects for the student), and tips for preparing your application.

We welcome all types of organizations and are very eager to involve first-time organizations with a 2021 goal of accepting 40 new orgs. We encourage veteran organizations to refer other organizations they think would be a good fit to participate in GSoC as well.

Last year, 1,106 students completed the program under the guidance of over 2,000 mentors from 198 open source organizations. Many types of open source organizations are involved in GSoC, from small and medium sized open source organizations to larger, umbrella organizations with many sub-projects under them (Python Software Foundation, Apache Software Foundation, etc.). Some organizations are relatively young (less than 2 years old), while other organizations have been around for 20+ years.

You can apply to be a mentoring organization for GSoC starting today on the program site. The deadline to apply is February 19th at 19:00 UTC. We will publicly announce the organizations chosen for GSoC 2021 on March 9th.

Please visit the program site for more information on how to apply and review the detailed timeline of important deadlines. We also encourage you to check out the Mentor Guide and our short video on why open source projects want to be a part of the GSoC program.

Good luck to all open source mentoring organization applicants!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Community leaders upskill themselves and find new roles with Elevate by Google Developers

Posted by Kübra Zengin, GDG North America Regional Lead

Image of participants in a recent Elevate workshop.

The North America Developer Ecosystem team recently hosted Elevate for Google Developer Groups organizers and Women Techmakers Ambassadors in US & Canada. The three-month professional development program met every Wednesday via Google Meet to help tech professionals upskill themselves with workshops on leadership, communication, thinking, and teamwork.

The first cohort of the seminar-style program recently came to a close, with 40+ Google Developer Groups organizers and Women Techmakers Ambassadors participating. Additionally, 18 guest speakers - 89% of whom were underrepresented genders - hosted specialized learning sessions over three months of events.

Elevate is just one example of the specialized applied skills training available to the Google Developer Groups community. As we look ahead to offering Elevate again in 2021, we wanted to share with you some of the key takeaways from the first installment of the program.

What the graduates had to say

From landing new roles at companies like Twitter and Accenture, to negotiating salary raises, the 40 graduates of Elevate have seen many successes. Here’s what a few of them had to say:

“I got a role at Accenture as a software engineer because I used the learnings from Elevate when applying and interviewing for the job. I can't thank the Google team enough!”

“The interactive workshops truly helped me land my new job at Twitter.”

“After the Elevate trainings on negotiation, I successfully secured a higher salary with my new employer.”

Whether it’s finding new jobs or moving to new countries, Elevate’s graduates have used their new skills to guide their careers towards their passions. Check out a few of the program’s key lessons below:

Bringing your best self to the table

One major focus of the program was to help community leaders develop their own professional identity and confidence by learning communication techniques that would help them stand out and define themselves in the workplace.

Entire learning sessions were dedicated to specific value-adding topics, including:

  • How to use persuasive body language;
  • Finding a networking, presenting, and storytelling voice;
  • The best practices for salary negotiation.

Along with other sessions on growth mindsets, problem solving, and more, attendees gained a deeper understanding of the best ways to present themselves, their ideas, and their worth in a professional setting - an essential ability that many feel has already helped them navigate job markets with more precision.

A team that feels valued brings value

“Who is on a team matters less than how the team members interact, structure their work, and view their contributions.”

The advice above, offered by a guest speaker during a teambuilding session, was one of the quotes that resonated with participants the most during the program. The emphasis on how coworkers think of each other and the best ways to build a culture of ownership over a team’s wins and losses embodies the key learnings central to Elevate’s mission.

The program further emphasized this message with learning sessions on:

  • Giving and accepting clear feedback;
  • Bias busting and empathy training in the workplace;
  • Conflict management and resolution.

With these trainings, paired with others on growth mindsets and decision making, Elevate’s participants were able to start analyzing the effectiveness of different work environments on productivity. Through breakout sessions, they quickly realized that the more secure and supported an employee feels, the more willing they are to go the extra mile for their team. Equipped with this new knowledge base, many participants have already started bringing these key takeaways to their own workplaces in an effort to build more inclusive and productive cultures.

Whether it’s finding a new role or improving your applied skills, we can’t wait to see how Google Developer programs can help members achieve their professional goals.

For similar opportunities, find out how to join a Google Developer Group near you, here. And register for upcoming applied skills trainings on the Elevate website, here.

Solve for the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals with Google technologies in this year’s Solution Challenge.

Posted by Erica Hanson, Global Program Manager, Google Developer Student Clubs

Solution Challenge image

Created by the United Nations in 2015 to be achieved by 2030, the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agreed upon by all 193 United Nations Member States aim to end poverty, ensure prosperity, and protect the planet.

Last year brought many challenges, but it also brought a greater spirit around helping each other and giving back to our communities. With that in mind, we invite students around the world to join the Google Developer Student Clubs 2021 Solution Challenge!

If you’re new to the Solution Challenge, it is an annual competition that invites university students to develop solutions for real world problems using one or more Google products or platforms.

This year, see how you can use Android, TensorFlow, Google Cloud, Flutter, or any of your favorite Google technologies to promote employment for all, economic growth, and climate action, by building a solution for one or more of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

What winners of the Solution Challenge receive

Participants will receive specialized prizes at different stages:

  1. The Top 50 teams will receive mentorship from Google and other experts to further work on their projects.
  2. The Top 10 finalists will receive a 1-year subscription to Pluralsight, swag, additional customized mentoring from Google, and a feature in the Google Developers Blog and Demo Day live on YouTube.
  3. The 3 Grand Prize Winners will receive all the prizes included in the Top 10 category along with a Chromebook and a private team meeting with a Google executive.

How to get started on the Solution Challenge

There are four main steps to joining the Solution Challenge and getting started on your project:

  1. Register at goo.gle/solutionchallenge and join a Google Developer Student Club at your college or university. If there is no club at your university, you can join the closest one through the event platform.
  2. Select one or more of the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals to solve for.
  3. Build a solution using Google technology.
  4. Create a demo and submit your project by March 31, 2021.

Resources from Google for Solution Challenge participants

Google will provide Solution Challenge participants with various resources to help students build strong projects for their contest submission.

  • Live online sessions with Q&As
  • Mentorship from Google, Google Developer Experts, and the Developer Student Club community
  • Curated codelabs designed by Google Developers
  • Access to Design Sprint guidelines developed by Google Ventures
  • and more!

When are winners announced?

Once all the projects are submitted after the March 31st deadline, judges will evaluate and score each submission from around the world using the criteria listed on the website. From there, winning solutions will be announced in three rounds.

Round 1 (May): The Top 50 teams will be announced.

Round 2 (July): After the top 50 teams submit their new and improved solutions, 10 finalists will be announced.

Round 3 (August): In the finale, the top 3 grand prize winners will be announced live on YouTube during the 2021 Solution Challenge Demo Day.

With a passion for building a better world, savvy coding skills, and a little help from Google, we can’t wait to see the solutions students create.

Learn more and sign up for the 2021 Solution Challenge, here.