Tag Archives: Chrome

Our commitments for the Privacy Sandbox

We all expect a more private and secure web. The Privacy Sandbox initiative aims to help build it by developing new digital advertising tools to protect people’s privacy and prevent covert tracking, while supporting a thriving ad-funded web. From the start of this project, we have been developing these tools in the open, and sought feedback at every step to ensure that they work for everyone, not just Google. As many publishers and advertisers rely on online advertising to fund their websites, getting this balance right is key to keeping the web open and accessible to everyone. 


So when the United Kingdom’s Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) announced its formal investigation of the Privacy Sandbox in January, we welcomed the opportunity to engage with a regulator with the mandate to promote competition for the benefit of consumers. 


This process has also recognized the importance of reconciling privacy and competition concerns. In a first-of-its-kind review involving converging regulatory authorities and expertise, the United Kingdom’s privacy regulator, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), is working collaboratively with, and providing direct input to, the CMA on Google’s approach.


Today we are offering a set of commitments — the result of many hours of discussions with the CMA and more generally with the broader web community — about how we’ll design and implement the Privacy Sandbox proposals and treat user data in Google’s systems in the years ahead. The CMA is now asking others in the industry for feedback on these commitments as part of a public consultation, with a view to making them legally binding. If the CMA accepts these commitments, we will apply them globally. 


The commitments


Consultation and collaboration  

Throughout this process, we will engage the CMA and the industry in an open, constructive and continuous dialogue. This includes proactively informing both the CMA and the wider ecosystem of timelines, changes and tests during the development of the Privacy Sandbox proposals, building on our transparent approach to date. We will work with the CMA to resolve concerns and develop agreed parameters for the testing of new proposals, while the CMA will be getting direct input from the ICO.  


No data advantage for Google advertising products 

Google has always had policies and practices to safeguard the use of people’s data. And we have explicitly stated that once third-party cookies are phased out, we will not build alternate identifiers to track individuals as they browse across the web, nor will we use such identifiers in our products. 


Building on this principle, the commitments confirm that once third-party cookies are phased out, our ads products will not access synced Chrome browsing histories (or data from other user-facing Google products) in order to track users to target or measure ads on sites across the web. 


Further, our ads products will also not access synced Chrome browsing histories or publishers' Google Analytics accounts to track users for targeting and measuring ads on our own sites, such as Google Search. 


No self-preferencing

We will play by the same rules as everybody else because we believe in competition on the merits. Our commitments make clear that, as the Privacy Sandbox proposals are developed and implemented, that work will not give preferential treatment or advantage to Google’s advertising products or to Google’s own sites. 


What’s next

We appreciate the CMA’s thoughtful approach throughout the review and their engagement with the difficult trade-offs that this process inevitably involves. We also welcome feedback from the public consultation and will continue to engage with the CMA and with the industry on this important topic. We understand that our plans will be scrutinized, so we’ll also continue to engage with other regulators, industry partners and privacy experts as well. 


We believe that these kinds of investments in privacy will create more opportunity, not less. The Privacy Sandbox seeks a way forward that improves people’s privacy online while ensuring that advertisers and publishers of all sizes can continue to succeed.


Source: Google Chrome


More ways we’re making every day safer with Google

Every day, we focus on making sure you’re in control of your data by building products that are secure by default and private by design. At this year’s I/O, we’re introducing new features and technologies to keep you safer with Google


Putting you in control of your data 


Privacy is personal. That's why we make it easy for you to choose the settings that are right for you — whether that’s one place to manage settings in your Google Account, Auto-Delete options, or controls that appear in context when you’re using our products. We announced a number of new controls today: 


  • Quick delete in Search. We’re introducing a new, “quick delete” option to delete the last 15 minutes of your Search history with a single tap from the Google Account Menu. 

  • A passcode protected Locked Folder in Photos. Have you ever handed your phone to show someone a photo, but worried they might scroll to a personal or sensitive image — like a photo of your passport or a surprise gift? “Locked Folder” is a new feature in Google Photos —  a passcode-protected space where select photos can be saved separately. These photos won’t show up as you scroll through your grid or in shared albums. This feature is coming to Google Pixels first, and more Android devices throughout the year.

  • Location History reminders in your Maps Timeline. Now, when you see places you've visited in your Timeline, we'll remind you that it's because you turned on Location History — which you can easily turn off right there in your Timeline. 

1. New “quick delete” option in Search.  2. The new Locked Folder in Photos. 3. Location History reminders in your Maps Timeline. 


We’re also introducing new, industry-leading transparency and permission features on Android 12. The new OS includes a Privacy Dashboard where you will see a timeline of when apps accessed your camera, microphone, or device location. We’ve also added indicators that show when your camera or microphone are in use, as well as easy toggles to disable access to both across your device. And you can now choose to share your approximate location with an app instead of a precise one.  


Building products that are secure by default


As recent high-profile third-party security incidents show, your information isn’t private if it’s not secure. With AI-driven technologies that protect billions of users around the world, our products are secure by default: every day, we block 100 million phishing attempts and 15 billion spam messages in Gmail and encrypt 4 billion photos. And Safe Browsing on Chrome and most other browsers helps keep the rest of the Internet secure, automatically protecting more than 4 billion devices.


One of the biggest security risks is still the continued reliance on passwords — they’re often easy to crack, used across multiple sites, or stolen in phishing attacks. That’s why we’ve been working towards a password-free future — focusing on safer ways to authenticate your identity and building multiple layers of protection into your Google Account, like automatic enrollment in 2-step verification


But because passwords are still required for most online accounts, we’ve also continued to improve our Password Manager, built directly into Chrome, Android and now iOS, to help you create, remember, save and auto-fill passwords across the web. Today, we announced new enhancements to Password Manager:

  • A new tool that makes it easy to import passwords from other password managers

  • Deeper integrations with Chrome and Android to seamlessly fill your passwords across sites and apps, regardless of whether you’re on desktop or on mobile 

  • Password Alerts that automatically warn you if we detect one of your saved passwords has been compromised via a third party breach.

  • A smart way to fix compromised passwords in Chrome with a simple tap. For supported sites and apps, whenever Password Manager finds a password that may have been compromised, you’ll see a "change password" button from Assistant. When you tap the button, the Assistant will not only navigate to the site, but also go through the entire process of changing your password. This feature is available on Android devices and will be rolling out to more sites and apps in the future.


1. A new way to fix compromised passwords in Chrome. 2. A new tool to import passwords from other password managers to Password Manager. 3. Password Alerts. 


Making our products private by design


We’ve pioneered new computing technologies like Federated Learning (invented by Google researchers in 2016) that make it possible to deliver helpful experiences while protecting individual data and privacy. We’ve also led on Differential Privacy, which powers some of our most helpful features and products, from our COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports to traffic predictions in Maps, without revealing individual user data. And this expertise guides our work on broader industry initiatives, like the open-source Privacy Sandbox


Now, we’re continuing that work with Android's Private Compute Core, which keeps your information safe and private for a number of popular AI-driven features like Live Caption (which displays captions based on audio), Now Playing (which tells you the song that’s playing) and Smart Reply (which suggests short responses to messages and emails). For these features, the audio and language processing happens exclusively on your device. Like the rest of Android, Private Compute Core is open source — it’s fully inspectable and verifiable by the security community. 


We’ll continue our work to make every day safer with Google with new controls, advanced security, and privacy-preserving technologies.


Posted by Jen Fitzpatrick, SVP, Core


Fix your passwords in Chrome with a single tap

Memorizing passwords is hard. That's why many of us use the same password across multiple sites. But this practice poses a huge risk, since it only takes one password breach to expose your account data from many different sites.

Not only that: changing passwords is itself a tedious task. You have to navigate to the site, sign in, find the account settings, open the password page — and then save it. Rinse and repeat on all your favorite sites, and that's a lot of work.

The good news is that Chrome comes with a strong password manager built-in. It's been checking the safety of your passwords for a while now. And starting today, whenever Chrome detects a breach, it can also fix any compromised passwords quickly, and safely.

Warning you about stolen passwords — and fixing them, too

Going forward, Chrome will help you change your passwords with a single tap. On supported sites, whenever you check your passwords and Chrome finds a password that may have been compromised, you will see a "Change password" button from Assistant. When you tap the button, Chrome will not only navigate to the site, but also go through the entire process of changing your password.  

Animation showing how Chrome will help you change stolen passwords automatically.

Going forward, Chrome will help you change compromised passwords automatically.

Importantly, you can control the entire experience and choose to go through the change password process manually from the start, or at any point during the process. And even if a site isn’t supported yet, Chrome’s password manager can always help you create strong and unique passwords for your various accounts.

Building on Duplex on the Web technology

Under the hood, Chrome is using Duplex on the Web to power this feature. We first introduced this technology in 2019 so that  Google Assistant could help you complete tasks on the web, like buying movie tickets. Since then, we’ve expanded to even more tasks, now helping millions of people every week order food and check in to flights. Powered by Duplex on the Web, Assistant takes over the tedious parts of web browsing: scrolling, clicking and filling forms, and allows you to focus on what’s important to you. And now we’re expanding these capabilities even further by letting you quickly create a strong password for certain sites and apps when Chrome determines your credentials have been leaked online. 

Expanding to more sites and apps soon

Automated password changes are rolling out gradually in Chrome on Android, to users who sync their passwords. It's starting in the U.S., and will become available on more sites and more countries in the coming months. 

Hallo from Munich 

Password generation, password leak checks, automated password changes and many more safety features were developed at the Google Safety Engineering Center (GSEC), a hub of privacy and security product experts and engineers based in Munich, which opened in 2019. GSEC is home to the engineering teams who work to deliver the safest personal browser experience to everyone, and we look forward to bringing more new features to strengthen the privacy and security of Chrome in 2021. 

Fix your passwords in Chrome with a single tap

Memorizing passwords is hard. That's why many of us use the same password across multiple sites. But this practice poses a huge risk, since it only takes one password breach to expose your account data from many different sites.

Not only that: changing passwords is itself a tedious task. You have to navigate to the site, sign in, find the account settings, open the password page — and then save it. Rinse and repeat on all your favorite sites, and that's a lot of work.

The good news is that Chrome comes with a strong password manager built-in. It's been checking the safety of your passwords for a while now. And starting today, whenever Chrome detects a breach, it can also fix any compromised passwords quickly, and safely.

Warning you about stolen passwords — and fixing them, too

Going forward, Chrome will help you change your passwords with a single tap. On supported sites, whenever you check your passwords and Chrome finds a password that may have been compromised, you will see a "Change password" button from Assistant. When you tap the button, Chrome will not only navigate to the site, but also go through the entire process of changing your password.  

Animation showing how Chrome will help you change stolen passwords automatically.

Going forward, Chrome will help you change compromised passwords automatically.

Importantly, you can control the entire experience and choose to go through the change password process manually from the start, or at any point during the process. And even if a site isn’t supported yet, Chrome’s password manager can always help you create strong and unique passwords for your various accounts.

Building on Duplex on the Web technology

Under the hood, Chrome is using Duplex on the Web to power this feature. We first introduced this technology in 2019 so that  Google Assistant could help you complete tasks on the web, like buying movie tickets. Since then, we’ve expanded to even more tasks, now helping millions of people every week order food and check in to flights. Powered by Duplex on the Web, Assistant takes over the tedious parts of web browsing: scrolling, clicking and filling forms, and allows you to focus on what’s important to you. And now we’re expanding these capabilities even further by letting you quickly create a strong password for certain sites and apps when Chrome determines your credentials have been leaked online. 

Expanding to more sites and apps soon

Automated password changes are rolling out gradually in Chrome on Android, to users who sync their passwords. It's starting in the U.S., and will become available on more sites and more countries in the coming months. 

Hallo from Munich 

Password generation, password leak checks, automated password changes and many more safety features were developed at the Google Safety Engineering Center (GSEC), a hub of privacy and security product experts and engineers based in Munich, which opened in 2019. GSEC is home to the engineering teams who work to deliver the safest personal browser experience to everyone, and we look forward to bringing more new features to strengthen the privacy and security of Chrome in 2021. 

A more helpful Chrome, throughout your workday

Lately, my productivity has been up and down, following the curves of the pandemic and the seasons. But where I live, spring is here 🌷. And, in addition to spending more time in my garden, I’m finally zeroing in on how I can be more productive working from home. Here’s how I use some new Chrome features to get work and life done throughout my day. Check them out for your own productivity boost.


Link to your highlighted text

As a product manager for Chrome, I often read research studies, articles and even tweets about how people use their browsers. Yesterday, I read a long article with an interesting data point I wanted to share with a colleague. Instead of copying the link from the address bar, I used Chrome’s new “link to highlight” feature by highlighting the text I want to share, right-clicking, choosing “Copy link to highlight” and then sending the link. When my coworker opened the link, he saw the exact section of text I wanted him to see 🙌. This feature is rolling out now to desktop and Android and is coming soon for iOS. 

With “Copy link to highlight”, you can share a URL for selected text highlighted for the recipient.

With “Copy link to highlight”, you can share a URL for selected text highlighted for the recipient.

New PDF features

During lunch, I decided to double-check a PDF for a presentation to my volunteer group. So, I took the opportunity to test drive the new PDF reader features my team and I just released, building on last year’s work to fill out and save PDF forms.


When I opened the PDF, I used the new sidebar to browse the thumbnails and quickly jump to the specific page I wanted to check. To practice for later, I turned on the new presentation mode, removing the on-screen distractions (toolbars, address bar, tabs), so my presentation will be focused and so will my audience.


We added more features to make working with PDFs better: document properties, two-page view and an updated top toolbar, which puts the most important PDF actions (zoom, jump to page, save, print and more) within a single click. These features are rolling out now.

New features on Chrome’s PDF reader: Check out the new top toolbar, side toolbar and overflow menu.

New features on Chrome’s PDF reader: Check out the new top toolbar, side toolbar and overflow menu.

Mute notifications when presenting 

Later in the day, I had a few meetings back to back. First up was a team meeting where I presented the latest designs for an upcoming feature. Luckily now, when presenting or sharing Chrome windows, Chrome mutes all notifications, so there’ll be less distraction. When done, they unmute. This new feature makes me laugh out loud, because it brings back a memory from years ago when I was presenting and a news notification for “Cougar Sighting on Campus!” leapt onto my screen and completely distracted me and the audience. True story!


Performance matters

Later, I moved to the patio to enjoy the sun, check my plants for aphids and finish up some remaining bits of work.


Sitting in my patio chair, using battery power, Chrome is still zipping right along with my tasks and I work longer without feeling my laptop get too hot. This is because recent performance improvements have decreased Chrome CPU usage, which often means more battery life, less fan noise and less heat. Chrome now reclaims up to 100MB per tab, which is more than 20% on some popular sites. 


Getting a bit nerdy with some new data: for Mac, we’re seeing up to 65% improvement in Energy Impact when activetabs are prioritized over tabs you aren’t using. This means up to 35% reduction in CPU usage and up to 1.25 more hours of battery life, with similar results on Windows, Chrome OS and Linux. And on Android, Chrome starts up 13% faster even with lots of tabs open.


Last but not least, we’re soon launching tab freezing for collapsed groups. This means when groups are collapsed (and tabs are hidden), the tabs inside use less memory and CPU, making your computer quicker. And right now, I have 11 groups collapsed with 64 tabs inside, so that’s awesome 💯. This feature is coming soon to beta.


If you want to learn more about our work to improve Chrome's performance, check out our series, The Fast and the Curious, on the Chromium blog.
When you collapse tab groups, Chrome will automatically freeze the tabs so they use less memory and CPU.

When you collapse tab groups, Chrome will automatically freeze the tabs so they use less memory and GPU.

Name your windows 

To set myself up for success the next day, my final work task was to organize my tabs and windows. I used tab search (now rolling out to all desktop platforms) to find and close tabs, tab groups to organize projects and then (drum roll please) I used window naming. I right-clicked on an empty spot in the tab strip and named each of my windows. With custom windows names, when you press alt+tab to switch windows or right-click on a tab and select “Move to another window” it’s easier to distinguish between open windows and you can find what you're looking for faster. This feature is rolling out now.
With custom window names, it’s easier to distinguish between your open Chrome windows.

With custom window names, it’s easier to distinguish between your open Chrome windows.

I hope these new Chrome features add productivity to your day and a spring to your step, like they do mine.

Experiment with AR and VR made for the web

Augmented and virtual reality are opening up the possibilities of how we interact with the world and information around us. WebXR brings together AR and VR on the web to make them more convenient and widely accessible.

Today on the Experiments with Google platform, we’re launching the new WebXR collection to showcase what is possible with this technology — from helpful utilities to get things done, to playful and immersive experiences:

From left to right: Sodar, Measure Up, Floom and Picturescape

Sodar helps to visualize social distancing. By activating a personal augmented reality radar from your browser, you can see what six feet (or two meters) looks like in any environment.

With Measure Up, you can calculate the length, area and volume of the things around you without using a tape measure. 

Floom is a fun new way to explore the planet, built with WebXR and Google Maps. Open your browser to tunnel through the earth and see what’s on the other side.

And coming soon, Picturescape turns your Google Photos library into an immersive gallery so you can explore your memories in augmented reality.

All you need to try these experiments is a supported Android device and the latest Chrome browser.

Check them out now and submit your own at g.co/webXR.

Source: Google Chrome


Privacy, sustainability and the importance of “and”

When other browsers started blocking third-party cookies by default, we were excited about the direction, but worried about the immediate impact. Excited because we absolutely need a more private web, and we know third-party cookies aren't the long-term answer. Worried because today many publishers rely on cookie-based advertising to support their content efforts, and we had seen that cookie blocking was already spawning privacy-invasive workarounds (such as fingerprinting) that were even worse for user privacy. Overall, we felt that blocking third-party cookies outright without viable alternatives for the ecosystem was irresponsible, and even harmful, to the free and open web we all enjoy. 

Since 2019, we’ve been working on a collaborative open-source effort — the Privacy Sandbox — to develop a set of new privacy-preserving technologies that make third-party cookies obsolete and enable publishers to keep growing their businesses and keep the web sustainable, with universal access to content. It’s a polarity to balance, but one we think is critical to keep the web open, accessible and thriving for everyone.

Today, a new piece of web technology — Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) — will start to roll out as a developer origin trial in Chrome. Keeping in mind the importance of “and,” FLoC is a new approach to interest-based advertising that both improves privacy and gives publishers a tool they need for viable advertising business models. FLoC is still in development and we expect it to evolve based on input from the web community and learnings from this initial trial.

Here’s a bit more information on how FLoC currently protects your privacy:

  • You’re part of a crowd.FLoC allows you to remain anonymous as you browse across websites and also improves privacy by allowing publishers to present relevant ads to large groups (called cohorts). Cohorts are defined by similarities in browsing history, but they’re not based on who you are individually. In fact, which cohort you are in frequently changes as your browsing history changes. Of course, when you want an individual experience, you can still sign into websites and share the personal information you choose.
  • FLoC doesn’t share your browsing history with Google or anyone. With FLoC, your browser determines which cohort corresponds most closely to your recent web browsing history, grouping you with thousands of other people who have similar browsing histories. The identification number of the cohort is the only thing provided when requested by a site. This is different from third-party cookies, which allow companies to follow you individually across different sites. FLoC works on your device without your browsing history being shared. Importantly, everyone in the ads ecosystem, including Google’s own advertising products, will have the same access to FLoC.
  • Chrome browser won’t create groups that it deems sensitive. Before a cohort becomes eligible, Chrome analyzes it to see if the cohort is visiting pages with sensitive topics, such as medical websites or websites with political or religious content, at a high rate. If so, Chrome ensures that the cohort isn’t used, without learning which sensitive topics users were interested in. We have created a detailed technical paper on how this works. And of course, sites can also opt out of FLoC, meaning the browser will not include visits to that site when determining a cohort.

The initial testing of FLoC is taking place with a small percentage of users in Australia, Brazil, Canada, India, Indonesia, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and the U.S. We’ll expand to other regions as the trial expands globally. If you’ve chosen to block third-party cookies with the current version of Chrome, you won’t be included in these origin trials. In April, we’ll introduce a control in Chrome Settings that you can use to opt out of inclusion in FLoC and other Privacy Sandbox proposals.

To help support this important milestone we’re also launching a new site, privacysandbox.com, dedicated to our Privacy Sandbox proposals where you can find an overview of this effort, FAQs on FLoC and links to additional resources, with more content to come over time. We’ll continue to share updates as we collaborate with the broader web ecosystem. And we welcome Privacy Sandbox contributions from publishers, ad tech companies, advertisers and developers.

Local students team up to help small businesses go online

Posted by Erica Hanson, Global Program Manager, Google Developer Student Clubs

Recently young developers in Saudi Arabia from Google Developer Student Clubs, a program of university based community groups for students interested in Google technologies, came together to help local small businesses. As more companies across the globe rely on online sales, these students noticed that many of their favorite local stores did not have a presence on the web.

So to help these local shops compete, these up-and-coming developers went into the community and began running workshops to teach local store owners the basics of building a website. Inspired by Google’s fundamentals of digital marketing course, these learning sessions focused on giving small business owners basic front-end skills, while introducing them to easy to use coding tools.

Front-end skills for small business owners

Image of Chrome Devtools

The first goal of these student-run workshops was to teach local store owners the basics of building web interfaces. In particular, they focused on websites that made it easy for customers to make purchases. To do this, the students first taught store owners the basics of HTML, CSS, and JS code. Then, they showed them how to deploy Chrome DevTools, a collection of web developer tools built directly into the Google Chrome browser that allows programmers to inspect and edit HTML, CSS, and JS code to optimize user experience.

Next, the students challenged participants to put their knowledge to use by creating demos of their businesses' new websites. The young developers again used Chrome DevTools to highlight the best practices for testing the demo sites on different devices and screen sizes.

Introduction to coding toolkits

Image of demo created and maintained in workshop.

With the basics of HTML, CSS, JS code, and Chrome DevTools covered, the students also wanted to give the store owners tools to help maintain their new websites. To do this, they introduced the small businesses to three toolkits:

  1. Bootstrap, to help templatize future workflow for the websites.
  2. Codepen, to make testing new features and aspects of the websites easier.
  3. Figma, to assist in the development of initial mockups.

With these basic coding skills, access to intuitive toolkits, and completed website demos, the local businesses owners now had everything they needed to launch their sites to the public - all thanks to a few dedicated students.

Ready to join a Google Developer Student Club near you?

All over the world, students are coming together to learn programming and make a difference in their community as members of local Google Developer Student Clubs. Learn more on how to get involved in projects like this one, here.

Local students team up to help small businesses go online

Posted by Erica Hanson, Global Program Manager, Google Developer Student Clubs

Recently young developers in Saudi Arabia from Google Developer Student Clubs, a program of university based community groups for students interested in Google technologies, came together to help local small businesses. As more companies across the globe rely on online sales, these students noticed that many of their favorite local stores did not have a presence on the web.

So to help these local shops compete, these up-and-coming developers went into the community and began running workshops to teach local store owners the basics of building a website. Inspired by Google’s fundamentals of digital marketing course, these learning sessions focused on giving small business owners basic front-end skills, while introducing them to easy to use coding tools.

Front-end skills for small business owners

Image of Chrome Devtools

The first goal of these student-run workshops was to teach local store owners the basics of building web interfaces. In particular, they focused on websites that made it easy for customers to make purchases. To do this, the students first taught store owners the basics of HTML, CSS, and JS code. Then, they showed them how to deploy Chrome DevTools, a collection of web developer tools built directly into the Google Chrome browser that allows programmers to inspect and edit HTML, CSS, and JS code to optimize user experience.

Next, the students challenged participants to put their knowledge to use by creating demos of their businesses' new websites. The young developers again used Chrome DevTools to highlight the best practices for testing the demo sites on different devices and screen sizes.

Introduction to coding toolkits

Image of demo created and maintained in workshop.

With the basics of HTML, CSS, JS code, and Chrome DevTools covered, the students also wanted to give the store owners tools to help maintain their new websites. To do this, they introduced the small businesses to three toolkits:

  1. Bootstrap, to help templatize future workflow for the websites.
  2. Codepen, to make testing new features and aspects of the websites easier.
  3. Figma, to assist in the development of initial mockups.

With these basic coding skills, access to intuitive toolkits, and completed website demos, the local businesses owners now had everything they needed to launch their sites to the public - all thanks to a few dedicated students.

Ready to join a Google Developer Student Club near you?

All over the world, students are coming together to learn programming and make a difference in their community as members of local Google Developer Student Clubs. Learn more on how to get involved in projects like this one, here.

Chrome can now caption audio and video

Captions make online content more accessible. If you’re in a noisy environment, trying to keep the volume down, or are part of the 466 million people in the world who are deaf or hard of hearing, having captions lets you follow along to whatever content you are watching — whether it’s viral feta pasta videos, breaking news or a scientist discussing their latest research. 


Unfortunately, captions aren’t always available for every piece of content. Now with Live Caption on Chrome, you can automatically generate real-time captions for media with audio on your browser. It works across social and video sites, podcasts and radio content, personal video libraries (such as Google Photos), embedded video players, and most web-based video or audio chat services.

Screen recording showing the steps to turn on Live Caption feature in Chrome followed by demonstration of the feature in use to add captions to a video of a dog
10:25

Turn on Live Caption in Chrome to see captions for media with audio played in your browser window

Laura D’Aquila, a software engineer on Google Workspace who is hard of hearing, tested out the feature early on. “With Live Caption, I no longer have to miss out on watching videos because of lack of captions, and I can engage in real-life conversations with family, friends or colleagues about this content. Just recently, my coworker sent a video to our team's chat, but it was not captioned. With Live Caption I was able to follow along and share my reactions to the video with my team.” 


These captions in Chrome are created on-device, which allows the captions to appear as the content plays without ever having to leave your computer. Live Caption also works offline, so you can even caption audio and video files saved on your hard drive when you play them in Chrome.  


To turn on Live Caption in Chrome from your desktop, go to Chrome Settings, click on the Advanced section, then go to the Accessibility section. The feature currently supports English and is available globally on the latest release of Chrome on Windows, Mac and Linux devices and will be coming soon to ChromeOS. For Android devices, Live Caption is already available for any audio or video on your mobile device.