Tag Archives: Announcements

These 27 organizations will mentor students in Google Code-in 2018

We’re excited to welcome 27 open source organizations to mentor students as part of Google Code-in 2018. The contest, now in its ninth year, offers 13-17 year old pre-university students from around the world an opportunity to learn and practice their skills while contributing to open source projects–all online!

Google Code-in starts for students on October 23rd. Students are encouraged to learn about the participating organizations ahead of time and can get started by clicking on the links below:
  • AOSSIE: Australian umbrella organization for open source projects.
  • Apertium: rule-based machine translation platform.
  • Catrobat: visual programming for creating mobile games and animations.
  • CCExtractor: open source tools for subtitle generation.
  • CloudCV: building platforms for reproducible AI research.
  • coala: a unified interface for linting and fixing code, regardless of the programming languages used.
  • Copyleft Games Group: develops tools, libraries, and game engines.
  • Digital Impact Alliance: collaborative space for multiple open source projects serving the international development and humanitarian response sectors.
  • Drupal: content management platform.
  • Fedora Project: a free and friendly Linux-based operating system.
  • FOSSASIA: developing communities across all ages and borders to form a better future with Open Technologies and ICT.
  • Haiku: operating system specifically targeting personal computing.
  • JBoss Community: a community of projects around JBoss Middleware.
  • KDE Community: produces FOSS by artists, designers, programmers, translators, writers and other contributors.
  • Liquid Galaxy: an interactive, panoramic and immersive visualization tool.
  • MetaBrainz: builds community maintained databases.
  • MovingBlocks: a Minecraft-inspired open source game.
  • OpenMRS: open source medical records system for the world.
  • OpenWISP: build and manage low cost networks such as public wifi.
  • OSGeo: building open source geospatial tools.
  • PostgreSQL: relational database system.
  • Public Lab: open software to help communities measure and analyze pollution.
  • RTEMS Project: operating system used in satellites, particle accelerators, robots, racing motorcycles, building controls, medical devices.
  • Sugar Labs: learning platform and activities for elementary education.
  • SCoRe: research lab seeking sustainable solutions for problems faced by developing countries.
  • The ns-3 Network Simulator Project: packet-level network simulator for research and education.
  • Wikimedia: non-profit foundation dedicated to bringing free content to the world, operating Wikipedia.
These 27 organizations are hard at work creating thousands of tasks for students to work on, including code, documentation, design, quality assurance, outreach, research and training tasks. The contest starts for students on Tuesday, October 23rd at 9:00am Pacific Time.

You can learn more about Google Code-in on the contest site where you’ll find Frequently Asked Questions, Important Dates and flyers and other helpful information including the Getting Started Guide.

Want to talk with other students, mentors, and organization administrations about the contest? Check out our discussion mailing list. We can’t wait to get started!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Code-in 2018 is looking for great open source organizations to apply

We are accepting applications for open source organizations interested in participating in Google Code-in 2018. Google Code-in (GCI) invites pre-university students ages 13-17 to learn by contributing to open source software.

Working with young students is a special responsibility and each year we hear inspiring stories from mentors who participate. To ensure these new, young contributors have a solid support system, we only select organizations that have gained experience in mentoring students by previously taking part in Google Summer of Code.

Organization applications are now open and all interested open source organizations must apply before Monday, September 17 at 16:00 UTC.

In 2017, 25 organizations were accepted – 9 of which were participating in GCI for the first time! Over the last 8 years, 8,108 students from 107 countries have completed more than 40,000 tasks for participating open source projects. Tasks fall into 5 categories:
  • Code: writing or refactoring.
  • Documentation/Training: creating/editing documents and helping others learn more.
  • Outreach/Research: community management, outreach/marketing, or studying problems and recommending solutions.
  • Quality Assurance: testing and ensuring code is of high quality.
  • Design: graphic design or user interface design.
Once an organization is selected for Google Code-in 2018 they will define these tasks and recruit mentors from their communities who are interested in providing online support for students during the seven week contest.

You can find a timeline, FAQ and other information about Google Code-in on our website. If you’re an educator interested in sharing Google Code-in with your students, you can find resources here.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Announcing Google Code-in 2018: nine is just fine!

We are excited to announce the 9th consecutive year of the Google Code-in (GCI) contest! Students ages 13 through 17 from around the world can learn about open source development by working on real open source projects, with mentorship from active developers. GCI begins on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 and runs for seven weeks, ending Wednesday, December 12, 2018.

Google Code-in is unique because, not only do the students choose what they want to work on from the 2,500+ tasks created by open source organizations, but they have mentors available to help answer their questions as they work on each of their tasks.

Getting started in open source software can be a daunting task for a developer of any age. What organization should I work with? How do I get started? Does the organization want my help? Am I too inexperienced?

The beauty of GCI is that participating open source organizations realize teens are often first time contributors, so the volunteer mentors come prepared with the patience and the experience to help these newcomers become part of the open source community.

Open source communities thrive when there is a steady flow of new contributors who bring new perspectives, ideas and enthusiasm. Over the last 8 years, GCI open source organizations have helped 8,108 students from 107 countries make meaningful contributions. Many of these students are still participating in open source communities years later. Dozens have gone on to become Google Summer of Code (GSoC) students and even mentor other students.

The tasks that contest participants will complete vary in skill set and level, including beginner tasks any student can take on, such as “setup your development environment.” With tasks in five different categories, there’s something to fit almost any student’s skills:
  • Code: writing or refactoring
  • Documentation/Training: creating/editing documents and helping others learn more
  • Outreach/Research: community management, marketing, or studying problems and recommending solutions
  • Quality Assurance: testing and ensuring code is of high quality
  • Design: graphic design or user interface design
Open source organizations can apply to participate as mentoring organizations for in Google Code-in starting on Thursday, September 6, 2018. Google Code-in starts for students October 23rd!

Visit the contest site g.co/gci to learn more about the contest and find flyers, slide decks, timelines, and more.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

That’s a wrap for Google Summer of Code 2018

We are pleased to announce that 1,072 students from 59 countries have successfully completed the 2018 Google Summer of Code (GSoC). Congratulations to all of our students and mentors who made this our biggest and best Google Summer of Code yet.

Over the past 12 weeks, GSoC students have worked diligently with 212 open source organizations and over 2,100 mentors from all around the world, learning to work with distributed teams and developing complex pieces of code. Student projects are now public – take a closer look at their work.

Open source communities need new ideas to keep projects thriving and evolving; GSoC students bring fresh perspectives while helping organizations enhance, extend, and refine their codebases. This is not the end of the road for GSoC students! Many will go on to become mentors in future years and many more will become long-term committers.

And finally, a big thank you to the mentors and organization administrators who make GSoC possible. Their dedication to welcoming new student contributors into their communities is awesome and inspiring. Thank you all!

By Mary Radomile, Google Open Source

Congratulations to the latest Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners

We are pleased to announce the latest round of Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners and the projects they support.

Open source software is a cornerstone of software development inside and outside of Google, and the Google Open Source Peer Bonus program is one way we thank the people who make our work possible. Twice a year we invite Googlers to nominate external contributors to be rewarded for their contribution to open source projects.

This time we have a truly international team of recipients from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, India, Italy, Ireland, France, Japan, Netherlands, Russia, Singapore, Switzerland, Sweden, UK and USA. You can learn about previous recipients in these blog posts.

Projects range from Linux distributions and version control systems to monitoring and testing software. Some are part of the backbone of our industry, others are critical dependencies of specific products and services we offer. All of them are important to us!

Listed below are the individuals who gave us permission to thank them publicly:

Name Project Name Project
Sultan AlsawafAndroid KernelRavi Santosh GudimetlaKubernetes
Allan McRaeArch LinuxSteve KuznetsovKubernetes
Seth Pollackaws-encryption-providerHisham MuhammadLuaRocks
George GensureBazel BuildfarmYutaka Matsubarameinheld
Omar CornutDear ImGuiPulkit GoyalMercurial
Alessandro ArzilliDelveYuya NishiharaMercurial
Matt KleinEnvoyAdam Mummery-SmithMixin
Ivan GrokhotkovESP8266 core for ArduinoArnout EngelenNotion
Esther OnfroyExodus PrivacyBrian BrazilPrometheus
Yao LiForkliftBruno Oliveirapytest
Warner LoshFreeBSDJames FriedmanRMWC
Elijah NewrenGitSteve KlabnikRust Book
Gábor SzederGitJack LukicSemantic UI
Alvaro Viebrantzgoogle-cloud-iot-arduinoVidar HolenShellCheck
Richard MusiolGopherJS, go-wasmIvan PopelyshevSkia graphics in Chrome
Tobias FuruholmGrafeasSpencer GibbSpring Cloud
David PursehouseJGitDaniel AlmSwift gRPC
Brian GrangerJupyterYong TangTensorFlow
Rodrigo MenezeskopsJason ZamanTensorFlow, Gentoo, SELinux
Rohith JayawardenekopsKai SasakiTensorFlow.js
Kam KasraviKubeflowManraj GroverTensorFlow.js
Pete MacKinnonKubeflowStefan WeilTesseract
Christoph BleckerKubernetesSumana HarihareswaraWarehouse (PyPI)
Davanum SrinivasKubernetesJia Lizone.js

Once again we would like to express our gratitude and appreciation to current and former recipients for their hard work, time and devotion to open source. Without you these projects wouldn’t thrive!

We look forward to your ongoing contributions and can’t wait to recognize even more contributors for their work in 2019.

By Maria Tabak, Google Open Source

Congratulations to the latest Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners

We are pleased to announce the latest round of Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners and the projects they support.

Open source software is a cornerstone of software development inside and outside of Google, and the Google Open Source Peer Bonus program is one way we thank the people who make our work possible. Twice a year we invite Googlers to nominate external contributors to be rewarded for their contribution to open source projects.

This time we have a truly international team of recipients from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, India, Italy, Ireland, France, Japan, Netherlands, Russia, Singapore, Switzerland, Sweden, UK and USA. You can learn about previous recipients in these blog posts.

Projects range from Linux distributions and version control systems to monitoring and testing software. Some are part of the backbone of our industry, others are critical dependencies of specific products and services we offer. All of them are important to us!

Listed below are the individuals who gave us permission to thank them publicly:

Name Project Name Project
Sultan AlsawafAndroid KernelRavi Santosh GudimetlaKubernetes
Allan McRaeArch LinuxSteve KuznetsovKubernetes
Seth Pollackaws-encryption-providerHisham MuhammadLuaRocks
George GensureBazel BuildfarmYutaka Matsubarameinheld
Omar CornutDear ImGuiPulkit GoyalMercurial
Alessandro ArzilliDelveYuya NishiharaMercurial
Matt KleinEnvoyAdam Mummery-SmithMixin
Ivan GrokhotkovESP8266 core for ArduinoArnout EngelenNotion
Esther OnfroyExodus PrivacyBrian BrazilPrometheus
Yao LiForkliftBruno Oliveirapytest
Warner LoshFreeBSDJames FriedmanRMWC
Elijah NewrenGitSteve KlabnikRust Book
Gábor SzederGitJack LukicSemantic UI
Alvaro Viebrantzgoogle-cloud-iot-arduinoVidar HolenShellCheck
Richard MusiolGopherJS, go-wasmIvan PopelyshevSkia graphics in Chrome
Tobias FuruholmGrafeasSpencer GibbSpring Cloud
David PursehouseJGitDaniel AlmSwift gRPC
Brian GrangerJupyterYong TangTensorFlow
Rodrigo MenezeskopsJason ZamanTensorFlow, Gentoo, SELinux
Rohith JayawardenekopsKai SasakiTensorFlow.js
Kam KasraviKubeflowManraj GroverTensorFlow.js
Pete MacKinnonKubeflowStefan WeilTesseract
Christoph BleckerKubernetesSumana HarihareswaraWarehouse (PyPI)
Davanum SrinivasKubernetesJia Lizone.js

Once again we would like to express our gratitude and appreciation to current and former recipients for their hard work, time and devotion to open source. Without you these projects wouldn’t thrive!

We look forward to your ongoing contributions and can’t wait to recognize even more contributors for their work in 2019.

By Maria Tabak, Google Open Source

OpenMetrics project accepted into CNCF Sandbox

For the past several months, engineers from Google Cloud, Prometheus, and other vendors have been aligning on OpenMetrics, a specification for metrics exposition. Today, the project was formally announced and accepted into the CNCF Sandbox, and we’re currently working on ways to support OpenMetrics in OpenCensus, a set of uniform tracing and stats libraries that work with multiple vendors’ services. This multi-vendor approach works to put architectural choices in the hands of developers.
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OpenMetrics stems from the stats formats used inside of Prometheus and Google’s Monarch time-series infrastructure, which underpins both Stackdriver and internal monitoring applications. As such, it is designed to be immediately familiar to developers and capable of operating at extreme scale. With additional contributions and review from AppOptics, Cortex, Datadog, InfluxData, Sysdig, and Uber, OpenMetrics has begun the cross-industry collaboration necessary to drive adoption of a new specification.

OpenCensus provides automatic instrumentation, APIs, and exporters for stats and distributed traces across C++, Java, Go, Node.js, Python, PHP, Ruby, and .Net. Each OpenCensus library allows developers to automatically capture distributed traces and key RPC-related statistics from their applications, add custom data, and export telemetry to their back-end of choice. Google has been a key collaborator in defining the OpenMetrics specification, and we’re now focusing on how to best implement this inside of OpenCensus.

“Google has a history of innovation in the metric monitoring space, from its early success with Borgmon, which has been continued in Monarch and Stackdriver. OpenMetrics embodies our understanding of what users need for simple, reliable and scalable monitoring, and shows our commitment to offering standards-based solutions,” said Sumeer Bhola, Lead Engineer on Monarch and Stackdriver at Google.

For more information about OpenMetrics, please visit openmetrics.io. For more information about OpenCensus and how you can quickly enable trace and metrics collection from your application, please visit opencensus.io.

By Morgan McLean, Product Manager for OpenCensus and Stackdriver APM

We’ve moved! Come see our new home!


Ten years, three months and 30 days ago, we wrote our first post on this blog, and now, we’re writing our last at this particular web address. Today, it’s with great excitement that we present to you the Google Cloud blog, your home for all the latest GCP product news, how-to’s, perspectives and customer stories that you’re used to, all living happily on a shiny, new mobile-friendly platform.

We’re really excited about this change. Not only does the new blog look really nice, but it includes all the content from across the entire Google Cloud family—GCP, G Suite, Google Maps Platform and Chrome Enterprise—so you can see how they all fit together. And because data analysis and artificial intelligence are so central to everything people are building today, we’ve also folded our Big Data and Machine Learning blog into this new platform.

Besides collecting all Google Cloud blog content in one place, we think you’ll really benefit from the blog’s rich tagging capabilities. Now, you can view blog posts by platform, and also drill down to specific technology areas like Application Development, Networking or Open Source, so you can quickly find related content. There are also dedicated pages for partners, customers, trainings and certifications, and solutions and how-to’s, to name a few. And because we can also tag posts to multiple products and topics, you’ll be sure to find what you’re looking for.

Those are just the high-level changes. There are a whole lot of new features to use and explore, and we encourage you to browse the site and get familiar with it. What’s not new is our mission: to provide you with honest, technical content to show you how to build your business on GCP.

To date, we’ve migrated over two year’s worth of GCP blog posts to this new home, with more to come. Let us know if you find any broken links, typos, or just flat-out missing content. And of course, we’d love your feedback on our content, the design, or any features you’d like to see. Thanks for reading!

Last month today: July on GCP

The month of July saw our Google Cloud Next ‘18 conference come and go, and there was plenty of exciting news, updates and demos to share from the show. Here’s a look at some of the most-read blog posts from July.

What caught your attention this month: Creating the open cloud
  • One of the most-read posts this month covered the launch of our Cloud Services Platform, which allows you to build a true hybrid cloud infrastructure. Some of the key components of Cloud Services Platform include the managed Istio service mesh, Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) On-Prem and GKE Policy Management, Cloud Build for fully managed CI/CD, and several serverless offerings (more on that below). Combined, these technologies can help you gain consistency, security, speed and flexibility of the cloud in your local data center, along with the freedom of workload portability to the environment of your choice.
  • Another popular read was a rundown of Google Cloud’s new serverless offerings. These include core serverless compute announcements such as new App Engine runtimes, Cloud Functions general availability and more. It also included serverless containers, so you can run serverless workloads in a fully managed container environment; GKE Serverless add-on to easily run serverless workloads on Kubernetes Engine; and Knative, the open-source project on which that add-on is built. There are even more features included in this post, too, like Cloud Build, Stackdriver monitoring and Cloud Firestore integration with GCP. 
Bringing detailed metrics and Kubernetes apps to the forefront
  • Another must-read post this month for many of you was Transparent SLIs: See Google Cloud the way your application experiences it, announcing the availability of detailed data insights on GCP services that your workloads use—helping you see like a Google site reliability engineer (SRE). These new service-level indicators (SLIs) go way beyond basic uptime and downtime to delve into response codes, latency and more. You can then separate out metrics by GCP service to see things like API version, location and protocol. The result is that you can filter and sort to get extremely fine-grained information on your software and the GCP services you use, which helps cut resolution times and improve the support experience. Transparent SLIs are available now through the Stackdriver monitoring console. Learn more here about the basics of using SLIs and other SRE tools to measure and manage availability.
  • It’s also now faster and easier to find production-ready commercial Kubernetes apps in the GCP Marketplace. These apps are prepackaged and configured to get up and running easily, whether on Kubernetes Engine or other Kubernetes clusters, and run the gamut from security, data analytics and developer tools to storage, machine learning and monitoring.
There was obviously a lot to talk about at the show, and you can get even more detail on what happened at Next ‘18 here.

Building the cloud back-end
  • For all of you developing cloud apps with Java, the availability of Jib was an exciting announcement last month. This open-source container image builder, available as Gradle and Maven plugins, cuts out several steps from the Docker build flow. Jib does all the work required to package your app into a container image—you don’t need to write a Dockerfile or even have Docker installed. You end up with faster builds and reproducible container images.
  • And on that topic, this best practices for building containers post was a hit, too, giving you tips that will set you up to run your environment more smoothly. The tips in this blog post cover graceful application shutdowns, how to simplify containers and how to choose and tag the container images you’ll use. 
It’s been a busy month at GCP, and we’re glad to share lots of new tools with you. Till next time, build away!

Istio reaches 1.0: ready for prod



Today, Google Cloud is proud to announce, together with our collaborators, that the Istio open-source project has reached the 1.0 milestone. This is a key step toward delivering the Cloud Services Platform that we discussed last week, helping you manage your services in a hybrid world where some of your infrastructure runs on VMs and some in Kubernetes, some services run in the cloud and some on-premises.

Istio: a service mesh

Istio is at its heart a service mesh—software that layers transparently onto an existing distributed application. It collects logs, traces and telemetry, and adds security and policy without embedding client libraries. Moreover, Istio is also a platform, complete with APIs that let you integrate with systems for logging, telemetry and policy.

Istio delivers a service-based view of the service interactions across the mesh. Whereas traditional monitoring gives you low-level metrics such as nodes’ CPU consumption, Istio measures the actual traffic between services: requests per second, error rates and latency. It also generates a dependency graph so you can see how services affect one another.

With Istio, your DevOps team gets the tools it needs to run distributed apps smoothly. Istio does canary rollouts, letting you smoke-test a new build to make sure it’s performing well before ramping up. It also offers fault-injection, retry logic and circuit breaking so DevOps teams can do more testing and change network behavior at runtime to keep applications up and running.

And finally, Istio adds security. It can be used to layer mTLS on every call, adding encryption-in-flight and giving you the ability to authorize every single call on your cluster and in your mesh.

Istio in action

Istio provides foundational capabilities for your infrastructure, freeing developers to work on code that is critical to your business. But there’s only one way to prove that Istio is ready for the enterprise: by running real workloads on it in production. Already, there are at least a dozen companies running Istio in production, including several on GCP. We worked with them through early hurdles, incorporated their feedback, and they’re reaping the benefits of Istio already. A great example is Auto Trader UK, which used Istio to help accelerate their move to containers and the public cloud.

Auto Trader UK is not only migrating from private cloud to public cloud, but also moving from virtual machines to Kubernetes. The level of control and visibility that Istio provides has enabled us to significantly de-risk this ambitious work, and in several cases has actually helped surface issues we were previously unaware of. We've been able to accelerate the delivery of capabilities such as mutual TLS, that previously would have taken significant engineering effort, allowing us to focus on our market differentiators.
- Karl Stoney, Delivery Infrastructure Lead, Auto Trader UK

A true joint effort

We first released Istio as open source last year, and what a year it’s been. Since that first 0.1 release, Istio has improved and matured significantly, with eight versions, 200+ contributors, and 4,000+ check-ins adding an ever growing set of functionality.

Getting to version 1.0 was truly a community-driven effort. IBM was a key collaborator and co-founder, and Lyft’s Envoy proxy is a key component of the project. Since then, the number of companies involved in Istio has skyrocketed, including Cisco, Red Hat, and VMware consolidating industry support with the goal of accelerating adoption and meeting the service mesh needs of their customers.

“The growth of Istio since its launch last year has been tremendous, and it’s quickly taking its place as the standard way to manage microservices in the cloud,” said Jason McGee, IBM Fellow and VP, IBM Cloud. “Our mission since Istio’s launch has been to enable everyone to succeed with microservices, especially in the enterprise. This is why we’ve focused the community around improving security and scale, and heavily leaned our contributions on what we’ve learned from building agile cloud architectures for companies of all sizes.”
- Jason McGee, IBM Fellow and VP, IBM Cloud 
"We see Istio's potential to be able to solve some of the most complex aspects of application development and deployment. It brings a control plane for service mesh, cluster orchestration, and network control that will support and enable developers to focus on the more important aspects of their application development. We are looking forward to leveraging Istio in Red Hat OpenShift to enable developers to deploy their applications in a more secure and efficient manner." 
- Brian 'Redbeard' Harrington, product manager, Istio, Red Hat
“VMware has been an integral part of the community developing Istio service mesh. We see great potential in Istio’s service-based approach to connectivity, security, and observability. We believe it will become an infrastructure cornerstone, spanning across vSphere and Kubernetes platforms and multiple private and public clouds, and helping our enterprise customers improve development efficiencies and deliver on their SLAs / SLOs in a secure manner. Istio’s application layer complements the network virtualization layer, and together allow enterprises to achieve defense in depth, improve performance and scalability, and speed time to application value.” 
- Pere Monclus, CTO Network and Security, VMware

We’re also thrilled with the number of companies writing adapters for Istio—from observability software from SolarWinds and Datadog, to deployment tools from Weaveworks and CodeFresh, to policy and security offerings from Aspenmesh and Octarine. While Istio is transparent to application developers, it provides a standard integration interface for anyone writing observability tools or policy engines.

Working and integrating with other open source projects in the community drives our success, as well. Integrations with SPIFFE, the Open Policy Agent and OpenTracing all improve the state of open source and the lives of developers.

Istio on GCP

While the open-source Istio project is a major undertaking, we’re also intent on making it especially easy to use on Google Cloud Platform. Last week at Google Cloud Next we announced the alpha release of Managed Istio: open-source Istio that’s automatically installed and upgraded on your Kubernetes Engine clusters as a part of the Cloud Services Platform. Managed Istio will help provide the visibility, security and control you need over services running in hybrid environments, and it integrates with other Google products like Stackdriver and Apigee.

Achieving 1.0 is just a first step, both for the project and for us at Google Cloud. We have ambitious plans for adding features and improving Istio’s usability with  the ultimate goal of delivering a complete set of tools to manage all of your services, so that you can focus on writing software and running a business.

To find out more about Istio and how to get started using it on GCP, please visit cloud.google.com/istio.