Tag Archives: Announcements

Seeking open source projects for Google Summer of Code 2019

Do you lead or represent a free or open source software organization? Are you seeking new contributors? (Who isn’t?) Do you enjoy the challenge and reward of mentoring new developers? Apply to be a mentor organization for Google Summer of Code 2019!

We are searching for open source projects and organizations to participate in the 15th annual Google Summer of Code (GSoC). GSoC is a global program that draws university student developers from around the world to contribute to open source. Each student spends three months working on a coding project, with the support of volunteer mentors, for participating open source organizations from late May to August.

Last year 1,264 students worked with 206 open source organizations. Organizations include individual smaller and medium sized open source projects as well as a number of umbrella organizations with many sub-projects under them (Python Software Foundation, CERN, Apache Software Foundation).

You can apply to be a mentoring organization for GSoC starting today. The deadline to apply is February 6 at 20:00 UTC. Organizations chosen for GSoC 2019 will be publicly announced on February 26.

Please visit the program site for more information on how to apply and review the detailed timeline of important deadlines. We also encourage you to check out the Mentor Guide and our short video on why open source projects choose to apply to be a part of the program.

Best of luck to all of the project applicants!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

The big reveal: Google Code-in 2018 winners and finalists

Our 9th consecutive year of Google Code-in (GCI) 2018 ended in mid-December. It was a very, very busy seven weeks for everyone – we had 3,124 students from 77 countries completing 15,323 tasks with a record 27 open source organizations!

Today, we are pleased to announce the Google Code-in 2018 Grand Prize Winners and Finalists with each organization. The 54 Grand Prize Winners from 19 countries completed an impressive 1,668 tasks between them while also helping other students during the contest.

Each of the Grand Prize Winners are invited to a four day trip to Google’s main campus and San Francisco offices in Northern California where they’ll meet Google engineers, meet one of the mentors they worked with during the contest, and enjoy some fun in California with the other winners. We look forward to seeing everyone later this year!
Country # of Winners Country # of Winners
Cameroon 1 Romania 1
Canada 1 Russian Federation 1
Czech Republic 1 Singapore 1
Georgia 1 South Africa 1
India 18 Spain 2
Indonesia 1 Sri Lanka 1
Macedonia 1 Ukraine 2
Netherlands 1 United Kingdom 6
Philippines 1 United States 9
Poland 4

Finalists

And a big congratulations to our 108 Finalists from 26 countries who completed over 2,350 tasks during the contest. The Finalists will all receive a special hoodie to commemorate their achievements in the contest. This year we had 1 student named as a finalist with 2 different organizations!

A breakdown of the countries represented by our finalists can be found below. 
Country # of Finalists Country # of Finalists
Canada 6 Philippines 1
China 2 Poland 15
Czech Republic 1 Russian Federation 2
Germany 1 Serbia 1
India 48 Singapore 2
Indonesia 2 South Korea 1
Israel 1 Spain 1
Kazakhstan 1 Sri Lanka 2
Luxembourg 1 Taiwan 1
Mauritius 2 Thailand 1
Mexico 1 United Kingdom 3
Nepal 1 United States 8
Pakistan 2 Uruguay 1

Mentors

This year we had 790 mentors dedicate their time and invaluable expertise to helping thousands of teenage students learn about open source by welcoming them into their communities. These mentors are the heart of GCI and the reason the contest continues to thrive. Mentors spend hundreds of hours answering questions, reviewing submitted tasks, and teaching students the basics and, in many cases, more advanced aspects of contributing to open source. GCI would not be possible without their enthusiasm and commitment.

We will post more statistics and fun stories that came from GCI 2018 here on the Google Open Source Blog over the next few months, so please stay tuned.

Congratulations to our Grand Prize Winners, Finalists, and all of the students who spent the last couple of months learning about, and contributing to, open source. We hope they will continue their journey in open source!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Wrapping up Google Code-in 2018

We are excited to announce the conclusion of the 9th annual Google Code-in (GCI), our global online contest introducing teenagers to the world of open source development. Over the years the contest has not only grown bigger, but also helped find and support talented young people around the world.

Here are some initial statistics about this year’s program:
  • Total number of students completing tasks: 3,123*
  • Total number of countries represented by students: 77
  • Percentage of girls among students: 17.9% 
Below you can see the total number of tasks completed by students year over year:
*These numbers will increase as mentors finish reviewing the final work submitted by students this morning.
Mentors from each of the 27 open source organizations are now busy reviewing the last  work submitted by participants. We look forward to sharing more statistics about the program, including countries and schools with the most student participants, in an upcoming blog post.

The mentors for each organization will spend the next couple of weeks selecting four Finalists (who will receive a hoodie too!) and their two Grand Prize Winners. Grand Prize Winners will be flown to Northern California to visit Google’s headquarters, enjoy a day of adventure in San Francisco, meet their mentors and hear talks from Google engineers.

Hearty congratulations to all the student participants for challenging themselves and making contributions to open source in the process!

Further, we’d like to thank the mentors and the organization administrators for GCI 2018. They are the heart of this program, volunteering countless hours creating tasks, reviewing student work, and helping bring students into the world of open source. Mentors teach young students about the many facets of open source development, from community standards and communicating across time zones to version control and testing. We couldn’t run this program without you! Thank you!

Stay tuned, we’ll be announcing the Grand Prize Winners and Finalists on January 7, 2019!

By Saranya Sampat, Google Open Source

Google joins the OpenChain Project for license compliance

Google is thrilled to announce that we are joining the OpenChain Project as Platinum Members. OpenChain is an effort to make open source license compliance simpler and more consistent. We will also join the OpenChain board and are excited that Facebook and Uber will be fellow board members.

Over the last 14 years, the Open Source Programs Office (OSPO) at Google has developed rigorous policies and processes so that we can do open source license compliance correctly, and at scale. This helps us use free and open source software extensively across the company and makes it easier to upstream our work. For us, it’s a matter of legal compliance as well as showing respect for the amazing communities that create and maintain the software.

Until now, there’s been no commonly accepted standard for open source compliance within an organization. Most organizations, like Google, have had to invent and cobble together policies and processes, occasionally comparing notes and hoping we haven’t forgotten anything.

The OpenChain Project is changing that by defining the core requirements of a quality compliance program and developing curriculum to help with training and management. It’s hard to overstate the importance of this work now that open source is a critical input at every step in the supply chain, both in hardware and software.

Google believes in this mission and is excited for the opportunity to use what we’ve learned to pave the way for the rest of the industry. We can help guide the development of standards that are rigorous, clear, and easy to follow for companies both large and small.

By Max Sills and Josh Simmons, Google Open Source

Introducing a Web Component and Data API for Quick, Draw!


Over the past couple years, the Creative Lab in collaboration with the Handwriting Recognition team have released a few experiments in the realm of “doodle” recognition.  First, in 2016, there was Quick, Draw!, which uses a neural network to guess what you’re drawing.  Since Quick, Draw! launched we have collected over 1 billion drawings across 345 categories.  In the wake of that popularity, we open sourced a collection of 50 million drawings giving developers around the world access to the data set and the ability to conduct research with it.

"The different ways in which people draw are like different notes in some universally human scale" - Ian Johnson, UX Engineer @ Google

Since the initial dataset was released, it has been incredible to see how graphs, t-sne clusters, and simply overlapping millions of these doodles have given us the ability to infer interesting human behaviors, across different cultures.  One example, from the Quartz study, is that 86% of Americans (from a sample of 50,000) draw their circles counterclockwise, while 80% of Japanese (from a sample of 800) draw them clockwise. Part of this pattern in behavior can be attributed to the strict stroke order in Japanese writing, from the top left to the bottom right.


It’s also interesting to see how the data looks when it’s overlaid by country, as Kyle McDonald did, when he discovered that some countries draw their chairs in perspective while others draw them straight on.


On the more fun, artistic spectrum, there are some simple but clever uses of the data like Neil Mendoza’s face tracking experiment and Deborah Schmidt’s letter collages.
See the video here of Neil Mendoza mapping Quick, Draw! facial features to your own face in front of a webcam


See the process video here of Deborah Schmidt packing QuickDraw data into letters using OpenFrameworks
Some handy tools have also been released from the community since the release of all this data, and one of those that we’re releasing now is a Polymer component that allows you to display a doodle in your web-based project with one line of markup:

The Polymer component is coupled with a Data API that layers a massive file directory (50 million files) and returns a JSON object or an HTML canvas rendering for each drawing.  Without downloading all the data, you can start creating right away in prototyping your ideas.  We’ve also provided instructions for how to host the data and API yourself on Google Cloud Platform (for more serious projects that demand a higher request limit).  

One really handy tool when hosting an API on Google Cloud is Cloud Endpoints.  It allowed us to launch a demo API with a quota limit and authentication via an API key.  

By defining an OpenAPI specification (here is the Quick, Draw! Data API spec) and adding these three lines to our app.yaml file, an Extensible Service Proxy (ESP) gets deployed with our API backend code (more instructions here):
endpoints_api_service:
name: quickdrawfiles.appspot.com
rollout_strategy: managed
Based on the OpenAPI spec, documentation is also automatically generated for you:


We used a public Google Group as an access control list, so anyone who joins can then have the API available in their API library.
The Google Group used as an Access Control List
This component and Data API will make it easier for  creatives out there to manipulate the data for their own research.  Looking to the future, a potential next step for the project could be to store everything in a single database for more complex queries (i.e. “give me an recognized drawing from China in March 2017”).  Feedback is always welcome, and we hope this inspires even more types of projects using the data! More details on the project and the incredible research projects done using it can be found on our GitHub repo

By Nick Jonas, Creative Technologist, Creative Lab

Editor's Note: Some may notice that this isn’t the only dataset we’ve open sourced recently! You can find many more datasets in our open source project directory.

Google Summer of Code: 15 years strong!

Google Open Source is proud to announce Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2019 – the 15th year of the program! We look forward to introducing the 15th batch of student developers to the world of open source and matching them with open source projects.

Over the last 14 years GSoC has provided over 14,000 university students from 109 countries with an opportunity to hone their skills by contributing to open source projects during their summer break. Participants gain invaluable experience working directly with mentors on open source projects, and earn a stipend upon successful completion of their project.

We’re excited to keep the tradition going! Applications for interested open source project organizations open on January 15, 2019, and student applications open March 25.

Are you an open source project interested in learning more? Visit the program site and read the mentor guide to learn more about what it means to be a mentor organization and how to prepare your community and your application. We welcome all types of organizations – large and small – and are eager to involve first time projects. Each year, about 20% of the organizations we accept are completely new to GSoC.

Are you a university student keen on learning about how to prepare for the 2019 GSoC program? It’s never too early to start thinking about your proposal or about what type of open source organization you may want to work with. You should read the student guide for important tips on preparing your proposal and what to consider if you wish to apply for the program in March. You can also get inspired by checking out the 200+ organizations that participated in Google Summer of Code 2018 as well as the projects that students worked on.

We encourage you to explore other resources and you can learn more on the program website.

By Stephanie Taylor, GSoC Program Lead

Google Code-in 2018 contest for teenagers begins today

Today marks the start of the 9th consecutive year of Google Code-in (GCI). This is the biggest and best contest ever and we hope you’ll join us for the fun!

What is Google Code-in?

Our global, online contest introducing students to open source development. The contest runs for 7 weeks until December 12, 2018.

Who can register?

Pre-university students ages 13-17 that have their parent or guardian’s permission to register for the contest.

How do students register and participate?

Students can register for the contest beginning today at g.co/gci. Once students have registered and the parental consent form has been submitted and approved by Program Administrators students can choose which contest “task” they want to work on first. Students choose the task they find interesting from a list of thousands of available tasks created by 27 participating open source organizations. Tasks take an average of 3-5 hours to complete. There are even beginner tasks that are a wonderful way for students to get started in the contest.

The task categories are:
  • Coding
  • Design
  • Documentation/Training
  • Outreach/Research
  • Quality Assurance

Why should students participate?

Students not only have the opportunity to work on a real open source software project, thus gaining invaluable skills and experience, but they also have the opportunity to be a part of the open source community. Mentors are readily available to help answer their questions while they work through the tasks.

Google Code-in is a contest so there are prizes! Complete one task and receive a digital certificate, three completed tasks and you’ll also get a fun Google t-shirt. Finalists earn the coveted hoodie. Grand Prize winners (2 from each organization) will receive a trip to Google headquarters in California!

Details

Over the last 8 years, more than 8,100 students from 107 countries have successfully completed over 40,000 tasks in GCI. Curious? Learn more about GCI by checking out the Contest Rules and FAQs. And please visit our contest site and read the Getting Started Guide.

Teachers, if you are interested in getting your students involved in Google Code-in we have resources available to help you get started.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

These 27 organizations will mentor students in Google Code-in 2018

We’re excited to welcome 27 open source organizations to mentor students as part of Google Code-in 2018. The contest, now in its ninth year, offers 13-17 year old pre-university students from around the world an opportunity to learn and practice their skills while contributing to open source projects–all online!

Google Code-in starts for students on October 23rd. Students are encouraged to learn about the participating organizations ahead of time and can get started by clicking on the links below:
  • AOSSIE: Australian umbrella organization for open source projects.
  • Apertium: rule-based machine translation platform.
  • Catrobat: visual programming for creating mobile games and animations.
  • CCExtractor: open source tools for subtitle generation.
  • CloudCV: building platforms for reproducible AI research.
  • coala: a unified interface for linting and fixing code, regardless of the programming languages used.
  • Copyleft Games Group: develops tools, libraries, and game engines.
  • Digital Impact Alliance: collaborative space for multiple open source projects serving the international development and humanitarian response sectors.
  • Drupal: content management platform.
  • Fedora Project: a free and friendly Linux-based operating system.
  • FOSSASIA: developing communities across all ages and borders to form a better future with Open Technologies and ICT.
  • Haiku: operating system specifically targeting personal computing.
  • JBoss Community: a community of projects around JBoss Middleware.
  • KDE Community: produces FOSS by artists, designers, programmers, translators, writers and other contributors.
  • Liquid Galaxy: an interactive, panoramic and immersive visualization tool.
  • MetaBrainz: builds community maintained databases.
  • MovingBlocks: a Minecraft-inspired open source game.
  • OpenMRS: open source medical records system for the world.
  • OpenWISP: build and manage low cost networks such as public wifi.
  • OSGeo: building open source geospatial tools.
  • PostgreSQL: relational database system.
  • Public Lab: open software to help communities measure and analyze pollution.
  • RTEMS Project: operating system used in satellites, particle accelerators, robots, racing motorcycles, building controls, medical devices.
  • Sugar Labs: learning platform and activities for elementary education.
  • SCoRe: research lab seeking sustainable solutions for problems faced by developing countries.
  • The ns-3 Network Simulator Project: packet-level network simulator for research and education.
  • Wikimedia: non-profit foundation dedicated to bringing free content to the world, operating Wikipedia.
These 27 organizations are hard at work creating thousands of tasks for students to work on, including code, documentation, design, quality assurance, outreach, research and training tasks. The contest starts for students on Tuesday, October 23rd at 9:00am Pacific Time.

You can learn more about Google Code-in on the contest site where you’ll find Frequently Asked Questions, Important Dates and flyers and other helpful information including the Getting Started Guide.

Want to talk with other students, mentors, and organization administrations about the contest? Check out our discussion mailing list. We can’t wait to get started!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Code-in 2018 is looking for great open source organizations to apply

We are accepting applications for open source organizations interested in participating in Google Code-in 2018. Google Code-in (GCI) invites pre-university students ages 13-17 to learn by contributing to open source software.

Working with young students is a special responsibility and each year we hear inspiring stories from mentors who participate. To ensure these new, young contributors have a solid support system, we only select organizations that have gained experience in mentoring students by previously taking part in Google Summer of Code.

Organization applications are now open and all interested open source organizations must apply before Monday, September 17 at 16:00 UTC.

In 2017, 25 organizations were accepted – 9 of which were participating in GCI for the first time! Over the last 8 years, 8,108 students from 107 countries have completed more than 40,000 tasks for participating open source projects. Tasks fall into 5 categories:
  • Code: writing or refactoring.
  • Documentation/Training: creating/editing documents and helping others learn more.
  • Outreach/Research: community management, outreach/marketing, or studying problems and recommending solutions.
  • Quality Assurance: testing and ensuring code is of high quality.
  • Design: graphic design or user interface design.
Once an organization is selected for Google Code-in 2018 they will define these tasks and recruit mentors from their communities who are interested in providing online support for students during the seven week contest.

You can find a timeline, FAQ and other information about Google Code-in on our website. If you’re an educator interested in sharing Google Code-in with your students, you can find resources here.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Announcing Google Code-in 2018: nine is just fine!

We are excited to announce the 9th consecutive year of the Google Code-in (GCI) contest! Students ages 13 through 17 from around the world can learn about open source development by working on real open source projects, with mentorship from active developers. GCI begins on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 and runs for seven weeks, ending Wednesday, December 12, 2018.

Google Code-in is unique because, not only do the students choose what they want to work on from the 2,500+ tasks created by open source organizations, but they have mentors available to help answer their questions as they work on each of their tasks.

Getting started in open source software can be a daunting task for a developer of any age. What organization should I work with? How do I get started? Does the organization want my help? Am I too inexperienced?

The beauty of GCI is that participating open source organizations realize teens are often first time contributors, so the volunteer mentors come prepared with the patience and the experience to help these newcomers become part of the open source community.

Open source communities thrive when there is a steady flow of new contributors who bring new perspectives, ideas and enthusiasm. Over the last 8 years, GCI open source organizations have helped 8,108 students from 107 countries make meaningful contributions. Many of these students are still participating in open source communities years later. Dozens have gone on to become Google Summer of Code (GSoC) students and even mentor other students.

The tasks that contest participants will complete vary in skill set and level, including beginner tasks any student can take on, such as “setup your development environment.” With tasks in five different categories, there’s something to fit almost any student’s skills:
  • Code: writing or refactoring
  • Documentation/Training: creating/editing documents and helping others learn more
  • Outreach/Research: community management, marketing, or studying problems and recommending solutions
  • Quality Assurance: testing and ensuring code is of high quality
  • Design: graphic design or user interface design
Open source organizations can apply to participate as mentoring organizations for in Google Code-in starting on Thursday, September 6, 2018. Google Code-in starts for students October 23rd!

Visit the contest site g.co/gci to learn more about the contest and find flyers, slide decks, timelines, and more.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source