Protecting Chrome users in Kazakhstan



When making secure connections, Chrome trusts certificates that have been locally installed on a user's computer or mobile device. This allows users to run tools to inspect and debug connections during website development, or for corporate environments to intercept and monitor internal traffic. It is not appropriate for this mechanism to be used to intercept traffic on the public internet.

In response to recent actions by the Kazakhstan government, Chrome, along with other browsers, has taken steps to protect users from the interception or modification of TLS connections made to websites.

Chrome will be blocking the certificate the Kazakhstan government required users to install:

Common Name
Qaznet Trust Network
SHA-256 Fingerprint
00:30:9C:73:6D:D6:61:DA:6F:1E:B2:41:73:AA:84:99:44:C1:68:A4:3A:15:
BF:FD:19:2E:EC:FD:B6:F8:DB:D2
SHA-256 of Subject Public Key Info
B5:BA:8D:D7:F8:95:64:C2:88:9D:3D:64:53:C8:49:98:C7:78:24:91:9B:64:
EA:08:35:AA:62:98:65:91:BE:50


The certificate has been added to CRLSet. No action is needed by users to be protected. In addition, the certificate will be added to a blocklist in the Chromium source code and thus should be included in other Chromium based browsers in due course.

Dev Channel update for Desktop

The Dev channel has been updated to 78.0.3887.7 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.



A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.
Srinivas Sista
Google Chrome

Improving real-time collaboration in Google Docs for assistive technology users

Quick launch summary 

It’s now easier for users of assistive technologies, like screen readers and Braille displays, to keep track of real-time updates made by collaborators in a document. With live edits, you can view a periodically updated summary of collaborator changes in a convenient sidebar. In Google Docs we believe that collaboration works best when it works for everyone.

New edits made by collaborators appear in the live edits sidebar.


To see live edits, open the Accessibility settings by going to Tools > Accessibility settings and check “Turn on screen reader support.” Then, select “Show live edits” from the Accessibility menu. To learn more, see this article in our Help Center.

Helpful links

Availability

Rollout details

G Suite editions
  • Available to all G Suite editions.

On/off by default? 
  • This feature will be available by default and can be enabled in the settings of Google Docs.


Stay up to date with G Suite launches

Android Studio 3.5: Project Marble goes into stable

Posted by Jamal Eason, Product Manager, Android

Android Studio logo

Have you ever wished that Android Studio was faster, more performant, and more memory efficient? If so, then download Android Studio 3.5 today. This stable version of Android Studio is a different kind of release where the Android Studio team took a step back from large feature work for eight months and instead focused on product quality to further accelerate your day-to-day app development. We called this initiative Project Marble, and it focused on making the fundamental features and flows of Android Studio & Emulator rock-solid by looking at three core areas: system health, feature polish, and bugs. Working on Project Marble was is in direct response to feedback from you and we continue to welcome any further feedback you have.

To improve system health in Android Studio, we first created a new set of infrastructure and internal dashboards to better detect performance problems. We did this to establish a safety net to catch issues that are typically difficult to catch with regular unit testing. Then, the team addressed a range of issues from fixing over 600 bugs, 50 memory leaks, 20 IDE hangs, and improving XML & Kotlin typing latency. Additionally, for the Android Emulator, we decreased the CPU and memory impact on your development machine. Project Mable was a focused period to work on the IDE and Android Emulator system health but it also uncovered a set of quality areas we will continue to work on going forward.

On top of memory and performance, we spent time polishing and fixing core user facing feature areas. For example, we took a look at the app deployment flow to a device, and completely re-architectured and replaced Instant Run with Apply Changes so that it’s more reliable and trusted. With Apply Changes, we no longer modify an APK during your build but instead, we use runtime instrumentation to redefine classes on the fly. If you want to quickly edit code and see code changes, you should try Android Studio 3.5 today.

Lastly, over the course of Project Marble we fixed bugs which landed in Android Studio in 3.5. We are thankful to those who filed bug reports and engaged with us on social media. We are especially thankful for the over 40 external contributors in the Android community that diligently worked with us in filing and resolving critical quality issues in Android Studio 3.5. Project Marble is not the end of quality work for the Android Studio team, but this latest stable release is a major milestone of our on-going quality investment into the IDE. With the quality work and new infrastructure put in place during Project Marble, we hope that you are even more productive in developing Android apps when you download and use Android Studio 3.5.

There are many quality changes we made to Android Studio 3.5. To see the full list of changes, see the Android Studio 3.5 beta release blog and release notes. But you can dive into some of the highlights of the changes below:

System Health

System health improvements during Project Marble was a combination of memory performance, typing & user interfaces freezes, build speed, CPU usage, and I/O performance. For each of these areas we created new ways to detect issues during development and a better process to analyze your feedback both from opt-in analytics and bugs that you file.

Our system health work has many under the hood improvements but a few notable changes include:

Auto-recommend Memory Settings

With Android Studio 3.5, the IDE will recognize when an app project needs more RAM on a machine with higher RAM capacity and will notify you to increase the memory heap size or you can adjust the settings yourself under Appearance & Behavior → Memory Settings.

Memory Settings

Memory Settings

User Interface Freezes

During the Project Marble development timeframe, we found in our opt-in product analytics that XML code editing was notably slower in the IDE. With this data point, we optimized XML typing, and have measurably better performance in Android Studio 3.5. You can see below that editing data binding expressions in XML is faster due to typing latency improvements.

Code Editing Before

Code Editing Before - Android Studio 3.4

Code Editing After - Android Studio 3.5

Build Speed

For Android Studio 3.5 we made many speed improvements but a significant change is the addition of incremental build support to the top annotation processors including Glide, AndroidX data binding, Dagger, Realm, and Kotlin (KAPT). Incremental support can make a notable impact on build speed. Learn more here.

Disk I/O File Access Speed

For users on Microsoft® Windows®, we found that disk I/O access times were notable higher on average than other platforms. Digging into the data, we found the default configuration of anti-virus scanners did not optimally exclude build output folders. In Android Studio 3.5, we detect this situation and help guide you through the optimal setup.

System Health Notification

System Health Notification - Anti-virus Check

Feature Polish

In addition to improving system health we relooked at a few critical users flows to address bugs and user friction. The areas we looked at ranged from data binding, layout editor, ChromeOS support to project upgrades. One notable area of improvement to highlight is the app deployment flow:

Apply Changes

During the Project Marble time period, we removed Instant Run and re-architectured and implemented from the ground-up a more practical approach in Android Studio 3.5 called Apply Changes. Unlike Instant Run, Apply Changes does not modify your APK which means it is realbile and has a predictable behavior. To support the changes, we re-architected the entire deployment pipeline to improve deployment speed, and also tweaked the run and deployment toolbar buttons for a more streamlined experience.

Apply Changes Buttons

Apply Changes Buttons

App Deployment User Flow

App Deployment User Flow

To recap, Android Studio 3.5 has hundreds of bug fixes and notable changes in these core areas:

System Health

  • Memory Settings
  • Memory Usage Report
  • Reduce Exceptions
  • User Interface Freezes
  • Build Speed
  • IDE Speed
  • Lint Code Analysis
  • I/O File Access
  • Emulator CPU Usage

Feature Polish

  • Apply Changes
  • Gradle Sync
  • Project Upgrades
  • Layout Editor
  • Data Binding
  • App Deployment
  • C++ Improvements
  • Intellij 2019.1 Platform Update
  • Conditional Delivery for Dynamic Feature Support
  • Emulator Foldables & Google Pixel Device Support
  • Chrome OS Support

Check our the Android Studio release notes page for more details and read about deep dives into several areas of Project Marble in the following Medium blog posts & Google I/O talk:

Opt-In & Feedback

The specific areas and the approach we took to optimize Android Studio for Project Marble were all based on your feedback and metrics data. The aggregate metrics you can opt-in to inside of Android Studio allow us to figure out if there are broader problems in the product for all users, and the data also allows the team to prioritize feature work appropriately. There are are a couple pathways to help us build better insights. At a baseline, you can opt-in to metrics, by going to Preferences /Settings → Appearance & Behavior → Data Sharing.

IDE Data Sharing

IDE Data Sharing

Additionally, throughout the year, you might see user sentiment emojis in the bottom corner of the IDE. Those icons are a lightweight way to inform the Android Studio team on how things are going and to give us in-context feedback, and the fastest way to log a bug and send to the team.

IDE User Feedback

IDE User Feedback

Getting Started

Download

Download Android Studio 3.5 from the download page. If you are using a previous release of Android Studio, you can simply update to the latest version of Android Studio.

To use the mentioned Android Emulator features make sure you are running at least Android Emulator v29.1.9 downloaded via the Android Studio SDK Manager.

As mentioned above, we appreciate any feedback on things you like, and issues or features you would like to see. If you find a bug or issue, feel free to file an issue. Follow us -- the Android Studio development team ‐ on Twitter and on Medium.

Turbo, An Improved Rainbow Colormap for Visualization



False color maps show up in many applications in computer vision and machine learning, from visualizing depth images to more abstract uses, such as image differencing. Colorizing images helps the human visual system pick out detail, estimate quantitative values, and notice patterns in data in a more intuitive fashion. However, the choice of color map can have a significant impact on a given task. For example, interpretation of “rainbow maps” have been linked to lower accuracy in mission critical applications, such as medical imaging. Still, in many applications, “rainbow maps” are preferred since they show more detail (at the expense of accuracy) and allow for quicker visual assessment.
Left: Disparity image displayed as greyscale. Right: The commonly used Jet rainbow map being used to create a false color image.
One of the most commonly used color mapping algorithms in computer vision applications is Jet, which is high contrast, making it useful for accentuating even weakly distinguished image features. However, if you look at the color map gradient, one can see distinct “bands” of color, most notably in the cyan and yellow regions. This causes sharp transitions when the map is applied to images, which are misleading when the underlying data is actually smoothly varying. Because the rate at which the color changes ‘perceptually’ is not constant, Jet is not perceptually uniform. These effects are even more pronounced for users that are color blind, to the point of making the map ambiguous:
The above image with simulated Protanopia
Today there are many modern alternatives that are uniform and color blind accessible, such as Viridis or Inferno from matplotlib. While these linear lightness maps solve many important issues with Jet, their constraints may make them suboptimal for day to day tasks where the requirements are not as stringent.
ViridisInferno
Today we are happy to introduce Turbo, a new colormap that has the desirable properties of Jet while also addressing some of its shortcomings, such as false detail, banding and color blindness ambiguity. Turbo was hand-crafted and fine-tuned to be effective for a variety of visualization tasks. You can find the color map data and usage instructions for Python here and C/C++ here, as well as a polynomial approximation here.

Development
To create the Turbo color map, we created a simple interface that allowed us to interactively adjust the sRGB curves using a 7-knot cubic spline, while comparing the result on a selection of sample images as well as other well known color maps.
Screenshot of the interface used to create and tune Turbo.
This approach provides control while keeping the curve C2 continuous. The resulting color map is not “perceptually linear” in the quantitative sense, but it is more smooth than Jet, without introducing false detail.

Turbo
Jet
Comparison with Common Color Maps
Viridis is a linear color map that is generally recommended when false color is needed because it is pleasant to the eye and it fixes most issues with Jet. Inferno has the same linear properties of Viridis, but is higher contrast, making it better for picking out detail. However, some feel that it can be harsh on the eyes. While this isn’t a concern for publishing, it does affect people’s choice when they must spend extended periods examining visualizations.
TurboJet
ViridisInferno
Because of rapid color and lightness changes, Jet accentuates detail in the background that is less apparent with Viridis and even Inferno. Depending on the data, some detail may be lost entirely to the naked eye. The background in the following images is barely distinguishable with Inferno (which is already punchier than Viridis), but clear with Turbo.
InfernoTurbo
Turbo mimics the lightness profile of Jet, going from low to high back down to low, without banding. As such, its lightness slope is generally double that of Viridis, allowing subtle changes to be more easily seen. This is a valuable feature, since it greatly enhances detail when color can be used to disambiguate the low and high ends.
TurboJet
ViridisInferno
Lightness plots generated by converting the sRGB values to CIECAM02-UCS and displaying the lightness value (J) in greyscale. The black line traces the lightness value from the low end of the color map (left) to the high end (right).
The Viridis and Inferno plots are linear, with Inferno exhibiting a higher slope and over a broader range. Jet’s plot is erratic and peaky, and banding can be seen clearly even in the grayscale image. Turbo has a similar asymmetric profile to Jet with the lows darker than the highs.This is intentional, to make cases where low values appear next to high values more distinct. The curvature in the lower region is also different from the higher region, due to the way blues are perceived in comparison to reds.

Although this low-high-low curve increases detail, it comes at the cost of lightness ambiguity. When rendered in grayscale, the coloration will be ambiguous, since some of the lower values will look identical to higher values. Consequently, Turbo is inappropriate for grayscale printing and for people with the rare case of achromatopsia.

Semantic Layers
When examining disparity maps, it is often desirable to compare values on different sides of the image at a glance. This task is much easier when values can be mentally mapped to a distinct semantic color, such as red or blue. Thus, having more colors helps the estimation ease and accuracy.
TurboJet
ViridisInferno
With Jet and Turbo, it’s easy to see which objects on the left of the frame are at the same depth as objects on the right, even though there is a visual gap in the middle. For example, you can easily spot which sphere on the left is at the same depth as the ring on the right. This is much harder to determine using Viridis or Inferno, which have far fewer distinct colors. Compared to Jet, Turbo is also much more smooth and has no “false layers” due to banding. You can see this improvement more clearly if the incoming values are quantized:
Left: Quantized Turbo colormap. Up to 33 quantized colors remain distinguishable and smooth in both lightness and hue change. Right: Quantized Jet color map. Many neighboring colors appear the same; Yellow and Cyan colors appear brighter than the rest.
Quick Judging
When doing a quick comparison of two images, it’s much easier to judge the differences in color than in lightness (because our attention system prioritizes hue). For example, imagine we have an output image from a depth estimation algorithm beside the ground truth. With Turbo it’s easy to discern whether or not the two are in agreement and which regions may disagree.
“Output” Viridis“Ground Truth” Viridis
“Output” Turbo“Ground Truth” Turbo
In addition, it is easy to estimate quantitative values, since they map to distinguishable and memorable colors.
Diverging Map Use Cases
Although the Turbo color map was designed for sequential use (i.e., values [0-1]), it can be used as a diverging colormap as well, as is needed in difference images, for example. When used this way, zero is green, negative values are shades of blue, and positive values are shades of red. Note, however, that the negative minimum is darker than the positive maximum, so it is not truly balanced.
"Ground Truth" disparity imageEstimated disparity image
Difference Image (ground truth - estimated disparity image), visualized with Turbo
Accessibility for Color Blindness
We tested Turbo using a color blindness simulator and found that for all conditions except Achromatopsia (total color blindness), the map remains distinguishable and smooth. In the case of Achromatopsia, the low and high ends are ambiguous. Since the condition affects 1 in 30,000 individuals (or 0.00003%), Turbo should be usable by 99.997% of the population.
Test Image
ProtanomalyProtanopia
DeuteranomalyDeuteranopia
TritanomalyTritanopia
Blue cone monochromacyAchromatopsia
Conclusion
Turbo is a slot-in replacement for Jet, and is intended for day-to-day tasks where perceptual uniformity is not critical, but one still wants a high contrast, smooth visualization of the underlying data. It can be used as a sequential as well as a diverging map, making it a good all-around map to have in the toolbox. You can find the color map data and usage instructions for Python here and for C/C++ here. There is also a polynomial approximation here, for cases where a look-up table may not be desirable.Our team uses it for visualizing disparity maps, error maps, and various other scalar quantities, and we hope you’ll find it useful as well.

Acknowledgements
Ambrus Csaszar stared at many color ramps with me in order to pick the right tradeoffs between uniformity and detail accentuation. Christian Haene integrated the map into our team’s tools, which caused wide usage and thus spurred further improvements. Matthias Kramm and Ruofei Du came up with closed form approximations.

Source: Google AI Blog


Improved as-you-type spelling and grammar correction in Gmail

What’s changing

We're introducing new spelling and grammar correction capabilities for Gmail to help you compose emails quickly with confidence.

As you type your message, Gmail will use artificial intelligence to make smarter spell-check suggestions while also detecting potential grammar issues. For some common spelling mistakes, we've also added as-you-type autocorrection for improved accuracy. Read more here about how grammar suggestions work.
Autocorrection of common spelling errors

Detecting spelling and grammar mistakes as you type


Who’s impacted

End users

Why you’d use it

If you're working against deadlines to write a lot of emails daily, correct spelling and grammar probably isn’t top of mind. These capabilities can also help you write and edit with more confidence if you’re a non-native speaker. With our AI-first approach, you can communicate smarter and faster, without sweating the small stuff.

How to get started


  • Admins: No action required.
  • End users: No action required. All suggestions and corrections take place automatically as you type. If you’d like to disable this feature, follow the steps in this Help Center article.

Additional details

You’ll now see inline spelling and contextual grammar suggestions in your draft emails as you type. If you’ve made a grammar mistake, a squiggly blue line will appear under the phrase as you write it. You can choose to accept the suggestion by clicking it.

When an auto-correction takes place, we’ll temporarily underline the corrected change so you can easily identify and undo the correction if you’d like. For now, autocorrect is currently only available in English.

Helpful links



Availability

Rollout details


G Suite editions

  • Available to all G Suite editions

On/off by default?

  • This feature will be ON by default and can be disabled by the end user in Gmail settings.

Stay up to date with G Suite launches

How Google adopted BeyondCorp: Part 2 (devices)




Intro

This is the second post in a series of four, in which we set out to revisit various BeyondCorp topics and share lessons that were learnt along the internal implementation path at Google.

The first post in this series focused on providing necessary context for how Google adopted BeyondCorp. This post will focus on managing devices - how we decide whether or not a device should be trusted and why that distinction is necessary. Device management provides both the data and guarantees required for making access decisions by securing the endpoints and providing additional context about it.


How do we manage devices?

At Google, we use the following principles to run our device fleet securely and at scale:
  • Secure default settings at depth with central enforcement
  • Ensure a scalable process
  • Invest in fleet testing, monitoring, and phased rollouts
  • Ensure high quality data
Secure default settings

Defense in depth requires us to layer our security defenses such that an attacker would need to pass multiple controls in an attack. To uphold this defensive position at scale, we centrally manage and measure various qualities of our devices, covering all layers of the platform;

  • Hardware/firmware configuration
  • Operating system and software
  • User settings and modifications
We use automated configuration management systems to continuously enforce our security and compliance policies. Independently, we observe the state of our hardware and software. This allows us to determine divergence from the expected state and verify whether it is an anomaly.

Where possible, our platforms use native OS capabilities to protect against malicious software, and we extend those capabilities across our platforms with custom and commercial tooling.


Scalable process

Google manages a fleet of several hundred thousand client devices (workstations, laptops, mobile devices) for employees who are spread across the world. We scale the engineering teams who manage these devices by relying on reviewable, repeatable, and automated backend processes and minimizing GUI-based configuration tools. By using and developing open-source software and integrating it with internal solutions, we reach a level of flexibility that allows us to manage fleets at scale without sacrificing customizability for our users. The focus is on operating system agnostic server and client solutions, where possible, to avoid duplication of effort.

Software for all platforms is provided by repositories which verify the integrity of software packages before making them available to users. The same system is used for distributing configuration settings and management tools, which enforce policies on client systems using the open-source configuration management system Puppet, running in standalone mode. In combination, this allows us to easily scale infrastructure and management horizontally as described in more detail and with examples in one of our BeyondCorp whitepapers, Fleet Management at Scale.

All device management policies are stored in centralized systems which allow settings to be applied both at the fleet and the individual device level. This way policy owners and device owners can manage sensible defaults or per-device overrides in the same system, allowing audits of settings and exceptions. Depending on the type of exception, they may either be managed self-service by the user, require approval from appropriate parties, or affect the trust level of the affected device. This way, we aim to guarantee user satisfaction and security simultaneously.


Fleet testing, monitoring, and phased rollouts

Applying changes at scale to a large heterogeneous fleet can be challenging. At Google, we have automated test labs which allow us to test changes before we deploy them to the fleet. Rollouts to the client fleet usually follow multiple stages and random canarying, similar to common practices with service management. Furthermore, we monitor various status attributes of our fleet which allows us to detect issues before they spread widely.

High quality data

Device management depends on the quality of device data. Both configuration and trust decisions are keyed off of inventory information. At Google, we track all devices in centralized asset management systems. This allows us to not only observe the current (runtime) state of a device, but also whether it’s a legitimate Google device. These systems store hardware attributes as well as the assignment and status of devices, which lets us match and compare prescribed values to those which are observed.

Prior to implementing BeyondCorp, we performed a fleet-wide audit to ensure the quality of inventory data, and we perform smaller audits regularly across the fleet. Automation is key to achieving this, both for entering data initially and for detecting divergence at later points. For example, instead of having a human enter data into the system manually, we use digital manifests and barcode scanners as much as possible.


How do we figure out whether devices are trustworthy?

After appropriate management systems have been put in place, and data quality goals have been met, the pertinent security information related to a device can be used to establish a "trust" decision as to whether a given action should be allowed to be performed from the device.



High level architecture for BeyondCorp


This decision can be most effectively made when an abundance of information about the device is readily available. At Google, we use an aggregated data pipeline to gather information from various sources, which each contain a limited subset of knowledge about a device and its history, and make this data available at the point when a trust decision is being made.

Various systems and repositories are employed within Google to perform collection and storage of device data that is relevant to security. These include tools like asset management repositories, device management solutions, vulnerability scanners, and internal directory services, which contain information and state about the multitude of physical device types (e.g., desktops, laptops, phones, tablets), as well as virtual desktops, used by employees at the company.

Having data from these various types of information systems available when making a trust decision for a given device can certainly be advantageous. However, challenges can present themselves when attempting to correlate records from a diverse set of systems which may not have a clear, consistent way to reference the identity of a given device. The challenge of implementation has been offset by the gains in security policy flexibility and improvements in securing our data.


What lessons did we learn?
As we rolled out BeyondCorp, we iteratively improved our fleet management and inventory processes as outlined above. These improvements are based on various lessons we learned around data quality challenges.

Audit your data ahead of implementing BeyondCorp

Data quality issues and inaccuracies are almost certain to be present in an asset management system of any substantial size, and these issues must be corrected before the data can be utilized in a manner which will have a significant impact on user experience. Having the means to compare values that have been manually entered into such systems against similar data that has been collected from devices via automation can allow for the correction of discrepancies, which may interrupt the intended behavior of the system.


Prepare to encounter unforeseen data quality challenges

Numerous data incorrectness scenarios and challenging issues are likely to present themselves as the reliance on accurate data increases. For example, be prepared to encounter issues with data ingestion processes that rely on transcribing device identifier information, which is physically labeled on devices or their packaging, and may incorrectly differ from identifier data that is digitally imprinted on the device.

In addition, over reliance on the assumed uniqueness of certain device identifiers can sometimes be problematic in the rare cases where conventionally unique attributes, like serial numbers, can appear more than once in the device fleet (this can be especially exacerbated in the case of virtual desktops, where such identifiers may be chosen by a user without regard for such concerns).

Lastly, routine maintenance and hardware replacements performed on employee devices can result in ambiguous situations with regards to the "identity" of a device. When internal device components, like network adapters or mainboards, are found to be defective and replaced, the device's identity can be changed into a state which no longer matches the known inventory data if care is not taken to correctly reflect such changes. 


Implement controls to maintain high quality asset inventory

After inventory data has been brought to an acceptable correctness level, mechanisms should be put into place to limit the ability for new inaccuracies to be introduced. For example, at Google, data correctness checks have been integrated into the provisioning process for new devices so that inventory records must be correct before a device can be successfully imaged with an operating system, ensuring that the device will meet required data accuracy standards before being delivered to an employee.

Next time
In the next post in this series, we will discuss a tiered access approach, how to create rule-based trust and the lessons we’ve learned through that process.

In the meantime, if you want to learn more, you can check out the BeyondCorp research papers. In addition, getting started with BeyondCorp is now easier using zero trust solutions from Google Cloud (context-aware access) and other enterprise providers.

Thank you to the editors of the BeyondCorp blog post series, Puneet Goel (Product Manager), Lior Tishbi (Program Manager), and Justin McWilliams (Engineering Manager).

“Lite” but packs a punch: Google Go comes to Android everywhere

Google Go is a lightweight, fast app that helps you access information, both online and in the world around you, even with an unstable connection. It does this while using less storage and memory, helping your phone stay fast. Google Go has been available in a few countries and on Android (Go edition) devices since 2017, and starting today, it’s available on the Play Store worldwide. 


Millions of people have already used Google Go to find information on the web and make sense of the world around them. But we know that people everywhere can sometimes struggle with spotty connections, phone storage, and reading or translating text.


Reading made easier

Earlier this year at I/O, we showcased Lens in Google Go, a way for you to read, translate and search the words you see by using your camera. When you find text you’d like help with, open Lens and point your camera at it to hear the words read out loud to you, translate them, or both.
Lens in Google Go

Some people would rather listen to content instead of reading on the web, especially if it’s lengthy. Google Go also offers an AI-powered read-out-loud feature that lets you listen to any web page, with words highlighted as they’re read so you can follow along. 

Read out loud Google Go

Use less storage, and worry less about your connection

Google Go helps you use less storage on your device, and keeps an unreliable connection from slowing you down. At just over 7MB, Google Go helps make sure your phone stays speedy when you’re traversing the web. It also puts web versions of your favorite apps at your fingertips, giving you the option of downloading fewer apps on your phone. And if you lose connectivity when you using Google Go, it will remember your place and even retrieve your search results for you once you’re back online. 


Starting today, Google Go is available on the Play Store globally for all Android devices using Lollipop and above.

New tools to help Spanish speakers build their careers

Spanish is my first language, and it’s what I spoke with my family growing up in Costa Rica. Even today, after making the U.S. my home for more than two decades, it’s the language my brain thinks in. So I understand well the challenges of living in a country where the spoken language is your second language, or even completely new to you. Especially for those trying to get ahead—taking classes, learning new skills, finding work—it can be really hard.

That’s why I’m thrilled that today, through Grow with Google, our initiative to create economic opportunity for everyone, we’re making new resources available to help Spanish speakers learn skills they need to prepare for a job or grow a business in today’s economy.

For example, our Applied Digital Skills curriculum helps learners develop crucial digital skills to thrive in the workplace through free, video-based lessons. We also offer minicourses in Spanish for local businesses and job seekers on our free Google Primer app, which teaches business and digital marketing skills through short and easy interactive lessons. Our IT Support Professional Certificate, which is designed to prepare beginners for entry-level IT support jobs in as little as six months, will be available in Spanish starting September 16. These resources and more can be accessed at grow.google/espanol

Skills like these help people thrive in today's jobs. According to Brookings, nearly two thirds of all new jobs created since 2010 required either high or medium-level digital skills. 

The Latino community makes up 16 percent of the U.S. labor market and will make up half of the people entering the workforce by 2025. Latino nonprofits are key resources for educating and training community members. Google.org is making a grant to the Hispanic Federation to launch an accelerator to strengthen institutions serving the Latino community with workforce development and digital training programs. Through this grant, the Hispanic Federation will enhance the capacity of 20 Latino-led and Latino-serving nonprofit organizations, which in turn will provide career-aligned digital skills training to more than 10,000 Latinos over the next two years. This builds on our ongoing commitment to the Latino community, which includes a $5 million grant announced earlier this year to bring computer science education to over one million Latino students and their families by 2022. 

The LULAC Institute will integrate Applied Digital Skills and Primer into their programming, to bring digital skills training in Spanish to more than 60 local technology centers around the country. Community organizations across the U.S. can also apply to join the Grow with Google Partner Program, to access bilingual resources and trainers that help community members learn essential skills like creating a resume or growing a business through digital marketing.

I’m proud that the company I work for is helping provide more opportunities for Spanish speakers to grow their skills all across the U.S.


El español es mi primer idioma, y es el que utilice con mi familia, mientras crecía en Costa Rica. Aún ahora, después de que los Estados Unidos se convirtió en mi hogar, durante más de dos décadas, es el idioma en el que mi cerebro piensa en la mañana. Así que entiendo las dificultades de vivir en un país donde el idioma hablado es tu segundo idioma. Especialmente para aquellos que quieren salir adelante—tomar clases, aprender nuevas habilidades, encontrar trabajo—puede ser muy difícil.

Por eso estoy emocionada que hoy, por medio de Grow with Google, nuestra iniciativa para crear oportunidades económicas para todos, estamos proporcionando  nuevos recursos a los hispanohablantes, para aprender las habilidades que necesitan, prepararse para un trabajo, o hacer negocios en la economía digital.

Por ejemplo, nuestro plan de estudios,Habilidades Digitales Aplicadas, ayuda a desarrollar habilidades digitales cruciales para prosperar en el trabajo, por medio de lecciones gratuitas basadas en video. También ofrecemos mini cursos en español para pequeños negocios y personas buscando trabajo en nuestra aplicación gratuitaGoogle Primer, que enseña habilidades comerciales y de marketing digital, a través de breves lecciones interactivas y fáciles.  NuestroCertificado Profesional de Soporte de TI, está diseñado para preparar a principiantes para trabajos de nivel de entrada de TI, en solo seis meses, y estará disponible en español a partir del 16 de septiembre. Se puede acceder a estos recursos y más en grow.google/espanol.

Habilidades como estas, ayudan a las personas a prosperar en los trabajos actuales. De acuerdo conBrookings, casi dos tercios de todos los nuevos empleos, creados desde 2010, requieren habilidades digitales de nivel alto o medio.

La comunidad latina representa el16 por ciento del mercado laboral de los Estados Unidos, y será la mitad de los trabajadores que ingresen a la fuerza laboral para 2025. Las organizaciones latinas, sin fines de lucro,  son instrumentos clave para educar y capacitar a los miembros de la comunidad. Es por eso que Google.org está otorgando una donación a la Federación Hispana (Hispanic Federation), para lanzar un acelerador que fortalezca las instituciones que sirven a la comunidad latina, con programas para el desarrollo y capacitación digital de la fuerza laboral. Con esta donación, la Federación Hispana acelerará la capacidad de 20 organizaciones sin fines de lucro, dirigidas a los  latinos que, a su vez, proporcionarán capacitación en habilidades digitales a más de 10,000 personas durante los próximos dos años. Esto aumenta nuestro compromiso con la comunidad latina, e incluye una donación de$5 millones de dólares, anunciada a principios de este año, para brindar educación en ciencias de la computación a más de un millón de estudiantes y familias latinas para el 2022.

ElInstituto LULAC integrará lasHabilidades Digitales Aplicadas yPrimer en su programación, para brindar capacitación en español a más de 60 centros de tecnología comunitarios en todo el país. Organizaciones comunitarias en los Estados Unidos también pueden solicitar unirse al programaGrow with Google Partner Program para tener acceso a recursos, así como entrenadores bilingües, que ayudan al aprendizaje comunitario de  habilidades y destrezas esenciales, como crear un currículum o hacer crecer un negocio a través del marketing digital.

Me siento orgullosa de que la compañía, para la cual trabajo, esté ayudando a brindar más oportunidades de crecimiento para los hispanohablantes en los Estados Unidos.

Celebrating Aussie sport: More ways to help you explore, learn and get into the games you love


Whether we’re playing or barracking, we Aussies take our commitment to sport very seriously. We have public holidays for horse races and grand finals – and 92% of us are interested in sports.* Over generations, sport has become a defining pillar of our identity, values and culture.

This passion for sport comes through in Search. According to Google Trends, Search interest in Australia sport is higher than Search interest in the weather every year – and the most searched Aussie by Aussies this year so far is tennis player and former cricketer, Ash Barty.

With this fascination in mind, we’ve been on a mission to help Aussies better connect with and explore the sports they love. Last year, we launched live scores, match results, fixtures and ladders across AFL, NRL, Cricket (and more) to help you stay up to date and cheer on your favourite teams. And this year, we launched voting in Search, inviting AFL fans to vote for their Friday Night Best on Ground and Player of the Round - directly in Search.

We know rich content and live streaming are important to fans. In the coming months, we’re delivering more tools to help partners bring their live streams and highlights through Search.

Building on these efforts, we’ve been working with more local partners to help people in Australia and around the world explore and learn about our rich sporting heritage.

Today, Google Arts & Culture is launching our first dedicated celebration of sports, Great Sporting Land – showcasing the people, moments and places which have shaped our extraordinary sport history. Australia was chosen as the first country to kick off this initiative – a true testament to our weight in the world of sport.



The exhibition features over 11,000 archived images and videos, and more than 100 original stories from over 30 partners including the Melbourne Cricket Club, Australian Football League, National Portrait Gallery and Bondi Surf Lifesaving. Google’s Art Camera technology also travelled to sporting institutions across the country to capture over 200 pieces of art, archival materials and artefacts in high-resolution gigapixel quality.

Cricket legend Steve Waugh will take you on a tour of the archives of the world-famous Bradman Museum to discover some of the most famous bats in the history of cricket, including hand-etched scores on the back of Don Bradman’s first bat. Steve will also take you through a video series that offers never-before-seen insight into his work and memories of the sport.


Zoom into the details of Don Bradman’s original bat (here held by Steve Waugh), from the Bradman Museum. 

You can also venture to Sydney Cricket Ground's Away Changing Room where visiting players have taken it upon themselves to graffiti their standout batting and bowling figures on the changing room door.
Sydney Cricket Ground's Away changing room cupboard door, from Sydney Cricket & Sports Grounds


If you’re ready for a dip, put on your togs and take a trip to Summers Past—an exhibition celebrating the golden days in the Australian sunshine. You can also Watch the Waves (a selection of photographs of surf lifesaving by the National Archives) or explore the North Bondi Surf Life Saving Club in VR.


A lifeguard watching over swimmers from a lookout, circa 1966, from National Archives of Australia

Whether you’re in Melbourne, Mumbai or Manchester, you can discover the tales, traditions, legends and artifacts that have shaped our great sporting nation at g.co/GreatSportingLand – or download the Google Arts & Culture app on iOS or Android.

*BCG Intergenerational Review of Australian Sport 2017, Australian Sports Commission