Tag Archives: Arts & Culture

All I Want: The stories behind Portuguese female artists

What’s the place of female artists? How much of their art is known, spoken or internationally recognized? There is still a long way to go to achieve gender equality, but making sure we open space to talk about the ones who already broke barriers is definitely the first step. "All I Want: Portuguese women artists from 1900 to 2020" is a feminist exhibit and a space of dialogue and affirmation. Even more, it is a collection to show the historical and artistic relevance of Portuguese female artists -- and certainly an exhibit that we want everyone to have access to, even amid travel restrictions. That’s why we’re excited to have partnered with Google Arts & Culture to bring this exhibit to the world.

More than 240 artworks by 40 Portuguese artists, from 1900 to 2020, come together in a large exhibit that we are making available to an international audience thanks to technology. Artists like Aurélia de Sousa, Maria Helena Vieira da Silva, Rosa Ramalho or Sarah Affonso gain life through 14 different stories transposing the physical exhibit and 40 stories telling the biographies of each selected artist. 

All I Want questions where women are in art today, and reinforces the need to celebrate women artists from history. The exhibit highlights artists that deserve recognition, putting forgotten women back in the frame and exploring concepts, styles, colors, feminism and how the artists reflect their individuality. 

The stories are divided into topics that will take people through a journey that spans from understanding generations to considering the place of women in art history, as well as discussions about the body and literary production. The curators, Helena de Freitas and Bruno Marchand, worked to make sure this exhibit would not only fill a gap in the art world, but also explain why this disparity started in the first place.


All I Want is an initiative of the Ministry of Culture, in partnership with Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, presented on the occasion of the Portuguese Presidency of the Council of the European Union 2021. After its period in Portugal, the physical exhibit will travel to France, but on Google Arts & Culture this project will be preserved and able to reach every corner. In my ideal world, every female artist would have  recognition and space for their art. For now, I am happy we are starting with these exceptional Portuguese women artists and I hope this inspires other institutions in the world.

Meet Barbara Hepworth, her art and life with Google Arts & Culture

Barbara Hepworth was one of the most important artists of the 20th century,and on this day in 1964 she unveiled her iconic sculpture Single Form at the United Nations in New York City. The piece is a dedication to her friend, UN Secretary General, Dag Hammarskjöld. To mark the decade since the opening of her namesake gallery — the Hepworth Wakefield — Google Arts & Culture’s latest collaboration brings thelargest retrospective of Hepworth’s work online, for audiences everywhere to explore.

Perhaps what one wants to say is formed in childhood and the rest of one's life is spent in trying to say it. Barbara Hepworth

Born and raised in the Yorkshire town of Wakefield, Hepworth worked at the forefront of contemporary art during her lifetime. Learn about Hepworth’s relationship with Yorkshire, and see how its influences can be seen throughout her career. The exhibition emphasizes how her work spanned across disciplines including space exploration, music, dance, politics and religion, while also reflecting her personal experiences.

Seminal sculptures such as Mother and Child, Springand Single Form have been captured in ultra high resolution using the latest technology, to allow viewers to get up close with the texture of the materials and see the carefully created marks Hepworth made during creation. Audiences can also discover more about the artist's lesser-known artworks including her printmaking and designs for theaters.

And if you aren’t able to make it to Yorkshire, art fans everywhere cantake a virtual walk around the stunning exhibition using Google Street View. A selection of Hepworth’s iconic sculptures can also be experienced using Augmented Reality to see them up close in your own space with the Google Arts & Culture app.

For a more contemporary fix, discover the newly commissioned works by Tacita Dean and Veronica Ryan, made especially for the anniversary exhibition. Or, if you are feeling creative, perhaps you could have a go at creating a Hepworth-inspired artwork yourself. There are activities for all agesand interests available, with videos, quizzes and more.

Visit g.co/BarbaraHepworth to explore more, and discover the incredible exhibition online. The Google Arts & Culture app is free and available online for iOS and Android.

Atlanta: Discover the Big Peach with Google Arts & Culture

For over 20 years, Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International airport has been the busiest in the U.S., welcoming millions of travelers. As we recover from COVID-19, we’re thrilled to once again be one of the main international traveling hubs. To inspire your next trip, Discover Atlanta is one of 30 partners launching a new online destination  at Google Arts & Culture. The site is dedicated to all the city has to offer, from civil rights history to our metropolis of food, our modern-day rap scene, and much more. Check out these 7 things to get started:

1. Dive into the history

  • Experience Atlanta’s rich history of the civil rights movement with Georgia Public Broadcasting’s story of movement leaders and see an exhibiton John Lewis with the National Center for Civil and Human Rights.
  • Meet Georgians who fought for human rights, like Rosalynn Carter’s advocacy for women’s rights with Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum, and Jewish pilot Evelyn Greenblatt Howren with the Breman Jewish Heritage Museum.

2. Meet the artists

  • MINT will introduce you to up-and-coming artists like Caleb Jamel Brown, Atlanta Contemporary shines the spotlight on outsider artists like Charles Williams, and High Museum of Art points you toward the Atlantan artists you’ve got to know.  Don’t forget to dive into Fahamu Pecou’s original painting as a tribute to the city.

3. Explore the neighborhoods

  • Let local radio station WABE take you on a tour through the city’s neighborhoods, discover community murals with Living Walls, and take a breather in Atlanta’s urban oasis with Atlanta Botanical Garden.

4. Discover the museums

  • The city’s universities hold extraordinary art, with Hale Woodruff linocuts from Spelman College Museum of Fine Art, public art on Clark Atlanta’s campus, and Albrecht Durer prints at Emory’s Carlos Museum.
  • Step inside Hammonds House Museum to discover Black art and artists ranging from Romare Bearden to Grace Kisa Nu, or venture to Museum of Design Atlanta to see how social justice and design overlap.

5. Get a taste for the food scene

  • Feel at home in the international restaurant hub of Buford Highway with oral histories from restaurateurs and community figures, shared by Southern Foodways Alliance, and discover how the city’s culinary scene combines global and Southern influences with Discover Atlanta

6. Enjoy performing arts and festivals

  • Let Atlanta Symphony Orchestra serenade you with their outdoor concert series, catch a pre-Broadway show at Alliance Theatre, step out in the crowd at the AtlantaBeltLine Lantern Parade with ChooseATL, and stop by one of the oldest free jazz festivals in the country.

7. Learn about rap and hip hop

  • Most of America’s hip hop, rap, and trap gets it start in Atlanta: go back in time with an iconic record collection thanks to the HipHop2020 Innovation Archive at Georgia Tech, explore paintings of your favorite trap artists from the Trap Music Museum, and listen to experts from Bottom of the Map Podcast dissect the “grind and hustle” of Atlanta’s hip hop.

Want to learn more? Visit g.co/exploreatlanta, or download Google Arts & Culture’s Android or iOS app.

Celebrate Africa Day through culture and music

Africa is home to more than 1.5 billion people, and each country, community and person has an incredible story to tell. Through the power of technology, artists and cultural institutions are using online platforms to share their stories and engage with new audiences.

This year, we’re hosting the Africa Day Benefit Concert in collaboration with MTV Base Africa and Idris Elba. We invite you to tune in at 7 PM CAT this evening to experience a musical homage to this amazing continent, and its next generation of pop stars making headlines across the world.

The concert is the culmination of Africa Month, which we’ve celebrated through YouTube Music and Google Arts & Culture. We’ve hosted a live performance by Sauti Sol, a talk on theLeading Women in Music, and the launch of the projectÈkó for Show: Explore Lagos. Music unites Africa, and we hope the concert tonight will bring Africans and people from other parts of the world together to celebrate the continent's roots, rhythms and records.

As we celebrate Africa Day today, we invite you to explore the continent's rich cultural heritage through curated online experiences on YouTube and Google Arts & Culture. We hope Africans and people from all over the world will be inspired by these activities that bring together the continent's roots and rhythms.

10:25

Africa Day Concert hosted by Idris Elba

Step inside Africa’s cultural institutions

There are thousands of iconic museums, galleries and cultural sites in Africa, including Kenya's African Heritage House. Virtually visit 32 cultural institutions across the continent and read over300 expert-curated stories on art, identity, music, fashion, food and more. 

Search for your favorite African artist and click on the Art Projector feature to display their artwork in front of you. Start with paintings byAli Omar Ermes, Ben Enwonwu, Mohammed Khadda, Nja Mahdaoui, Wangechi Mutu, William Kentridge and Wosene Worke Kosrof.

Discover more about contemporary African art and its artists by visiting Jean Pigozzi’s Pocket Galleryin augmented reality. Can you spot the paintings by artistChéri Samba and Esther Mahlangu?

Exterior of the African Heritage House, Deidi von Schaewen, African Heritage House

Exterior of the African Heritage House, Deidi von Schaewen, African Heritage House

Be inspired by Africa's trailblazing women

Let the voices of women from the past and present inspire you. Meet a courageous freedom fighter, let Mama Nike ignite your creativity, learn about activist Winnie Mandela's bravery, take in the remarkable story ofQueen Tiye and score a goal with a strong women's football team.

10:25

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela

Learn about Kenyan heroes and explore the future

Step back in time with 61 Kenyan heroes and discover how they fought for their communities’ land, freedom and spiritual well-being. Take the quiz to find out who your super alter-ego would be. 

Drawing on Afrofuturism, be inspired by artists from the diasporaand Osborne Macharia to create your own Afrofuturist world. Release your inner superpowers and let your imagination be your guide.

Superheroes of Kenya, Shujaa Stories and National Museums of Kenya, 2020

Superheroes of Kenya, Shujaa Stories and National Museums of Kenya, 2020

Feel the buzz of Lagos and explore South Africa

Step inside Lagos, Nigeria's most populous city, with Èkó for Show, and let over 100 creatives inspire you. Start singing Afrobeat tunes with Reekado Banks, paint the lagoon withVictor Ehikamenor, meet the stars of Nollywood with Iké Udé and letDavido inspire your taste buds. 

Continue your journey to South Africa and feel the urban vibe with musicians Busiswa andMuzi. Let them take you on a personal city tour and learn how Durban and Johannesburg have impacted their lives.

Èkó for Show: Explore Lagos, Google Arts & Culture

Èkó for Show: Explore Lagos, Google Arts & Culture

Celebrate the power of African literature

Let poet Siphokazi Jonas'love letter to her home country inspire you, and learn more about what identity means to author Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o.Share Africa’s greatest stories by joining the #AfricaReads challenge with YouTube. Share a video of yourself reading a book by your favorite African author, or watch how people across the continent came together to read Lọlá Shónẹ́yìn's novel The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives.

Crack the hieroglyphic code

Still curious about words and languages? We challenge you to crack the hieroglyphic code from Ancient Egypt with the AI-powered toolFabricius.You can also use emojis to create secret codes with friends.

Fabricius: Learn, Play, and Work, Google Arts & Culture

Fabricius: Learn, Play, and Work, Google Arts & Culture

Explore and protect Africa’s wildlife and natural wonders

Africa is home to some of the world's most extraordinary wildlife and nature. Learn more about the importance of conservation with thelast male northern white rhino or join a virtual game to meet Africa's big five: lion, leopard, rhino, elephant and buffalo.

If you’re one for appreciating nature, we invite you to check out the people of Kilwa Kisiwani in Tanzania, and learn how planting mangrove trees and using technology can help save historical ruins and communities.

Addo Elephant National Park, Eastern Cape, South Africa, South African Tourism

Addo Elephant National Park, Eastern Cape, South Africa, South African Tourism

Turn your lens on Africa

Join Africa's photographers in capturing and sharing culture in new ways. Be inspired by legendary photojournalist James Barnor, take a look back at 10 years of LagosPhoto Festival and learn how to turn the street into a runway with Stephen Tayo.

Ibeji (brothers), Stephen Tayo, Homecoming, 2019

Ibeji (brothers), Stephen Tayo, Homecoming, 2019

Explore Black history beyond the continent

African culture has had a transformative impact on the world and keeps fuelling creativity in the diaspora. Join rapper Nas in paying homage to the long tradition of black musicians and storytellers who inspire us to this day. Learn more about Black history and culture in theUnited States, theUnited Kingdom or explore 50 years of black creativity through the exhibitionGet Up, Stand Up Now.

10:25

Celebrating history's Black musicians with Nas

Find out more on YouTube Music and with the Google Arts & Culture app on Android or iOS.

Woolaroo: a new tool for exploring indigenous languages

“Our dictionary doesn’t have a word for shoe” my Uncle Allan Lena said, so when kids ask him what to call it in Yugambeh, he’ll say “jinung gulli” - a foot thing.


Uncle Allan Lena is a frontline worker in the battle to reteach the Yugambeh Aboriginal language to the children of southeast Queensland, Australia, where it hasn’t been spoken fluently for decades and thus is – like many other languages around the world – in danger of disappearing.  


For the younger generation, even general language can be a challenge to understand, but it can be especially difficult to try to describe modern items using Indigenous languages like Yugambeh. For example in the Australian outdoors, it’s easy to teach children the words for trees and animals, but around the house it becomes harder. Traditional language didn't have a word for a fridge - so we say waring bin - a cold place. The same with a telephone - we call it a gulgun biral - voice thrower.


However, today’s technology can help provide an educational and interactive way to promote language learning and preservation.  I’m particularly proud for Yugambeh to be the first Australian Aboriginal language to be featured on Woolaroo, a new Google Arts & Culture experiment using the Cloud Vision API. 


The team behind the Yugambeh Museum has been working for three decades to help gather local language and cultural stories. Given the importance of Aboriginal language to Australian culture we have the incentive to record the known but in particular new words our community members are using as the world evolves bringing us new technology we didn’t have before.
An info graphic with numbers on the Yugambeh language

Woolaroo is open source and allows language communities like ours to preserve and expand their language word lists and add audio recordings to help with pronunciation. Today it supports 10 global languages including Louisiana Creole, Calabrian Greek, Māori, Nawat, Tamazight, Sicilian, Yang Zhuang, Rapa Nui, Yiddish and Yugambeh. Any of these languages are an important aspect of a community’s cultural heritage. 


Crucial to Indigenous communities is that Woolaroo puts the power to add, edit and delete entries completely in their hands. So people can respond immediately to newly remembered words and phrases and add them directly.


So if you, your grandparents or people in your community speak any of these languages – even if just a few words –  you can help to expand the growing coverage of Woolaroo.


We hope people will enjoy learning and interacting with a new language and  learn about the diversity of communities and heritage we all share together. 


Explore more on the Google Arts & Culture app for iOS and Android and at g.co/woolaroo.

Woolaroo: a new tool for exploring indigenous languages

“Our dictionary doesn’t have a word for shoe” my Uncle Allan Lena said, so when kids ask him what to call it in Yugambeh, he’ll say “jinung gulli” - a foot thing.


Uncle Allan Lena is a frontline worker in the battle to reteach the Yugambeh Aboriginal language to the children of southeast Queensland, Australia, where it hasn’t been spoken fluently for decades and thus is – like many other languages around the world – in danger of disappearing.  


For the younger generation, even general language can be a challenge to understand, but it can be especially difficult to try to describe modern items using Indigenous languages like Yugambeh. For example in the Australian outdoors, it’s easy to teach children the words for trees and animals, but around the house it becomes harder. Traditional language didn't have a word for a fridge - so we say waring bin - a cold place. The same with a telephone - we call it a gulgun biral - voice thrower.


However, today’s technology can help provide an educational and interactive way to promote language learning and preservation.  I’m particularly proud for Yugambeh to be the first Australian Aboriginal language to be featured on Woolaroo, a new Google Arts & Culture experiment using the Cloud Vision API. 


The team behind the Yugambeh Museum has been working for three decades to help gather local language and cultural stories. Given the importance of Aboriginal language to Australian culture we have the incentive to record the known but in particular new words our community members are using as the world evolves bringing us new technology we didn’t have before.
An info graphic with numbers on the Yugambeh language

Woolaroo is open source and allows language communities like ours to preserve and expand their language word lists and add audio recordings to help with pronunciation. Today it supports 10 global languages including Louisiana Creole, Calabrian Greek, Māori, Nawat, Tamazight, Sicilian, Yang Zhuang, Rapa Nui, Yiddish and Yugambeh. Any of these languages are an important aspect of a community’s cultural heritage. 


Crucial to Indigenous communities is that Woolaroo puts the power to add, edit and delete entries completely in their hands. So people can respond immediately to newly remembered words and phrases and add them directly.


So if you, your grandparents or people in your community speak any of these languages – even if just a few words –  you can help to expand the growing coverage of Woolaroo.


We hope people will enjoy learning and interacting with a new language and  learn about the diversity of communities and heritage we all share together. 


Explore more on the Google Arts & Culture app for iOS and Android and at g.co/woolaroo.

Celebrating Asian Pacific American Art and Cultures

While the Asian and Pacific Islander communities have always faced forms of discrimination and xenophobia, the recent increase of hate and violence have been a troubling and heartbreaking  reminder of prejudice, especially as our elders have been targeted.

In times of division and hatred, arts and culture are a great source of humanity and hope. As we raise our voices and come together, turning to arts and culture can help us find new ways of learning, understanding and healing.

With Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month upon us, it is with great joy that I’m announcing that Google Arts & Culture has partnered with 48 cultural institutions and experts of Asian American and Pacific Islander (API) cultures to celebrate and launch a new hub dedicated to Asian American and Pacific Islander cultures. This builds on our work with partners including the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American CenterCenter for Asian American MediaMuseum of Chinese in America and Shangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design.

With new partners including Visual Communications, Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation, and Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, the site includes over 110 stories and thousands of cultural artifacts, archives and artworks — all available in one place. Now, everyone will be able to learn more about API cultures in the US and how their contributions shaped the economical, political and cultural life of the country.

Whether these cultures are familiar or new to you, there will be something for you on this hub to get acquainted with and deepen your understanding of API cultures.

Wondering where to start? From food, art, music, poetry, science and innovation, follow our cultural bucket list to celebrate Asian American and Pacific Islander cultures:

  1. Poetry:Often called the Ellis Island of the West, Angel Island is where thousands of immigrants arrived in the US. Read this moving story about the immigrants’ poems engraved onto the barrack walls.
  2. Art:Jenifer K Wofford's mural, patterned with Tibetan bone aprons and Thai Kranok motifs, name-checks prominent figures in Bay Area Asian American art history, including Carlos Villa and Jade Snow Wong.
  3. Heirlooms:What’s your favorite personal object? Hear the Museum of Chinese in America’s communityshare stories about a special object of theirs; a cassette single ofA Tribe Called Quest's "Check the Rhime,” a Fu Manchu mustache, a jade necklace, a marathon medal.
  4. Science: Ellison Onizuka was the first Asian American to fly to space, and whose important legacy has inspired many since.
  5. Food:Meet Hieu Pham, the owner of Crawfish Shack Seafood in Atlanta, who uses his multicultural background to create unique Vietnamese cuisine with a touch of the American South.
  6. Art:Read about Ruth Asawa’s journey to become one of America’s esteemed modern artists.
  7. History:Learn about these two Queens of Hawaii, Kapi‘olani and Lili‘uokalani, whose legacy of advocacy and philanthropy are still at the heart of Hawaii today.
  8. Sport: Follow the story of Tommy Kono, the record-breaking Olympian who overcame hardship and discrimination, becoming one of the greatest weightlifters of all time.

We’re hoping this will inspire you to start your journey of learning more about API cultures, and that you’ll  come back regularly as we work with cultural institutions to tell more Asian and Pacific Islander stories. 

Celebrating Asian Pacific American Art and Cultures

While the Asian and Pacific Islander communities have always faced forms of discrimination and xenophobia, the recent increase of hate and violence have been a troubling and heartbreaking  reminder of prejudice, especially as our elders have been targeted.

In times of division and hatred, arts and culture are a great source of humanity and hope. As we raise our voices and come together, turning to arts and culture can help us find new ways of learning, understanding and healing.

With Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month upon us, it is with great joy that I’m announcing that Google Arts & Culture has partnered with 48 cultural institutions and experts of Asian American and Pacific Islander (API) cultures to celebrate and launch a new hub dedicated to Asian American and Pacific Islander cultures. This builds on our work with partners including the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American CenterCenter for Asian American MediaMuseum of Chinese in America and Shangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design.

With new partners including Visual Communications, Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation, and Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, the site includes over 110 stories and thousands of cultural artifacts, archives and artworks — all available in one place. Now, everyone will be able to learn more about API cultures in the US and how their contributions shaped the economical, political and cultural life of the country.

Whether these cultures are familiar or new to you, there will be something for you on this hub to get acquainted with and deepen your understanding of API cultures.

Wondering where to start? From food, art, music, poetry, science and innovation, follow our cultural bucket list to celebrate Asian American and Pacific Islander cultures:

  1. Poetry:Often called the Ellis Island of the West, Angel Island is where thousands of immigrants arrived in the US. Read this moving story about the immigrants’ poems engraved onto the barrack walls.
  2. Art:Jenifer K Wofford's mural, patterned with Tibetan bone aprons and Thai Kranok motifs, name-checks prominent figures in Bay Area Asian American art history, including Carlos Villa and Jade Snow Wong.
  3. Heirlooms:What’s your favorite personal object? Hear the Museum of Chinese in America’s communityshare stories about a special object of theirs; a cassette single ofA Tribe Called Quest's "Check the Rhime,” a Fu Manchu mustache, a jade necklace, a marathon medal.
  4. Science: Ellison Onizuka was the first Asian American to fly to space, and whose important legacy has inspired many since.
  5. Food:Meet Hieu Pham, the owner of Crawfish Shack Seafood in Atlanta, who uses his multicultural background to create unique Vietnamese cuisine with a touch of the American South.
  6. Art:Read about Ruth Asawa’s journey to become one of America’s esteemed modern artists.
  7. History:Learn about these two Queens of Hawaii, Kapi‘olani and Lili‘uokalani, whose legacy of advocacy and philanthropy are still at the heart of Hawaii today.
  8. Sport: Follow the story of Tommy Kono, the record-breaking Olympian who overcame hardship and discrimination, becoming one of the greatest weightlifters of all time.

We’re hoping this will inspire you to start your journey of learning more about API cultures, and that you’ll  come back regularly as we work with cultural institutions to tell more Asian and Pacific Islander stories. 

When artists and machine intelligence come together

Throughout history, from photography to video to hypertext, artists have pushed the expressive limits of new technologies, and artificial intelligence is no exception. At I/O 2019, Google Research and Google Arts & Culture launched the Artists + Machine Intelligence Grants, providing a range of support and technical mentorship to six artists from around the globe following an open call for proposals. The inaugural grant program sought to expand the field of artists working with Machine Learning (ML) and, through supporting pioneering artists, creatively push at the boundaries of generative ML and natural language processing. 


Today, we are publishing the outcomes of the grants. The projects draw from many disciplines, including rap and hip hop, screenwriting, early cinema, phonetics, Spanish language poetry, and Indian pre-modern sound. What they all have in common is an ability to challenge our assumptions about AI’s creative potential.


a graffiti-style visualization of the artwork

Learn more about the Hip Hop Poetry Bot

Hip Hop Poetry Bot by Alex Fefegha  

Can AI rap? Alex explores speech generation trained on rap and hip hop lyrics by Black artists. For the moment it exists as a proof of concept, as building the experiment in full requires a large, public dataset of rap and hip hop lyrics on which an algorithm can be trained, and such a public archive doesn’t currently exist.  The project is therefore launching with an invitation from Alex to rap and hip hop artists to become creative collaborators and contribute their lyrics to create a new, public dataset of lyrics by Black artists. 

A woman, partly smiling, in an industrial-style room

Read more about Neural Swamp

Neural Swamp by Martine Syms 

Martine uses video and performance to examine representations of blackness across generations, geographies, mediums, and traditions. For this residency, Martine developed Neural Swamp, a play staged across five screens, starring five entities who talk and sing alongside and over each other. Two of the five voices are trained on Martine’s voice and generated using machine learning speech models. The project will premiere at The Philadelphia Museum of Art and Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo in Fall 2021.

A dashboard with toggles for changing the letters in a sentence

The Nonsense Laboratory by Allison Parrish  

Allison invites you to adjust, poke at, mangle, curate and compress words with a series of playful tools in her Nonsense Laboratory. Powered by a bespoke code library and machine learning model developed by Allison Parrish you can mix and respell words, sequence mouth movements to create new words, rewrite a text so that the words feel different in your mouth, or go on a journey through a field of nonsense. 

A collage of images, in the style of old cinema film

Let Me Dream Again by Anna Ridler 

Anna uses machine learning to try to recreate lost films from fragments of early Hollywood and European cinema that still exist. The outcome? An endlessly evolving, algorithmically generated film and soundtrack. The film will continually play, never repeating itself, over a period of one month. 

A woman in a desert holding a staff

Read more about Knots of Code

Knots of Code by Paola Torres Núñez del Prado

Paola studies the history of quipus, a pre-Columbian notation system that is based on the tying of knots in ropes, as part of a new research project, Knots of Code. The project’s first work is a Spanish language poetry-album from Paola and AIELSON, an artificial intelligence system that composes and recites poetry inspired by quipus and emulating the voice of the late Peruvian poet J.E. Eielson. 

An empty stage with bells hanging on wires

Read more about Dhvāni

Dhvāni by Budhaditya Chattopadhyay 

Budhaditya brings a lifelong interest in the materiality, phenomenology, political-cultural associations, and the sociability of sound to Dhvāni, a responsive sound installation, comprising 51 temple bells and conducted with the help of machine learning. An early iteration of Dhvāni was installed at EXPERIMENTA Arts & Sciences Biennale 2020 in Grenoble, France.  

Explore the artworks at g.co/artistsmeetai or on the free Google Arts & Culture app for iOS and Android.


Discover the people behind Japanese gastronomy

Last year, we introduced the ‘Meshiagare!’ exhibition, showcasing thousands of photos and videos exploring Japanese cuisine. Today, we’re revealing the second installation of this mouth-watering project, with a focus on the people putting food on the table

In partnership with the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Google Arts & Culture is launching a new projectabout the incredible people behind the uniqueness of Japanese cuisine. You can check out their stories through 48 new exhibitions and more than a thousand unique images and videos.  

Here’s just a taste of what you might find.

Building up small businesses, generation after generation

Discover the stories of small family-run businesses and how over generations they’ve used traditional methods of making typical Japanese dishes, such as harvesting special products from very specific areas. Begin by exploring the history of soba noodles, where you’ll learn about Eiichi Kaneko, the 7th generation owner of Sarashina Nunoya — a shining example of Tokyo's classic soba stores.

A photograph of seventh generation soba maker, Eiichi Kaneko

Innovation and Japanese gastronomy

Discover how technology is used to create new types of food, incorporating tastes and methods from other countries. Stop by the Okaki Farm, where they’re working on the Taste and Beauty of Japanese Shine Muscat by introducing new technologies, as well as researching and developing new cultivation methods like renewable solar power.

A farmer at Okaki Farm carefully checks on the Shine Muscat grapes

Making the food industry more sustainable

More and more agricultural businesses are addressing environmental concerns, and many are changing their methods to reduce their use of chemicals. One example is Yamashita Fruit Garden CEO, Eri Yamashita (pictured at the top of the blog), who shares how Apples Make Us Think About The Environment and Consumerism.

Helping tourists learn about Japanese food culture

Discover how green tourism, traditional guest houses in farms, and teaching courses on traditional Japanese food and manners are more and more used to promote the stunning treasures of the culture of gastronomy — check out how the staff at Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo Ryotei Kinsui teaches the Beauty of Japanese Dining Etiquette.

A Japanese culinary appreciation and etiquette class at Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo Ryotei Kinsui

Still hungry for more? Check out the video of the passionate food influencer Sakiko Hirano receiving Professor Toru Fushiki to teach how to make the famous broth Dashi and Marie Chiba to expound on how to pair sake with Japanese food


This dive into the secrets of Japanese food-making will inspire you to learn more about the unique origins and transformation of incredible ingredients — and the people and businesses that make it all happen. 


Discover more online on Google Arts & Culture, available on iOS and Android.