Tag Archives: YouTube

Find A Way Together, #WithMe on YouTube

This year has demanded a lot of each of us. And we’ve all been finding our own ways to cope. 
But despite the uncertainty, something profound has been happening on YouTube. People are coming together to support each other, and creators are doing what they do best: showing up for their communities. Whether it’s pausing to check in, find a moment of joy, reflect or simply express vulnerability, creators are sharing their expertise, stories, passions, and a little bit more of themselves. And these simple acts are making a difference. 
For World Mental Health Day, Mental Health Week Australia and National Mental Health Month—we want to shine a light on our YouTube community, and creators who are sharing their stories, and helping others find ways to speak out, take care, and cope. 
Thank you to the registered mental health organisations like Black Dog Institute, Project Rockit and headspace Australia on the platform for sharing your expert knowledge and resources with us. And thank you to the many other creators—from yoga instructors to musicians, from gardeners to gamers—for providing emotional support and a sense of connection just by opening up and talking about what you’re going through. You are all helping us take better care of ourselves and each other. 


Turning to YouTube for Support and Comfort 
Videos related to many practices associated with coping with anxiety and stress, including many hobbies, yoga and exercise, have seen increases in viewership this year. 
Aussie creator Chloe Ting, was one channel offering locals in lockdown an outlet. Videos with ‘Chloe Ting’ or ‘Chloe Ting Challenge’ or ‘#chloetingchallenge’ in the title generated more than 140 million views globally since March 15, 2020.1 
Videos with prayer in the title are also among those seeing an increase in views—up 70 percent in the first quarter of 2020 compared to the prior year.2 Prayer plays an important role in the lives of many, especially in handling stressful situations, and these videos may offer a feeling of solace. They also offer a way to continue participating in religious practices, and to maintain a routine during a time that is anything but routine. 

Mental health exists on a spectrum from illness to wellness and, as such, impacts every single one of us. If you’re looking for ways to take care or you’re interested to hear how others are coping with different experiences, below are a few videos to explore. For more, check out our Mental Health Awareness Playlist


Meet Sarah Chrisp 
Kiwi entrepreneur Sarah aka Wholesale Ted usually shares advice on ecommerce with her 620k fans. This week saw a break in tradition though, when she posted this video on her struggle with anxiety, depression and burnout, and how she restored her sense of wellbeing, and balance. 


Meet Maaz 
He’s a trained medical doctor turned animator extraordinaire. This video breaks away from Maaz’s renowned comedic take on life events and stories, as he talks about the discrimination he faced growing up as Muslim Pakastani in Australia, and how he has learned to be comfortable in his own skin. 


Meet Jason Stephenson 
Average daily views of videos related to insomnia more than doubled after April 1 compared to the first quarter of the year,3 and in turn, average daily views of videos related to guided meditation with “sleep” in the title increased 25 percent in April, compared to March.4  
So find a comfy seat, close down your eyes and take a moment. Jason has attracted almost two million fans to his channel, sharing weekly guided meditations, inspirational talks and affirmations to help you de-stress, find calm and get better sleep. 


Meet Erin May Henry 
Based in Melbourne, Erin has become a go-to for videos on positive self-talk. Tune in for videos like this one on self-care routines, healthy habits and life lessons that’ll help you feel motivated, and supported.


Meet Jamie Perkins 
He shares honest stories about the ins and outs of being a dad to two young daughters. Jamie created his YouTube channel to provide fun, inspirational videos on his approach to life and raising little ones. In this video created for World Mental Health Day, he talks gratitude, and what helps him get through. 


What creators are doing on YouTube is no small thing. Talking openly about coping matters. When creators promote healthy ways of coping and share adaptive skills and tips, they not only inspire us to try new strategies, but they also begin to chip away at the stigma associated with talking about and taking care of our mental health. And when stigma is reduced, we’re more likely to reach out and ask for the additional help we may need. 

If you're looking for support or want to talk, help is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, anywhere in Australia and New Zealand: 
Lifeline Australia | 13 11 14 
Kids Helpline | 1800 55 1800 
Beyond Blue | 1300 22 4636 

Lifeline New Zealand | 0800 54 33 54 
Youthline New Zealand | 0800 376 633 

For research-informed mental health resources and free support tools, check out Black Dog Institute.



1 YouTube data, Global, 15 March 2020 - 5 July 2020
2 YouTube data, Global, jan - Mar 2019, Jan - Mar 2020 
3 YouTube data, Global, January - April 2020 
4 YouTube data, Global, March - April 2020 

Find A Way Together, #WithMe on YouTube

This year has demanded a lot of each of us. And we’ve all been finding our own ways to cope. 
But despite the uncertainty, something profound has been happening on YouTube. People are coming together to support each other, and creators are doing what they do best: showing up for their communities. Whether it’s pausing to check in, find a moment of joy, reflect or simply express vulnerability, creators are sharing their expertise, stories, passions, and a little bit more of themselves. And these simple acts are making a difference. 
For World Mental Health Day, Mental Health Week Australia and National Mental Health Month—we want to shine a light on our YouTube community, and creators who are sharing their stories, and helping others find ways to speak out, take care, and cope. 
Thank you to the registered mental health organisations like Black Dog Institute, Project Rockit and headspace Australia on the platform for sharing your expert knowledge and resources with us. And thank you to the many other creators—from yoga instructors to musicians, from gardeners to gamers—for providing emotional support and a sense of connection just by opening up and talking about what you’re going through. You are all helping us take better care of ourselves and each other. 


Turning to YouTube for Support and Comfort 
Videos related to many practices associated with coping with anxiety and stress, including many hobbies, yoga and exercise, have seen increases in viewership this year. 
Aussie creator Chloe Ting, was one channel offering locals in lockdown an outlet. Videos with ‘Chloe Ting’ or ‘Chloe Ting Challenge’ or ‘#chloetingchallenge’ in the title generated more than 140 million views globally since March 15, 2020.1 
Videos with prayer in the title are also among those seeing an increase in views—up 70 percent in the first quarter of 2020 compared to the prior year.2 Prayer plays an important role in the lives of many, especially in handling stressful situations, and these videos may offer a feeling of solace. They also offer a way to continue participating in religious practices, and to maintain a routine during a time that is anything but routine. 

Mental health exists on a spectrum from illness to wellness and, as such, impacts every single one of us. If you’re looking for ways to take care or you’re interested to hear how others are coping with different experiences, below are a few videos to explore. For more, check out our Mental Health Awareness Playlist


Meet Sarah Chrisp 
Kiwi entrepreneur Sarah aka Wholesale Ted usually shares advice on ecommerce with her 620k fans. This week saw a break in tradition though, when she posted this video on her struggle with anxiety, depression and burnout, and how she restored her sense of wellbeing, and balance. 


Meet Maaz 
He’s a trained medical doctor turned animator extraordinaire. This video breaks away from Maaz’s renowned comedic take on life events and stories, as he talks about the discrimination he faced growing up as Muslim Pakastani in Australia, and how he has learned to be comfortable in his own skin. 


Meet Jason Stephenson 
Average daily views of videos related to insomnia more than doubled after April 1 compared to the first quarter of the year,3 and in turn, average daily views of videos related to guided meditation with “sleep” in the title increased 25 percent in April, compared to March.4  
So find a comfy seat, close down your eyes and take a moment. Jason has attracted almost two million fans to his channel, sharing weekly guided meditations, inspirational talks and affirmations to help you de-stress, find calm and get better sleep. 


Meet Erin May Henry 
Based in Melbourne, Erin has become a go-to for videos on positive self-talk. Tune in for videos like this one on self-care routines, healthy habits and life lessons that’ll help you feel motivated, and supported.


Meet Jamie Perkins 
He shares honest stories about the ins and outs of being a dad to two young daughters. Jamie created his YouTube channel to provide fun, inspirational videos on his approach to life and raising little ones. In this video created for World Mental Health Day, he talks gratitude, and what helps him get through. 


What creators are doing on YouTube is no small thing. Talking openly about coping matters. When creators promote healthy ways of coping and share adaptive skills and tips, they not only inspire us to try new strategies, but they also begin to chip away at the stigma associated with talking about and taking care of our mental health. And when stigma is reduced, we’re more likely to reach out and ask for the additional help we may need. 

If you're looking for support or want to talk, help is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, anywhere in Australia and New Zealand: 
Lifeline Australia | 13 11 14 
Kids Helpline | 1800 55 1800 
Beyond Blue | 1300 22 4636 

Lifeline New Zealand | 0800 54 33 54 
Youthline New Zealand | 0800 376 633 

For research-informed mental health resources and free support tools, check out Black Dog Institute.



1 YouTube data, Global, 15 March 2020 - 5 July 2020
2 YouTube data, Global, jan - Mar 2019, Jan - Mar 2020 
3 YouTube data, Global, January - April 2020 
4 YouTube data, Global, March - April 2020 

Audiovisual Speech Enhancement in YouTube Stories

While tremendous efforts are invested in improving the quality of videos taken with smartphone cameras, the quality of audio in videos is often overlooked. For example, the speech of a subject in a video where there are multiple people speaking or where there is high background noise might be muddled, distorted, or difficult to understand. In an effort to address this, two years ago we introduced Looking to Listen, a machine learning (ML) technology that uses both visual and audio cues to isolate the speech of a video’s subject. By training the model on a large-scale collection of online videos, we are able to capture correlations between speech and visual signals such as mouth movements and facial expressions, which can then be used to separate the speech of one person in a video from another, or to separate speech from background sounds. We showed that this technology not only achieves state-of-the-art results in speech separation and enhancement (a noticeable 1.5dB improvement over audio-only models), but in particular can improve the results over audio-only processing when there are multiple people speaking, as the visual cues in the video help determine who is saying what.

We are now happy to make the Looking to Listen technology available to users through a new audiovisual Speech Enhancement feature in YouTube Stories (on iOS), allowing creators to take better selfie videos by automatically enhancing their voices and reducing background noise. Getting this technology into users’ hands was no easy feat. Over the past year, we worked closely with users to learn how they would like to use such a feature, in what scenarios, and what balance of speech and background sounds they would like to have in their videos. We heavily optimized the Looking to Listen model to make it run efficiently on mobile devices, overall reducing the running time from 10x real-time on a desktop when our paper came out, to 0.5x real-time performance on the phone. We also put the technology through extensive testing to verify that it performs consistently across different recording conditions and for people with different appearances and voices.

From Research to Product
Optimizing Looking to Listen to allow fast and robust operation on mobile devices required us to overcome a number of challenges. First, all processing needed to be done on-device within the client app in order to minimize processing time and to preserve the user’s privacy; no audio or video information would be sent to servers for processing. Further, the model needed to co-exist alongside other ML algorithms used in the YouTube app in addition to the resource-consuming video recording itself. Finally, the algorithm needed to run quickly and efficiently on-device while minimizing battery consumption.

The first step in the Looking to Listen pipeline is to isolate thumbnail images that contain the faces of the speakers from the video stream. By leveraging MediaPipe BlazeFace with GPU accelerated inference, this step is now able to be executed in just a few milliseconds. We then switched the model part that processes each thumbnail separately to a lighter weight MobileNet (v2) architecture, which outputs visual features learned for the purpose of speech enhancement, extracted from the face thumbnails in 10 ms per frame. Because the compute time to embed the visual features is short, it can be done while the video is still being recorded. This avoids the need to keep the frames in memory for further processing, thereby reducing the overall memory footprint. Then, after the video finishes recording, the audio and the computed visual features are streamed to the audio-visual speech separation model which produces the isolated and enhanced speech.

We reduced the total number of parameters in the audio-visual model by replacing “regular” 2D convolutions with separable ones (1D in the frequency dimension, followed by 1D in the time dimension) with fewer filters. We then optimized the model further using TensorFlow Lite — a set of tools that enable running TensorFlow models on mobile devices with low latency and a small binary size. Finally, we reimplemented the model within the Learn2Compress framework in order to take advantage of built-in quantized training and QRNN support.

Our Looking to Listen on-device pipeline for audiovisual speech enhancement

These optimizations and improvements reduced the running time from 10x real-time on a desktop using the original formulation of Looking to Listen, to 0.5x real-time performance using only an iPhone CPU; and brought the model size down from 120MB to 6MB now, which makes it easier to deploy. Since YouTube Stories videos are short — limited to 15 seconds — the result of the video processing is available within a couple of seconds after the recording is finished.

Finally, to avoid processing videos with clean speech (so as to avoid unnecessary computation), we first run our model only on the first two seconds of the video, then compare the speech-enhanced output to the original input audio. If there is sufficient difference (meaning the model cleaned up the speech), then we enhance the speech throughout the rest of the video.

Researching User Needs
Early versions of Looking to Listen were designed to entirely isolate speech from the background noise. In a user study conducted together with YouTube, we found that users prefer to leave in some of the background sounds to give context and to retain some the general ambiance of the scene. Based on this user study, we take a linear combination of the original audio and our produced clean speech channel: output_audio = 0.1 x original_audio + 0.9 x speech. The following video presents clean speech combined with different levels of the background sounds in the scene (10% background is the balance we use in practice).

Below are additional examples of the enhanced speech results from the new Speech Enhancement feature in YouTube Stories. We recommend watching the videos with good speakers or headphones.

Fairness Analysis
Another important requirement is that the model be fair and inclusive. It must be able to handle different types of voices, languages and accents, as well as different visual appearances. To this end, we conducted a series of tests exploring the performance of the model with respect to various visual and speech/auditory attributes: the speaker’s age, skin tone, spoken language, voice pitch, visibility of the speaker’s face (% of video in which the speaker is in frame), head pose throughout the video, facial hair, presence of glasses, and the level of background noise in the (input) video.

For each of the above visual/auditory attributes, we ran our model on segments from our evaluation set (separate from the training set) and measured the speech enhancement accuracy, broken down according to the different attribute values. Results for some of the attributes are summarized in the following plots. Each data point in the plots represents hundreds (in most cases thousands) of videos fitting the criteria.

Speech enhancement quality (signal-to-distortion ratio, SDR, in dB) for different spoken languages, sorted alphabetically. The average SDR was 7.89 dB with a standard deviation of 0.42 dB — deviation that for human listeners is considered hard to notice.
Left: Speech enhancement quality as a function of the speaker’s voice pitch. The fundamental voice frequency (pitch) of an adult male typically ranges from 85 to 180 Hz, and that of an adult female ranges from 165 to 255 Hz. Right: speech enhancement quality as a function of the speaker’s predicted age.
As our method utilizes facial cues and mouth movements to isolate the speech, we tested whether facial hair (e.g., a moustache, beard) may obstruct those visual cues and affect the method’s performance. Our evaluations show that the quality of speech enhancement is maintained well also in the presence of facial hair.

Using the Feature
YouTube creators who are eligible for YouTube Stories creation may record a video on iOS, and select “Enhance speech” from the volume controls editing tool. This will immediately apply speech enhancement to the audio track and will play back the enhanced speech in a loop. It is then possible to toggle the feature on and off multiple times to compare the enhanced speech with the original audio.

In parallel to this new feature in YouTube, we are also exploring additional venues for this technology. More to come later this year — stay tuned!

Acknowledgements
This feature is a collaboration across multiple teams at Google. Key contributors include: from Research-IL: Oran Lang; from VisCAM: Ariel Ephrat, Mike Krainin, JD Velasquez, Inbar Mosseri, Michael Rubinstein; from Learn2Compress: Arun Kandoor; from MediaPipe: Buck Bourdon, Matsvei Zhdanovich, Matthias Grundmann; from YouTube: Andy Poes, Vadim Lavrusik, Aaron La Lau, Willi Geiger, Simona De Rosa, and Tomer Margolin.

Source: Google AI Blog


Build your brand with YouTube: New ways to drive reach and engage your audience at scale

The digital video boom is here. As people spend more time at home and the need for relevant, fresh content is at an all time high, the shift from linear to digital video is accelerating.

On YouTube in particular, over 2 billion people globally are gravitating toward timely content, from live entertainment like Post Malone's livestreamed living room concerts to transformative current events like rallying cries for racial justice from creators. They are also favoring the TV screen—with watch time growing across regions. In the US for example, watch time on YouTube and YouTube TV on TV screens jumped 80 percent year over year

Leading brands are making the most of YouTube’s massive reach and deeply relevant content to build brand awareness, and ultimately, drive results at scale. Today, we're sharing new ways to help advertisers achieve these goals, including expanded reach planning solutions and advanced contextual targeting—a new and better way to show up in the right contexts for your customers.


Expanded tools to drive efficient reach and fuel your awareness strategy on YouTube

More viewership and the right mix of tools to reach a growing audience means that YouTube can offer incremental reach for the same budget. In the US, our relationship with Nielsen helps advertisers find the right mix. On average, advertisers saw that shifting just 20% of spend from TV to YouTube generated a 25% increase to the total campaign reach within their target audience, lowering the cost per reach point by almost 20%, across 21 Share Shift studies we've commissioned from Nielsen.1 To help global marketers, we are expanding our evaluation of Nielsen’s Total Ad Ratings to the UK and Italy.

When marketers include YouTube to drive efficient reach, they are seeing it pay off in real business results. Katie Haniffy, Head of Media, PepsiCo Beverages, turned to YouTube to drive scale and extend reach of Pepsi’s “Gift it Forward” Holiday campaign. The creative, starring Cardi B, celebrated the gifting mindset during the holiday season.  "We knew YouTube had to play a critical role in ‘Gift it Forward’ as it continues to deliver strong performance across the beverage portfolio. The ‘Gift it Forward’ campaign did not disappoint—YouTube drove new brand buyers during the holiday season to the unique audience we wanted to reach.”

32003_YT_Awareness_Blog_v07a (1).png

To help you easily plan campaign strategies that take advantage of this incremental reach beyond TV, soon we are also expanding TV data in Reach Planner to more countries, including France, Spain and Vietnam.

Additionally, if you’re looking to plan YouTube with other online video partners, we’re enabling reach planning capabilities across your entire campaign in Display & Video 360 including YouTube, auction and programmatic deals. 

Awareness_ProTip_v01.png

Use Video reach campaigns for a simpler way to buy efficient reach across ad formats. 

Since launch, we’ve seen when advertisers combine skippable in-stream ads and bumpers into one campaign optimized for unique reach, they see higher lifts in Brand Awareness than advertisers who bought either format on its own.4  Marion Carpentier, Omni Business Leader at French men’s wear brand, Jules, says “By combining multiple formats into one campaign on YouTube, we were not only able to reach incremental audiences at a more optimal frequency compared to other video partners, but were able to drive a relative brand lift of 4.9 percent.” 


A new way to show up in the right contexts for your brand

YouTube’s ability to drive mass reach means we can also deliver scale in specific contexts that matter for consumers and your brand. To make it easier to discover the content that’s best for you, today we are announcing YouTube dynamic lineups—powered by advanced contextual targeting.

Advanced contextual targeting is the next generation of content targeting on YouTube. It uses Google's machine learning to better understand each channel on YouTube, including analysis of video imagery, sound, speech and text. 

Advanced_Contextual_Targeting_GIF_v01 (2).gif

How advanced contextual targeting works

This allows us to create lineups5 that are scalable across content based on specific topics, cultural moments or popularity. For example, in addition to home or lifestyle lineups in most markets, you can find more nuanced choices like “home and garden” and “home improvement.” This means better access to customers with unique interests and needs—all with the brand suitability controls that are most important for your business.  

It also means you’re able to drive greater impact for your brand. A recent study conducted by Google and Ipsos in the US found that video advertising based on consumer interest and intent has significantly more impact than demo—with a 32 percent higher lift in ad recall and 100 percent higher lift in purchase intent. 

Awareness_ProTip_v01.png

Complement your audience strategy with dynamic lineups to maximize reach.

Early adopters like OMD are seeing strong results using YouTube dynamic lineups to complement their existing audience strategies. Chrissie Hanson, Global Chief Strategy Officer at OMD says, “Using lineups powered by advanced contextual targeting delivers a more relevant and empathetic understanding of audiences. This in turn serves to drive more relevant reach and efficiencies for our customers, as part of a broader program that leverages audiences and other tactics across YouTube." 

YouTube dynamic lineups are launching on a rolling basis starting today and will be fully available by the end of September in ten markets. They are available across both Google Ads and Display & Video 360, with more countries coming soon.


From sales to ROI—deliver the results that matter

Most importantly, efficient reach and relevant ad experiences must drive not only awareness, but also business results. Across global Marketing Mix Modeling studies we’ve commissioned from Nielsen, we’ve seen YouTube deliver the bottom line results you care about.

32003_YT_Awareness_Map-animation_v01.gif


Check out our new awareness collection—from success stories to trends

We’re sharing a new collection of resources on our Advertising Solutions Center to help you build awareness for this new world. You’ll hear first-hand perspectives from companies like PepsiCo, Domino’s and Jules, delve into trends driving YouTube viewership and learn about our newest product innovations built to better meet your awareness objectives. We’ll continue to roll out more content on the Advertising Solutions Center in the coming weeks.

We hope these latest updates will help you build your brand for today, and create resiliency for tomorrow.

Reach out to your Google sales rep to learn more about the solutions above, including best practices on campaign set-up, how to apply for the Video reach campaigns beta and how to access YouTube dynamic lineups in your market.


1. Nielsen Share Shift Meta Analysis commissioned by Google including 21 NMI Share Shift US studies inclusive of YouTube in-app traffic utilizing target audiences running 1/1/19-5/5/20 across desktop, mobile and TV; across 9 demos; average total TV+YouTube budget $17.3M.
2. Nielsen Total Ad Ratings, Pepsi Holiday campaign across TV and YouTube among P18-49, 11/11/19-12/29/19
3.  IRI Lift for YouTube, Pepsi TM Q4’19 Holiday Sales Impact Analysis, June 2020
4. Google Brand Lift, Global, Jan 2019 - May 2020
5.  Lineups are packages of channels based on a topic, cultural moment or popularity.
6. Commissioned Nielsen MMM Meta-Analysis, 2016-2018. Base: a list of studies selected and compiled by Nielsen, consisting of all available CPG studies completed in 2016-2018 that contain YouTube Select, Other Digital, and TV results. This list includes 45 studies for US Brands across all CPG categories. ROI is “Retail ROI,” defined as total incremental sales divided by total media spend. Incremental offline retail sales measured for TV represents average across all TV broadcasters.
7. Commissioned Nielsen MMM Meta-Analysis, 2016-2018. Base: a list of studies selected and compiled by Nielsen, consisting of all available CPG studies completed in 2016-2018 that contain YouTube, Other Digital, and TV results. This list includes 117 studies for German Brands across all CPG categories. ROI is “Retail ROI,” defined as total incremental sales divided by total media spend. Incremental offline retail sales measured for TV represents average across all TV broadcasters.
8. Commissioned Nielsen MMM meta-analysis, 2016-2018. YouTube effectiveness was 8.4 compared to TV effectiveness of 0.19. Base: A list of studies selected and compiled by Nielsen, consisting of all available CPG studies completed in 2016-2018 that contain YouTube, Other Digital and TV results. This list includes 96 studies for  Brazil Brands across all CPG categories.Incremental offline retail sales measured for TV represents average across all TV broadcasters.  Effectiveness is defined as total incremental sales per 1,000 impressions. Studies were excluded if either channel had fewer than 500 impressions. The Effectiveness numbers in the claim are impression-weighted averages across all studies for each channel.
9. Commissioned Nielsen MMM meta-analysis, 2016-2018. YouTube effectiveness was $9.69 compared to TV effectiveness of $3.20. Base: A list of studies selected and compiled by Nielsen, consisting of all available CPG studies completed in 2017-2018 that contain YouTube, Other Digital and TV results. This list includes 37 studies for Japan Brands across all CPG categories.Incremental offline retail sales measured for TV represents average across all TV broadcasters. Effectiveness is defined as total incremental sales per 1,000 impressions (in USD). Studies were excluded if either channel had fewer than 500 impressions. The Effectiveness numbers in the claim are impression-weighted averages across all studies for each channel.

Ever wonder how YouTube works?


YouTube has always been a place where people come to be informed, inspired, and delighted.
Over the past few months, as our daily lives have changed in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, we've seen people turning to YouTube more than ever. As part of our ongoing commitment to transparency, we're launching today
How YouTube Works - a new website designed to answer the questions we most often receive about what we're doing to foster a responsible platform for our community, and explain our products and policies in detail.

Answering the important questions

How YouTube Works addresses some of the important questions we face every day about our platform - involving topics such as child safety, harmful content, misinformation, and copyright, as well as tackling timely issues as they arise, like how we have responded to the COVID -19 crisis. Within the site, we explain how we apply our responsibility principles (the Four Rs) - which work alongside our commitment to users' security - to tackle these important questions.

Get to know our products and policies

How YouTube Works provides an in-depth look at our products and settings, such as YouTube Search, Recommendations, privacy controls, and Ad Settings, showing how they help our users have the best possible experience while they ' re using YouTube.Additionally, users will find details of our policies - like our Community Guidelines and monetization policies - so everyone in the community knows what they can and can't do on YouTube. We explain how our policies are developed and enforced in partnership with a wide range of external experts and creators.

Learn about the progress and impact we've made

To show the progress we've made on managing harmful content, How YouTube Works includes facts and figures from our Community Guidelines Enforcement Report, which explain how and why we've removed videos recently.

We also provide data, records, and current trends that have emerged on YouTube to help you better understand the next generation of creators and artists.Users can also explore the stories behind some of YouTube's creative entrepreneurs in Canada, and discover how they are transforming their lives and communities. Get to know Aysha Harun, who's built a successful career on YouTube as a Black Muslim woman, inspring a widely underrepresented community in the beauty and lifestyle space. Or learn more about James Hobson, an engineer turned YouTube creator who takes fictional ideas from movies and comics and turns them into real-life prototypes with the power of STEM.

How YouTube Works is an important part of our ongoing transparency efforts to ensure millions of users, creators, and artists can continue making YouTube a place to connect with others, learn about the world, and showcase their creative talents.


Posted by The YouTube Canada Team

Ever wonder how YouTube works?


YouTube has always been a place where people come to be informed, inspired, and delighted.
Over the past few months, as our daily lives have changed in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, we've seen people turning to YouTube more than ever. As part of our ongoing commitment to transparency, we're launching today
How YouTube Works - a new website designed to answer the questions we most often receive about what we're doing to foster a responsible platform for our community, and explain our products and policies in detail.

Answering the important questions

How YouTube Works addresses some of the important questions we face every day about our platform - involving topics such as child safety, harmful content, misinformation, and copyright, as well as tackling timely issues as they arise, like how we have responded to the COVID -19 crisis. Within the site, we explain how we apply our responsibility principles (the Four Rs) - which work alongside our commitment to users' security - to tackle these important questions.

Get to know our products and policies

How YouTube Works provides an in-depth look at our products and settings, such as YouTube Search, Recommendations, privacy controls, and Ad Settings, showing how they help our users have the best possible experience while they ' re using YouTube.Additionally, users will find details of our policies - like our Community Guidelines and monetization policies - so everyone in the community knows what they can and can't do on YouTube. We explain how our policies are developed and enforced in partnership with a wide range of external experts and creators.

Learn about the progress and impact we've made

To show the progress we've made on managing harmful content, How YouTube Works includes facts and figures from our Community Guidelines Enforcement Report, which explain how and why we've removed videos recently.

We also provide data, records, and current trends that have emerged on YouTube to help you better understand the next generation of creators and artists.Users can also explore the stories behind some of YouTube's creative entrepreneurs in Canada, and discover how they are transforming their lives and communities. Get to know Aysha Harun, who's built a successful career on YouTube as a Black Muslim woman, inspring a widely underrepresented community in the beauty and lifestyle space. Or learn more about James Hobson, an engineer turned YouTube creator who takes fictional ideas from movies and comics and turns them into real-life prototypes with the power of STEM.

How YouTube Works is an important part of our ongoing transparency efforts to ensure millions of users, creators, and artists can continue making YouTube a place to connect with others, learn about the world, and showcase their creative talents.


Posted by The YouTube Canada Team

Nonprofits use Google tools to stay resilient

From bringing an aquarium online through live webcams to building an app that prepares underrepresented students for the workforce, nonprofits around the world are responding to issues facing their communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using technology as a key resource, these organizations are showing resilience, determination and flexibility while also trying to quickly adapt to everything that’s happening this year. Google for Nonprofits is now available in 67 countries around the world, offering free tools and resources for organizations to boost productivity, engage supporters and spread the word about their stories. Here’s how three organizations continue to make an impact with help from Google tools. 

Providing workshops for budding entrepreneurs

Instituto Fazendo Acontecer (IFA) is a nonprofit based in São Paulo, Brazil which provides entrepreneurial education for vulnerable children and adolescents. Before COVID-19 became a concern, they ran eight types of in-person free workshops to prepare students for their professional futures and strengthen their roles as citizens, regardless of their backgrounds.

At the start of the pandemic, they worked quickly to move education programs online. They developed a free mobile app with their learning curriculum available in both English and Portuguese, so students could access workshops, educational games and training experiences from any location. IFA also started using Google Meet to create an interactive environment from home and connect teachers to students. 

Instituto Fazendo Acontecer

IFA team members use Google Meet to stay connected and develop programs. 

With these new app-based workshops and remote work capabilities, they soon realized this was an opportunity to expand their programs from São Paulo to more locations. So far, they have supported more than 8,000 students. IFA expects to engage 10,000 more this year by partnering with teams around the world, and they have more than doubled their instructors during the pandemic. “Google has helped us provide the tools we needed in a moment when we weren't sure how to keep our work running, and this was key for our success,” says Jose Dornelas, IFA’s president. 

Bringing interactive activities online

California Academy of Sciences is an aquarium, planetarium and natural history museum in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park—and a powerful global voice for biodiversity research, environmental education and sustainability. Normally, they see around 1.5 million visitors every year. Prior to COVID-19, they opened their doors every Thursday night for an experience called NightLife, a themed interactive event that immerses visitors in a mix of science, art and culture. 

With the museum closed due to the pandemic, they had to quickly reorganize their approach to start working remotely. In just two weeks, they started to find ways to support the community and make these nighttime programs still accessible.

California Academy of Sciences

Viewers can now watch live streams of the Steinhart Aquarium which is home to nearly 40,000 live animals from over  900 unique species.

With help from G Suite for Nonprofits, staffers used Google Chat and Meet to stay in touch and brainstorm ideas virtually. They had dabbled in livestreaming before, so they decided to create a YouTube livestream for NightLife, bringing in many production partners like scientists, musicians and programming teams to create a virtually engaging experience. Their YouTube channel became more popular than ever before with people tuning in to join educational programs, take part in Nightlife and to enjoy live animal webcams. With the in-person exhibits remaining closed for the time being, NightLife continues each week to bring its after-hours educational experience to the community. 

Supporting volunteers and addressing uncertainty 

Venture 2 Impact, based in Halifax, Canada, works to break the cycle of poverty for individuals, families and communities by connecting skilled professionals with the communities around the world that need their support. Before the pandemic, they had tech experts travel around the world to lead workshops and trainings. But when travel was no longer safe, they had to reassess their entire strategy while helping volunteers cope with loneliness, anxiety and fear about the future. Their challenge was to figure out how to use technology to inspire hope within volunteers and continue to provide support to the communities they serve. 


Venture2Impact

Venture 2 Impact now trains their nonprofit partners by creating content on YouTube. 

They focused on understanding the challenges of NGO partners by using surveys with Google Forms. Then, they determined which training videos to produce, reached out to industry experts to create them and used Google Calendar to organize the schedule. Google Meet, which is now free for everyone, was essential in delivering and recording the workshops. Then, they uploaded the videos to YouTube to share them with their nonprofit community in India, Nepal, Thailand, Romania and Rwanda, and they organized the content into playlists to make it easier for viewers to find. 


To support volunteers in the U.S., Ireland, the U.K. and Canada, they created a mental health-focused virtual series hosted on Google Meet called WholeHearted Thursdays. They also created a room on Google Chat to share simulating articles, videos and ideas. Google tools helped them to launch new programs quickly, engage their staff, partners and volunteers in meaningful ways and tackle the problems that each community is facing. 

Introducing YouTube Music Sessions: Today’s music headliners with support from tomorrow’s

How many times have you been to a gig or festival and fallen in love with a new artist? I remember seeing Thandi Phoenix perform live right before she released her first EP last year -- it was soulful and captivating. Her song ‘Say It’ is full of energy and so catchy, it quickly became a favourite in our house. Seeing her on stage, and now being able to watch her career grow and more people discover her talent, is really special.
But 2020 has delivered the unexpected, with the entire music industry affected by COVID-19.
“The live music industry was probably one of the worst affected as a result of COVID-19. It’s been really horrible seeing all the tours and festivals cancelled and knowing that so many people have lost work for months on end.” -- Jessica Mauboy 
As music fans we feel the loss, as it has become harder for us to find our new favourite artists at gigs. But for emerging artists, cancelled support tours and festival appearances means they are missing out on essential exposure to new audiences as well as associations and endorsements from other more established artists, not to mention the financial impact too.
“Not being able to play live shows during these times has really impacted the ability for all artists to reach new audiences. As an emerging artist, live shows and support slots in particular are super integral in getting you in front of new audiences, new communities, cities and in developing a fanbase.” -- Emalia 
So we can all keep discovering new music and Australian artists can have a platform to connect with fans around the world, we are introducing YouTube Music Sessions, in partnership with ARIA -- a series of four exclusive online performances by leading Australian artists, supported by up and comers through virtual support slots this August.

“We know it’s not easy, at the best of times, being a new artist on the scene trying to get your music out there so I think it’s such an important thing right now for the community to come together and help each other out.” -- Jack Gray 
Premiering live every Wednesday this August at 7pm, one headliner and one support act will perform for audiences around the world.

August 5 
Lime Cordiale supported by Mia Rodriguez 
Fresh from their #1 ARIA Album release, Oli and Louis are pumped to be able to share Mia’s sound with their fans: “We’ve been following her progress for a while and her vibe is mad. She works with the same producer as us so every now and then we get a little sneak peek at some of her upcoming music and it’s always so exciting.”
August 12 
Jessica Mauboy supported by Emalia 
Emalia is honoured to share a virtual stage with Jessica Mauboy: “Supporting Jess is pretty surreal to me. I was a big fan of her growing up and she is such an icon of the Australian music scene. To be able to play the YouTube Music Sessions with her, at a time when I believe sharing music to spread love and healing is vital, feels really special.”
August 19 
Paul Kelly supported by Eliott 
Eliott is trying to contain her excitement in singing alongside Paul Kelly: “Paul Kelly is such an incredible songwriter and performer, so authentic and raw. Which is something I always strive to be in my own music.”
August 26 
Vera Blue supported by Jack Gray 
Vera Blue can’t wait to see Jack’s career take off: “Jack Gray is an incredibly cool up and coming artist! I love his style and his voice is so unique. His songs have a semi electronic rock style with emotion and which reminds of surfy skate rock culture.”
Each performance will stream on the headliner’s YouTube channel and will be playlisted on the YouTube Australia and New Zealand channel and the ARIA channel.
We couldn’t celebrate the music industry like this without the support of ARIA and are thrilled the team are partnering with us.
Dan Rosen, ARIA Chief Executive, said, “ARIA is thrilled to continue our partnership with YouTube and provide another platform for music fans around the world to engage with Australian artists. During these challenging times we have seen Australian audiences move to watch even more online performances, and our artists have done an amazing job in helping us stay connected in this difficult period. I can’t wait to hear some incredible new music from some of our established greats and to discover new music from emerging artists on these YouTube Music Sessions.”
YouTube Music Sessions is also proud to help Support Act, Australia’s only charity delivering crisis relief services to artists, crew and music workers. For anyone tuning in to the performances and that can, please click the link in the description to make a donation to Support Act and show your love for our Aussie music industry. YouTube will be kicking the effort off with a $50,000 donation.
Clive Miller, Support Act CEO, said, “The pandemic has created intense financial hardship for artists, crew and music workers. It has also created significant anxiety, depression, career concerns and other mental health related issues, resulting in a 60% increase in utilisation of the Support Act Wellbeing Helpline.
“We’ll be using donations from YouTube Music Sessions to support our 24/7 professional counselling helpline as well as COVID-19 crisis relief grants -- which provide financial support in the areas of rent/mortgage, food, utilities, medical equipment and other expenses.”
“It’s really great that the organisation Support Act is involved so that we can support not only our artists during this tough time, but the crew and teams involved in making shows and festivals come together are being supported too.” -- Vera Blue 
We can’t wait to watch these performances and hope you’ll join us at 7pm each Wednesday night in August. Paul Kelly summed it up perfectly -- this is the time for the entire music industry to support each other.
“Emerging artists and established artists support each other. It isn’t a one-way street. I like to put a bill together with other artists so that we complement each other. It’s a kind of curation. A synergy. I love introducing young artists I like to my audience. I want that audience to walk away with the sense that they’ve just witnessed something that will never happen again.” -- Paul Kelly 

‘After School’ with YouTube Kids

Parents and caretakers,
We know this isn’t the easiest time for you. You’re juggling work, life, kids and the state of the world today. The struggle is real for you and all families around the world. I’m there as well, with two young sons of my own at home, asking me for some extra screen-time, even as I type this. It is increasingly difficult as a parent to choose the right content and how much of it is for our kids. That’s why we want to help you with a library of high quality full-length movies and specials that will enrich as well as entertain your children, and that you can enjoy along with them.
YouTube Kids is a platform of choice for many of you, and with the extended time being spent at home it has become even more helpful for families. While some schools are back to physical in-class instruction, others remain virtual. We want to help you keep your kids engaged, enriched and entertained ‘After School’ because as a parent I can understand how difficult a task that can often be. Therefore starting today, until August 31st, we will release over 100 movies and specials on YouTube Kids, ensuring that your kids have a memorable ‘After School’ experience.
Over 100 Movies & Specials now on YouTube Kids
From popular family movies and specials featuring Tayo the Little Bus, Baby Shark and Pinkfong, The Wiggles, Masha And The Bear, Oggy & the Cockroaches and Paddington, to a collection of the best animated short films anchored by Oscar-winning short film Hair Love, and a wide variety of educational specials including Sesame Street’s Elmo’s World News, produced in collaboration with the Lego Foundation, and selections from BBC Studios’ hit series, Hey Duggee. Every Monday starting today, for the next five weeks, we will surface these excellent movies and specials in the app's “Shows” category, as individual videos, as well as playlists.
As part of this initiative, we will premiere Spookiz, a new movie produced by Wildbrain in collaboration with South Korean studio Keyring Studios, exclusively on YouTube Kids. Moreover, we will also offer special YouTube Original content, including Disney's complete series Shook and two Simon's Cat specials courtesy of Endemol Shine, for kids ages six and up.
We also have a wide variety of YouTube Originals available on YouTube Originals for Kids & Family Channel and YouTube Kids, including SHERWOOD for kids age eight and older, Kings of Atlantis and Fruit Ninja Frenzy Force for ages five and up, and current favourite for many kids and tweens across the world -- Lockdown, suitable for ages five and up.
Oscar-winning short film Hair Love on YouTube Kids
That’s not all, you could create a movie watching experience for your kids at home by making their favourite flavoured popcorn, movie night kits, setting ambient lighting, tweaking those sound settings, and don't forget to introduce them to the movie characters ahead of the movie. One interesting activity I love doing with my kids is to get them to produce their own movie review or create their own story based on the movie we just watched together. It's a great way to help them learn and improve their writing and communication skills. Check out this great video in YouTube Kids to teach your children how to craft their own stories today.
In addition, we are continuing to feature evergreen monthly themes on YouTube Kids, including our Month of Reading with a focus on diversity and inclusion, and read-alongs featuring Oprah Winfrey, Oscar Award winning actor Rami Malek and James Bond actress Michelle Yeoh from StorylineOnline. Moreover, just last month we announced Camp YouTube: a digital learning experience to help parents recreate the fun of summer camp at home. Camp YouTube spotlights content on the [email protected] site and YouTube Kids across beloved summer camp themes, such as arts, adventure, sports, STEM, and more. With over 1,200 videos programmed, we want to take kids on a virtual journey of learning and exploration. Families can discover how to make a tide pool aquarium in their backyard with Brave Wilderness, make art with household items while learning art history with the ArtistYear, or learn coding with Goldieblox.
YouTube Kids app was built keeping in mind kids below the age of 13 years. It's a family-friendly place for kids to explore their imagination and curiosity. The app empowers parents to control what YouTube content their child can see, including the option to only allow content from trusted partners like Sesame Street, ChuChu TV, Bounce Patrol and PBS Kids, or hand pick other videos and channels to create a curated playlist for their kids.
We know this time of the year may be a bit different for a lot of us. However, with the help of our partners and creators, we hope you and your families can experience a great time right from your homes.

17,572 singers, in perfect harmony (from their own homes)

When you think of a choir, you likely put a descriptor before it: a school choir, a church choir, a community choir. Singing in a chorus usually means you’re standing within a large group of people, belting out songs and nailing those harmonies together. But what happens when you can’t gather in person to sing? 


That’s where virtual choirs come in. Composer and conductor Eric Whitacre has been putting them together for more than a decade, long before the pandemic left us stuck at home—and his most recent collaboration, which debuted on YouTube July 19, is his biggest project yet. 


Whitacre started organizing Virtual Choirs in 2009, when a fan uploaded a video of herself singing one of his choral compositions. He saw the video, then asked others to record themselves singing the other parts of the same composition to form a “choir.” That first group featured 185 singers, and each one since has grown larger and larger, to more than 8,000 voices for the fifth performance in 2018.

Eric Whitacre Credit Marc Royce.jpg

Eric Whitacre (Photo by Marc Royce)

This year, signups for Virtual Choir have skyrocketed. More than 17,000 singers from around the world found a way to participate in the sixth recording from the isolation of their own homes. They all learned “Sing Gently,” a song Whitacre composed during the pandemic. “Even early on, you’d be walking down the street in masks and you’d go out of your way to not pass someone,” Whitacre says. “A random stranger would become a threat. That was hard to see, and I was feeling that all over.” So the lyrics to “Sing Gently” encourage people to “live with compassion and empathy, and do this together,” he says. 


The Virtual Choir team uses every video submitted, unless there’s a technical problem with the recording. That means there are thousands of videos to sync together, and thousands of sound recordings to edit so the result sounds seamless. This time around, the team featured three sound editors, six people reviewing each submission and two executive producers; the team was scattered through the U.S., the U.K. and South Africa. Across three different continents, they used Google Docs and Google Sheets to keep track of their progress, Google’s webmaster tools to manage thousands of email addresses and Google Translate to keep in touch with singers around the world. Singers checked the choir’s YouTube channels for rehearsal videos, footage of Whitacre conducting the song and Q&As with other singers and composers.

Sing Gently.jpeg

The video for "Sing Gently" features the song's lyrics and footage of the singers, who recorded from their homes.

It was also significant that these singers came together (figuratively speaking) at a time when musicians are suddenly out of work. “It’s an especially surreal moment for singers, because we’ve been labeled as superspreaders,” Whitacre laments, referring to a term for people who spread the disease more than others; in one instance, dozens of singers in Washington state were infected after a choir practice.  “Even just the act of singing is dangerous for other people.” He says he was struck by the number of participants who told him it felt good to sing with others again—even though they weren’t actually performing in the same room. 


Molly Jenkins, a choir lover based in North Carolina, was one of the 6,262 sopranos who took part in “Sing Gently.” She had always wanted to join a virtual choir, but never found the perfect time to give it a try. But since there’s no such thing as a perfect moment in a pandemic, she decided to figure out a way to make it work. 

This, I think, is the best of the promise of the Internet. Eric Whitacre
composer and conductor

With her phone in hand to hear the guide tracks, Molly practiced whenever and wherever she could: in the shower, at the kitchen table while working from home, in her front yard and while burping her baby. When it came time to record her track, there was one problem: finding a quiet place to record. “There was no space to record where a shrieking, gurgling baby wouldn’t interrupt the take,” she says. 

She ended up in her car on a rainy day, playing the conductor track on her laptop and recording her vocals on her phone. Sound engineers were able to isolate her vocal track from the background noise of the rain tapping on her windshield. “I’m just so glad I went for it,” Molly says.

Whitacre says that improvisational spirit is key to creating his choirs, and he’s grateful that technology can enable great collaborations despite social distancing. “It really speaks to the best of technology,” he says. “This, I think, is the best of the promise of the Internet.”