Tag Archives: Education

Women who code: “I just want to see us win”

Naia Johnson knows what it’s like to feel outnumbered. 

“I have a computer science program at my school but I’m one of five girls in my class and of all the Black girls, I’m maybe one of two.” Naia explains. “It’s never deterred me, though — if anything, it has made me want to do better.” 

Naia is a high school senior at Oakland Technical High School as well as a student at Google’s Code Next Lab in Oakland, a free computer science education program aimed at preparing and uplifting the next generation of Black and Latinx tech leaders. Naia is the first Code Next student to facilitate a workshop — she’s currently leading a virtual “Creative Coding” club for other Code Next students. 

“I’ve always had an idea of running my own business,” Naia explains “Before Code Next, it wasn’t so tech-focused, but there was always this idea that I was going to do something, [that] I was going to be somebody and that I was going to make that happen.”

At Code Next, Naia works with Amber Morse, the lab’s Community Manager. “I try to stay as relevant and creative as possible to continue to keep [students] engaged,” Amber says. “There is so much light, vibrancy and possibility already being met in Oakland, so fostering community doesn’t take much.”

Both Amber and Naia are working within Code Next and the Oakland community to reshape what the tech industry looks like — and more precisely, who it works for. For Women’s History Month, we asked Naia and Amber to interview one another so we could get to know them, and their work, a little better. 

Amber and Naia standing next to each other, smiling and looking at the camera.

Naia and Amber

Amber: What got you interested in Computer Science, Naia? In other words, when did that spark... spark?

Naia: I think it’s always been sparked. Since a young age, I was a “maker” kid. One time I made a functioning radio out of snap circuits. It barely picked up anything unless I held it in a very specific place in the middle of my brother’s rooms and we had the windows wide open. It would pick up sports channels..in Spanish...but it worked. It's cool to think, ‘Wow I made this.’

Amber:I know you also had some involvement with Black Girls Code. That’s why we have this synergy, I think. Before Google, I worked for Black Girls Code and I’m sure at some point I was at one of your workshops. 

Naia: Yes! I loved it. By far my favorite class with Black Girls Code was when we worked with Raspberry Pi’s [small circuit board computers]. We connected them to little go-karts and made cars move around. That was also my favorite group of girls. I’m still in contact with a lot of them today. 

Amber:Aw, that’s so cool, I love to hear that! Yes to sisterhood!

Naia: I actually met [one of the girls] at Google one day. It’s really cool to think I met her through technology and to see she’s still interested in it—and that I’m still interested in it! I think Black Girls Code was that first introduction to a community of people that were not only interested in tech but looked like me and were interested in tech. 

Amber: What one’s lesson you carry with you from Code Next? 

Naia:As cliche as it sounds, there’s no such thing as a silly question or a silly answer; it's something that needs to be said and something to be heard. It sticks better when you’re wrong because your brain is like, “Well I don’t want to be wrong again first of all.” Sometimes, not knowing the answer is better than knowing what to do. It’s not just about knowing why answer B is right; it’s also understanding why A, C and D are wrong. You learn more when you’re not just trying to be right. I really focus on these ideas in the Creative Coding Club that I facilitate.

Amber: What are your dreams and aspirations in life? 

Naia: It goes back to the younger me living here somewhere. I want to be my own boss. That's my biggest dream. I also want to be a role model, because not only is it a tribute to my own success, but it will end up being a tribute to other black and brown girls interested in the tech field. I want to nurture and support more programs that cultivate an interest in CS from a young age.

Amber:You know, it’s already happening Naia. You’re a student ambassador for Code Next, and you are an example for so many students looking up to you. You may not know you’re in it, but you’re in it. 

Naia: What about you?

Amber: I just want to see us win. When I think about all of our leaders and all of our supporters along the way, and when I see you and what the future might look like, I’m always inspired. That’s my inspiration, my aspiration... to continue to support women like you in ways to [get into] leadership positions, so that we can then support one another.

5 ways Search can help you learn

As students, parents and teachers continue to rise to the challenges of remote learning, we’ve created tools across desktop and mobile to help you find the best educational resources on the web. Whether it’s step-by-step guidance on complex math problems you’ve been stuck on or visual 3D models to ace that chemistry lab report, Search is here to help. These features are currently available in English everywhere, with plans to expand to more languages. And to make these tools more accessible, we’ve built these products to support screen readers and improved keyboard usage for people with motor disabilities. 

Here are five tools you can use to you help you L.E.A.R.N.: 

Look up over 2000 STEM concepts for quick access to educational resources  

When you search for underlying science and math concepts, such as “chemical bonds'', you’ll have easy access to educational overviews, useful examples, and helpful videos from across the web. 

Explore close to a million practice problems

Practice makes perfect, and with the launch of practice problems you can do just that. This interactive feature tests your knowledge of high school math, chemistry and physics topics directly on Search. Start by looking up a subject matter like “chemical bond practice problems”. You'll be one click away from learning resources from educational providers like BBC Bitesize, Byjus, Careers360, Chegg, CK12, Education Quizzes, GradeUp, Great Minds, Kahoot!, OpenStax, Toppr, Vedantu and more.

An animated image of screen showing how when you type something like 'chemical bond practice problems' into the Search bar you can access practice problems and quiz questions related to that topic.

Augment lessons with 3D models 

Who said you couldn’t turn your living room into a science lab? Our 3D augmented reality concepts bring to life over 200 chemistry, biology, physics and anatomy concepts — right in your room. With the help of AR on mobile you can visualize everything from a human skeleton to Bohr’s model.

An animated image of screen showing how when you type something like 'chemical bonds' into the Search bar you can choose to view it in AR.

Review how to solve math problems

Are you struggling to help your child with their math homework? Don’t worry, Google has your back. Type the  equation, like “x^2-3x-4=0”, into the Search bar or take a picture through Lens in the Google App to find step-by-step explanations in over 70 languages. We’re expanding support to even more types of math equations through our partnerships with Symbolab, Mathway (a Chegg Service), and Tiger Algebra which is coming. You’ll also be able to access a variety of explanations for how to solve math problems, increasing the chances that one of them may stick.

Navigate complex questions 

Getting stuck on a tricky STEM question, like “0.50 moles of NaCI are dissolved in 2.5 L of water, what is the molarity?” can be frustrating. In the coming weeks, you can access detailed explanations for specific questions and similar ones as well as targeted resources on these types of complex subjects. These tools will help take your understanding to the next level.

Posted by Mailys Robin, Product Manager, Learning and Education, and Michael Le, Product Manager, Learning and Education

 


5 ways Search can help you learn

As students, parents and teachers continue to rise to the challenges of remote learning, we’ve created tools across desktop and mobile to help you find the best educational resources on the web. Whether it’s step-by-step guidance on complex math problems you’ve been stuck on or visual 3D models to ace that chemistry lab report, Search is here to help. These features are currently available in English everywhere, with plans to expand to more languages. And to make these tools more accessible, we’ve built these products to support screen readers and improved keyboard usage for people with motor disabilities. 

Here are five tools you can use to you help you L.E.A.R.N.: 

Look up over 2000 STEM concepts for quick access to educational resources  

When you search for underlying science and math concepts, such as “chemical bonds'', you’ll have easy access to educational overviews, useful examples, and helpful videos from across the web. 

Explore close to a million practice problems

Practice makes perfect, and with the launch of practice problems you can do just that. This interactive feature tests your knowledge of high school math, chemistry and physics topics directly on Search. Start by looking up a subject matter like “chemical bond practice problems”. You'll be one click away from learning resources from educational providers like BBC Bitesize, Byjus, Careers360, Chegg, CK12, Education Quizzes, GradeUp, Great Minds, Kahoot!, OpenStax, Toppr, Vedantu and more.

An animated image of screen showing how when you type something like 'chemical bond practice problems' into the Search bar you can access practice problems and quiz questions related to that topic.

Augment lessons with 3D models 

Who said you couldn’t turn your living room into a science lab? Our 3D augmented reality concepts bring to life over 200 chemistry, biology, physics and anatomy concepts — right in your room. With the help of AR on mobile you can visualize everything from a human skeleton to Bohr’s model.

An animated image of screen showing how when you type something like 'chemical bonds' into the Search bar you can choose to view it in AR.

Review how to solve math problems

Are you struggling to help your child with their math homework? Don’t worry, Google has your back. Type the  equation, like “x^2-3x-4=0”, into the Search bar or take a picture through Lens in the Google App to find step-by-step explanations in over 70 languages. We’re expanding support to even more types of math equations through our partnerships with Symbolab, Mathway (a Chegg Service), and Tiger Algebra which is coming. You’ll also be able to access a variety of explanations for how to solve math problems, increasing the chances that one of them may stick.

Navigate complex questions 

Getting stuck on a tricky STEM question, like “0.50 moles of NaCI are dissolved in 2.5 L of water, what is the molarity?” can be frustrating. In the coming weeks, you can access detailed explanations for specific questions and similar ones as well as targeted resources on these types of complex subjects. These tools will help take your understanding to the next level.

Posted by Mailys Robin, Product Manager, Learning and Education, and Michael Le, Product Manager, Learning and Education

 


5 ways Search can help you learn

As students, parents and teachers continue to rise to the challenges of remote learning, we’ve created tools across desktop and mobile to help you find the best educational resources on the web. Whether it’s step-by-step guidance on complex math problems you’ve been stuck on or visual 3D models to ace that chemistry lab report, Search is here to help. These features are currently available in English everywhere, with plans to expand to more languages. And to make these tools more accessible, we’ve built these products to support screen readers and improved keyboard usage for people with motor disabilities. 

Here are five tools you can use to you help you L.E.A.R.N.: 

Look up over 2000 STEM concepts for quick access to educational resources  

When you search for underlying science and math concepts, such as “chemical bonds'', you’ll have easy access to educational overviews, useful examples, and helpful videos from across the web. 

Explore close to a million practice problems

Practice makes perfect, and with the launch of practice problems you can do just that. This interactive feature tests your knowledge of high school math, chemistry and physics topics directly on Search. Start by looking up a subject matter like “chemical bond practice problems”. You'll be one click away from learning resources from educational providers like BBC Bitesize, Byjus, Careers360, Chegg, CK12, Education Quizzes, GradeUp, Great Minds, Kahoot!, OpenStax, Toppr, Vedantu and more.

An animated image of screen showing how when you type something like 'chemical bond practice problems' into the Search bar you can access practice problems and quiz questions related to that topic.

Augment lessons with 3D models 

Who said you couldn’t turn your living room into a science lab? Our 3D augmented reality concepts bring to life over 200 chemistry, biology, physics and anatomy concepts — right in your room. With the help of AR on mobile you can visualize everything from a human skeleton to Bohr’s model.

An animated image of screen showing how when you type something like 'chemical bonds' into the Search bar you can choose to view it in AR.

Review how to solve math problems

Are you struggling to help your child with their math homework? Don’t worry, Google has your back. Type the  equation, like “x^2-3x-4=0”, into the Search bar or take a picture through Lens in the Google App to find step-by-step explanations in over 70 languages. We’re expanding support to even more types of math equations through our partnerships with Symbolab, Mathway (a Chegg Service), and Tiger Algebra which is coming. You’ll also be able to access a variety of explanations for how to solve math problems, increasing the chances that one of them may stick.

Navigate complex questions 

Getting stuck on a tricky STEM question, like “0.50 moles of NaCI are dissolved in 2.5 L of water, what is the molarity?” can be frustrating. In the coming weeks, you can access detailed explanations for specific questions and similar ones as well as targeted resources on these types of complex subjects. These tools will help take your understanding to the next level.

Posted by Mailys Robin, Product Manager, Learning and Education, and Michael Le, Product Manager, Learning and Education

 


5 ways Search can help you learn

As students, parents and teachers continue to rise to the challenges of remote learning, we’ve created tools across desktop and mobile to help you find the best educational resources on the web. Whether it’s step-by-step guidance on complex math problems you’ve been stuck on or visual 3D models to ace that chemistry lab report, Search is here to help. These features are currently available in English everywhere, with plans to expand to more languages. And to make these tools more accessible, we’ve built these products to support screen readers and improved keyboard usage for people with motor disabilities. 

Here are five tools you can use to you help you L.E.A.R.N.: 

Look up over 2000 STEM concepts for quick access to educational resources  

When you search for underlying science and math concepts, such as “chemical bonds'', you’ll have easy access to educational overviews, useful examples, and helpful videos from across the web. 

Explore close to a million practice problems

Practice makes perfect, and with the launch of practice problems you can do just that. This interactive feature tests your knowledge of high school math, chemistry and physics topics directly on Search. Start by looking up a subject matter like “chemical bond practice problems”. You'll be one click away from learning resources from educational providers like BBC Bitesize, Byjus, Careers360, Chegg, CK12, Education Quizzes, GradeUp, Great Minds, Kahoot!, OpenStax, Toppr, Vedantu and more.

An animated image of screen showing how when you type something like 'chemical bond practice problems' into the Search bar you can access practice problems and quiz questions related to that topic.

Augment lessons with 3D models 

Who said you couldn’t turn your living room into a science lab? Our 3D augmented reality concepts bring to life over 200 chemistry, biology, physics and anatomy concepts — right in your room. With the help of AR on mobile you can visualize everything from a human skeleton to Bohr’s model.

An animated image of screen showing how when you type something like 'chemical bonds' into the Search bar you can choose to view it in AR.

Review how to solve math problems

Are you struggling to help your child with their math homework? Don’t worry, Google has your back. Type the  equation, like “x^2-3x-4=0”, into the Search bar or take a picture through Lens in the Google App to find step-by-step explanations in over 70 languages. We’re expanding support to even more types of math equations through our partnerships with Symbolab, Mathway (a Chegg Service), and Tiger Algebra which is coming. You’ll also be able to access a variety of explanations for how to solve math problems, increasing the chances that one of them may stick.

Navigate complex questions 

Getting stuck on a tricky STEM question, like “0.50 moles of NaCI are dissolved in 2.5 L of water, what is the molarity?” can be frustrating. In the coming weeks, you can access detailed explanations for specific questions and similar ones as well as targeted resources on these types of complex subjects. These tools will help take your understanding to the next level. 

Advice from a Google engineer: Join a coding competition

Google's Coding Competitions are back for 2021 with multiple opportunities for participants to improve their programming skills by solving algorithmic problems designed by Google engineers. Sadia Atique is a Site Reliability Engineer (SRE) based in Munich, Germany who works on the Corporate Engineering team and actively contributes to competitions like Code Jam and Kick Start. We recently sat down with Sadia to learn how she got involved in coding competitions and why she thinks you should consider doing the same.

Do you remember your first coding competition? 

When I decided to pursue a degree in Computer Science at my university in Bangladesh, I had very little computing experience. Once I was familiar with coding, I started participating in competitions to build my skills while also having fun. I attended a programming camp which really drew me into the world of algorithmic problem solving and contests. Competitive coding is just like any other sport where you get that rush of adrenaline from trying to solve extremely challenging problems.

Sadia Atique

Googler Sadia Atique

Did you participate in any of Google's Coding Competitions before joining the company?

I participated in both Code Jam and Kick Start during university since I was passionate about eventually landing a role at Google. While I found Code Jam problems to be particularly tough, I was frequently a top scorer in Kick Start, which I hoped would help me get noticed by a recruiter. I was actually too afraid to apply on my own — luckily one day a recruiter reached out and the rest is history! These contests are a great investment of your time — plus they’re free, so why not?

Why did you get involved with Coding Competitions as a Googler?

Since I participated before I was hired, the Kick Start team contacted me to see if I was interested in contributing to critical problem development work. I jumped at the opportunity, first with Kick Start and then with Code Jam. Google's culture encourages engineers to use their skills and apply them toward the greater community, not just individual work. I really value this because the community aspect of coding competitions means a lot to me. It's a place where I feel like I can learn from others and keep growing, but where I also deeply belong. 

How would you compare Code Jam and Kick Start?

The quality of problems, level of commitment to problem preparation and cheating detection mechanism that keeps things fair are uniform between Code Jam and Kick Start. For contestants, the main differences are in problem difficulty and contest structure. 

Code Jam’s structure also makes it highly competitive — only 25 contestants make it to the World Finals — whereas Kick Start is accessible to folks wanting to try a new round almost every month. 

What advice would you share with someone thinking of registering for the 2021 season?

I’m clearly biased, but I think coding competitions are an excellent way to spend your free time. You  build problem-solving skills while learning new techniques and thinking creatively. And my competitive programming mindset has given me an ability to "think outside the box" to better approach unexpected situations. Competitions also help you build stamina, resilience and confidence — it takes a lot of patience and dedication to sit through hours of algorithmic problem solving! 

I also hope failure won't stop you. There were times I had to submit a problem 30 times before it was accepted, but I never stopped trying. I hope down the road you'll find these experiences to be as useful and inspiring as they have been for me.

Code Jam kicks off its season March 26 with the 30-hour Qualification Round (participants only need a few hours to compete). Registration will close at the end of the round, so be sure to register today. Kick Start registration is also now open throughout the year — we encourage coders of all levels to register before the first round on March 21

A guide to Google Meet for parents and guardians

When the COVID-19 pandemic required students worldwide to transition to distance learning, many parents and guardians suddenly found themselves in the role of part-time teachers — and even IT technicians — on top of their existing responsibilities at work and home. If this describes your family’s situation these days, you’re definitely not alone. Many students and schools use Google Workspace for Education for teaching and learning – which includes tools for organizing classwork, like Google Classroom, and for video conferencing, like Google Meet. If you’re new to using Google Meet, we created the below guide to help make things easier while you juggle your many roles at home. 

What is Google Meet?

Google Meet is Google’s secure and easy-to-use video conferencing solution that is available to schools for free through Google Workspace for Education. Educators use Meet to connect with your child one-on-one, to facilitate remote instruction and to hold virtual meetings and conferences with parents and guardians.


Meet works with all modern web browsers (like Chrome, Safari, etc.), meaning you don’t have to install or download software to your desktop computer in order to use it. For those looking to join from a mobile device like a tablet or smartphone, Meet has a dedicated mobile app that optimizes the video conferencing experience for mobile conditions. If you are using Meet on a Chromebook, we recently made significant performance improvements like audio and video optimizations and the ability to handle multitasking better.

How do I join a Google Meet?

There are a variety of ways to join a call or meeting, including joining from Google Classroom, or via a meeting link or invitation that your teacher has shared via email or Calendar.

How does Meet protect my child’s safety and privacy? 

Google is committed to building products that help protect student and teacher privacy and security. 

We designed Meet with industry-leading built-in protections that help keep calls safe by default. Here are a few examples: 

  • Encryption by default:In Meet, all data is encrypted in transit by default between your device and Google.

  • Unique meeting IDs:Each Meeting ID is 10 characters long, with 25 characters in the set, so it’s difficult to make an unauthorized attempt to join the meeting by guessing the ID. 

  • Protection against reusing finished meetings:Students can’t rejoin meetings once the final participant has left, unless they have meeting creation privileges to start a new meeting. This means if the instructor is the last person to leave a meeting, students can’t join again until an instructor restarts the meeting.

  • No plug-ins required:To limit the attack surface and eliminate the need to push out frequent security patches, Meet works entirely in your web browser, eliminating the need to download and update plug-ins.

Meet also gives educators powerful controls to help keep virtual classes safe and secure. 

  • Safety locks: Educators can decide which methods of joining (via calendar invite or phone, for example) require users to obtain explicit approval to join. 

  • Block anonymous users by default:Engaging safety locks will block all attempts to join a meeting from anonymous users (users not logged in through a Google Account), and enforce the requirement that the host joins first.

  • Host moderation controls:Educators can control the level of participant interactivity in the meeting. The chat lock and present lock will let hosts control which attendees can chat and present content within the meeting. Educators can also access these controls on mobile devices. 

  • End a meeting for all participants:Prevents students from staying on after the teacher has left — including in breakout rooms.

How does Meet help keep my child engaged during class?

Over the past year, we’ve launched a number of features to help engage students by bringing some of in-classroom magic to the virtual classroom: 

  • Hand raise, to help students indicate if they have a question or want to speak without disrupting the class.

  • Breakout rooms, used by educators to host small group discussions or working time. Teachers can easily jump between the different breakout rooms before bringing everyone back to the main discussion. 

  • Q&A, allowing students to submit and upvote questions from the teacher for better group engagement.

  • Polls, used by educators to quickly gather feedback from their students, oftentimes using it to identify topics that need more discussion or to test comprehension of a certain topic. 

  • Captions, allowing participants to follow along with live closed captions in Meet. Captions are now available in English, Spanish, French and Portuguese.

  • Tile view in mobile, allowing you to see up to 48 people on a screen when using a mobile device or a tablet. 

  • Customizable backgrounds, to let students and teachers express themselves creatively while in class, and background blur to help reduce background distractions and keep the focus on the participant.

  • Advanced safety locks, to block anonymous users from joining and let teachers control who can chat and present in a meeting. We will launch more controls in the upcoming weeks, like muting all, and ending meetings for everyone.

An animation showing how Breakout Rooms work in Meet.

What’s new in Google Meet?

There are a number of new features we’ve launched in the last couple of months to enhance the learning experience:

  • More controls for educators:Educators can now mute everyone on the call at once so they can keep class on track. And coming soon, we’ll be launching new settings for school leaders to set policies for who can join their school’s video calls, and whether people from their school can join video calls from other schools.  

  • Coming soon, we’ll have Emoji reactions, allowing students to more easily engage and express themselves in Meet.

  • Later this year, Meet will support multiple hosts, making it easier for educators to partner with others helping facilitate the class.

  • Later this year,  meeting transcripts can help students who weren’t able to attend class stay up to date.

An animation showing different colored Meet chat bubbles populating in a transcript.

What additional Meet resources are available to me?

If you have questions or need help, check out our Tech Toolkit video, read our Guardian’s Guide to Google Meet or visit our Help Center page for troubleshooting information. For more tips and resources to help families navigate technology visit families.google. We hope we can continue helping improve the digital education experience and bring parents and guardians along, to support all families through these times.

Celebrating 10 years of Chromebooks in education

A decade ago, we launched a small pilot program with a handful of schools. Council Bluffs in Iowa and Fon du Lac in Wisconsin were among the very first to use Chromebooks. Today, Chromebooks are as essential as a backpack for students learning in the US and in places like Australia, Brasil, Canada, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain and Sweden. As we celebrate our 10th birthday, we’re taking a look back at how far Chromebooks have come in the classroom, and announcing new features for educators and students. 

From pilot program to 40 million 

Googlers took the first Chromebooks into schools in the U.S. for a pilot program in 2010, and we found that students, teachers, and education leaders immediately loved how fast, simple and secure they were — three principles we still adhere to today. And with the rapid introduction of Chrome Education Upgrade, which unlocked advanced features in the operating system, Chromebooks rapidly became a hit with schools and IT administrators for their shareability and ease of management at scale. With Google Admin Console, school administrators were suddenly able to manage devices remotely, which has fundamentally shifted the computing model for schools from “computer rooms” to “shared carts” to today, assigned Chromebooks for most students – because hundreds of thousands of devices can all be managed by a single person.

Chromebooks expanded globally, scaling up in partnership with manufacturers like Acer, ASUS, Dell, HP, Lenovo and Samsung. More recently, NEC and Sharp have all started building Chromebooks for the Japan Education market--making Chromebooks the #1 device in K-12 education globally for the last year. To open up possibilities for note taking, digital reading, art, filming video reports, podcasts, and early learning apps, Chromebooks are now available in multiple formats, like convertibles, clamshells and tablets, and come with stylus support and touchscreen functionality. And to increase access, Chromebooks now come with multiple connectivity options including WiFi and mobile broadband. Today there’s a device for every learner and a growing ecosystem of apps for students and teachers alike-- over 40 million of them around the world-- with the Chromebook App Hub offering engaging apps and fresh lesson ideas. 

Chromebooks were built to be the foundation for teaching and learning, no matter where you are. And in 2020, as schools turned to distance learning, we’ve worked hard to improve the video conferencing capabilities of older as well as newly released devices to run Google Meet and Zoom, and introduced new features like Zero Touch Enrollment to help admins remotely enroll and ship devices to students and teachers at home, and extended support for automatic updates to eight years, so devices stay secure and equipped with the latest features for years to come. 

Building for the future of teaching and learning

With over 40 new devices for education, we’re launching new devices for not only students, but educators and faculty as well. We’ve heard from teachers that they love having a high-powered, lightweight convertible with a stylus that fits perfectly in the nook of their arm, because it untethers them from their desktop to enable them to roam freely about the classroom and engage with students 1:1 – or use those same devices to help teach remotely. 

So we’re kicking off Chromebook’s next decade with helpful productivity features for educators and students like the new Screen Capture tool that lets you take screenshots and screen recordings, perfect for recording lessons and sharing with students. When taking a screen capture, it’ll immediately show up in Tote, a new space that keeps important files right at your fingertips - perfect for adding images or videos to presentations or group projects. To help keep track of the many links and homework assignments, Chromebook now has a Clipboard that saves the last five items copied so you can easily paste any or all to a new page without needing to switch between tabs. And with support for eight Desks, students can have separate desks for each class, and teachers can keep their lesson planning separate from grading. Best of all, when you reboot, your windows will restore to their previous desks so workflows aren’t interrupted. 

We’re continuing to make improvements to Select-to-speak to support students with dyslexia and those who need additional reading support. Now, students can press pause and resume play, adjust the speed at which content is being read and skip between sentences and paragraphs using the new Select-to-Speak control panel or keyboard shortcuts. 

We’re also launching an API for user and printer policies, meaning IT administrators sometimes managing hundreds of thousands of Chromebooks can now write scripts to manage policies at scale, in addition to using Admin Console. And to help figure out when it’s time to switch legacy devices over to Chrome OS, the Chrome OS Readiness Tool is there to help, and our TCO Calculator will help schools determine which Chromebooks are right for them with our helpful guide, For more for IT administrators, head here.

Wherever you’re learning from, Chromebooks are easier than ever to use and manage remotely. For families helping their children learn from home, they can add a school account to their personal Google account managed with Family Link to approve content and help kids develop healthy device habits, and even create a PIN to make sign-in easier for young kids.

We’d love to hear from you on what you love most about Chromebooks. Reach out to @GoogleForEdu on Twitter, and join in the fun. 

An open call for aspiring computer scientists

For four weeks each summer, Google works with aspiring first-year college students interested in computer science, particularly from groups that have been historically marginalized from the tech industry. But this isn’t your typical summer school: It’s an intensive, interactive, hands-on and fun program, and applications are now open for this year’s program, which runs from July 12 through August 6.

The Computer Science Summer Institute, which is online this year, features a specially designed, project-based curriculum to help prepare students for computer science studies. Students learn directly from Google engineers, and work towards designing and developing their own applications. They also participate in daily development sessions to learn about and prepare for future internships and job opportunities.

Students posing in a photo booth with hand held signs and props.

Students from Google’s 2019 CSSI program.

Google is committed to increasing the enrollment and retention of students in the field of computer science and creating opportunities that foster diversity, equity, and inclusion for future technologists. CSSI: Online is free and open to students who plan on enrolling in a four-year college or university in the U.S. or Canada, and will live in the U.S., Canada or Mexico during the duration of programming.

Group of students sitting in chairs wearing CSSI shirts.

Students from Google’s 2018 CSSI program.

The application deadline is Monday, March 29 at 11:59 pm Pacific time, and application decisions will be announced in early May. Visit the Google CSSI page for more information and to apply. 

An open call for aspiring computer scientists

For four weeks each summer, Google works with aspiring first-year college students interested in computer science, particularly from groups that have been historically marginalized from the tech industry. But this isn’t your typical summer school: It’s an intensive, interactive, hands-on and fun program, and applications are now open for this year’s program, which runs from July 12 through August 6.

The Computer Science Summer Institute, which is online this year, features a specially designed, project-based curriculum to help prepare students for computer science studies. Students learn directly from Google engineers, and work towards designing and developing their own applications. They also participate in daily development sessions to learn about and prepare for future internships and job opportunities.

Students posing in a photo booth with hand held signs and props.

Students from Google’s 2019 CSSI program.

Google is committed to increasing the enrollment and retention of students in the field of computer science and creating opportunities that foster diversity, equity, and inclusion for future technologists. CSSI: Online is free and open to students who plan on enrolling in a four-year college or university in the U.S. or Canada, and will live in the U.S., Canada or Mexico during the duration of programming.

Group of students sitting in chairs wearing CSSI shirts.

Students from Google’s 2018 CSSI program.

The application deadline is Monday, March 29 at 11:59 pm Pacific time, and application decisions will be announced in early May. Visit the Google CSSI page for more information and to apply.