Tag Archives: app engine

An easier way to move your App Engine apps to Cloud Run

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

Blue header

An easier yet still optional migration

In the previous episode of the Serverless Migration Station video series, developers learned how to containerize their App Engine code for Cloud Run using Docker. While Docker has gained popularity over the past decade, not everyone has containers integrated into their daily development workflow, and some prefer "containerless" solutions but know that containers can be beneficial. Well today's video is just for you, showing how you can still get your apps onto Cloud Run, even If you don't have much experience with Docker, containers, nor Dockerfiles.

App Engine isn't going away as Google has expressed long-term support for legacy runtimes on the platform, so those who prefer source-based deployments can stay where they are so this is an optional migration. Moving to Cloud Run is for those who want to explicitly move to containerization.

Migrating to Cloud Run with Cloud Buildpacks video

So how can apps be containerized without Docker? The answer is buildpacks, an open-source technology that makes it fast and easy for you to create secure, production-ready container images from source code, without a Dockerfile. Google Cloud Buildpacks adheres to the buildpacks open specification and allows users to create images that run on all GCP container platforms: Cloud Run (fully-managed), Anthos, and Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE). If you want to containerize your apps while staying focused on building your solutions and not how to create or maintain Dockerfiles, Cloud Buildpacks is for you.

In the last video, we showed developers how to containerize a Python 2 Cloud NDB app as well as a Python 3 Cloud Datastore app. We targeted those specific implementations because Python 2 users are more likely to be using App Engine's ndb or Cloud NDB to connect with their app's Datastore while Python 3 developers are most likely using Cloud Datastore. Cloud Buildpacks do not support Python 2, so today we're targeting a slightly different audience: Python 2 developers who have migrated from App Engine ndb to Cloud NDB and who have ported their apps to modern Python 3 but now want to containerize them for Cloud Run.

Developers familiar with App Engine know that a default HTTP server is provided by default and started automatically, however if special launch instructions are needed, users can add an entrypoint directive in their app.yaml files, as illustrated below. When those App Engine apps are containerized for Cloud Run, developers must bundle their own server and provide startup instructions, the purpose of the ENTRYPOINT directive in the Dockerfile, also shown below.

Starting your web server with App Engine (app.yaml) and Cloud Run with Docker (Dockerfile) or Buildpacks (Procfile)

Starting your web server with App Engine (app.yaml) and Cloud Run with Docker (Dockerfile) or Buildpacks (Procfile)

In this migration, there is no Dockerfile. While Cloud Buildpacks does the heavy-lifting, determining how to package your app into a container, it still needs to be told how to start your service. This is exactly what a Procfile is for, represented by the last file in the image above. As specified, your web server will be launched in the same way as in app.yaml and the Dockerfile above; these config files are deliberately juxtaposed to expose their similarities.

Other than this swapping of configuration files and the expected lack of a .dockerignore file, the Python 3 Cloud NDB app containerized for Cloud Run is nearly identical to the Python 3 Cloud NDB App Engine app we started with. Cloud Run's build-and-deploy command (gcloud run deploy) will use a Dockerfile if present but otherwise selects Cloud Buildpacks to build and deploy the container image. The user experience is the same, only without the time and challenges required to maintain and debug a Dockerfile.

Get started now

If you're considering containerizing your App Engine apps without having to know much about containers or Docker, we recommend you try this migration on a sample app like ours before considering it for yours. A corresponding codelab leading you step-by-step through this exercise is provided in addition to the video which you can use for guidance.

All migration modules, their videos (when available), codelab tutorials, and source code, can be found in the migration repo. While our content initially focuses on Python users, we hope to one day also cover other legacy runtimes so stay tuned. Containerization may seem foreboding, but the goal is for Cloud Buildpacks and migration resources like this to aid you in your quest to modernize your serverless apps!

Containerizing Google App Engine apps for Cloud Run

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

Google App Engine header

An optional migration

Serverless Migration Station is a video mini-series from Serverless Expeditions focused on helping developers modernize their applications running on a serverless compute platform from Google Cloud. Previous episodes demonstrated how to migrate away from the older, legacy App Engine (standard environment) services to newer Google Cloud standalone equivalents like Cloud Datastore. Today's product crossover episode differs slightly from that by migrating away from App Engine altogether, containerizing those apps for Cloud Run.

There's little question the industry has been moving towards containerization as an application deployment mechanism over the past decade. However, Docker and use of containers weren't available to early App Engine developers until its flexible environment became available years later. Fast forward to today where developers have many more options to choose from, from an increasingly open Google Cloud. Google has expressed long-term support for App Engine, and users do not need to containerize their apps, so this is an optional migration. It is primarily for those who have decided to add containerization to their application deployment strategy and want to explicitly migrate to Cloud Run.

If you're thinking about app containerization, the video covers some of the key reasons why you would consider it: you're not subject to traditional serverless restrictions like development language or use of binaries (flexibility); if your code, dependencies, and container build & deploy steps haven't changed, you can recreate the same image with confidence (reproducibility); your application can be deployed elsewhere or be rolled back to a previous working image if necessary (reusable); and you have plenty more options on where to host your app (portability).

Migration and containerization

Legacy App Engine services are available through a set of proprietary, bundled APIs. As you can surmise, those services are not available on Cloud Run. So if you want to containerize your app for Cloud Run, it must be "ready to go," meaning it has migrated to either Google Cloud standalone equivalents or other third-party alternatives. For example, in a recent episode, we demonstrated how to migrate from App Engine ndb to Cloud NDB for Datastore access.

While we've recently begun to produce videos for such migrations, developers can already access code samples and codelab tutorials leading them through a variety of migrations. In today's video, we have both Python 2 and 3 sample apps that have divested from legacy services, thus ready to containerize for Cloud Run. Python 2 App Engine apps accessing Datastore are most likely to be using Cloud NDB whereas it would be Cloud Datastore for Python 3 users, so this is the starting point for this migration.

Because we're "only" switching execution platforms, there are no changes at all to the application code itself. This entire migration is completely based on changing the apps' configurations from App Engine to Cloud Run. In particular, App Engine artifacts such as app.yaml, appengine_config.py, and the lib folder are not used in Cloud Run and will be removed. A Dockerfile will be implemented to build your container. Apps with more complex configurations in their app.yaml files will likely need an equivalent service.yaml file for Cloud Run — if so, you'll find this app.yaml to service.yaml conversion tool handy. Following best practices means there'll also be a .dockerignore file.

App Engine and Cloud Functions are sourced-based where Google Cloud automatically provides a default HTTP server like gunicorn. Cloud Run is a bit more "DIY" because users have to provide a container image, meaning bundling our own server. In this case, we'll pick gunicorn explicitly, adding it to the top of the existing requirements.txt required packages file(s), as you can see in the screenshot below. Also illustrated is the Dockerfile where gunicorn is started to serve your app as the final step. The only differences for the Python 2 equivalent Dockerfile are: a) require the Cloud NDB package (google-cloud-ndb) instead of Cloud Datastore, and b) start with a Python 2 base image.

Image of The Python 3 requirements.txt and Dockerfile

The Python 3 requirements.txt and Dockerfile

Next steps

To walk developers through migrations, we always "START" with a working app then make the necessary updates that culminate in a working "FINISH" app. For this migration, the Python 2 sample app STARTs with the Module 2a code and FINISHes with the Module 4a code. Similarly, the Python 3 app STARTs with the Module 3b code and FINISHes with the Module 4b code. This way, if something goes wrong during your migration, you can always rollback to START, or compare your solution with our FINISH. If you are considering this migration for your own applications, we recommend you try it on a sample app like ours before considering it for yours. A corresponding codelab leading you step-by-step through this exercise is provided in addition to the video which you can use for guidance.

All migration modules, their videos (when published), codelab tutorials, START and FINISH code, etc., can be found in the migration repo. We hope to also one day cover other legacy runtimes like Java 8 so stay tuned. We'll continue with our journey from App Engine to Cloud Run ahead in Module 5 but will do so without explicit knowledge of containers, Docker, or Dockerfiles. Modernizing your development workflow to using containers and best practices like crafting a CI/CD pipeline isn't always straightforward; we hope content like this helps you progress in that direction!

Cloud NDB to Cloud Datastore migration

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

An optional migration

Serverless Migration Station is a mini-series from Serverless Expeditions focused on helping users on one of Google Cloud's serverless compute platforms modernize their applications. The video today demonstrates how to migrate a sample app from Cloud NDB (or App Engine ndb) to Cloud Datastore. While Cloud NDB suffices as a current solution for today's App Engine developers, this optional migration is for those who want to consolidate their app code to using a single client library to talk to Datastore.

Cloud Datastore started as Google App Engine's original database but matured to becoming its own standalone product in 2013. At that time, native client libraries were created for the new product so non-App Engine apps as well as App Engine second generation apps could access the service. Long-time developers have been using the original App Engine service APIs to access Datastore; for Python, this would be App Engine ndb. While the legacy ndb service is still available, its limitations and lack of availability in Python 3 are why we recommend users switch to standalone libraries like Cloud NDB in the preceding video in this series.

While Cloud NDB lets users break free from proprietary App Engine services and upgrade their applications to Python 3, it also gives non-App Engine apps access to Datastore. However, Cloud NDB's primary role is a transition tool for Python 2 App Engine developers. Non-App Engine developers and new Python 3 App Engine developers are directed to the Cloud Datastore native client library, not Cloud NDB.

As a result, those with a collection of Python 2 or Python 3 App Engine apps as well as non-App Engine apps may be using completely different libraries (ndb, Cloud NDB, Cloud Datastore) to connect to the same Datastore product. Following the best practices of code reuse, developers should consider consolidating to a single client library to access Datastore. Shared libraries provide stability and robustness with code that's constantly tested, debugged, and battle-proven. Module 2 showed users how to migrate from App Engine ndb to Cloud NDB, and today's Module 3 content focuses on migrating from Cloud NDB to Cloud Datastore. Users can also go straight from ndb directly to Cloud Datastore, skipping Cloud NDB entirely.

Migration sample and next steps

Cloud NDB follows an object model identical to App Engine ndb and is deliberately meant to be familiar to long-time Python App Engine developers while use of the Cloud Datastore client library is more like accessing a JSON document store. Their querying styles are also similar. You can compare and contrast them in the "diffs" screenshot below and in the video.

The diffs between the Cloud NDB and Cloud Datastore versions of the sample app

The "diffs" between the Cloud NDB and Cloud Datastore versions of the sample app

All that said, this migration is optional and only useful if you wish to consolidate to using a single client library. If your Python App Engine apps are stable with ndb or Cloud NDB, and you don't have any code using Cloud Datastore, there's no real reason to move unless Cloud Datastore has a compelling feature inaccessible from your current client library. If you are considering this migration and want to try it on a sample app before considering for yours, see the corresponding codelab and use the video for guidance.

It begins with the Module 2 code completed in the previous codelab/video; use your solution or ours as the "START". Both Python 2 (Module 2a folder) and Python 3 (Module 2b folder) versions are available. The goal is to arrive at the "FINISH" with an identical, working app but using a completely different Datastore client library. Our Python 2 FINISH can be found in the Module 3a folder while Python 3's FINISH is in the Module 3b folder. If something goes wrong during your migration, you can always rollback to START, or compare your solution with our FINISH. We will continue our Datastore discussion ahead in Module 6 as Cloud Firestore represents the next generation of the Datastore service.

All of these learning modules, corresponding videos (when published), codelab tutorials, START and FINISH code, etc., can be found in the migration repo. We hope to also one day cover other legacy runtimes like Java 8 and others, so stay tuned. Up next in Module 4, we'll take a different turn and showcase a product crossover, showing App Engine developers how to containerize their apps and migrate them to Cloud Run, our scalable container-hosting service in the cloud. If you can't wait for either Modules 4 or 6, try out their respective codelabs or access the code samples in the table at the repo above. Migrations aren't always easy, and we hope content like this helps you modernize your apps.

Migrating from App Engine ndb to Cloud NDB

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

Migrating to standalone services

Today we're introducing the first video showing long-time App Engine developers how to migrate from the App Engine ndb client library that connects to Datastore. While the legacy App Engine ndb service is still available for Datastore access, new features and continuing innovation are going into Cloud Datastore, so we recommend Python 2 users switch to standalone product client libraries like Cloud NDB.

This video and its corresponding codelab show developers how to migrate the sample app introduced in a previous video and gives them hands-on experience performing the migration on a simple app before tackling their own applications. In the immediately preceding "migration module" video, we transitioned that app from App Engine's original webapp2 framework to Flask, a popular framework in the Python community. Today's Module 2 content picks up where that Module 1 leaves off, migrating Datastore access from App Engine ndb to Cloud NDB.

Migrating to Cloud NDB opens the doors to other modernizations, such as moving to other standalone services that succeed the original App Engine legacy services, (finally) porting to Python 3, breaking up large apps into microservices for Cloud Functions, or containerizing App Engine apps for Cloud Run.

Moving to Cloud NDB

App Engine's Datastore matured to becoming its own standalone product in 2013, Cloud Datastore. Cloud NDB is the replacement client library designed for App Engine ndb users to preserve much of their existing code and user experience. Cloud NDB is available in both Python 2 and 3, meaning it can help expedite a Python 3 upgrade to the second generation App Engine platform. Furthermore, Cloud NDB gives non-App Engine apps access to Cloud Datastore.

As you can see from the screenshot below, one key difference between both libraries is that Cloud NDB provides a context manager, meaning you would use the Python with statement in a similar way as opening files but for Datastore access. However, aside from moving code inside with blocks, no other changes are required of the original App Engine ndb app code that accesses Datastore. Of course your "YMMV" (your mileage may vary) depending on the complexity of your code, but the goal of the team is to provide as seamless of a transition as possible as well as to preserve "ndb"-style access.

The difference between the App Engine ndb and Cloud NDB versions of the sample app

The "diffs" between the App Engine ndb and Cloud NDB versions of the sample app

Next steps

To try this migration yourself, hit up the corresponding codelab and use the video for guidance. This Module 2 migration sample "STARTs" with the Module 1 code completed in the previous codelab (and video). Users can use their solution or grab ours in the Module 1 repo folder. The goal is to arrive at the end with an identical, working app that operates just like the Module 1 app but uses a completely different Datastore client library. You can find this "FINISH" code sample in the Module 2a folder. If something goes wrong during your migration, you can always rollback to START, or compare your solution with our FINISH. Bonus content migrating to Python 3 App Engine can also be found in the video and codelab, resulting in a second FINISH, the Module 2b folder.

All of these learning modules, corresponding videos (when published), codelab tutorials, START and FINISH code, etc., can be found in the migration repo. We hope to also one day cover other legacy runtimes like Java 8 and others, so stay tuned! Developers should also check out the official Cloud NDB migration guide which provides more migration details, including key differences between both client libraries.

Ahead in Module 3, we will continue the Cloud NDB discussion and present our first optional migration, helping users move from Cloud NDB to the native Cloud Datastore client library. If you can't wait, try out its codelab found in the table at the repo above. Migrations aren't always easy; we hope this content helps you modernize your apps and shows we're focused on helping existing users as much as new ones.

Migrating from App Engine webapp2 to Flask

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud
graphic showing movement with arrows,. settings, lines, and more

Migrating web framework

The Google Cloud team recently introduced a series of codelabs (free, self-paced, hands-on tutorials) and corresponding videos designed to help users on one of our serverless compute platforms modernize their apps, with an initial focus on our earliest users running their apps on Google App Engine. We kick off this content by showing users how to migrate from App Engine's webapp2 web framework to Flask, a popular framework in the Python community.

While users have always been able to use other frameworks with App Engine, webapp2 comes bundled with App Engine, making it the default choice for many developers. One new requirement in App Engine's next generation platform (which launched in 2018) is that web frameworks must do their own routing, which unfortunately, means that webapp2 is no longer supported, so here we are. The good news is that as a result, modern App Engine is more flexible, lets users to develop in a more idiomatic fashion, and makes their apps more portable.

For example, while webapp2 apps can run on App Engine, Flask apps can run on App Engine, your servers, your data centers, or even on other clouds! Furthermore, Flask has more users, more published resources, and is better supported. If Flask isn't right for you, you can select from other WSGI-compliant frameworks such as Django, Pyramid, and others.

Video and codelab content

In this "Module 1" episode of Serverless Migration Station (part of the Serverless Expeditions series) Google engineer Martin Omander and I explore this migration and walk developers through it step-by-step.

In the previous video, we introduced developers to the baseline Python 2 App Engine NDB webapp2 sample app that we're taking through each of the migrations. In the video above, users see that the majority of the changes are in the main application handler, MainHandler:

The diffs between the webapp2 and Flask versions of the sample app

The "diffs" between the webapp2 and Flask versions of the sample app

Upon (re)deploying the app, users should see no visible changes to the output from the original version:

VisitMe application sample output

VisitMe application sample output

Next steps

Today's video picks up from where we left off: the Python 2 baseline app in its Module 0 repo folder. We call this the "START". By the time the migration has completed, the resulting source code, called "FINISH", can be found in the Module 1 repo folder. If you mess up partway through, you can rewind back to the START, or compare your solution with ours, FINISH. We also hope to one day provide a Python 3 version as well as cover other legacy runtimes like Java 8, PHP 5, and Go 1.11 and earlier, so stay tuned!

All of the migration learning modules, corresponding videos (when published), codelab tutorials, START and FINISH code, etc., can all be found in the migration repo. The next video (Module 2) will cover migrating from App Engine's ndb library for Datastore to Cloud NDB. We hope you find all these resources helpful in your quest to modernize your serverless apps!

Introducing "Serverless Migration Station" Learning Modules

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud
graphic showing movement with arrows,. settings, lines, and more

Helping users modernize their serverless apps

Earlier this year, the Google Cloud team introduced a series of codelabs (free, online, self-paced, hands-on tutorials) designed for technical practitioners modernizing their serverless applications. Today, we're excited to announce companion videos, forming a set of "learning modules" made up of these videos and their corresponding codelab tutorials. Modernizing your applications allows you to access continuing product innovation and experience a more open Google Cloud. The initial content is designed with App Engine developers in mind, our earliest users, to help you take advantage of the latest features in Google Cloud. Here are some of the key migrations and why they benefit you:

  • Migrate to Cloud NDB: App Engine's legacy ndb library used to access Datastore is tied to Python 2 (which has been sunset by its community). Cloud NDB gives developers the same NDB-style Datastore access but is Python 2-3 compatible and allows Datastore to be used outside of App Engine.
  • Migrate to Cloud Run: There has been a continuing shift towards containerization, an app modernization process making apps more portable and deployments more easily reproducible. If you appreciate App Engine's easy deployment and autoscaling capabilities, you can get the same by containerizing your App Engine apps for Cloud Run.
  • Migrate to Cloud Tasks: while the legacy App Engine taskqueue service is still available, new features and continuing innovation are going into Cloud Tasks, its standalone equivalent letting users create and execute App Engine and non-App Engine tasks.


The "Serverless Migration Station" videos are part of the long-running Serverless Expeditions series you may already be familiar with. In each video, Google engineer Martin Omander and I explore a variety of different modernization techniques. Viewers will be given an overview of the task at hand, a deeper-dive screencast takes a closer look at the code or configuration files, and most importantly, illustrates to developers the migration steps necessary to transform the same sample app across each migration.

Sample app

The baseline sample app is a simple Python 2 App Engine NDB and webapp2 application. It registers every web page visit (saving visiting IP address and browser/client type) and displays the most recent queries. The entire application is shown below, featuring Visit as the data Kind, the store_visit() and fetch_visits() functions, and the main application handler, MainHandler.


import os
import webapp2
from google.appengine.ext import ndb
from google.appengine.ext.webapp import template

class Visit(ndb.Model):
'Visit entity registers visitor IP address & timestamp'
visitor = ndb.StringProperty()
timestamp = ndb.DateTimeProperty(auto_now_add=True)

def store_visit(remote_addr, user_agent):
'create new Visit entity in Datastore'
Visit(visitor='{}: {}'.format(remote_addr, user_agent)).put()

def fetch_visits(limit):
'get most recent visits'
return (v.to_dict() for v in Visit.query().order(
-Visit.timestamp).fetch(limit))

class MainHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
'main application (GET) handler'
def get(self):
store_visit(self.request.remote_addr, self.request.user_agent)
visits = fetch_visits(10)
tmpl = os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'index.html')
self.response.out.write(template.render(tmpl, {'visits': visits}))

app = webapp2.WSGIApplication([
('/', MainHandler),
], debug=True)

Baseline sample application code

Upon deploying this application to App Engine, users will get output similar to the following:

image of a website with text saying VisitMe example

VisitMe application sample output

This application is the subject of today's launch video, and the main.py file above along with other application and configuration files can be found in the Module 0 repo folder.

Next steps

Each migration learning module covers one modernization technique. A video outlines the migration while the codelab leads developers through it. Developers will always get a starting codebase ("START") and learn how to do a specific migration, resulting in a completed codebase ("FINISH"). Developers can hit the reset button (back to START) if something goes wrong or compare their solutions to ours (FINISH). The hands-on experience helps users build muscle-memory for when they're ready to do their own migrations.

All of the migration learning modules, corresponding Serverless Migration Station videos (when published), codelab tutorials, START and FINISH code, etc., can all be found in the migration repo. While there's an initial focus on Python 2 and App Engine, you'll also find content for Python 3 users as well as non-App Engine users. We're looking into similar content for other legacy languages as well so stay tuned. We hope you find all these resources helpful in your quest to modernize your serverless apps!

Modernizing your Google App Engine applications

Posted by Wesley Chun, Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

Modernizing your Google App Engine applications header

Next generation service

Since its initial launch in 2008 as the first product from Google Cloud, Google App Engine, our fully-managed serverless app-hosting platform, has been used by many developers worldwide. Since then, the product team has continued to innovate on the platform: introducing new services, extending quotas, supporting new languages, and adding a Flexible environment to support more runtimes, including the ability to serve containerized applications.

With many original App Engine services maturing to become their own standalone Cloud products along with users' desire for a more open cloud, the next generation App Engine launched in 2018 without those bundled proprietary services, but coupled with desired language support such as Python 3 and PHP 7 as well as introducing Node.js 8. As a result, users have more options, and their apps are more portable.

With the sunset of Python 2, Java 8, PHP 5, and Go 1.11, by their respective communities, Google Cloud has assured users by expressing continued long-term support of these legacy runtimes, including maintaining the Python 2 runtime. So while there is no requirement for users to migrate, developers themselves are expressing interest in updating their applications to the latest language releases.

Google Cloud has created a set of migration guides for users modernizing from Python 2 to 3, Java 8 to 11, PHP 5 to 7, and Go 1.11 to 1.12+ as well as a summary of what is available in both first and second generation runtimes. However, moving from bundled to unbundled services may not be intuitive to developers, so today we're introducing additional resources to help users in this endeavor: App Engine "migration modules" with hands-on "codelab" tutorials and code examples, starting with Python.

Migration modules

Each module represents a single modernization technique. Some are strongly recommended, others less so, and, at the other end of the spectrum, some are quite optional. We will guide you as far as which ones are more important. Similarly, there's no real order of modules to look at since it depends on which bundled services your apps use. Yes, some modules must be completed before others, but again, you'll be guided as far as "what's next."

More specifically, modules focus on the code changes that need to be implemented, not changes in new programming language releases as those are not within the domain of Google products. The purpose of these modules is to help reduce the friction developers may encounter when adapting their apps for the next-generation platform.

Central to the migration modules are the codelabs: free, online, self-paced, hands-on tutorials. The purpose of Google codelabs is to teach developers one new skill while giving them hands-on experience, and there are codelabs just for Google Cloud users. The migration codelabs are no exception, teaching developers one specific migration technique.

Developers following the tutorials will make the appropriate updates on a sample app, giving them the "muscle memory" needed to do the same (or similar) with their applications. Each codelab begins with an initial baseline app ("START"), leads users through the necessary steps, then concludes with an ending code repo ("FINISH") they can compare against their completed effort. Here are some of the initial modules being announced today:

  • Web framework migration from webapp2 to Flask
  • Updating from App Engine ndb to Google Cloud NDB client libraries for Datastore access
  • Upgrading from the Google Cloud NDB to Cloud Datastore client libraries
  • Moving from App Engine taskqueue to Google Cloud Tasks
  • Containerizing App Engine applications to execute on Cloud Run

Examples

What should you expect from the migration codelabs? Let's preview a pair, starting with the web framework: below is the main driver for a simple webapp2-based "guestbook" app registering website visits as Datastore entities:

class MainHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
'main application (GET) handler'
def get(self):
store_visit(self.request.remote_addr, self.request.user_agent)
visits = fetch_visits(LIMIT)
tmpl = os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'index.html')
self.response.out.write(template.render(tmpl, {'visits': visits}))

A "visit" consists of a request's IP address and user agent. After visit registration, the app queries for the latest LIMIT visits to display to the end-user via the app's HTML template. The tutorial leads developers a migration to Flask, a web framework with broader support in the Python community. An Flask equivalent app will use decorated functions rather than webapp2's object model:

@app.route('/')
def root():
'main application (GET) handler'
store_visit(request.remote_addr, request.user_agent)
visits = fetch_visits(LIMIT)
return render_template('index.html', visits=visits)

The framework codelab walks users through this and other required code changes in its sample app. Since Flask is more broadly used, this makes your apps more portable.

The second example pertains to Datastore access. Whether you're using App Engine's ndb or the Cloud NDB client libraries, the code to query the Datastore for the most recent limit visits may look like this:

def fetch_visits(limit):
'get most recent visits'
query = Visit.query()
visits = query.order(-Visit.timestamp).fetch(limit)
return (v.to_dict() for v in visits)

If you decide to switch to the Cloud Datastore client library, that code would be converted to:

def fetch_visits(limit):
'get most recent visits'
query = DS_CLIENT.query(kind='Visit')
query.order = ['-timestamp']
return query.fetch(limit=limit)

The query styles are similar but different. While the sample apps are just that, samples, giving you this kind of hands-on experience is useful when planning your own application upgrades. The goal of the migration modules is to help you separate moving to the next-generation service and making programming language updates so as to avoid doing both sets of changes simultaneously.

As mentioned above, some migrations are more optional than others. For example, moving away from the App Engine bundled ndb library to Cloud NDB is strongly recommended, but because Cloud NDB is available for both Python 2 and 3, it's not necessary for users to migrate further to Cloud Datastore nor Cloud Firestore unless they have specific reasons to do so. Moving to unbundled services is the primary step to giving users more flexibility, choices, and ultimately, makes their apps more portable.

Next steps

For those who are interested in modernizing their apps, a complete table describing each module and links to corresponding codelabs and expected START and FINISH code samples can be found in the migration module repository. We are also working on video content based on these migration modules as well as producing similar content for Java, so stay tuned.

In addition to the migration modules, our team has also setup a separate repo to support community-sourced migration samples. We hope you find all these resources helpful in your quest to modernize your App Engine apps!

How we brought the latest version of Python to App Engine and Cloud Functions

At Cloud Next 2018, we added Python 3.7 support to Cloud Functions and now we’ve announced Python 3.7 support for the App Engine standard environment. These new runtimes allow you to write Python functions and apps using the latest version of Python and the rich ecosystem of packages available on Python Packaging Index (PyPI).

This new runtime marks a significant update to App Engine and was enabled by new open source software that we recently released: gVisor and FTL.

Python, straight from the source

Running Python 3.7 on App Engine and Cloud Functions required us to fundamentally rethink our infrastructure. Traditionally, meeting Google Cloud’s security requirements meant that we had to run a modified version of the Python interpreter. However, using a modified interpreter constrained some language features and only allowed us to support a limited set of whitelisted Python libraries.

Thanks to gVisor, a container sandbox that provides improved security and process isolation, we can now run the unmodified Python 3.7.0 interpreter. We’ve done extensive testing to make sure Python 3.7 is compatible with gVisor. As part of our compatibility testing, we run Python’s full suite of language tests, and tests for Python packages that are popular on PyPI. We’re committed to ensuring that everything you’ve come to know and love about Python is supported on our platform.

Seamless deployments

Most importantly, this change in our infrastructure makes it easier to take advantage of Python’s vast ecosystem. As a developer, you just add project dependencies to a requirements.txt file and deploy.

During deployment, FTL, a tool for building containers, fetches dependencies listed in your requirements.txt file and installs them alongside your app or function. FTL also includes a short-lived dependency cache, which speeds up repeated deployments if no changes are detected in your requirements.txt file. This is particularly useful if you find just need to re-deploy because you found a typo.

Keeping up with the Pythonistas

In making these changes, we also decided to expand the list of system packages that are included with each runtime’s Ubuntu 18.04 distribution. We think that will make life just a little bit easier for developers working with the latest release of Python.

Looking forward, we’re excited about how these changes will allow us to keep up with the Python community’s progress as they release new versions and libraries. Please let us know what you think and if you run into any challenges.

You can learn more about how to get started with it on App Engine and Cloud Functions in our documentation. We can’t wait to see what you build with Python 3.7.

By Stewart Reichling, Product Manager

Developing bots for Hangouts Chat

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, G Suite

We recently introduced Hangouts Chat to general availability. This next-generation messaging platform gives G Suite users a new place to communicate and to collaborate in teams. It features archive & search, tighter G Suite integration, and the ability to create separate, threaded chat rooms. The key new feature for developers is a bot framework and API. Whether it's to automate common tasks, query for information, or perform other heavy-lifting, bots can really transform the way we work.

In addition to plain text replies, Hangouts Chat can also display bot responses with richer user interfaces (UIs) called cards which can render header information, structured data, images, links, buttons, etc. Furthermore, users can interact with these components, potentially updating the displayed information. In this latest episode of the G Suite Dev Show, developers learn how to create a bot that features an updating interactive card.

As you can see in the video, the most important thing when bots receive a message is to determine the event type and take the appropriate action. For example, a bot will perform any desired "paperwork" when it is added to or removed from a room or direct message (DM), generically referred to as a "space" in the vernacular.

Receiving an ordinary message sent by users is the most likely scenario; most bots do "their thing" here in serving the request. The last event type occurs when a user clicks on an interactive card. Similar to receiving a standard message, a bot performs its requisite work, including possibly updating the card itself. Below is some pseudocode summarizing these four event types and represents what a bot would likely do depending on the event type:

function processEvent(req, rsp) {
var event = req.body; // event type received
var message; // JSON response message

if (event.type == 'REMOVED_FROM_SPACE') {
// no response as bot removed from room
return;

} else if (event.type == 'ADDED_TO_SPACE') {
// bot added to room; send welcome message
message = {text: 'Thanks for adding me!'};

} else if (event.type == 'MESSAGE') {
// message received during normal operation
message = responseForMsg(event.message.text);

} else if (event.type == 'CARD_CLICKED') {
// user-click on card UI
var action = event.action;
message = responseForClick(
action.actionMethodName, action.parameters);
}

rsp.send(message);
};

The bot pseudocode as well as the bot featured in the video respond synchronously. Bots performing more time-consuming operations or those issuing out-of-band notifications, can send messages to spaces in an asynchronous way. This includes messages such as job-completed notifications, alerts if a server goes down, and pings to the Sales team when a new lead is added to the CRM (Customer Relationship Management) system.

Hangouts Chat supports more than JavaScript or Python and Google Apps Script or Google App Engine. While using JavaScript running on Apps Script is one of the quickest and simplest ways to get a bot online within your organization, it can easily be ported to Node.js for a wider variety of hosting options. Similarly, App Engine allows for more scalability and supports additional languages (Java, PHP, Go, and more) beyond Python. The bot can also be ported to Flask for more hosting options. One key takeaway is the flexibility of the platform: developers can use any language, any stack, or any cloud to create and host their bot implementations. Bots only need to be able to accept HTTP POST requests coming from the Hangouts Chat service to function.

At Google I/O 2018 last week, the Hangouts Chat team leads and I delivered a longer, higher-level overview of the bot framework. This comprehensive tour of the framework includes numerous live demos of sample bots as well as in a variety of languages and platforms. Check out our ~40-minute session below.

To help you get started, check out the bot framework launch post. Also take a look at this post for a deeper dive into the Python App Engine version of the vote bot featured in the video. To learn more about developing bots for Hangouts Chat, review the concepts guides as well as the "how to" for creating bots. You can build bots for your organization, your customers, or for the world. We look forward to all the exciting bots you're going to build!

Build a mobile gaming analytics platform

Popular mobile games can attract millions of players and generate terabytes of game-related data in a short burst of time. This places extraordinary pressure on the infrastructure powering these games and requires scalable data analytics services to provide timely, actionable insights in a cost-effective way.

To address these needs, a growing number of successful gaming companies use Google’s web-scale analytics services to create personalized experiences for their players. They use telemetry and smart instrumentation to gain insight into how players engage with the game and to answer questions like: At what game level are players stuck? What virtual goods did they buy? And what's the best way to tailor the game to appeal to both casual and hardcore players?


A new reference architecture describes how you can collect, archive and analyze vast amounts of gaming telemetry data using Google Cloud Platform’s data analytics products. The architecture demonstrates two patterns for analyzing mobile game events:

  • Batch processing: This pattern helps you process game logs and other large files in a fast, parallelized manner. For example, leading mobile gaming company DeNA moved to BigQuery from Hadoop to get faster query responses for their log file analytics pipeline. In this GDC Lightning Talk video they explain the speed benefits of Google’s analytics tools and how the team was able to process large gaming datasets without the need to manage any infrastructure.
  • Real-time processing: Use this pattern when you want to understand what's happening in the game right now. Cloud Pub/Sub and Cloud Dataflow provide a fully managed way to perform a number of data-processing tasks like data cleansing and fraud detection in real-time. For example, you can highlight a player with maximum hit-points outside the valid range. Real-time processing is also a great way to continuously update dashboards of key game metrics, like how many active users are currently logged in or which in-game items are most popular.

Some Cloud Dataflow features are especially useful in a mobile context since messages may be delayed from the source due to mobile Internet connection issues or batteries running out. Cloud Dataflow's built-in session windowing functionality and triggers aggregate events based on the actual time they occurred (event time) as opposed to the time they're processed so that you can still group events together by user session even if there's a delay from the source.

But why choose between one or the other pattern? A key benefit of this architecture is that you can write your data pipeline processing once and execute it in either batch or streaming mode without modifying your codebase. So if you start processing your logs in batch mode, you can easily move to real-time processing in the future. This is an advantage of the high-level Cloud Dataflow model that was released as open source by Google.



Cloud Dataflow loads the processed data into one or more BigQuery tables. BigQuery is built for very large scale, and allows you to run aggregation queries against petabyte-scale datasets with fast response times. This is great for interactive analysis and data exploration, like the example screenshot above, where a simple BigQuery SQL query dynamically creates a Daily Active Users (DAU) graph using Google Cloud Datalab.


And what about player engagement and in-game dynamics? The BigQuery example above shows a bar chart of the ten toughest game bosses. It looks like boss10 killed players more than 75% of the time, much more than the next toughest. Perhaps it would make sense to lower the strength of this boss? Or maybe give the player some more powerful weapons? The choice is yours, but with this reference architecture you'll see the results of your changes straight away. Review the new reference architecture to jumpstart your data-driven quest to engage your players and make your games more successful, contact us, or sign up for a free trial of Google Cloud Platform to get started.

Further Reading and Additional Resources


- Posted by Oyvind Roti, Solutions Architect