Tag Archives: App dev

Migrating App Engine push queues to Cloud Tasks

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

Banner image that shows the Cloud Task logo

Introduction

The previous Module 7 episode of Serverless Migration Station gave developers an idea of how App Engine push tasks work and how to implement their use in an existing App Engine ndb Flask app. In this Module 8 episode, we migrate this app from the App Engine Datastore (ndb) and Task Queue (taskqueue) APIs to Cloud NDB and Cloud Tasks. This makes your app more portable and provides a smoother transition from Python 2 to 3. The same principle applies to upgrading other legacy App Engine apps from Java 8 to 11, PHP 5 to 7, and up to Go 1.12 or newer.

Over the years, many of the original App Engine services such as Datastore, Memcache, and Blobstore, have matured to become their own standalone products, for example, Cloud Datastore, Cloud Memorystore, and Cloud Storage, respectively. The same is true for App Engine Task Queues, whose functionality has been split out to Cloud Tasks (push queues) and Cloud Pub/Sub (pull queues), now accessible to developers and applications outside of App Engine.

Migrating App Engine push queues to Cloud Tasks video

Migrating to Cloud NDB and Cloud Tasks

The key updates being made to the application:

  1. Add support for Google Cloud client libraries in the app's configuration
  2. Switch from App Engine APIs to their standalone Cloud equivalents
  3. Make required library adjustments, e.g., add use of Cloud NDB context manager
  4. Complete additional setup for Cloud Tasks
  5. Make minor updates to the task handler itself

The bulk of the updates are in #3 and #4 above, and those are reflected in the following "diff"s for the main application file:

Screenshot shows primary differences in code when switching to Cloud NDB & Cloud Tasks

Primary differences switching to Cloud NDB & Cloud Tasks

With these changes implemented, the web app works identically to that of the Module 7 sample, but both the database and task queue functionality have been completely swapped to using the standalone/unbundled Cloud NDB and Cloud Tasks libraries… congratulations!

Next steps

To do this exercise yourself, check out our corresponding codelab which leads you step-by-step through the process. You can use this in addition to the video, which can provide guidance. You can also review the push tasks migration guide for more information. Arriving at a fully-functioning Module 8 app featuring Cloud Tasks sets the stage for a larger migration ahead in Module 9. We've accomplished the most important step here, that is, getting off of the original App Engine legacy bundled services/APIs. The Module 9 migration from Python 2 to 3 and Cloud NDB to Cloud Firestore, plus the upgrade to the latest version of the Cloud Tasks client library are all fairly optional, but they represent a good opportunity to perform a medium-sized migration.

All migration modules, their videos (when available), codelab tutorials, and source code, can be found in the migration repo. While the content focuses initially on Python users, we will cover other legacy runtimes soon so stay tuned.

How to use App Engine push queues in Flask apps

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

Banner image that shows the Cloud Task logo

Introduction

Since its original launch in 2008, many of the core Google App Engine services such as Datastore, Memcache, and Blobstore, have matured to become their own standalone products: for example, Cloud Datastore, Cloud Memorystore, and Cloud Storage, respectively. The same is true for App Engine Task Queues with Cloud Tasks. Today's Module 7 episode of Serverless Migration Station reviews how App Engine push tasks work, by adding this feature to an existing App Engine ndb Flask app.

App Engine push queues in Flask apps video

That app is where we left off at the end of Module 1, migrating its web framework from App Engine webapp2 to Flask. The app registers web page visits, creating a Datastore Entity for each. After a new record is created, the ten most recent visits are displayed to the end-user. If the app only shows the latest visits, there is no reason to keep older visits, so the Module 7 exercise adds a push task that deletes all visits older than the oldest one shown. Tasks execute asynchronously outside the normal application flow.

Key updates

The following are the changes being made to the application:

  1. Add use of App Engine Task Queues (taskqueue) API
  2. Determine oldest visit displayed, logging and saving that timestamp
  3. Create task to delete old visits
  4. Update web page template to display timestamp threshold
  5. Log how many and which visits (by Entity ID) are deleted

Except for #4 which occurs in the HTML template file, these updates are reflected in the "diff"s for the main application file:

Screenshot of App Engine push tasks application source code differences

Adding App Engine push tasks application source code differences

With these changes implemented, the web app now shows the end-user which visits will be deleted by the new push task:

Screenshot of VisitMe example showing last ten site visits. A red circle around older visits being deleted

Sample application output

Next steps

To do this exercise yourself, check out our corresponding codelab which leads you step-by-step through the process. You can use this in addition to the video, which can provide guidance. You can also review the push queue documentation for more information. Arriving at a fully-functioning Module 7 app featuring App Engine push tasks sets the stage for migrating it to Cloud Tasks (and Cloud NDB) ahead in Module 8.

All migration modules, their videos (when available), codelab tutorials, and source code, can be found in the migration repo. While the content focuses initially on Python users, we will cover other legacy runtimes soon so stay tuned.

An easier way to move your App Engine apps to Cloud Run

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

Blue header

An easier yet still optional migration

In the previous episode of the Serverless Migration Station video series, developers learned how to containerize their App Engine code for Cloud Run using Docker. While Docker has gained popularity over the past decade, not everyone has containers integrated into their daily development workflow, and some prefer "containerless" solutions but know that containers can be beneficial. Well today's video is just for you, showing how you can still get your apps onto Cloud Run, even If you don't have much experience with Docker, containers, nor Dockerfiles.

App Engine isn't going away as Google has expressed long-term support for legacy runtimes on the platform, so those who prefer source-based deployments can stay where they are so this is an optional migration. Moving to Cloud Run is for those who want to explicitly move to containerization.

Migrating to Cloud Run with Cloud Buildpacks video

So how can apps be containerized without Docker? The answer is buildpacks, an open-source technology that makes it fast and easy for you to create secure, production-ready container images from source code, without a Dockerfile. Google Cloud Buildpacks adheres to the buildpacks open specification and allows users to create images that run on all GCP container platforms: Cloud Run (fully-managed), Anthos, and Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE). If you want to containerize your apps while staying focused on building your solutions and not how to create or maintain Dockerfiles, Cloud Buildpacks is for you.

In the last video, we showed developers how to containerize a Python 2 Cloud NDB app as well as a Python 3 Cloud Datastore app. We targeted those specific implementations because Python 2 users are more likely to be using App Engine's ndb or Cloud NDB to connect with their app's Datastore while Python 3 developers are most likely using Cloud Datastore. Cloud Buildpacks do not support Python 2, so today we're targeting a slightly different audience: Python 2 developers who have migrated from App Engine ndb to Cloud NDB and who have ported their apps to modern Python 3 but now want to containerize them for Cloud Run.

Developers familiar with App Engine know that a default HTTP server is provided by default and started automatically, however if special launch instructions are needed, users can add an entrypoint directive in their app.yaml files, as illustrated below. When those App Engine apps are containerized for Cloud Run, developers must bundle their own server and provide startup instructions, the purpose of the ENTRYPOINT directive in the Dockerfile, also shown below.

Starting your web server with App Engine (app.yaml) and Cloud Run with Docker (Dockerfile) or Buildpacks (Procfile)

Starting your web server with App Engine (app.yaml) and Cloud Run with Docker (Dockerfile) or Buildpacks (Procfile)

In this migration, there is no Dockerfile. While Cloud Buildpacks does the heavy-lifting, determining how to package your app into a container, it still needs to be told how to start your service. This is exactly what a Procfile is for, represented by the last file in the image above. As specified, your web server will be launched in the same way as in app.yaml and the Dockerfile above; these config files are deliberately juxtaposed to expose their similarities.

Other than this swapping of configuration files and the expected lack of a .dockerignore file, the Python 3 Cloud NDB app containerized for Cloud Run is nearly identical to the Python 3 Cloud NDB App Engine app we started with. Cloud Run's build-and-deploy command (gcloud run deploy) will use a Dockerfile if present but otherwise selects Cloud Buildpacks to build and deploy the container image. The user experience is the same, only without the time and challenges required to maintain and debug a Dockerfile.

Get started now

If you're considering containerizing your App Engine apps without having to know much about containers or Docker, we recommend you try this migration on a sample app like ours before considering it for yours. A corresponding codelab leading you step-by-step through this exercise is provided in addition to the video which you can use for guidance.

All migration modules, their videos (when available), codelab tutorials, and source code, can be found in the migration repo. While our content initially focuses on Python users, we hope to one day also cover other legacy runtimes so stay tuned. Containerization may seem foreboding, but the goal is for Cloud Buildpacks and migration resources like this to aid you in your quest to modernize your serverless apps!

Containerizing Google App Engine apps for Cloud Run

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

Google App Engine header

An optional migration

Serverless Migration Station is a video mini-series from Serverless Expeditions focused on helping developers modernize their applications running on a serverless compute platform from Google Cloud. Previous episodes demonstrated how to migrate away from the older, legacy App Engine (standard environment) services to newer Google Cloud standalone equivalents like Cloud Datastore. Today's product crossover episode differs slightly from that by migrating away from App Engine altogether, containerizing those apps for Cloud Run.

There's little question the industry has been moving towards containerization as an application deployment mechanism over the past decade. However, Docker and use of containers weren't available to early App Engine developers until its flexible environment became available years later. Fast forward to today where developers have many more options to choose from, from an increasingly open Google Cloud. Google has expressed long-term support for App Engine, and users do not need to containerize their apps, so this is an optional migration. It is primarily for those who have decided to add containerization to their application deployment strategy and want to explicitly migrate to Cloud Run.

If you're thinking about app containerization, the video covers some of the key reasons why you would consider it: you're not subject to traditional serverless restrictions like development language or use of binaries (flexibility); if your code, dependencies, and container build & deploy steps haven't changed, you can recreate the same image with confidence (reproducibility); your application can be deployed elsewhere or be rolled back to a previous working image if necessary (reusable); and you have plenty more options on where to host your app (portability).

Migration and containerization

Legacy App Engine services are available through a set of proprietary, bundled APIs. As you can surmise, those services are not available on Cloud Run. So if you want to containerize your app for Cloud Run, it must be "ready to go," meaning it has migrated to either Google Cloud standalone equivalents or other third-party alternatives. For example, in a recent episode, we demonstrated how to migrate from App Engine ndb to Cloud NDB for Datastore access.

While we've recently begun to produce videos for such migrations, developers can already access code samples and codelab tutorials leading them through a variety of migrations. In today's video, we have both Python 2 and 3 sample apps that have divested from legacy services, thus ready to containerize for Cloud Run. Python 2 App Engine apps accessing Datastore are most likely to be using Cloud NDB whereas it would be Cloud Datastore for Python 3 users, so this is the starting point for this migration.

Because we're "only" switching execution platforms, there are no changes at all to the application code itself. This entire migration is completely based on changing the apps' configurations from App Engine to Cloud Run. In particular, App Engine artifacts such as app.yaml, appengine_config.py, and the lib folder are not used in Cloud Run and will be removed. A Dockerfile will be implemented to build your container. Apps with more complex configurations in their app.yaml files will likely need an equivalent service.yaml file for Cloud Run — if so, you'll find this app.yaml to service.yaml conversion tool handy. Following best practices means there'll also be a .dockerignore file.

App Engine and Cloud Functions are sourced-based where Google Cloud automatically provides a default HTTP server like gunicorn. Cloud Run is a bit more "DIY" because users have to provide a container image, meaning bundling our own server. In this case, we'll pick gunicorn explicitly, adding it to the top of the existing requirements.txt required packages file(s), as you can see in the screenshot below. Also illustrated is the Dockerfile where gunicorn is started to serve your app as the final step. The only differences for the Python 2 equivalent Dockerfile are: a) require the Cloud NDB package (google-cloud-ndb) instead of Cloud Datastore, and b) start with a Python 2 base image.

Image of The Python 3 requirements.txt and Dockerfile

The Python 3 requirements.txt and Dockerfile

Next steps

To walk developers through migrations, we always "START" with a working app then make the necessary updates that culminate in a working "FINISH" app. For this migration, the Python 2 sample app STARTs with the Module 2a code and FINISHes with the Module 4a code. Similarly, the Python 3 app STARTs with the Module 3b code and FINISHes with the Module 4b code. This way, if something goes wrong during your migration, you can always rollback to START, or compare your solution with our FINISH. If you are considering this migration for your own applications, we recommend you try it on a sample app like ours before considering it for yours. A corresponding codelab leading you step-by-step through this exercise is provided in addition to the video which you can use for guidance.

All migration modules, their videos (when published), codelab tutorials, START and FINISH code, etc., can be found in the migration repo. We hope to also one day cover other legacy runtimes like Java 8 so stay tuned. We'll continue with our journey from App Engine to Cloud Run ahead in Module 5 but will do so without explicit knowledge of containers, Docker, or Dockerfiles. Modernizing your development workflow to using containers and best practices like crafting a CI/CD pipeline isn't always straightforward; we hope content like this helps you progress in that direction!

Migrating from App Engine webapp2 to Flask

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud
graphic showing movement with arrows,. settings, lines, and more

Migrating web framework

The Google Cloud team recently introduced a series of codelabs (free, self-paced, hands-on tutorials) and corresponding videos designed to help users on one of our serverless compute platforms modernize their apps, with an initial focus on our earliest users running their apps on Google App Engine. We kick off this content by showing users how to migrate from App Engine's webapp2 web framework to Flask, a popular framework in the Python community.

While users have always been able to use other frameworks with App Engine, webapp2 comes bundled with App Engine, making it the default choice for many developers. One new requirement in App Engine's next generation platform (which launched in 2018) is that web frameworks must do their own routing, which unfortunately, means that webapp2 is no longer supported, so here we are. The good news is that as a result, modern App Engine is more flexible, lets users to develop in a more idiomatic fashion, and makes their apps more portable.

For example, while webapp2 apps can run on App Engine, Flask apps can run on App Engine, your servers, your data centers, or even on other clouds! Furthermore, Flask has more users, more published resources, and is better supported. If Flask isn't right for you, you can select from other WSGI-compliant frameworks such as Django, Pyramid, and others.

Video and codelab content

In this "Module 1" episode of Serverless Migration Station (part of the Serverless Expeditions series) Google engineer Martin Omander and I explore this migration and walk developers through it step-by-step.

In the previous video, we introduced developers to the baseline Python 2 App Engine NDB webapp2 sample app that we're taking through each of the migrations. In the video above, users see that the majority of the changes are in the main application handler, MainHandler:

The diffs between the webapp2 and Flask versions of the sample app

The "diffs" between the webapp2 and Flask versions of the sample app

Upon (re)deploying the app, users should see no visible changes to the output from the original version:

VisitMe application sample output

VisitMe application sample output

Next steps

Today's video picks up from where we left off: the Python 2 baseline app in its Module 0 repo folder. We call this the "START". By the time the migration has completed, the resulting source code, called "FINISH", can be found in the Module 1 repo folder. If you mess up partway through, you can rewind back to the START, or compare your solution with ours, FINISH. We also hope to one day provide a Python 3 version as well as cover other legacy runtimes like Java 8, PHP 5, and Go 1.11 and earlier, so stay tuned!

All of the migration learning modules, corresponding videos (when published), codelab tutorials, START and FINISH code, etc., can all be found in the migration repo. The next video (Module 2) will cover migrating from App Engine's ndb library for Datastore to Cloud NDB. We hope you find all these resources helpful in your quest to modernize your serverless apps!

Introducing "Serverless Migration Station" Learning Modules

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud
graphic showing movement with arrows,. settings, lines, and more

Helping users modernize their serverless apps

Earlier this year, the Google Cloud team introduced a series of codelabs (free, online, self-paced, hands-on tutorials) designed for technical practitioners modernizing their serverless applications. Today, we're excited to announce companion videos, forming a set of "learning modules" made up of these videos and their corresponding codelab tutorials. Modernizing your applications allows you to access continuing product innovation and experience a more open Google Cloud. The initial content is designed with App Engine developers in mind, our earliest users, to help you take advantage of the latest features in Google Cloud. Here are some of the key migrations and why they benefit you:

  • Migrate to Cloud NDB: App Engine's legacy ndb library used to access Datastore is tied to Python 2 (which has been sunset by its community). Cloud NDB gives developers the same NDB-style Datastore access but is Python 2-3 compatible and allows Datastore to be used outside of App Engine.
  • Migrate to Cloud Run: There has been a continuing shift towards containerization, an app modernization process making apps more portable and deployments more easily reproducible. If you appreciate App Engine's easy deployment and autoscaling capabilities, you can get the same by containerizing your App Engine apps for Cloud Run.
  • Migrate to Cloud Tasks: while the legacy App Engine taskqueue service is still available, new features and continuing innovation are going into Cloud Tasks, its standalone equivalent letting users create and execute App Engine and non-App Engine tasks.


The "Serverless Migration Station" videos are part of the long-running Serverless Expeditions series you may already be familiar with. In each video, Google engineer Martin Omander and I explore a variety of different modernization techniques. Viewers will be given an overview of the task at hand, a deeper-dive screencast takes a closer look at the code or configuration files, and most importantly, illustrates to developers the migration steps necessary to transform the same sample app across each migration.

Sample app

The baseline sample app is a simple Python 2 App Engine NDB and webapp2 application. It registers every web page visit (saving visiting IP address and browser/client type) and displays the most recent queries. The entire application is shown below, featuring Visit as the data Kind, the store_visit() and fetch_visits() functions, and the main application handler, MainHandler.


import os
import webapp2
from google.appengine.ext import ndb
from google.appengine.ext.webapp import template

class Visit(ndb.Model):
'Visit entity registers visitor IP address & timestamp'
visitor = ndb.StringProperty()
timestamp = ndb.DateTimeProperty(auto_now_add=True)

def store_visit(remote_addr, user_agent):
'create new Visit entity in Datastore'
Visit(visitor='{}: {}'.format(remote_addr, user_agent)).put()

def fetch_visits(limit):
'get most recent visits'
return (v.to_dict() for v in Visit.query().order(
-Visit.timestamp).fetch(limit))

class MainHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
'main application (GET) handler'
def get(self):
store_visit(self.request.remote_addr, self.request.user_agent)
visits = fetch_visits(10)
tmpl = os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'index.html')
self.response.out.write(template.render(tmpl, {'visits': visits}))

app = webapp2.WSGIApplication([
('/', MainHandler),
], debug=True)

Baseline sample application code

Upon deploying this application to App Engine, users will get output similar to the following:

image of a website with text saying VisitMe example

VisitMe application sample output

This application is the subject of today's launch video, and the main.py file above along with other application and configuration files can be found in the Module 0 repo folder.

Next steps

Each migration learning module covers one modernization technique. A video outlines the migration while the codelab leads developers through it. Developers will always get a starting codebase ("START") and learn how to do a specific migration, resulting in a completed codebase ("FINISH"). Developers can hit the reset button (back to START) if something goes wrong or compare their solutions to ours (FINISH). The hands-on experience helps users build muscle-memory for when they're ready to do their own migrations.

All of the migration learning modules, corresponding Serverless Migration Station videos (when published), codelab tutorials, START and FINISH code, etc., can all be found in the migration repo. While there's an initial focus on Python 2 and App Engine, you'll also find content for Python 3 users as well as non-App Engine users. We're looking into similar content for other legacy languages as well so stay tuned. We hope you find all these resources helpful in your quest to modernize your serverless apps!

Modernizing your Google App Engine applications

Posted by Wesley Chun, Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

Modernizing your Google App Engine applications header

Next generation service

Since its initial launch in 2008 as the first product from Google Cloud, Google App Engine, our fully-managed serverless app-hosting platform, has been used by many developers worldwide. Since then, the product team has continued to innovate on the platform: introducing new services, extending quotas, supporting new languages, and adding a Flexible environment to support more runtimes, including the ability to serve containerized applications.

With many original App Engine services maturing to become their own standalone Cloud products along with users' desire for a more open cloud, the next generation App Engine launched in 2018 without those bundled proprietary services, but coupled with desired language support such as Python 3 and PHP 7 as well as introducing Node.js 8. As a result, users have more options, and their apps are more portable.

With the sunset of Python 2, Java 8, PHP 5, and Go 1.11, by their respective communities, Google Cloud has assured users by expressing continued long-term support of these legacy runtimes, including maintaining the Python 2 runtime. So while there is no requirement for users to migrate, developers themselves are expressing interest in updating their applications to the latest language releases.

Google Cloud has created a set of migration guides for users modernizing from Python 2 to 3, Java 8 to 11, PHP 5 to 7, and Go 1.11 to 1.12+ as well as a summary of what is available in both first and second generation runtimes. However, moving from bundled to unbundled services may not be intuitive to developers, so today we're introducing additional resources to help users in this endeavor: App Engine "migration modules" with hands-on "codelab" tutorials and code examples, starting with Python.

Migration modules

Each module represents a single modernization technique. Some are strongly recommended, others less so, and, at the other end of the spectrum, some are quite optional. We will guide you as far as which ones are more important. Similarly, there's no real order of modules to look at since it depends on which bundled services your apps use. Yes, some modules must be completed before others, but again, you'll be guided as far as "what's next."

More specifically, modules focus on the code changes that need to be implemented, not changes in new programming language releases as those are not within the domain of Google products. The purpose of these modules is to help reduce the friction developers may encounter when adapting their apps for the next-generation platform.

Central to the migration modules are the codelabs: free, online, self-paced, hands-on tutorials. The purpose of Google codelabs is to teach developers one new skill while giving them hands-on experience, and there are codelabs just for Google Cloud users. The migration codelabs are no exception, teaching developers one specific migration technique.

Developers following the tutorials will make the appropriate updates on a sample app, giving them the "muscle memory" needed to do the same (or similar) with their applications. Each codelab begins with an initial baseline app ("START"), leads users through the necessary steps, then concludes with an ending code repo ("FINISH") they can compare against their completed effort. Here are some of the initial modules being announced today:

  • Web framework migration from webapp2 to Flask
  • Updating from App Engine ndb to Google Cloud NDB client libraries for Datastore access
  • Upgrading from the Google Cloud NDB to Cloud Datastore client libraries
  • Moving from App Engine taskqueue to Google Cloud Tasks
  • Containerizing App Engine applications to execute on Cloud Run

Examples

What should you expect from the migration codelabs? Let's preview a pair, starting with the web framework: below is the main driver for a simple webapp2-based "guestbook" app registering website visits as Datastore entities:

class MainHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
'main application (GET) handler'
def get(self):
store_visit(self.request.remote_addr, self.request.user_agent)
visits = fetch_visits(LIMIT)
tmpl = os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'index.html')
self.response.out.write(template.render(tmpl, {'visits': visits}))

A "visit" consists of a request's IP address and user agent. After visit registration, the app queries for the latest LIMIT visits to display to the end-user via the app's HTML template. The tutorial leads developers a migration to Flask, a web framework with broader support in the Python community. An Flask equivalent app will use decorated functions rather than webapp2's object model:

@app.route('/')
def root():
'main application (GET) handler'
store_visit(request.remote_addr, request.user_agent)
visits = fetch_visits(LIMIT)
return render_template('index.html', visits=visits)

The framework codelab walks users through this and other required code changes in its sample app. Since Flask is more broadly used, this makes your apps more portable.

The second example pertains to Datastore access. Whether you're using App Engine's ndb or the Cloud NDB client libraries, the code to query the Datastore for the most recent limit visits may look like this:

def fetch_visits(limit):
'get most recent visits'
query = Visit.query()
visits = query.order(-Visit.timestamp).fetch(limit)
return (v.to_dict() for v in visits)

If you decide to switch to the Cloud Datastore client library, that code would be converted to:

def fetch_visits(limit):
'get most recent visits'
query = DS_CLIENT.query(kind='Visit')
query.order = ['-timestamp']
return query.fetch(limit=limit)

The query styles are similar but different. While the sample apps are just that, samples, giving you this kind of hands-on experience is useful when planning your own application upgrades. The goal of the migration modules is to help you separate moving to the next-generation service and making programming language updates so as to avoid doing both sets of changes simultaneously.

As mentioned above, some migrations are more optional than others. For example, moving away from the App Engine bundled ndb library to Cloud NDB is strongly recommended, but because Cloud NDB is available for both Python 2 and 3, it's not necessary for users to migrate further to Cloud Datastore nor Cloud Firestore unless they have specific reasons to do so. Moving to unbundled services is the primary step to giving users more flexibility, choices, and ultimately, makes their apps more portable.

Next steps

For those who are interested in modernizing their apps, a complete table describing each module and links to corresponding codelabs and expected START and FINISH code samples can be found in the migration module repository. We are also working on video content based on these migration modules as well as producing similar content for Java, so stay tuned.

In addition to the migration modules, our team has also setup a separate repo to support community-sourced migration samples. We hope you find all these resources helpful in your quest to modernize your App Engine apps!

NoSQL for the serverless age: Announcing Cloud Firestore general availability and updates

Posted by Amit Ganesh, VP Engineering & Dan McGrath, Product Manager

As modern application development moves away from managing infrastructure and toward a serverless future, we're pleased to announce the general availability of Cloud Firestore, our serverless, NoSQL document database. We're also making it available in 10 new locations to complement the existing three, announcing a significant price reduction for regional instances, and enabling integration with Stackdriver for monitoring.

Cloud Firestore is a fully managed, cloud-native database that makes it simple to store, sync, and query data for web, mobile, and IoT applications. It focuses on providing a great developer experience and simplifying app development with live synchronization, offline support, and ACID transactions across hundreds of documents and collections. Cloud Firestore is integrated with both Google Cloud Platform (GCP) and Firebase, Google's mobile development platform. You can learn more about how Cloud Firestore works with Firebase here. With Cloud Firestore, you can build applications that move swiftly into production, thanks to flexible database security rules, real-time capabilities, and a completely hands-off auto-scaling infrastructure.

Cloud Firestore does more than just core database tasks. It's designed to be a complete data backend that handles security and authorization, infrastructure, edge data storage, and synchronization. Identity and Access Management (IAM) and Firebase Auth are built in to help make sure your application and its data remain secure. Tight integration with Cloud Functions, Cloud Storage, and Firebase's SDK accelerates and simplifies building end-to-end serverless applications. You can also easily export data into BigQuery for powerful analysis, post-processing of data, and machine learning.

Building with Cloud Firestore means your app can seamlessly transition from online to offline and back at the edge of connectivity. This helps lead to simpler code and fewer errors. You can serve rich user experiences and push data updates to more than a million concurrent clients, all without having to set up and maintain infrastructure. Cloud Firestore's strong consistency guarantee helps to minimize application code complexity and reduces bugs. A client-side application can even talk directly to the database, because enterprise-grade security is built right in. Unlike most other NoSQL databases, Cloud Firestore supports modifying up to 500 collections and documents in a single transaction while still automatically scaling to exactly match your workload.

What's new with Cloud Firestore

  • New regional instance pricing. This new pricing takes effect on March 3, 2019 for most regional instances, and is as low as 50% of multi-region instance prices.
    • Data in regional instances is replicated across multiple zones within a region. This is optimized for lower cost and lower write latency. We recommend multi-region instances when you want to maximize the availability and durability of your database.
  • SLA now available. You can now take advantage of Cloud Firestore's SLA: 99.999% availability for multi-region instances and 99.99% availability for regional instances.
  • New locations available. There are 10 new locations for Cloud Firestore:
    • Multi-region
      • Europe (eur3)
    • North America (Regional)
      • Los Angeles (us-west2)
      • Montréal (northamerica-northeast1)
      • Northern Virginia (us-east4)
    • South America (Regional)
      • São Paulo (southamerica-east1)
    • Europe (Regional)
      • London (europe-west2)
    • Asia (Regional)
      • Mumbai (asia-south1)
      • Hong Kong (asia-east2)
      • Tokyo (asia-northeast1)
    • Australia (Regional)
      • Sydney (australia-southeast1)

Cloud Firestore is now available in 13 regions.

  • Stackdriver integration (in beta). You can now monitor Cloud Firestore read, write and delete operations in near-real time with Stackdriver.
  • More features coming soon. We're working on adding some of the most requested features to Cloud Firestore from our developer community, such as querying for documents across collections and incrementing database values without needing a transaction.

As the next generation of Cloud Datastore, Cloud Firestore is compatible with all Cloud Datastore APIs and client libraries. Existing Cloud Datastore users will be live-upgraded to Cloud Firestore automatically later in 2019. You can learn more about this upgrade here.

Adding flexibility and scalability across industries

Cloud Firestore is already changing the way companies build apps in media, IoT, mobility, digital agencies, real estate, and many others. The unifying themes among these workloads include: the need for mobility even when connectivity lapses, scalability for many users, and the ability to move quickly from prototype to production. Here are a few of the stories we've heard from Cloud Firestore users.

When opportunity strikes...

In the highly competitive world of shared, on-demand personal mobility via cars, bikes, and scooters, the ability to deliver a differentiated user experience, iterate rapidly, and scale are critical. The prize is huge. Skip provides a scooter-sharing system where shipping fast can have a big impact. Mike Wadhera, CTO and Co-founder, says, "Cloud Firestore has enabled our engineering and product teams to ship at the clock-speed of a startup while leveraging Google-scale infrastructure. We're delighted to see continued investment in Firebase and the broader GCP platform."

Another Cloud Firestore user, digital consultancy The Nerdery, has to deliver high-quality results in a short period of time, often needing to integrate with existing third-party data sources. They can't build up and tear down complicated, expensive infrastructure for every client app they create. "Cloud Firestore was a great fit for the web and mobile applications we built because it required a solution to keep 40,000-plus users apprised of real-time data updates," says Jansen Price, Principal Software Architect. "The reliability and speed of Cloud Firestore coupled with its real-time capabilities allowed us to deliver a great product for the Google Cloud Next conferences."

Reliable information delivery

Incident response company Now IMS uses real-time data to keep citizens safe in crowded places, where cell service can get spotty when demand is high. "As an incident management company, real-time and offline capabilities are paramount to our customers," says John Rodkey, Co-founder. "Cloud Firestore, along with the Firebase Javascript SDK, provides us with these capabilities out of the box. This new 100% serverless architecture on Google Cloud enables us to focus on rapid application development to meet our customers' needs instead of worrying about infrastructure or server management like with our previous cloud."

Regardless of the app, users want the latest information right away, without having to click refresh. The QuintoAndar mobile application connects tenants and landlords in Brazil for easier apartment rentals. "Being able to deliver constantly changing information to our customers allows us to provide a truly engaging experience. Cloud Firestore enables us to do this without additional infrastructure and allows us to focus on the core challenges of our business," says Guilherme Salerno, Engineering Manager at QuintoAndar.

Real-time, responsive apps, happy users

Famed broadsheet and media company The Telegraph uses Cloud Firestore so registered users can easily discover and engage with relevant content. The Telegraph wanted to make the user experience better without having to become infrastructure experts in serving and managing data to millions of concurrent connections. "Cloud Firestore allowed us to build a real-time personalized news feed, keeping readers informed with synchronized content state across all of their devices," says Alex Mansfield-Scaddan, Solution Architect. "It allowed The Telegraph engineering teams to focus on improving engagement with our customers, rather than becoming real-time database and infrastructure experts."

On the other side of the Atlantic, The New York Times used Cloud Firestore to build a feature in The Times' mobile app to send push notifications updated in real time for the 2018 Winter Olympics. In previous approaches to this feature, scaling had been a challenge. The team needed to track each reader's history of interactions in order to provide tailored content for particular events or sports. Cloud Firestore allowed them to query data dynamically, then send the real-time updates to readers. The team was able to send more targeted content faster.

Delivering powerful edge storage for IoT devices

Athlete testing technology company Hawkin Dynamics was an early, pre-beta adopter of Cloud Firestore. Their pressure pads are used by many professional sports teams to measure and track athlete performance. In the fast-paced, high-stakes world of professional sports, athletes can't wait around for devices to connect or results to calculate. They demand instant answers even if the WiFi is temporarily down. Hawkin Dynamics uses Cloud Firestore to bring real-time data to athletes through their app dashboard, shown below.

"Our core mission at Hawkin Dynamics is to help coaches make informed decisions regarding their athletes through the use of actionable data. With real-time updates, our users can get the data they need to adjust an athlete's training on a moment-by-moment basis," says Chris Wales, CTO. "By utilizing the powerful querying ability of Cloud Firestore, we can provide them the insights they need to evaluate the overall efficacy of their programs. The close integrations with Cloud Functions and the other Firebase products have allowed us to constantly improve on our product and stay responsive to our customers' needs. In an industry that is rapidly changing, the flexibility afforded to us by Cloud Firestore in extending our applications has allowed us to stay ahead of the game."

Getting started with Cloud Firestore

We've heard from many of you that Cloud Firestore is helping solve some of your most timely development challenges by simplifying real-time data and data synchronization, eliminating server-side code, and providing flexible yet secure database authentication rules. This reflects the state of the cloud app market, where developers are exploring lots of options to help them build better and faster while also providing modern user experiences. This glance at Stack Overflow questions gives a good picture of some of these trends, where Cloud Firestore is a hot topic among cloud databases.

Source: StackExchange

We've seen close to a million Cloud Firestore databases created since its beta launch. The platform is designed to serve databases ranging in size from kilobytes to multiple petabytes of data. Even a single application running on Cloud Firestore is delivering more than 1 million real-time updates per second to users. These apps are just the beginning. To learn more about serverless application development, take a look through the archive of the recent application development digital conference.

We'd love to hear from you, and we can't wait to see what you build next. Try Cloud Firestore today for your apps.