Tag Archives: YouTube

YouTube Music and Universal Music Group change the way you see music

Great music videos are works of art that continue to drive cultural influence across generations. And just like priceless paintings or sculptures in museums, from time to time they need some TLC.

Now, in a pioneering partnership, YouTube is working with Universal Music Group to remaster some of the most iconic music videos of all time, to ensure current and future generations will get to enjoy these timeless classics as they’ve never before been experienced.

Starting today, exclusively on YouTube, you’ll find more than 100 music videos in the highest available video and audio quality, including titles from Billy Idol, Beastie Boys, Boyz II Men, George Strait, Janet Jackson, Kiss, Lady Antebellum, Lady Gaga, Lionel Richie, Maroon 5, Meat Loaf, No Doubt/Gwen Stefani, Smokey Robinson, The Killers, Tom Petty and more!

And this is just the beginning. YouTube and Universal Music Group are committed to fully upgrading nearly 1,000 music videos, painstakingly remastering some of the most important works in the history of the format to the highest possible standards. Each week over the next year, we’ll add more titles, with all 1,000 titles expected to be available before the end of 2020.

“It’s really an honor to partner with Universal Music Group and change the way fans around the globe will experience viewing some of the most classic and iconic videos. The quality is truly stunning,” said Stephen Bryan, Global Head of Label Relations at YouTube. “It's our goal to ensure that today's music videos — true works of art — meet the high quality standards that artists' works deserve and today's music fans expect.”

For years, some of the greatest music videos in YouTube’s catalog have been available only in the outdated standards originally intended for tube televisions with mono speakers. With this new initiative, we’re upgrading videos, vastly improving the viewing experience, whether on mobile, desktop or living room screens. The new videos will seamlessly replace the original versions on both YouTube and within YouTube Music, while retaining the same url, view-counts and “likes.”

Michael Nash, Executive Vice President of Digital Strategy at UMG, said, “We’re excited to partner with YouTube to present these iconic music videos in the highest audio and video quality possible. Our recording artists and video directors imbued these videos with so much creativity; it’s great to enable the full experience of their vision and music. These videos not only look amazing on any screen now, they will be enjoyed by music fans for decades to come.”

Celebrate the anniversary of some of the most iconic music videos of all time by seeing the remastered versions for the first time ever on YouTube, including:




YouTube Music will continue to roll out remastered music videos from your favorite UMG artists, so be on the lookout for “Remastered” in the description of videos as they transform from SD to HD, exclusively on YouTube!

— YouTube Music Team

Source: YouTube Blog


Immersive branded experiences in YouTube and display ads

As a three-dimensional, visual medium, augmented reality (AR) is a powerful tool for brands looking to tell richer, more engaging stories about their products to consumers. Recently, we brought AR to Google products like Search, and made updates to our developer platform, ARCore, to help creators build more immersive experiences. Starting this week, we’re also bringing AR to YouTube and interactive 3D assets to display ads.

Helping YouTube beauty fans pick their next lipstick

Many consumers look to YouTube creators for help when deciding on new products to purchase. And brands have long been teaming up with creators to connect with audiences. Now, brands and creators can make that experience even more personalized and useful for viewers in AR.

Today, we’re introducing AR Beauty Try-On, which lets viewers virtually try on makeup while following along with YouTube creators to get tips, product reviews, and more. Thanks to machine learning and AR technology, it offers realistic, virtual product samples that work on a full range of skin tones. Currently in alpha, AR Beauty Try-On is available through FameBit by YouTube, Google’s in-house branded content platform.

M·A·C Cosmetics is the first brand to partner with FameBit to launch an AR Beauty Try-On campaign. Using this new format, brands like M·A·C will be able to tap into YouTube’s vibrant creator community, deploy influencer campaigns to YouTube’s 2 billion monthly active users, and measure their results in real time.

Famebit_MAC_Shortened.gif

Viewers will be able to try on different shades of M·A·C lipstick as their favorite beauty creator tries on the same shades. After trying on a lipstick, they can click to visit M·A·C’s website to purchase it.

We tested this experience earlier this year with several beauty brands and found that 30 percent of viewers activated the AR experience in the YouTube iOS app, spending over 80 seconds on average trying on lipstick virtually.

Bringing three-dimensional assets to display ads

We're also offering brands a new canvas for creativity with Swirl, our first immersive display format. Swirl brings three-dimensional assets to display advertising on the mobile web, which can help educate consumers before making a purchase. They can directly zoom in and out, rotate a product, or play an animation. Swirl is available exclusively through Display and Video 360.
3D_Display.gif

In this example from New Balance, people can rotate to explore the Fresh Foam 1080 running shoe. Objects like a mobile phone (right) can expand to show additional layered content.

To help brands more easily edit, configure and publish high-quality, realistic models to use in Swirl display ads, we’re introducing a new editor on Poly, Google’s 3D platform. It provides more editorial control over 3D objects, including new ways to change animation settings, customize backgrounds, and add realistic reflections.

NB_BG (1).gif

The new Poly editor lets you easily edit photorealistic three-dimensional objects for use in Swirl display ads.

These new tools will be available to brands and advertisers this summer. We think they’ll help brands and advertisers make content more engaging, educational, and ultimately effective in driving purchase decisions. If you’re interested, check out our getting started guide for tips. We look forward to seeing you bring your products to life!

Taking a harder look at harassment

There have been a lot of questions over the last few days about our policies on harassment, particularly around two YouTube creators: Carlos Maza and Steven Crowder. These are important issues and we’d like to provide more details and context than is possible in any one string of tweets.

Since YouTube started 14 years ago, we have focused on providing a platform where anyone can broadcast themselves, connect with people, and share their voices and their experiences with the world. This has brought a lot of good — like Jouelzy, who founded the #smartbrowngirl movement to empower women of color, or MatPat, a gaming creator — who, along with his fans and other creators — raised over $200,000 to combat mental illness. But it has also created many challenges. One of the most important issues we face is around harassment. We enforce our policies here rigorously and regardless of the creator in question: In the first quarter of 2019, we removed tens of thousands of videos and accounts for violation of our policies on cyberbullying and harassment. We also removed hundreds of millions of comments, many of which were flagged and removed due to harassment.

That said, policies need to keep up with current problems. One particular challenge we face more and more these days is creator-on-creator harassment. It’s an issue that Susan addressed in her latest creator letter. We update our policies on an ongoing basis to make sure they’re current. Just today, we took another step in our fight against hate speech and our responsibility to reduce the spread of harmful borderline content. As mentioned, one of our upcoming projects will reexamine our harassment policy, as well.

As an open platform, we sometimes host opinions and views that many, ourselves included, may find offensive. These could include edgy stand-up comedy routines, a chart-topping song, or a charged political rant — and more. Short moments from these videos spliced together paint a troubling picture. But, individually, they don’t always cross the line.

There are two key policies at play here: harassment and hate speech. For harassment, we look at whether the purpose of the video is to incite harassment, threaten or humiliate an individual; or whether personal information is revealed. We consider the entire video: For example, is it a two-minute video dedicated to going after an individual? A 30-minute video of political speech where different individuals are called out a handful of times? Is it focused on a public or private figure? For hate speech, we look at whether the primary purpose of the video is to incite hatred toward or promote supremacism over a protected group; or whether it seeks to incite violence. To be clear, using racial, homophobic, or sexist epithets on their own would not necessarily violate either of these policies. For example, as noted above, lewd or offensive language is often used in songs and comedic routines. It's when the primary purpose of the video is hate or harassment. And when videos violate these policies, we remove them.

Not everyone will agree with the calls we make — some will say we haven’t done enough; others will say we’ve gone too far. And, sometimes, a decision to leave an offensive video on the site will look like us defending people who have used their platforms and audiences to bully, demean, marginalize or ignore others. If we were to take all potentially offensive content down, we’d be losing valuable speech — speech that allows people everywhere to raise their voices, tell their stories, question those in power, and participate in the critical cultural and political conversations of our day.

Even if a creator’s content doesn’t violate our community guidelines, we will take a look at the broader context and impact, and if their behavior is egregious and harms the broader community, we may take action. In the case of Crowder’s channel, a thorough review over the weekend found that individually, the flagged videos did not violate our Community Guidelines. However, in the subsequent days, we saw the widespread harm to the YouTube community resulting from the ongoing pattern of egregious behavior, took a deeper look, and made the decision to suspend monetization. In order to be considered for reinstatement, all relevant issues with the channel need to be addressed, including any videos that violate our policies, as well as things like offensive merchandise.

In the coming months, we will be taking a hard look at our harassment policies with an aim to update them — just as we have to so many policies over the years — in consultation with experts, creators, journalists and those who have, themselves, been victims of harassment. We are determined to evolve our policies, and continue to hold our creators and ourselves to a higher standard.

—Chris Dale, YouTube

Source: YouTube Blog


Taking a harder look at harassment

There have been a lot of questions over the last few days about our policies on harassment, particularly around two YouTube creators: Carlos Maza and Steven Crowder. These are important issues and we’d like to provide more details and context than is possible in any one string of tweets.

Since YouTube started 14 years ago, we have focused on providing a platform where anyone can broadcast themselves, connect with people, and share their voices and their experiences with the world. This has brought a lot of good — like Jouelzy, who founded the #smartbrowngirl movement to empower women of color, or MatPat, a gaming creator — who, along with his fans and other creators — raised over $200,000 to combat mental illness. But it has also created many challenges. One of the most important issues we face is around harassment. We enforce our policies here rigorously and regardless of the creator in question: In the first quarter of 2019, we removed tens of thousands of videos and accounts for violation of our policies on cyberbullying and harassment. We also removed hundreds of millions of comments, many of which were flagged and removed due to harassment.

That said, policies need to keep up with current problems. One particular challenge we face more and more these days is creator-on-creator harassment. It’s an issue that Susan addressed in her latest creator letter. We update our policies on an ongoing basis to make sure they’re current. Just today, we took another step in our fight against hate speech and our responsibility to reduce the spread of harmful borderline content. As mentioned, one of our upcoming projects will reexamine our harassment policy, as well.

As an open platform, we sometimes host opinions and views that many, ourselves included, may find offensive. These could include edgy stand-up comedy routines, a chart-topping song, or a charged political rant — and more. Short moments from these videos spliced together paint a troubling picture. But, individually, they don’t always cross the line.

There are two key policies at play here: harassment and hate speech. For harassment, we look at whether the purpose of the video is to incite harassment, threaten or humiliate an individual; or whether personal information is revealed. We consider the entire video: For example, is it a two-minute video dedicated to going after an individual? A 30-minute video of political speech where different individuals are called out a handful of times? Is it focused on a public or private figure? For hate speech, we look at whether the primary purpose of the video is to incite hatred toward or promote supremacism over a protected group; or whether it seeks to incite violence. To be clear, using racial, homophobic, or sexist epithets on their own would not necessarily violate either of these policies. For example, as noted above, lewd or offensive language is often used in songs and comedic routines. It's when the primary purpose of the video is hate or harassment. And when videos violate these policies, we remove them.

Not everyone will agree with the calls we make — some will say we haven’t done enough; others will say we’ve gone too far. And, sometimes, a decision to leave an offensive video on the site will look like us defending people who have used their platforms and audiences to bully, demean, marginalize or ignore others. If we were to take all potentially offensive content down, we’d be losing valuable speech — speech that allows people everywhere to raise their voices, tell their stories, question those in power, and participate in the critical cultural and political conversations of our day.

Even if a creator’s content doesn’t violate our community guidelines, we will take a look at the broader context and impact, and if their behavior is egregious and harms the broader community, we may take action. In the case of Crowder’s channel, a thorough review over the weekend found that individually, the flagged videos did not violate our Community Guidelines. However, in the subsequent days, we saw the widespread harm to the YouTube community resulting from the ongoing pattern of egregious behavior, took a deeper look, and made the decision to suspend monetization. In order to be considered for reinstatement, all relevant issues with the channel need to be addressed, including any videos that violate our policies, as well as things like offensive merchandise.

In the coming months, we will be taking a hard look at our harassment policies with an aim to update them — just as we have to so many policies over the years — in consultation with experts, creators, journalists and those who have, themselves, been victims of harassment. We are determined to evolve our policies, and continue to hold our creators and ourselves to a higher standard.

—Chris Dale, YouTube

Source: YouTube Blog


Our ongoing work to tackle hate

Over the past few years, we’ve been investing in the policies, resources and products needed to live up to our responsibility and protect the YouTube community from harmful content. This work has focused on four pillars: removing violative content, raising up authoritative content, reducing the spread of borderline content and rewarding trusted creators. Thanks to these investments, videos that violate our policies are removed faster than ever and users are seeing less borderline content and harmful misinformation. As we do this, we’re partnering closely with lawmakers and civil society around the globe to limit the spread of violent extremist content online.

We review our policies on an ongoing basis to make sure we are drawing the line in the right place: In 2018 alone, we made more than 30 policy updates. One of the most complex and constantly evolving areas we deal with is hate speech. We’ve been taking a close look at our approach towards hateful content in consultation with dozens of experts in subjects like violent extremism, supremacism, civil rights, and free speech. Based on those learnings, we are making several updates:

Removing more hateful and supremacist content from YouTube



YouTube has always had rules of the road, including a longstanding policy against hate speech. In 2017, we introduced a tougher stance towards videos with supremacist content, including limiting recommendations and features like comments and the ability to share the video. This step dramatically reduced views to these videos (on average 80%). Today, we're taking another step in our hate speech policy by specifically prohibiting videos alleging that a group is superior in order to justify discrimination, segregation or exclusion based on qualities like age, gender, race, caste, religion, sexual orientation or veteran status. This would include, for example, videos that promote or glorify Nazi ideology, which is inherently discriminatory. Finally, we will remove content denying that well-documented violent events, like the Holocaust or the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary, took place.

We recognize some of this content has value to researchers and NGOs looking to understand hate in order to combat it, and we are exploring options to make it available to them in the future. And as always, context matters, so some videos could remain up because they discuss topics like pending legislation, aim to condemn or expose hate, or provide analysis of current events. We will begin enforcing this updated policy today; however, it will take time for our systems to fully ramp up and we’ll be gradually expanding coverage over the next several months.

Reducing borderline content and raising up authoritative voices


In addition to removing videos that violate our policies, we also want to reduce the spread of content that comes right up to the line. In January, we piloted an update of our systems in the U.S. to limit recommendations of borderline content and harmful misinformation, such as videos promoting a phony miracle cure for a serious illness, or claiming the earth is flat. We’re looking to bring this updated system to more countries by the end of 2019. Thanks to this change, the number of views this type of content gets from recommendations has dropped by over 50% in the U.S. Our systems are also getting smarter about what types of videos should get this treatment, and we’ll be able to apply it to even more borderline videos moving forward. As we do this, we’ll also start raising up more authoritative content in recommendations, building on the changes we made to news last year. For example, if a user is watching a video that comes close to violating our policies, our systems may include more videos from authoritative sources (like top news channels) in the "watch next" panel.

Continuing to reward trusted creators and enforce our monetization policies


Finally, it’s critical that our monetization systems reward trusted creators who add value to YouTube. We have longstanding advertiser-friendly guidelines that prohibit ads from running on videos that include hateful content and we enforce these rigorously. And in order to protect our ecosystem of creators, advertisers and viewers, we tightened our advertising criteria in 2017. In the case of hate speech, we are strengthening enforcement of our existing YouTube Partner Program policies. Channels that repeatedly brush up against our hate speech policies will be suspended from the YouTube Partner program, meaning they can’t run ads on their channel or use other monetization features like Super Chat.

The openness of YouTube’s platform has helped creativity and access to information thrive. It’s our responsibility to protect that, and prevent our platform from being used to incite hatred, harassment, discrimination and violence. We are committed to taking the steps needed to live up to this responsibility today, tomorrow and in the years to come.

— The YouTube Team

Source: YouTube Blog


Catch up on the Cricket World Cup with a little help from Google

For all the fans looking to catch the action and understand the ins and outs of the 2019 ICC Cricket World Cup, Google Search, the Assistant, and YouTube have you covered.


Stay in the know with Google Search

Over the next six weeks, you can explore the tournament table, stats and upcoming matches right in Google Search. Just search for “ICC Cricket World Cup” in English, Hindi, Bengali, Marathi, or Urdu to get started.


ICC Cricket World Cup in Search

If you want to get in on the action before the opening toss, you can search for your favorite team—for instance “India cricket team”—to read up on the latest news, view squads, lineups, and even dive into winning probabilities, which will continuously update before and during the game.


If you can’t watch a live match, Search can help you stay on top of the game. You can view short video clips highlighting exciting moments and read through live commentary in English and Hindi. If you’re following a team or all matches in the World Cup, you’ll also see game notifications appear on your home screen to make sure you don’t drop the ball.


To keep track of all the matches, you can pin real-time scores on your Android phone screen from Search on mobile browsers or from the Android Google App. Find the match you’re looking for, tap and drag to pin the match anywhere on your screen.


ICC Cricked World Cup - pin real-time scores on Android phone screen

After each match, you can dive into summaries including player of the match, top performers and key moments. Within an hour after a game ends, you’ll find video recaps from select broadcasting partners featuring highlights of major match moments.

ICC Cricket World Cup summaries

On the front foot with your Google Assistant

To make sure you never miss a game, try asking your Assistant, “Hey Google, when does Australia play next?” And while you’re watching your favorite team hit another six or rip through the opposing top order, you can ask your Assistant for interesting stats about your favorite player or team -- like how many career runs a player has, or who the player of a specific match was. You can even get up-to-date stats by asking, "Hey Google, what are the current Cricket standings?" This also works in Google Search.


Highlights, live audio, behind-the-scenes and more from YouTube

On YouTube you can get highlights to every game on the official ICC channel. And top teams like England and Australia will take you behind the scenes with the players on their YouTube channels.    


Now that you have everything you need to stay informed during the ICC Cricket World Cup, it’s time to pick up your bat and ball and dive into the action!



An update on our efforts to protect minors and families

Responsibility is our number one priority, and chief among our areas of focus is protecting minors and families. Over the years, we’ve heavily invested in a number of technologies and efforts to protect young people on our platform, such as our CSAI Match technology. And in 2015, because YouTube has never been for kids under 13, we created YouTube Kids as a way for kids to be able to safely explore their interests and for parents to have more control. Accounts belonging to people under 13 are terminated when discovered. In fact, we terminate thousands of accounts per week as part of this process.

We also enforce a strong set of policies to protect minors on our platform, including those that prohibit exploiting minors, encouraging dangerous or inappropriate behaviors, and aggregating videos of minors in potentially exploitative ways. In the first quarter of 2019 alone, we removed more than 800,000 videos for violations of our child safety policies, the majority of these before they had ten views.

The vast majority of videos featuring minors on YouTube, including those referenced in recent news reports, do not violate our policies and are innocently posted  a family creator providing educational tips, or a parent sharing a proud moment. But when it comes to kids, we take an extra cautious approach towards our enforcement and we’re always making improvements to our protections. Here are a few updates we’ve made over the past several months:


  • Restricting live features: We updated enforcement of our live streaming policy to specifically disallow younger minors from live streaming unless they are clearly accompanied by an adult. Channels not in compliance with this policy may lose their ability to live stream. We also launched new classifiers (machine learning tools that help us identify specific types of content) on our live products to find and remove more of this content.
  • Disabling comments on videos featuring minors: We disabled comments on tens of millions of videos featuring minors across the platform, to limit the risk of exploitation. Additionally, we implemented a classifier that helped us remove 2x the number of violative comments. We recognize that comments are a core part of the YouTube experience and creators have told us they feel we removed a valuable way for them to connect with and grow audiences. But we strongly believe this is an important step to keeping young people safe on YouTube.
  • Reducing recommendations: We expanded our efforts from earlier this year around limiting recommendations of borderline content to include videos featuring minors in risky situations. While the content itself does not violate our policies, we recognize the minors could be at risk of online or offline exploitation. We’ve already applied these changes to tens of millions of videos across YouTube.


Over the last 2+ years, we’ve been making regular improvements to the machine learning classifier that helps us protect minors and families. We rolled out our most recent improvement earlier this month. With this update, we’ll be able to better identify videos that may put minors at risk and apply our protections, including those described above, across even more videos.

To stay informed of the latest research and advances in child safety, we work with civil society and law enforcement. In the last two years, the reports we sent to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) have led to more than 6,000 law enforcement investigations. Additionally, we share our technologies and expertise with the industry, and consult with outside experts to complement our team of in-house experts.

YouTube is a company made up of parents and families, and we’ll always do everything we can to prevent any use of our platform that attempts to exploit or endanger minors. Kids and families deserve the best protection we have to offer: We’re committed to investing in the teams and technology to make sure they get it.

The YouTube Team

Source: YouTube Blog


Breaking down barriers to VR

YouTube is where people go to experience VR videos. With over one million VR videos and experiences, YouTube VR offers a diverse library of immersive content for everyone to enjoy and explore the world from a new perspective.

But to make VR for everyone, we have to continue breaking down barriers on how people create and watch VR content on YouTube. To do this, we’re focused on offering YouTube VR on even more platforms, celebrating award-winning VR content and improving creator education programs.

Offering YouTube VR on even more platforms


Since the initial launch of the YouTube VR app in November 2016, we’ve been focused on bringing the app to as many people with a VR headset as possible. It’s already available on Daydream View, HTC Vive, Playstation VR, Samsung Gear VR, Oculus Go and Oculus Rift. And when Oculus Quest becomes available on Tuesday, May 21, the YouTube VR app will be available as a launch title.

Celebrating award-winning VR content on YouTube


VR allows creators to transport their audiences to new, amazing and even impossible places. We’ve partnered with creators to bring immersive experiences to YouTube. And, over the last six months, these VR videos have been recognized with a number of standout awards, including Emmy®, Webby and Streamy awards.



Baobab Studios recently nabbed multiple Emmy® awards for the animated short film, “Crow: The Legend VR.” With a star-studded cast  including John Legend, Oprah, Liza Koshy and Constance Wu  this immersive short film is animated VR content at its best.



But the Emmy® awards didn’t stop there. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory won an Emmy® for their “Cassini's Grand Finale 360°” videos and NASA's first 360° livestream. These 360-degree videos transport viewers to space, unlocking an out-of-this-world experience.



Isle of Dogs: Behind the Scenes (in Virtual Reality)” won two Webby Awards and the Clio Entertainment Gold award. The immersive video takes the audience behind-the-scenes of the film, featuring on-set interviews with the cast and an inside look at the unique craft of stop-motion animation.

Improving creator education through the YouTube VR Creator Lab


As part of our efforts to continue democratizing VR content creation, we’re currently accepting applications for the European edition of the YouTube VR Creator Lab. This three-month, learning and production intensive helps creators embrace YouTube’s VR180 format.

Selected participants get to attend a three-day boot camp at a YouTube Space and receive advanced education from leading VR instructors and filmmakers, ongoing mentoring, a shiny VR180 camera to keep, and $20,000 USD in funding toward the production of their dream projects.



Since the program launched in 2017, we’ve hosted six YouTube VR Creator Labs with over 60 creators across the globe in Los Angeles, London and Tokyo. Participants have gone on to win Emmy and Streamy awards for their VR content created during the lab.

We’re excited to see where VR will bring us next!

Posted by Julia Hamiton Trost, Head of VR/AR Content & Partnerships, who recently watched “Cirque du Soleil's VOLTA Hair Suspension in VR180,” and Kurt Wilms, Product Lead, VR, who recently watched “Engineering for Mars: Building the Mars 2020 Mission (360 video)



Creator Summit: What 6 creators had to say

Photos by Alexander Stein

Over the past couple days, we hosted our fifth annual North American Creator Summit, where we brought together over a hundred of our most influential creators and artists for inspirational conversations. It was candid, it was fun, and there was a lot of latte art. From burning questions posed to YouTube Leadership to meaningful discussions with peers, the creators and artists who joined us fostered a special kind of community this year. There was energy and excitement in the air that was palpable and spirited, which gave the rollerskating extravaganza extra pizzazz.

We caught up with a few creators right after Susan Wojcicki (CEO), Neal Mohan (CPO) and Robert Kyncl (CBO) spoke about how creators and artists are the very heart of YouTube.

“The Internet’s always going to be asking for more, but hearing them talk about it in person — their steps and plans, what they’re planning to do to fix it, and how many people are part of the team to work on very specific issue — it’s comforting to hear them say that and know that they’re on our side,” said Lily Hevesh, the domino artist behind Hevesh5.

Interviews have been condensed for clarity.

Sam Tsui performing at Creator Summit (Photo by Alexander Stein)

Sam Tsui


Sam Tsui is a singer-songwriter who’s been on YouTube since August 2011.
YouTube: Favorite part so far?
Sam Tsui: It’s incredible to have the face-to-face with YouTube, with Susan [Wojcicki], and all the people who make this platform possible. There’s a lot to learn and a lot to know. … It’s always so amazing that YouTube wants us to come out and hear what we think, give us a heads up on what’s coming and all that good stuff. … Between that and all the fun activities, it’s totally amazing, overwhelming, and a ton of fun.
YouTube: Key takeaway after hearing Susan, Neal and Robert on stage?
Sam Tsui: [It’s] wonderful to hear how healthy the platform is. The statistics about the number of creators who have over one million subs is growing, and the engagement, and the fact that this is, as ever, the place for the kind of stuff you want to be doing.
Natalie and Dennis (Photo by Nesrin Danan)

Natalie & Dennis Show

Natalie and Dennis got married in December 2017 after six years of dating. Natalie also has her own separate channel called Natalies Outlet.
YouTube: Favorite part so far?
Natalie: It’s such an honor to be in a room full of some of the most powerful people on the Internet. Especially having the speakers come in and talk to you so genuinely, and without a third wall and so real. Sometimes I think we get caught up in the business of YouTube, and it all comes down to the passion.
Dennis: The hospitality is always so nice. We always have packages when we arrive. We feel cared for.
YouTube: Key takeaway after hearing Susan, Neal and Robert on stage?
Natalie: Sometimes you don’t really see what they’re doing behind-the-scenes. You just think, “Oh, they represent YouTube.” But they really did show that they’re working on policies. They’re working on making sure as creators, we’re continuing to monetize. It’s nice to see that they’re so caring and they answered real questions, even though [the questions are] kind of hot sometimes.

Hyunee (Photo by Nesrin Danan)

Hyunee Eats

Hyunee’s mukbang channel has 1.2 million subscribers, and this is her first year at Creator Summit.

YouTube: Key takeaway after hearing Susan, Neal and Robert on stage?
Hyunee Eats: We complain a lot about the faults that they have, but knowing that they’re working hard to improve everything and actually seeing them talk to us in person has helped us learn about what they actually do behind-the-scenes. ... They’re like real people, like us.

Lily Hevesh (far right) Photo by Alexander Stein

Lily Hevesh of Hevesh5

Lily Hevesh has been making domino art videos since 2009. This is also her first Creator Summit!

YouTube: Favorite part so far?
Lily Hevesh: I don’t really get the opportunity to meet other people who make videos for a living, so bringing all the top creators in one room is super exciting.
YouTube: Key takeaway after hearing Susan, Neal and Robert on stage?
Lily Hevesh: Just seeing them in person and hearing them speak — to me, it felt like they really do deeply care about the creators, fans and advertisers. And they’re trying their best to please all of them. While there are lots of issues with the site, they’re working as hard as they can to try and solve them.

MissRemiAshten (Photo by Nesrin Danan)

MissRemiAshten

Remi Cruz is a 23-year-old lifestyle and wellness creator with 2.5 million subscribers.

YouTube: Favorite part so far?
MissRemiAshten: We’re only on day one, and this has been my favorite one, for sure. Getting to see Julie Rice, the co-founder of SoulCycle, and getting to see her interact with Blogilates, who’s one of my favorite YouTubers and one of my really good friends. I feel like they’re two people I look up to so much, and I live by Soulcycle so I genuinely feel like they tailored a lot of stuff to our interests today.
YouTube: Key takeaway after hearing Susan, Neal and Robert on stage?
MissRemiAshten: There are so many things that go on behind the scenes that I don’t even know about. So it’s interesting to hear that. … It’s nice that YouTube has this whole conference for us in general, because no other platform does it.

— The YouTube Team