Tag Archives: Google Apps

10 must-see G Suite developer sessions at Google Cloud Next ‘18

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

Google Cloud Next '18 is only a few days away, and this year, there are over 500 sessions covering all aspects of cloud computing, from G Suite to the Google Cloud Platform. This is your chance to learn first-hand how to build custom solutions in G Suite alongside other developers from Independent Software Vendors (ISVs), systems integrators (SIs), and industry enterprises.

G Suite's intelligent productivity apps are secure, smart, and simple to use, so why not integrate your apps with them? If you're planning to attend the event and are wondering which sessions you should check out, here are some sessions to consider:

  • "Power Your Apps with Gmail, Google Drive, Calendar, Sheets, Slides, and More!" on Tuesday, July 24th. Join me as I lead this session that provides a high-level technical overview of the various ways you can build with G Suite. This is a great place to start before attending deeper technical sessions.
  • "Power your apps with Gmail, Google Drive, Calendar, Sheets, Slides and more" on Monday, July 23rd and Friday, July 27th. Join me for one of our half-day bootcamps! Both are identical and bookend the conference—one on Monday and another on Friday, meaning you can do either one and still make it to all the other conference sessions. While named the same as the technical overview above, the bootcamps dive a bit deeper and feature more detailed tech talks on Google Apps Script, the G Suite REST APIs, and App Maker. The three (or more!) hands-on codelabs will leave you with working code that you can start customizing for your own apps on the job! Register today to ensure you get a seat.
  • "Automating G Suite: Apps Script & Sheets Macro Recorder" and "Enhancing the Google Apps Script Developer Experience" both on Tuesday, July 24th. Interested in Google Apps Script, our customized serverless JavaScript runtime used to automate, integrate, and extend G Suite? The first session introduces developers and ITDMs to new features as well as real business use cases while the other dives into recent features that make Apps Script more friendly for the professional developer.
  • "G Suite + GCP: Building Serverless Applications with All of Google Cloud" on Wednesday, July 25th. This session is your chance to attend one of the few hybrid talks that look at how to you can build applications on both the GCP and G Suite platforms. Learn about serverless—a topic that's become more and more popular over the past year—and see examples on both platforms with a pair of demos that showcase how you can take advantage of GCP tools from a G Suite serverless app, and how you can process G Suite data driven by GCP serverless functions. I'm also leading this session and eager to show how you can leverage the strengths of each platform together in the same applications.
  • "Build apps your business needs, with App Maker" and "How to Build Enterprise Workflows with App Maker" on Tuesday, July 24th and Thursday, July 26th, respectively. Google App Maker is a new low-code, development environment that makes it easy to build custom apps for work. It's great for business analysts, technical managers, or data scientists who may not have software engineering resources. With a drag & drop UI, built-in templates, and point-and-click data modeling, App Maker lets you go from idea to app in minutes! Learn all about it with our pair of App Maker talks featuring our Developer Advocate, Chris Schalk.
  • "The Google Docs, Sheets & Slides Ecosystem: Stronger than ever, and growing" and "Building on the Docs Editors: APIs and Apps Script" on Wednesday, July 25th and Thursday, July 26th, respectively. Check out these pair of talks to learn more about how to write apps that integrate with the Google Docs editors (Docs, Sheets, Slides, Forms). The first describes the G Suite productivity tools' growing interoperability in the enterprise with while the second focuses on the different integration options available to developers, either using Google Apps Script or the REST APIs.
  • "Get Productive with Gmail Add-ons" on Tuesday, July 24th. We launched Gmail Add-ons less than a year ago to help developers integrate their apps alongside Gmail. Check out this video I made to help you get up-to-speed on Gmail Add-ons! This session is for developers either new to Gmail Add-ons or want to hear the latest from the Gmail Add-ons and API team.

I look forward to meeting you in person at Next '18. In the meantime, check out the entire session schedule to find out everything it has to offer. Don't forget to swing by our "Meet the Experts" office hours (Tue-Thu), G Suite "Collaboration & Productivity" showcase demos (Tue-Thu), the G Suite Birds-of-a-Feather meetup (Wed), and the Google Apps Script & G Suite Add-ons meetup (just after the BoF on Wed). I'm excited at how we can use "all the tech" to change the world. See you soon!

10 must-see G Suite developer sessions at Google Cloud Next ‘18



Google Cloud Next '18 is less than a week away and this year, there are over 500 sessions, covering all aspects of cloud computing—IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS. This is your chance to hear from experts in artificial intelligence, as well as learn first-hand how to build custom solutions in G Suite alongside developers other Independent Software Vendors (ISVs), systems integrators (SIs) or industry enterprises.

G Suite’s intelligent productivity apps are secure, smart and simple to use, so why not integrate your apps with them? If you’re planning to attend the event and are wondering which sessions you should check out to enhance your skill set, here are some sessions to consider:

  • Power Your Apps with Gmail, Google Drive, Calendar, Sheets, Slides, and More!" on Tuesday, July 24th. Join me as I lead this session that provides a high-level technical overview of the various ways you can build with G Suite. This is a great place to start before attending deeper technical sessions. 
  • “Power your apps with Gmail, Google Drive, Calendar, Sheets, Slides and more” on Monday, July 23rd and Friday, July 27th. If you're already up-to-speed and want to leave NEXT with actual, working code you can use at school or on the job, join us for one of our bootcamps! Both are identical and bookend the conference—one on Monday and another on Friday. While named the same as the technical overview talk above, these dive a bit deeper, show more API usage examples and feature hands-on codelabs. Register today to ensure you get a seat.
  • Automating G Suite: Apps Script & Sheets Macro Recorder” or “Enhancing the Google Apps Script Developer Experience” on Tuesday, July 24th. Interested in Google Apps Script, our customized serverless JavaScript runtime used to automate, integrate, and extend G Suite apps and data? The first session introduces developers and ITDMs to new features as well as real business use cases while the other session dives into recent features that make Apps Script more friendly for the professional developer. 
  • G Suite + GCP: Building Serverless Applications with All of Google Cloud” on Wednesday, July 25th. This session is your chance to attend one of the few hybrid talks that look at how to you can build applications on both GCP and G Suite platforms. Learn about GCP and G Suite serverless products— a topic that’s become more and more popular over the past year—and see how it works firsthand with demos. I’m also leading this session and eager to show how you can leverage both platforms in the same application. 
  • Build apps your business needs, with App Maker” or “How to Build Enterprise Workflows with App Maker” on Tuesday, July 24th and Thursday, July 26th respectively. Google App Maker is a new low-code, development environment that makes it easy to build custom apps for work. It’s great for business analysts, technical managers or data scientists who may not have software engineering resources. With a drag & drop UI, built-in templates, and point-and-click data modeling, App Maker lets you go from idea to app in minutes! Learn all about it with our pair of App Maker talks featuring our Developer Advocate, Chris Schalk. 
  • The Google Docs, Sheets & Slides Ecosystem: Stronger than ever, and growing” or “Building on the Docs Editors: APIs and Apps Script” on Wednesday, July 25th and Thursday, July 26th respectively. Check out these pair of talks to learn more about how to write apps that integrate with Google Docs, Sheets, Slides and Forms. The first describes the G Suite productivity tools' growing interoperability in the enterprise with while the second focuses on the different options available to developers for integrating with the G Suite "editor" applications. 
  • Get Productive with Gmail Add-ons” on Tuesday, July 24th. We launched Gmail Add-ons less than a year ago (You can check out this video to learn more.) to help developers integrate their apps alongside Gmail. Come to this session to learn the latest from the Gmail Add-ons and API team.
I look forward to meeting you in person at Next '18. In the meantime, you can check out the entire session schedule to find out everything NEXT has to offer or this video where I talk about how I think technology will change the world. See you soon!

Getting started with App Maker: a detailed walkthrough



We recently made App Maker generally available. App Maker is a new, low-code development environment for G Suite that lets you build a wide range of apps for your business and customize processes to help you be more efficient.

Building apps in App Maker is easy. You can declaratively define your app’s backend data, visually design a UI, add custom behaviors with Code (optional) and publish your app quickly.

To get familiar, here’s a quick walkthrough of App Maker’s main app development features.

Building your data backend 

With App Maker, backend Data Models are created in a declarative manner so you don’t have to worry about writing a lot of database code. Supported App Maker Data Models include:
  • Cloud SQL - connects to Google Cloud SQL (GCP account required). 
  • Calculated - a computed virtual model via Scripting or SQL. It can also connect to external data (JDBC, REST). 
  • Directory - fetches your organizational data.

To build Data Model Fields you can either build them from scratch, or use an existing CSV or via a Google Sheet.
After defining the structure of your Data Model you can insert validation rules to limit what data can be saved.
Building relations (one-to-many, many-to-many, etc.) between data models is easily doable in the App Maker Relation Editor.
The App Maker Model editor also provides a variety of other features that include setting up custom queries and filters, securing data access based on Roles as well as triggering Data Events based execution. See the Data Models documentation for more info.

Designing your UI 

App Maker helps you streamline UI development by providing a visual design environment where you can drag and drop UI elements (Widgets) onto a canvas and then set the properties of the widgets using a Property Editor. Or if you want, there are also helpful UI generation wizards that can create ready-made UI structures, including Edit or Insert Forms, Tables and a variety of Charts to further speed UI development.
The look and feel of the UI is governed by CSS, where the default is Google's Material design standard. A variety of style variants are available in the editor so that the author can easily toggle how a widget is rendered via a dropdown menu or direct CSS editing.

The UI is connected to backend data via App Maker’s data-binding feature which allows an author to connect widget properties to data model fields.

The combination of visual design, databinding, CSS UI Styling with, Google Material as a default, all contribute to a productive UI creation experience. For full coverage of App Maker UI concepts. see the UI documentation.

Enrich your apps with code 

Although App Maker does all the heavy lifting when it comes to database communications and UI design, sometimes you need to customize application behaviors. This is where App Maker’s scripting feature comes in.

The scripting language used by App Maker is JavaScript, which is used in both the Browser (Client) or Server. The Server’s runtime environment is Apps Script which provides access to a vast library of G Suite services for common operations with Gmail, Docs, Sheets, Calendar and other services.

App Maker streamlines the process of writing code by providing an intuitive Code Editor that’s equipped with helpful Code Completion.
Plus, App Maker provides syntax error highlighting along with an interactive warning/error indication feature. For more information on App Maker coding topics, see these Scripting Docs.

Previewing and publishing your app 

Finally, App Maker provides an easy-to-use Preview feature where you can quickly test your app on your own. When you’re ready to share your app with users, App Maker provides a comprehensive Publish (or Deployment) feature. To learn more about previewing and publishing apps, see the publishing guide.

Try App Maker today 

Now that you have a general idea of App Maker’s features, have a go at the App Maker Codelab. Note: You’ll need to have App Maker enabled on your domain via G Suite Business/Enterprise or G Suite for Education.
To learn more about App Maker, visit developers.google.com/appmaker or stay tuned for more information!

Developing bots for Hangouts Chat


Do you feel like you live in a chat window, and wish it could do more? Google made Hangouts Chat generally available earlier this year to help. This messaging platform helps users easily collaborate from one place, and features archive and search, tighter G Suite integrations and the ability to create separate, threaded chat rooms. More importantly for developers, Chat includes a bot framework and API. Whether you want to automate common tasks, query information or perform other heavy-lifting, bots can help transform the way you work.

Speed up workflows with bots in Hangouts Chat 

In addition to plain text replies, Hangouts Chat can also display bot responses with richer user interfaces (UIs) called cards which can render header information, structured data, images, links, buttons and more. Users can also interact with these components, like updating displayed information. In the latest episode of the G Suite Dev Show, we talk about how to create a bot that features an updating interactive card.


Pointers on building a Hangouts Chat bot The most important thing when bots receive a message is to determine the event type and take the appropriate action. Here are the types and how each work:
  • ADDED_TO_SPACE 
  • REMOVED_FROM_SPACE - A bot will perform any desired "paperwork" when it is added to or removed from a room or direct message (DM), generically referred to as a "space.” When added to a space, a bot will generally send a welcome message like, "Thank you for adding me to this room." No notifications are sent when a bot is removed from a space (because the bot has been removed… duh!). Developers typically just log that the bot has been removed. 
  • MESSAGE - Receiving an ordinary message sent by users is the most likely scenario. Most bots do "their thing" here in serving the request. 
  • CARD_CLICKED - The last event type occurs when a user clicks on an interactive card. Similar to receiving a standard message, a bot performs its requisite work, including possibly updating the card itself.
Below is some pseudocode summarizing these four event types and represents what a bot would likely do depending on the event type:

function processEvent(req, rsp) {
var event = req.body; // event type received
var message; // JSON response message

if (event.type == 'REMOVED_FROM_SPACE') {
// no response as bot removed from room
return;

} else if (event.type == 'ADDED_TO_SPACE') {
// bot added to room; send welcome message
message = {text: 'Thanks for adding me!'};

} else if (event.type == 'MESSAGE') {
// message received during normal operation
message = responseForMsg(event.message.text);

} else if (event.type == 'CARD_CLICKED') {
// user-click on card UI
var action = event.action;
message = responseForClick(
action.actionMethodName, action.parameters);
}

rsp.send(message);
};

The bot pseudocode as well as the bot featured in the video respond synchronously. Bots performing more time-consuming operations, or those issuing out-of-band notifications, can send messages to spaces in an asynchronous way. This includes messages like notifications when a job is completed, alerts if a server goes down or pings to the Sales team when a new lead is added to the CRM (Customer Relationship Management) system.

Build your bot, your way 

While we demonstrate the bot implemented in JavaScript and Python in the video, one key takeaway is the flexibility of the platform: developers can use any language, any stack or any cloud to create and host their bot implementations. Bots only need to be able to accept HTTP POST requests coming from the Hangouts Chat service to function.

We recently delivered an overview of the bot framework at Google I/O 2018. This comprehensive tour of the framework includes live demos of sample bots in a variety of languages and platforms. Check it out:

To get started, check out this post on the Google Developers blog or this post for a deeper dive into the Python App Engine version of the vote bot featured in the video.

You can learn more about developing bots for Hangouts Chat by reviewing the concept guides as well as this “how-to” on creating bots.

Building a Gmail Add-on with Trello



Last October, we launched the Gmail Add-ons framework so that developers can build apps that appear inside Gmail. As a part of the launch, we invited a few partners to try out the new platform, including Trello. Trello’s team built an add-on that allows its users to create Trello cards right from their inbox. On Trello, “cards” represent individual tasks that are part of a larger workflow.

To learn more, we sat down with Desmond Morris, Trello’s lead developer for the add-on, to get his thoughts on the experience.

What is the Trello Add-on for Gmail? Why did you decide to build it? 

The Gmail Add-on we built for Trello makes it easy for folks to take incoming email messages and immediately send them to a Trello board. Trello’s board and list format gives the user more context as to where a task is in the process.

Basically, when you open up an email in Gmail, there is a Trello icon in the top right corner. When you first click the icon, the add-on will ask you to log in to your Trello account. Once authenticated, you are presented with the card creation form. The form is pre-populated with the subject and body of the email, and allows you to select both the board and list to which the card should be added.



Trello already integrates with other G Suite applications—Trello users can attach Google Drive files and folders to Trello cards and send alerts to Hangouts Chat right from Trello. Given the already tight integrations between our two products, building the Gmail Add-on felt like a natural fit.

What was your experience like building the Gmail Add-on? 

This was my first look ever at Apps Script. I had never used it before at all. I have experience writing Javascript, so picking up Apps Script was pretty easy.

Before I started building, I took a look through the docs and the samples that Google provided. There was a sample add-on which incorporated nearly all of the features provided by the framework. It was great because it basically gave us a set scope for exactly what we wanted to do. So my immediate first step was to dig around and start matching up the ideas I had in mind for the add-on and how the example demonstrated those features.

Did anything surprise you? 

At first when I was developing the add-on, I didn’t even touch mobile. When I finally got to the mobile portion, I was surprised to see that the code I’d been working with for the web client also worked on mobile, with no extra code on my part. It was easy, really.

I was initially surprised that the Add-ons framework didn't allow for "free rein" control—the ability to add a myriad of HTML/CSS/JS. But then I started using the tools and found that I had enough flexibility to be effective. Limiting what you can do actually helps make these add-ons device agnostic, which in turn relieves much of the burden from the developer.

Do you have any tips for developers who are considering building on the platform?

The tip I would suggest to developers, especially if they are new to the platform, is to make good use of the guides and sample code provided. It was helpful in allowing me to understand what was and was not possible within the platform.

The composable nature of the provided widgets made it easy to build simple abstractions around UI patterns. In the add-on, I made use of the Selection Input field widget to provide selectors for users to pick the board and list they want to create cards on. Rendering a selection input widget requires only a few lines of code, but I figured it would be helpful to get down to a single function call:

/**
* A helper function for building dropdown widgets
*/
function buildDropdownWidget(key, title, items, selected) {

var widget = CardService.newSelectionInput()
.setType(CardService.SelectionInputType.DROPDOWN)
.setTitle(title)
.setFieldName(key)

for(var i = 0; i < items.length; i++) {
var itemSelected = selected === items[i].value
widget.addItem(items[i].text, items[i].value, itemSelected)
}

return widget
}

It's great that we were able to add further integrations with G Suite for our users using add-ons.

To get started, visit the Gmail Add-ons documentation or check out this video library for inspiration to learn how to use Apps Script to build add-ons.

New OAuth protections to reduce risk from malicious apps



As part of our constant efforts to improve Google’s OAuth application ecosystem, we are launching additional protections that can limit the spread of malicious applications. Applications requiring OAuth will be subject to a daily total new user cap and a new user acquisition rate limit. The first restricts the total number of new users that can authorize your application, while the second limits how rapidly your application can acquire new users.

Every application will have its own quotas depending on its history, developer reputation, and risk profile; for more details, see User Limits for Applications using OAuth.

These quotas will be initially set to match your application’s status and current usage so the majority of developers will see no impact. However, if you have received a quota warning about your application, or if you anticipate your application may exceed its quota (due to, for example, a high profile launch), you can take action to improve your application's adoption:

  1. If your application has reached its total new user cap, submit the OAuth Developer Verification Form to request OAuth verification. Once granted, verification removes the new user cap. 
  2. If your application is running into the new user authorization rate limit, you can request a rate limit quota increase for the application. 
We will actively monitor every application’s quota usage and take proactive steps to contact any developer whose application is approaching its quota. This should help prevent interruption due to these quotas for non-malicious developers on our platform.

These enhanced protections will help protect our users and create an OAuth ecosystem where developers can continue to grow and thrive in a safer environment.

New OAuth protections to reduce risk from malicious apps



As part of our constant efforts to improve Google’s OAuth application ecosystem, we are launching additional protections that can limit the spread of malicious applications. Applications requiring OAuth will be subject to a daily total new user cap and a new user acquisition rate limit. The first restricts the total number of new users that can authorize your application, while the second limits how rapidly your application can acquire new users.

Every application will have its own quotas depending on its history, developer reputation, and risk profile; for more details, see User Limits for Applications using OAuth.

These quotas will be initially set to match your application’s status and current usage so the majority of developers will see no impact. However, if you have received a quota warning about your application, or if you anticipate your application may exceed its quota (due to, for example, a high profile launch), you can take action to improve your application's adoption:

  1. If your application has reached its total new user cap, submit the OAuth Developer Verification Form to request OAuth verification. Once granted, verification removes the new user cap. 
  2. If your application is running into the new user authorization rate limit, you can request a rate limit quota increase for the application. 
We will actively monitor every application’s quota usage and take proactive steps to contact any developer whose application is approaching its quota. This should help prevent interruption due to these quotas for non-malicious developers on our platform.

These enhanced protections will help protect our users and create an OAuth ecosystem where developers can continue to grow and thrive in a safer environment.

Introducing the Data Studio Community Connector Codelab

Cross-posted from the Google Developer blog 
Posted by Minhaz Kazi, Developer Advocate, Google Data Studio


Data Studio is Google’s free next gen business intelligence and data visualization platform. Community Connectors for Data Studio let you build connectors to any internet-accessible data source using Google Apps Script. You can build Community Connectors for commercial, enterprise, and personal use. Learn how to build Community Connectors using the Data Studio Community Connector Codelab.

Use the Community Connector Codelab 

The Community Connector Codelab explains how Community Connectors work and provides a step by step tutorial for creating your first Community Connector. You can get started if you have a basic understanding of Javascript and web APIs. You should be able to build your first connector in 30 mins using the Codelab.

If you have previously imported data into Google Sheets using Apps Script, you can use this Codelab to get familiar with the Community Connectors and quickly port your code to fetch your data directly into Data Studio.

Why create your own Community Connector 

Community Connectors can help you to quickly deliver an end-to-end visualization solution that is user-friendly and delivers high user value with low development efforts. Community Connectors can help you build a reporting solution for personal, public, enterprise, or commercial data, and also do explanatory visualizations.

  • If you provide a web based service to customers, you can create template dashboards or even let your users create their own visualization based on the users’ data from your service. 
  • Within an enterprise, you can create serverless and highly scalable reporting solutions where you have complete control over your data and sharing features. 
  • You can create an aggregate view of all your metrics across different commercial platforms and service providers while providing drill down capabilities. 
  • You can create connectors to public and open datasets. Sharing these connectors will enable other users to quickly gain access to these datasets and dive into analysis directly without writing any code. 

By building a Community Connector, you can go from scratch to a push button customized dashboard solution for your service in a matter of hours.

The following dashboard uses Community Connectors to fetch data from Stack Overflow, GitHub, and Twitter. Try using the date filter to view changes across all sources:


This dashboard uses the following Community Connectors:
You can build your own connector to any preferred service and publish it in the Community Connector gallery. The Community Connector gallery now has over 90 Partner Connectors connecting to more than 450 data sources.

Once you have completed the Codelab, view the Community Connector documentation and sample code on the Data Studio open source repository to build your own connector.

Developing bots for Hangouts Chat

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, G Suite

We recently introduced Hangouts Chat to general availability. This next-generation messaging platform gives G Suite users a new place to communicate and to collaborate in teams. It features archive & search, tighter G Suite integration, and the ability to create separate, threaded chat rooms. The key new feature for developers is a bot framework and API. Whether it's to automate common tasks, query for information, or perform other heavy-lifting, bots can really transform the way we work.

In addition to plain text replies, Hangouts Chat can also display bot responses with richer user interfaces (UIs) called cards which can render header information, structured data, images, links, buttons, etc. Furthermore, users can interact with these components, potentially updating the displayed information. In this latest episode of the G Suite Dev Show, developers learn how to create a bot that features an updating interactive card.

As you can see in the video, the most important thing when bots receive a message is to determine the event type and take the appropriate action. For example, a bot will perform any desired "paperwork" when it is added to or removed from a room or direct message (DM), generically referred to as a "space" in the vernacular.

Receiving an ordinary message sent by users is the most likely scenario; most bots do "their thing" here in serving the request. The last event type occurs when a user clicks on an interactive card. Similar to receiving a standard message, a bot performs its requisite work, including possibly updating the card itself. Below is some pseudocode summarizing these four event types and represents what a bot would likely do depending on the event type:

function processEvent(req, rsp) {
var event = req.body; // event type received
var message; // JSON response message

if (event.type == 'REMOVED_FROM_SPACE') {
// no response as bot removed from room
return;

} else if (event.type == 'ADDED_TO_SPACE') {
// bot added to room; send welcome message
message = {text: 'Thanks for adding me!'};

} else if (event.type == 'MESSAGE') {
// message received during normal operation
message = responseForMsg(event.message.text);

} else if (event.type == 'CARD_CLICKED') {
// user-click on card UI
var action = event.action;
message = responseForClick(
action.actionMethodName, action.parameters);
}

rsp.send(message);
};

The bot pseudocode as well as the bot featured in the video respond synchronously. Bots performing more time-consuming operations or those issuing out-of-band notifications, can send messages to spaces in an asynchronous way. This includes messages such as job-completed notifications, alerts if a server goes down, and pings to the Sales team when a new lead is added to the CRM (Customer Relationship Management) system.

Hangouts Chat supports more than JavaScript or Python and Google Apps Script or Google App Engine. While using JavaScript running on Apps Script is one of the quickest and simplest ways to get a bot online within your organization, it can easily be ported to Node.js for a wider variety of hosting options. Similarly, App Engine allows for more scalability and supports additional languages (Java, PHP, Go, and more) beyond Python. The bot can also be ported to Flask for more hosting options. One key takeaway is the flexibility of the platform: developers can use any language, any stack, or any cloud to create and host their bot implementations. Bots only need to be able to accept HTTP POST requests coming from the Hangouts Chat service to function.

At Google I/O 2018 last week, the Hangouts Chat team leads and I delivered a longer, higher-level overview of the bot framework. This comprehensive tour of the framework includes numerous live demos of sample bots as well as in a variety of languages and platforms. Check out our ~40-minute session below.

To help you get started, check out the bot framework launch post. Also take a look at this post for a deeper dive into the Python App Engine version of the vote bot featured in the video. To learn more about developing bots for Hangouts Chat, review the concepts guides as well as the "how to" for creating bots. You can build bots for your organization, your customers, or for the world. We look forward to all the exciting bots you're going to build!

Making progress (bars) with Slides Add-ons

Originally posted on the G Suite Developers Blog by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate and Grant Timmerman, Developer Programs Engineer, G Suite

We recently introduced Google Slides Add-ons so developers can add functionality from their apps to ours. Here are examples of Slides Add-ons that some of our partners have already built—remember, you can also add functionality to other apps outside of Slides, like Docs, Sheets, Gmail and more.

When it comes to Slides, if your users are delivering a presentation or watching one, sometimes it's good to know how far along you are in the deck. Wouldn't it be great if Slides featured progress bars?

In the latest episode of the G Suite Dev Show, G Suite engineer Grant Timmerman and I show you how to do exactly that—implement simple progress bars using a Slides Add-on.

Using Google Apps Script, we craft this add-on which lets users turn on or hide progress bars in their presentations. The progress bars are represented as appropriately-sized rectangles at the bottom of slide pages. Here's a snippet of code for createBars(), which adds the rectangle for each slide.

var BAR_ID = 'PROGRESS_BAR_ID';
var BAR_HEIGHT = 10; // px
var presentation = SlidesApp.getActivePresentation();

function createBars() {
var slides = presentation.getSlides();
deleteBars();
for (var i = 0; i < slides.length; ++i) {
var ratioComplete = (i / (slides.length - 1));
var x = 0;
var y = presentation.getPageHeight() - BAR_HEIGHT;
var barWidth = presentation.getPageWidth() * ratioComplete;
if (barWidth > 0) {
var bar = slides[i].insertShape(SlidesApp.ShapeType.RECTANGLE,
x, y, barWidth, BAR_HEIGHT);
bar.getBorder().setTransparent();
bar.setLinkUrl(BAR_ID);
}
}
}

To learn more about this sample and see all of the code, check out the Google Slides Add-on Quickstart. This is just one example of what you can build using Apps Script and add-ons; here's another example where you can create a slide presentation from a collection of images using a Slides Add-on.

If you want to learn more about Apps Script, check out the video library or view more examples of programmatically accessing Google Slides here. To learn about using Apps Script to create other add-ons, check out this page in the docs.