USB-C Titan Security Keys now available in the US

Quick launch summary 

We’re expanding the 2-Step Verification (2SV) options available for Google Accounts by offering a new USB-C Titan Security Key in the United States.

Titan Security Keys are phishing-resistant two-factor authentication (2FA) devices that support FIDO standards. FIDO security keys are the strongest form of 2SV available, and using them can significantly reduce the risk of account hijacking. Providing a USB-C option alongside the other available 2SV methods will help make it easier for more users to protect their accounts.

These new Titan Security Keys can also be used in Google’s Advanced Protection Program for enterprise, which is designed to protect users most at risk of targeted attacks. These can include IT administrators, business executives, and employees in security-sensitive industries such as finance and healthcare.

USB-C Titan Security Keys are compatible with Android, Chrome OS, macOS, and Windows devices. For more information, see our post about USB-C Titan Security Keys on the Google Security Blog.


USB-C Titan Security Key is now available 

Availability 

Rollout details 



G Suite editions 
Available to all G Suite and Cloud Identity editions.

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Our 2019 Made by Google Line Up

Earlier today, we shared news about our new Made by Google product line up. Take a look at our round up on our blog, The Keyword. Below, you’ll find some more info on what’s coming to Canada, and when. Happy reading!
Google Pixel 4
With a camera that captures detail that others can't, a new way to use your phone without touching it, the Google Assistant, and a fast and responsive display, Pixel 4 packs new technology into a striking new design. Best of all, Pixel includes the latest version of Android and Google’s best software, which gets better with each update.

In Canada, beginning today, you can pre-order a Pixel 4 for $999 and Pixel 4 XL for $1129 on the Google Store, and at all major Canadian carriers and select retailers. Phones will ship by October 24, globally. Pixel 4 comes in three colours, including Clearly White, Just Black, and a limited edition, Oh So Orange.
Read more about Pixel 4 on The Keyword.
Nest Mini
Google Home Mini launched in the U.S. in 2017 as a small and mighty part of the Google Home family, with all the smarts of the Google Assistant to deliver hands-free help in every room. Nest Mini is the next generation rebuilt from the ground up with brand new hardware including an embedded dedicated machine learning chip with one TeraOPS of processing power. With Nest Mini, we upgraded the hardware and software to make it sound even better, and it really brings the bass. Nest Mini provides bass that’s twice as strong as the original Google Home Mini (measured from 60-100 Hz at max volume).

Nest Mini has the same iconic design as the original Mini, with soft rounded edges that blend in with your home. It comes in four colours: Chalk, Charcoal, Coral and a new colour, Sky, which was inspired by Lake Como in Italy. We’ve also incorporated wall mounting capabilities into Nest Mini, because you told us that you needed creative ways to incorporate Nest Mini into your decor and save precious counter and shelf space.

In Canada, starting today, you can pre-order Nest Mini for $69 from the Google Store. You’ll find Google Nest Mini on shelves on October 22 at Best Buy Canada and select retailers.
Read more about Nest Mini on The Keyword.
Nest Wifi
With Nest Wifi, we’re taking everything you love about Google Wifi and making it even better, with a powerful router and a Wifi point that includes the Google Assistant, bringing you more help at home.

The Nest Wifi system is actually two separate devices: The Nest Wifi router plugs directly into your modem, forming the basis for a strong and powerful home network, and the Nest Wifi point expands your coverage where you need it most. A two pack can deliver coverage for a 3,800-square-foot home. The system is scalable, so you can add more points later (or buy a three pack to start with) to make sure you’re covered. And if you’ve already got a Google Wifi network, you can easily add Nest Wifi to it for additional coverage.

In Canada, Nest Wifi is available for preorder today on the Google Store and will be on sale on November 4. You can get a two-pack with one router and one point for $269, or a three-pack with one router and two points for $349 at the Google Store, Best Buy Canada and select retailers.
Read more about Nest Wifi on The Keyword.
Nest Hub Max
We’re also bringing Nest Hub Max to Canada. Nest Hub Max is a Google Assistant smart display that’s the perfect addition to your helpful home—it’s a TV for your kitchen, an indoor camera, a smart home controller, a digital photo frame and a great way to make video calls. Enjoy photos of your favourite memories from Google Photos on Nest Hub Max’s 10-inch HD screen. It comes in Chalk and Charcoal for $299 on the Google Store, Best Buy Canada and select retailers.
Read more about Nest Hub Max on The Keyword.
Nest Aware
Today we’re announcing the new Nest Aware service, which will soon offer whole home awareness across more of your Nest devices at one affordable monthly rate. Nest Aware coverage is expanding to include our family of speakers (Nest Mini, Google Home, Google Home Max), our displays (Nest Hub and Nest Hub Max) and the Nest Wifi point. You can choose from two simple plans: Nest Aware, with 30 days of event video history, at $8 per month, or Nest Aware Plus, with 60 days of event video history and 10 days of 24/7 video history, at $16 per month.
Read more about Nest Aware on The Keyword.
Pixelbook Go
Back in 2017 we introduced Pixelbook, a high-performance Chromebook that can adapt to your needs. And now we’re making it available to even more people with Pixelbook Go. At barely two pounds and 13 mm thin, it’s easy to bring Pixelbook Go wherever life takes you. And with its starting price of $879, it still has all the features you love about Pixelbook. You’ll get quiet, backlit keys for easy typing in all lighting and powerful processors to handle any workload, with an even bigger battery and 13.3 inch touchscreen.
In Canada, Pixelbook Go is available for preorder today and will be on sale later this month at the Google Store, Best Buy Canada and select retailers. Pixelbook Go will be available starting at $879 in Just Black, with Not Pink coming to Canada soon.
Read more about Pixelbook Go on The Keyword.

You can also check out The Keyword to learn more about Stadia, Pixel Buds, the latest Pixel 4 accessories, our sustainability commitments and more.

Directly click on chart elements to move and delete them in Google Sheets

What’s changing 

We’re adding new features that give users more options to easily customize their charts in Google Sheets. Now you can click directly on data labels, chart titles or legends and drag to reposition them. Or you can easily delete these elements using the delete or backspace keys.

Deleting chart elements in Google Sheets

Repositioning chart elements in Google Sheets.

Who’s impacted 

End users

Why you’d use it 

These features give you more ways to control the look and feel of your charts. For example, you can now easily reposition data labels that overlap to avoid clutter and ensure that key data points stand out. Or you can reposition the legend inside the chart area in order to maximize chart space.

How to get started 



Additional details 

When clicking on a group of items (like a set of data labels), the entire group will be selected first. If you want to drill down further (for example, to select an individual data label), simply click again on the specific element.

Note that most chart elements can be repositioned and deleted, except those that derive their position from data. So, you can reposition elements like chart titles or legends, but data points will remain fixed.

Also included in this launch is the ability to navigate through chart elements using your keyboard.

  • Tab: move between elements 
  • Enter: select an individual element from a group 
  • Escape: go back from an individual element to a group 
  • Arrow keys: reposition the selected elements 


For those who use a screen reader, chart elements will be verbalized as you navigate through them.

Helpful links 



Availability 

Rollout details


G Suite editions 

  • Available to all G Suite editions 

On/off by default? 

  • These features will be available by default. 


Stay up to date with G Suite launches

Meet the new Google Pixel Buds

Many of us turn to our phones constantly. On average, people check their smartphones almost 100 times a day, and more than half of those interactions—playing a song, setting a reminder or getting directions—are less than 30 seconds. Google Pixel Buds can help make those quick tasks easier and faster, with instant access to the Google Assistant. Plus, they’re comfortable and secure in your ear, deliver high-quality sound, make clear calls, and have a long battery life. 

Comfortable and secure in your ear

Because everyone's ears are shaped differently, we scanned thousands of ears to create a design that’s comfortable for as many people as possible. Pixel Buds have a low-profile look that sits flush in your ear. The stabilizer arc gently tucks in, and together with the interchangeable eartip, make Pixel Buds fit securely and comfortably, so they stay put even when you’re exercising.

Multiple people wearing Pixel Buds

Great sound all around

Pixel Buds have a unique hybrid design that keeps you aware of the world around you, while still delivering powerful sound. The eartips gently seal the ear to isolate the loud outside noises, and to give high quality audio. The spatial vent underneath reduces that plugged-ear feeling, and lets through just the right amount of environmental sound so you can stay aware of the things around you. Pixel Buds also have Adaptive Sound, which dynamically adjusts the volume as you move from a quiet environment to a noisy one, so you don’t have to constantly raise or lower the volume.

Pixel Buds - Product GIF (1).gif

Clear calls anywhere

When it’s time to talk instead of listen, Pixel Buds make sure the sound of your voice is at the forefront. Two microphones in each earbud focus on the sound of your voice while suppressing other sounds in the background, which extends to the most challenging environments. Pixel Buds have a voice accelerometer that can detect speech through the vibrations of your jawbone, so that you can be heard even in windy conditions, like when you’re running or biking.

Convenience on the go

Long-range Bluetooth connectivity lets you use Pixel Buds even when your phone isn’t by your side. They’ll stay connected three rooms away indoors or a football field-distance away outdoors. Pixel Buds pair easily with Bluetooth 4.0+ laptops, tablets and iOS devices. And with your Pixel phone and other Android 6.0+ devices, they pair with just a single tap. 

Pixel Buds automatically detect when they’re in your ear and each earbud gives you handy touch controls: just tap to play or pause, and swipe to adjust volume. With Pixel Buds, you get 5 hours of listening time on a single charge, with up to 24 hours with the wireless charging case. They are sweat and water resistant, so rainy days and intense workouts are no problem. 

Blogpost earbuds.png

Helpful wherever you are

Pixel Buds also give you hands-free access to the Google Assistant, so instead of turning to your phone for quick tasks, just say “Hey Google,” and ask the Assistant for whatever you need—playing a podcast, sending a quick text, or translating a foreign language.

Pixel Buds - Assistant GIF.gif

Google Pixel Buds will be available next year in the U.S. at $179, and will come in four colors: Clearly White, Oh So Orange, Quite Mint and Almost Black. In the meantime, head over to the Google Store to learn more and sign up for our waitlist to be notified when they’re available.

Stadia arrives on November 19

Stadia Founder’s Edition will start arriving on gamers’ doorsteps on November 19, 2019. If you were one of the first gamers who pre-ordered and have received your Founder’s Editions, you’ll be able to buy and play your favorite games beginning at 9AM PST/5PM BST/6PM CET on November 19. You can play Red Dead Redemption 2, Mortal Kombat 11, Kine, and more on your TV, laptop, desktop, and select tablets and phones.

Whether you ordered Stadia Founder’s Edition or Premiere Edition, you’ll have three months of Stadia Pro, with access to Destiny 2: The Collection. Using the included Chromecast Ultra and Stadia Controller, you’ll be gaming in up to 4K HDR with 5.1 surround sound when playing on your TV. For any questions on what devices are supported, broadband internet connection requirements, and the details on Stadia Pro, visit stadia.com.

Stadia Founder’s Editions and Stadia Premiere Editions will begin shipping in the same order that pre-orders were received. You’ll get an email when your package ships, and soon after, will receive a code to activate your Stadia account and Stadia Pro.

If you haven’t already pre-ordered, head to stadia.com and join the new generation of gaming where you can play your favorite games across multiple screens. And if you’ve already placed your order, welcome to Stadia!

Customize text size and position for captions in Google Slides

Quick launch summary

You can now personalize caption text size and position while presenting in Google Slides. These features can help make captions easier to read, like ensuring all audience members can view captions in a large room. Or, you could make your text smaller to maximize the number of words on screen at once.


While presenting, select the dropdown menu next to the Captions button on the toolbar. From there, you can then set the text size and position.


See our Help Center to learn more about presenting Slides with captions.


Availability

Rollout details

G Suite editions
  • Available to all G Suite editions

On/off by default?
  • This feature will be available by default.

Stay up to date with G Suite launches

USB-C Titan Security Keys – available tomorrow in the US




Securing access to online accounts is critical for safeguarding private, financial, and other sensitive data online. Phishing - where an attacker tries to trick you into giving them your username and password - is one of the most common causes of data breaches. To protect user accounts, we’ve long made it a priority to offer users many convenient forms of 2-Step Verification (2SV), also known as two-factor authentication (2FA), in addition to Google’s automatic protections. These measures help to ensure that users are not relying solely on passwords for account security.

For users at higher risk (e.g., IT administrators, executives, politicians, activists) who need more effective protection against targeted attacks, security keys provide the strongest form of 2FA. To make this phishing-resistant security accessible to more people and businesses, we recently built this capability into Android phones, expanded the availability of Titan Security Keys to more regions (Canada, France, Japan, the UK), and extended Google’s Advanced Protection Program to the enterprise.

Starting tomorrow, you will have an additional option: Google’s new USB-C Titan Security Key, compatible with your Android, Chrome OS, macOS, and Windows devices.



USB-C Titan Security Key


We partnered with Yubico to manufacture the USB-C Titan Security Key. We have had a long-standing working and customer relationship with Yubico that began in 2012 with the collaborative effort to create the FIDO Universal 2nd Factor (U2F) standard, the first open standard to enable phishing-resistant authentication. This is the same security technology that we use at Google to protect access to internal applications and systems.

USB-C Titan Security Keys are built with a hardware secure element chip that includes firmware engineered by Google to verify the key’s integrity. This is the same secure element chip and firmware that we use in our existing USB-A/NFC and Bluetooth/NFC/USB Titan Security Key models manufactured in partnership with Feitian Technologies.

USB-C Titan Security Keys will be available tomorrow individually for $40 on the Google Store in the United States. USB-A/NFC and Bluetooth/NFC/USB Titan Security Keys will also become available individually in addition to the existing bundle. Bulk orders are available for enterprise organizations in select countries.


We highly recommend all users at a higher risk of targeted attacks to get Titan Security Keys and enroll into the Advanced Protection Program (APP), which provides Google’s industry-leading security protections to defend against evolving methods that attackers use to gain access to your accounts and data. You can also use Titan Security Keys for any site where FIDO security keys are supported for 2FA, including your personal or work Google Account, 1Password, Coinbase, Dropbox, Facebook, GitHub, Salesforce, Stripe, Twitter, and more.

Dev Channel Update for Desktop

The Dev Channel has been updated to 79.0.3938.0 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.



A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.
Lakshmana Pamarthy Google Chrome

Exploring Massively Multilingual, Massive Neural Machine Translation



“... perhaps the way [of translation] is to descend, from each language, down to the common base of human communication — the real but as yet undiscovered universal language — and then re-emerge by whatever particular route is convenient.”Warren Weaver, 1949

Over the last few years there has been enormous progress in the quality of machine translation (MT) systems, breaking language barriers around the world thanks to the developments in neural machine translation (NMT). The success of NMT however, owes largely to the great amounts of supervised training data. But what about languages where data is scarce, or even absent? Multilingual NMT, with the inductive bias that “the learning signal from one language should benefit the quality of translation to other languages”, is a potential remedy.

Multilingual machine translation processes multiple languages using a single translation model. The success of multilingual training for data-scarce languages has been demonstrated for automatic speech recognition and text-to-speech systems, and by prior research on multilingual translation [1,2,3]. We previously studied the effect of scaling up the number of languages that can be learned in a single neural network, while controlling the amount of training data per language. But what happens once all constraints are removed? Can we train a single model using all of the available data, despite the huge differences across languages in data size, scripts, complexity and domains?

In “Massively Multilingual Neural Machine Translation in the Wild: Findings and Challenges” and follow-up papers [4,5,6,7], we push the limits of research on multilingual NMT by training a single NMT model on 25+ billion sentence pairs, from 100+ languages to and from English, with 50+ billion parameters. The result is an approach for massively multilingual, massive neural machine translation (M4) that demonstrates large quality improvements on both low- and high-resource languages and can be easily adapted to individual domains/languages, while showing great efficacy on cross-lingual downstream transfer tasks.

Massively Multilingual Machine Translation
Though data skew across language-pairs is a great challenge in NMT, it also creates an ideal scenario in which to study transfer, where insights gained through training on one language can be applied to the translation of other languages. On one end of the distribution, there are high-resource languages like French, German and Spanish where there are billions of parallel examples, while on the other end, supervised data for low-resource languages such as Yoruba, Sindhi and Hawaiian, is limited to a few tens of thousands.
The data distribution over all language pairs (in log scale) and the relative translation quality (BLEU score) of the bilingual baselines trained on each one of these specific language pairs.
Once trained using all of the available data (25+ billion examples from 103 languages), we observe strong positive transfer towards low-resource languages, dramatically improving the translation quality of 30+ languages at the tail of the distribution by an average of 5 BLEU points. This effect is already known, but surprisingly encouraging, considering the comparison is between bilingual baselines (i.e., models trained only on specific language pairs) and a single multilingual model with representational capacity similar to a single bilingual model. This finding hints that massively multilingual models are effective at generalization, and capable of capturing the representational similarity across a large body of languages.
Translation quality comparison of a single massively multilingual model against bilingual baselines that are trained for each one of the 103 language pairs.
In our EMNLP’19 paper [5], we compare the representations of multilingual models across different languages. We find that multilingual models learn shared representations for linguistically similar languages without the need for external constraints, validating long-standing intuitions and empirical results that exploit these similarities. In [6], we further demonstrate the effectiveness of these learned representations on cross-lingual transfer on downstream tasks.
Visualization of the clustering of the encoded representations of all 103 languages, based on representational similarity. Languages are color-coded by their linguistic family.
Building Massive Neural Networks
As we increase the number of low-resource languages in the model, the quality of high-resource language translations starts to decline. This regression is recognized in multi-task setups, arising from inter-task competition and the unidirectional nature of transfer (i.e., from high- to low-resource). While working on better learning and capacity control algorithms to mitigate this negative transfer, we also extend the representational capacity of our neural networks by making them bigger by increasing the number of model parameters to improve the quality of translation for high-resource languages.

Numerous design choices can be made to scale neural network capacity, including adding more layers or making the hidden representations wider. Continuing our study on training deeper networks for translation, we utilized GPipe [4] to train 128-layer Transformers with over 6 billion parameters. Increasing the model capacity resulted in significantly improved performance across all languages by an average of 5 BLEU points. We also studied other properties of very deep networks, including the depth-width trade-off, trainability challenges and design choices for scaling Transformers to over 1500 layers with 84 billion parameters.

While scaling depth is one approach to increasing model capacity, exploring architectures that can exploit the multi-task nature of the problem is a very plausible complementary way forward. By modifying the Transformer architecture through the substitution of the vanilla feed-forward layers with sparsely-gated mixture of experts, we drastically scale up the model capacity, allowing us to successfully train and pass 50 billion parameters, which further improved translation quality across the board.
Translation quality improvement of a single massively multilingual model as we increase the capacity (number of parameters) compared to 103 individual bilingual baselines.
Making M4 Practical
It is inefficient to train large models with extremely high computational costs for every individual language, domain or transfer task. Instead, we present methods [7] to make these models more practical by using capacity tunable layers to adapt a new model to specific languages or domains, without altering the original.

Next Steps
At least half of the 7,000 languages currently spoken will no longer exist by the end of this century*. Can multilingual machine translation come to the rescue? We see the M4 approach as a stepping stone towards serving the next 1,000 languages; starting from such multilingual models will allow us to easily extend to new languages, domains and down-stream tasks, even when parallel data is unavailable. Indeed the path is rocky, and on the road to universal MT many promising solutions appear to be interdisciplinary. This makes multilingual NMT a plausible test bed for machine learning practitioners and theoreticians interested in exploring the annals of multi-task learning, meta-learning, training dynamics of deep nets and much more. We still have a long way to go.

Acknowledgements
This effort is built on contributions from Naveen Arivazhagan, Dmitry Lepikhin, Melvin Johnson, Maxim Krikun, Mia Chen, Yuan Cao, Yanping Huang, Sneha Kudugunta, Isaac Caswell, Aditya Siddhant, Wei Wang, Roee Aharoni, Sébastien Jean, George Foster, Colin Cherry, Wolfgang Macherey, Zhifeng Chen and Yonghui Wu. We would also like to acknowledge support from the Google Translate, Brain, and Lingvo development teams, Jakob Uszkoreit, Noam Shazeer, Hyouk Joong Lee, Dehao Chen, Youlong Cheng, David Grangier, Colin Raffel, Katherine Lee, Thang Luong, Geoffrey Hinton, Manisha Jain, Pendar Yousefi and Macduff Hughes.


* The Cambridge Handbook of Endangered Languages (Austin and Sallabank, 2011).

Source: Google AI Blog