Tag Archives: programming

Learn Android and Kotlin with no programming experience

Posted by Kat Kuan, Developer Advocate, Android

Many people today are considering career paths that enable them to work remotely. App development allows for that style of work. For people who want a new opportunity, it’s possible to start learning Android today, even without prior programming experience.

In 2016, we released our Android Basics curriculum, which assumes no programming experience, and the response has been tremendous. Hundreds of thousands of students have been learning Android development and programming concepts simultaneously as they build apps. Since then, there have been big platform changes with four major releases of Android and support added for the Kotlin programming language. We also introduced Jetpack, a suite of libraries that make it easier to build better apps with less code. With all these new updates, it’s time to release the next generation of training content for beginners.

Today we’re announcing the launch of Android Basics in Kotlin, a new online course for people without programming experience to learn how to build Android apps. The course teaches Kotlin, a modern programming language that developers love because of its conciseness and how it increases productivity. Kotlin is quickly gaining momentum in industry. Over a single year from 2018 - 2019, Indeed Hiring Lab found a 76% increase in Kotlin jobs.*

Google announced that Android development is Kotlin-first, and 60% of professional Android developers have already adopted the language. In the Play Store, 70% of the top 1,000 apps use Kotlin. To keep pace and prepare for the future, there has never been a more opportune time to learn Android with Kotlin.

Learning to code for the first time can feel intimidating, but it is possible to learn without a technical background. From a recent Stack Overflow Developer Survey, nearly 40% of the professional developers who studied at university did not receive a formal computer science or software engineering degree.

To build your confidence, the Android Basics in Kotlin course offers step-by-step instructions on how to use Android Studio to build apps, as well as how to run them on an Android device (or virtual device). The goal is to expose you to the tools and resources that professional Android developers use. With hands-on practice, you learn the fundamentals of programming. By the end of the course, you will have completed a collection of Android apps to start building a portfolio.

Object detection & tracking gif Text recognition + Language ID + Translate gif

App screenshots from the course

This course is split up into units, where each unit is made up of a series of pathways. At the end of each pathway, there is a quiz to assess what you’ve learned so far. If you pass the quiz, you earn a badge that can be saved to your Google Developer Profile.
Object detection & tracking gif Text recognition + Language ID + Translate gif

Badges you can earn

The course is free for anyone to take. Basic computer literacy and basic math skills are recommended prerequisites. Unit 1 of the course is available today, with more units being released as they become available. If you’ve never built an app before but want to learn how, check out the Android Basics in Kotlin course.

If you already have programming experience, check out the other free training courses we offer in Kotlin:

We can’t wait to see what you build!

*from US tech job postings on Indeed.com

The Go language turns 10: A Look at Go’s Growth in the Enterprise

Posted by Steve Francia, Go TeamGo's gopher mascot

The Go gopher was created by renowned illustrator Renee French. This image is adapted from a drawing by Egon Elbre.

November 10 marked Go’s 10th anniversary—a milestone that we are lucky enough to celebrate with our global developer community.

The Gopher community will be celebrating Go’s 10th anniversary at conferences such as Gopherpalooza in Mountain View and KubeCon in San Diego, and dozens of meetups around the world.

In recognition of this milestone, we’re taking a moment to reflect on the tremendous growth and progress Go (also known as golang) has made: from its creation at Google and open sourcing, to many early adopters and enthusiasts, to the global enterprises that now rely on Go everyday for critical workloads.

New to Go?

Go is an open-source programming language designed to help developers build fast, reliable, and efficient software at scale. It was created at Google and is now supported by over 2100 contributors, primarily from the open-source community. Go is syntactically similar to C, but with the added benefits of memory safety, garbage collection, structural typing, and CSP-style concurrency.

Most importantly, Go was purposefully designed to improve productivity for multicore, networked machines and large codebases—allowing programmers to rapidly scale both software development and deployment.

Millions of Gophers!

Today, Go has more than a million users worldwide, ranging across industries, experience, and engineering disciplines. Go’s simple and expressive syntax, ease-of-use, formatting, and speed have helped it become one of the fastest growing languages—with a thriving open source community.

As Go’s use has grown, more and more foundational services have been built with it. Popular open source applications built on Go include Docker, Hugo, Kubernetes. Google’s hybrid cloud platform, Anthos, is also built with Go.

Go was first adopted to support large amounts of Google’s services and infrastructure. Today, Go is used by companies including, American Express, Dropbox, The New York Times, Salesforce, Target, Capital One, Monzo, Twitch, IBM, Uber, and Mercado Libre. For many enterprises, Go has become their language of choice for building on the cloud.

An Example of Go In the Enterprise

One exciting example of Go in action is at MercadoLibre, which uses Go to scale and modernize its ecommerce ecosystem, improve cost-efficiencies, and system response times.

MercadoLibre’s core API team builds and maintains the largest APIs at the center of the company’s microservices solutions. Historically, much of the company’s stack was based on Grails and Groovy backed by relational databases. However this big framework with multiple layers was soon found encountering scalability issues.

Converting that legacy architecture to Go as a new, very thin framework for building APIs streamlined those intermediate layers and yielded great performance benefits. For example, one large Go service is now able to run 70,000 requests per machine with just 20 MB of RAM.

“Go was just marvelous for us,” explains Eric Kohan, Software Engineering Manager at MercadoLibre. “It’s very powerful and very easy to learn, and with backend infrastructure has been great for us in terms of scalability.”

Using Go allowed MercadoLibre to cut the number of servers they use for this service to one-eighth the original number (from 32 servers down to four), plus each server can operate with less power (originally four CPU cores, now down to two CPU cores). With Go, the company obviated 88 percent of their servers and cut CPU on the remaining ones in half—producing a tremendous cost-savings.

With Go, MercadoLibre’s build times are three times (3x) faster and their test suite runs an amazing 24 times faster. This means the company’s developers can make a change, then build and test that change much faster than they could before.

Today, roughly half of Mercadolibre's traffic is handled by Go applications.

"We really see eye-to-eye with the larger philosophy of the language," Kohan explains. "We love Go's simplicity, and we find that having its very explicit error handling has been a gain for developers because it results in safer, more stable code in production."

Visit go.dev to Learn More

We’re thrilled by how the Go community continues to grow, through developer usage, enterprise adoption, package contribution, and in many other ways.

Building off of that growth, we’re excited to announce go.dev, a new hub for Go developers.

There you’ll find centralized information for Go packages and modules, a wealth of learning resources to get started with the language, and examples of critical use cases and case studies of companies using Go.

MercadoLibre’s recent experience is just one example of how Go is being used to build fast, reliable, and efficient software at scale.

You can read more about MercadoLibre’s success with Go in the full case study.