Tag Archives: grow with google

Digital tools and skills bring economic recovery in Canada

When 2020 began, like so many others, I saw the opportunity for technology to help businesses grow, positively impact Canadians and address economic challenges. But I could have never imagined how the year would unfold and the profound impact digital technology would have on our daily lives.


Eight months into the pandemic, I made a purchase from 22 & Lou, where owner Laura Freel makes jams and marmalades out of her home kitchen in Toronto. Laura’s preserves had been flying off local market shelves, but with sudden store closures, she quickly realized that to keep her business alive, she’d have to start selling online. With no previous experience, she signed up for Digital Main Street’s ShopHERE powered by Google program, was paired with a Canadian student to build her website, and in a matter of weeks, her business was back up and running.


Laura’s is just one of the many stories of resilience I’ve heard from business owners across the country. And it’s a story we’re proud to be a part of. Today I’m sharing an update on how our teams worked alongside Canadian businesses and local organizations to support our country’s economic recovery. 

Statistics about digital skills in Canada

Helping Canadian businesses bounce back

We knew it was critical to get small businesses online quickly. That’s why in May, we invested $1 million to expand the ShopHERE program, and made a pledge to get 50,000 Canadian small businesses online. The program is currently operating in nearly 450 municipalities, and will continue to expand across the country, helping businesses like 22 & Lou start selling online. 


More than 1.5 million Canadians have visited our Small Business Hub, which provides the tools needed to get online, connect with customers and build digital skills. We made it free for Canadian retailers to list their products on the Google Shopping tab. And to help businesses keep up with the demand for e-commerce, we delivered Google Ads training through Skillshop and Google Academy, and worked with partners like the Retail Council of Canada, Export Development Canada, Startup Canada and Business Development Bank of Canada to deliver free virtual training to over 20,000 Canadian entrepreneurs.

Giving back to local communities 

But it’s not just about businesses, we are just as committed to helping the communities in which we live and work. As part of our COVID-19 local response, our Canadian sites donated over $800,000 in Community Grants through our philanthropic arm, Google.org. The organizations that received grants, such as Region Ready, Toronto Public Library Foundation, Kids Code Jeunesse and the Ottawa Food Bank, address critical areas of need, like food insecurity, connectivity, education and PPE for frontline health workers. Through the gift match program Google offers employees annually, Canadian Googlers have raised $1.6 million for organizations in their communities and around the world.

Digital skills training for the future of work

We need to better align the skills of the Canadian workforce with the jobs of the future. This year we transformed our free Grow with Google training to virtual formats and have trained more than 80,000 Canadians on digital skills. With school closures, we trained more than 10,000 Canadian teachers in G Suite for Education, to help them adapt to teaching from home. We also funded community organizations that do critical work to boost digital skills. Google.org announced  a $2.5 million grant for NPower Canada, to go toward IT training for 1,700 young adults from underrepresented groups. The first cohort graduated in September, and over half of the graduates have already secured employment just three months post-training. Last week, Google.org announced a $250,000 grant to ComIT, to provide free IT training to 450 Indigenous learners across Canada.

Supporting tech in Canada

We’ll continue our expansion plans to build new offices in Toronto, Montreal and Waterloo. To strengthen our support for the broader tech ecosystem, we launched two accelerators for Canadian startups. Collectively, the Google for Startups Accelerator Canada and Google for Startups Accelerator: Women Founders have enrolled 14 Canadian startups. We’ve also renewed our commitment to Canada’s AI ecosystem with an additional $3.5+ million grant to Mila, the world’s largest deep learning research institute based in Québec.  

In a year that has brought about many changes for us all, the pandemic is one thing we all have in common. And collaboration has been our strongest resource. As we all move increasingly online to find products and services, digitization is clearly the next driver of sustained growth for our country.  But we can’t do it alone. We’ll continue to work alongside businesses, local organizations and nonprofits into 2021 and beyond. 

Learn to code with Grasshopper, now in Spanish

Ver abajo versión en español

Since Grasshopper launched in 2018, one million people have spent at least one hour learning to code through our app. That’s approximately 114 years spent learning the fundamentals of coding. We’ve also run a number of academic studies on the effectiveness of Grasshopper, and found two insights: after two weeks of use, students are more motivated to learn to code. And while women tend to start off their Grasshopper journey feeling a bit more unsure about learning to code, we see that confidence gap between men and women decrease by 18 percent.

Grasshopper app in Spanish

Feedback in Spanish for one of our initial lessons.

With our beginner-centered learning environment, we guide students through quick, visual puzzles that teach key coding concepts like functions, loops and variables. Students build coding skills and gain confidence in their abilities as they progress through the curriculum.

With the launch of Grasshopper in Spanish, Spanish-speaking students will be able to read through the instructions, get support and receive feedback in their native language so they can learn to code without having to constantly translate from English. 

As technical skills continue to become more important for employers around the world, it is crucial that we continue to build learning tools for everyone. Skills like coding help people thrive in today's job market. According to Code.org, computing jobs are the number one source of new income in the US and they're projected to grow at twice the rate of other jobs.

If you’re ready to start learning to code, Grasshopper is available on Android, iOS and desktop in English, and now, por supuesto, in Spanish.


Desde el lanzamiento de Grasshopper en 2018, un millón de personas han pasado al menos una hora aprendiendo a programar a través de nuestra aplicación. ¡Esos son aproximadamente 114 años dedicados a aprender los fundamentos de la programación! Hoy, como parte de Crece con Google, estamos lanzando Grasshopper en español. 

También hemos llevado a cabo unos estudios académicos sobre la efectividad de Grasshopper y hemos encontrado dos resultados interesantes: mientras que las mujeres comienzan con el programa sintiéndose un poco más inseguras sobre aprender a codificar, vemos que la brecha en este sentido entre hombres y mujeres desciende al 18%.

Con nuestro entorno de aprendizaje centrado en principiantes, guiamos a los estudiantes a través de acertijos visuales rápidos que enseñan conceptos clave de programación como funciones, ciclos y variables. Los estudiantes desarrollan habilidades de programación y ganan confianza en ellas a medida que avanzan en el plan de estudios.

Con el lanzamiento de Grasshopper en español, los estudiantes podrán leer las instrucciones, obtener apoyo y recibir comentarios en su idioma materno para que puedan aprender a programar sin tener que traducir constantemente del inglés.

A medida que las habilidades técnicas continúan siendo más importantes para los empleadores de todo el mundo, es fundamental que sigamos creando herramientas de aprendizaje para todos. Habilidades como la programación ayudan a las personas a prosperar en el mercado laboral actual. Según Code.org, los trabajos de informática son la principal fuente de nuevos ingresos en los EE. UU. Y se prevé que crezcan al doble de la tasa de otros trabajos.

Si estás listo para comenzar a aprender a programar, Grasshopper está disponible en Android, iOS y dispositivos de escritorio en inglés, y ahora, por supuesto, en español.

Learn to code with Grasshopper, now in Spanish

Ver abajo versión en español

Since Grasshopper launched in 2018, one million people have spent at least one hour learning to code through our app. That’s approximately 114 years spent learning the fundamentals of coding. We’ve also run a number of academic studies on the effectiveness of Grasshopper, and found two insights: after two weeks of use, students are more motivated to learn to code. And while women tend to start off their Grasshopper journey feeling a bit more unsure about learning to code, we see that confidence gap between men and women decrease by 18 percent.

Grasshopper app in Spanish

Feedback in Spanish for one of our initial lessons.

With our beginner-centered learning environment, we guide students through quick, visual puzzles that teach key coding concepts like functions, loops and variables. Students build coding skills and gain confidence in their abilities as they progress through the curriculum.

With the launch of Grasshopper in Spanish, Spanish-speaking students will be able to read through the instructions, get support and receive feedback in their native language so they can learn to code without having to constantly translate from English. 

As technical skills continue to become more important for employers around the world, it is crucial that we continue to build learning tools for everyone. Skills like coding help people thrive in today's job market. According to Code.org, computing jobs are the number one source of new income in the US and they're projected to grow at twice the rate of other jobs.

If you’re ready to start learning to code, Grasshopper is available on Android, iOS and desktop in English, and now, por supuesto, in Spanish.


Desde el lanzamiento de Grasshopper en 2018, un millón de personas han pasado al menos una hora aprendiendo a programar a través de nuestra aplicación. ¡Esos son aproximadamente 114 años dedicados a aprender los fundamentos de la programación! Hoy, como parte de Crece con Google, estamos lanzando Grasshopper en español. 

También hemos llevado a cabo unos estudios académicos sobre la efectividad de Grasshopper y hemos encontrado dos resultados interesantes: mientras que las mujeres comienzan con el programa sintiéndose un poco más inseguras sobre aprender a codificar, vemos que la brecha en este sentido entre hombres y mujeres desciende al 18%.

Con nuestro entorno de aprendizaje centrado en principiantes, guiamos a los estudiantes a través de acertijos visuales rápidos que enseñan conceptos clave de programación como funciones, ciclos y variables. Los estudiantes desarrollan habilidades de programación y ganan confianza en ellas a medida que avanzan en el plan de estudios.

Con el lanzamiento de Grasshopper en español, los estudiantes podrán leer las instrucciones, obtener apoyo y recibir comentarios en su idioma materno para que puedan aprender a programar sin tener que traducir constantemente del inglés.

A medida que las habilidades técnicas continúan siendo más importantes para los empleadores de todo el mundo, es fundamental que sigamos creando herramientas de aprendizaje para todos. Habilidades como la programación ayudan a las personas a prosperar en el mercado laboral actual. Según Code.org, los trabajos de informática son la principal fuente de nuevos ingresos en los EE. UU. Y se prevé que crezcan al doble de la tasa de otros trabajos.

Si estás listo para comenzar a aprender a programar, Grasshopper está disponible en Android, iOS y dispositivos de escritorio en inglés, y ahora, por supuesto, en español.

Expanded funding for Indigenous businesses in the U.S.

Danielle Greendeer is the owner of Wampanoag Trading Post and Gallery in Massachusetts, which sells handmade Eastern Woodland art made by Indigenous artists. She is also a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag Nation. The Wampanoag are associated with what became known as the “first Thanksgiving.” 

Danielle Greendeer

“The year 2020 marks the 400th year since the arrival of the Mayflower and the introduction of the Pilgrims to the Wampanoag Nation,” she told our team at Google.org earlier this month. “For the Mashpee Wampanoag people, it is important to tell the history from our perspective and educate the public on the challenges that our Tribe is still trying to overcome. The survival and evolution of our art is an example of how resilient our culture is.”

November is also Native American Heritage Month. As an Indigenous person, I see this moment as a reminder for society to reflect on, honor and celebrate the resilience of the people who are the first inhabitants of the United States. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has hit these communities especially hard, both in terms of health and economic stability. Earlier this year, we awarded $1 million in loans to Citizen Potawatomi Community Development Center through Grow with Google, and $250,000 in Google.org grants to the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), to provide immediate relief to small businesses owned by Native Americans/American Indians. We’re also working with NCAI to offer Grow with Google training for small businesses and job seekers in Native American communities. This embedded digital training program will train more than 5,000 Native businesses owners to better leverage their online presence by April 2021.  

Danielle’s business received financial support from Google.org and NCAI, which helped her hire temporary part-time workers, support six more Indigenous artisans and schedule workshops and screenings of Native films. For Native American Heritage Month, they have opened an extension space and are screening a documentary film called Mashpee Nine. “Offering this film to the public at no charge is part of our commitment to educate our community about the history of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe,” she says.

We know there are many more amazing businesses like Danielle’s, which is why we’re announcing an additional $1 million in funding through Google.org to NCAI which will directly support hundreds of businesses. The fund is open to Native American/American Indian business owners for applications today. Head to the NCAI fund website for more information or to apply. 

Expanded funding for Indigenous businesses in the U.S.

Danielle Greendeer is the owner of Wampanoag Trading Post and Gallery in Massachusetts, which sells handmade Eastern Woodland art made by Indigenous artists. She is also a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag Nation. The Wampanoag are associated with what became known as the “first Thanksgiving.” 

Danielle Greendeer

“The year 2020 marks the 400th year since the arrival of the Mayflower and the introduction of the Pilgrims to the Wampanoag Nation,” she told our team at Google.org earlier this month. “For the Mashpee Wampanoag people, it is important to tell the history from our perspective and educate the public on the challenges that our Tribe is still trying to overcome. The survival and evolution of our art is an example of how resilient our culture is.”

November is also Native American Heritage Month. As an Indigenous person, I see this moment as a reminder for society to reflect on, honor and celebrate the resilience of the people who are the first inhabitants of the United States. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has hit these communities especially hard, both in terms of health and economic stability. Earlier this year, we awarded $1 million in loans to Citizen Potawatomi Community Development Center through Grow with Google, and $250,000 in Google.org grants to the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), to provide immediate relief to small businesses owned by Native Americans/American Indians. We’re also working with NCAI to offer Grow with Google training for small businesses and job seekers in Native American communities. This embedded digital training program will train more than 5,000 Native businesses owners to better leverage their online presence by April 2021.  

Danielle’s business received financial support from Google.org and NCAI, which helped her hire temporary part-time workers, support six more Indigenous artisans and schedule workshops and screenings of Native films. For Native American Heritage Month, they have opened an extension space and are screening a documentary film called Mashpee Nine. “Offering this film to the public at no charge is part of our commitment to educate our community about the history of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe,” she says.

We know there are many more amazing businesses like Danielle’s, which is why we’re announcing an additional $1 million in funding through Google.org to NCAI which will directly support hundreds of businesses. The fund is open to Native American/American Indian business owners for applications today. Head to the NCAI fund website for more information or to apply. 

A call to advance women entrepreneurs

When I joined Google more than a decade ago, I was one of the only working mothers at Google Tokyo. I spoke with other women at the office, and was surprised to find that for many of my female colleagues, the cultural stigma of being a working mom was still hard to overcome, even at a company as supportive as Google. I was especially struck by conversations with younger women who had yet to start families, but who had already decided that when the time came, work and family would be too hard to juggle. 


I became an advocate for encouraging women in the workplace, both within and outside of Google. I wanted women to know they can choose what is right for them. It means a lot to be able to say that, today, 100 percent of women at Google in Japan come back to work after maternity leave.  


Making space for women and diverse voices means more creative ideas and solutions. But you don’t have to take my word for it—the benefits of investing in women entrepreneurs in particular are substantial. Experts have said that closing the entrepreneurial gender gap could boost the global economy by up to $5 trillion. This is even more important as economies around the world strive to recover from the challenges of COVID-19. 


Today, on Women’s Entrepreneurship Day, Google’s Women Willinitiative is launching a global report called Advancing Women in Entrepreneurship, which takes a look at some of the factors behind the entrepreneurship gender gap, as well as potential areas for intervention.


The report, which surveyed women in Asia-Pacific (Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam), Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Mexico) and Sub-Saharan Africa (Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa), finds that:

  • Self-confidence is ranked by women as one of the top three skills most critical to successfully running a business in most countries in Asia. However, aspiring women entrepreneurs are less confident (compared to men) across all of the twelve countries in our research.

  • Less than half of women surveyed said they had access to mentors or supportive social groups.

  • About 80% of both current and aspiring entrepreneurs were interested in learning and improving their skills.

Building a culture of support, confidence and learning is important for women entrepreneurs to grow and thrive. Just a few weeks ago, I kicked off the first session of the Google for Startups’ Immersion: Women Founders program for Asia-Pacific, an eight-week, mentorship program for female founders. We’ve already heard that access to mentorship and the chance to form a community have been highlights for the participants. Hanna Kim, the founder of Grip, a live-streaming e-commerce platform in Korea, said, “It’s been really helpful to get insights from the mentors, like practical business and HR insights. I’m also so inspired by everyone in the cohort. It makes me dream even bigger!” 

Another initiative we hope will make a difference is a series of six  webinarswith UN Women’s WE EMPOWER campaign, focused on on topics like adapting through COVID-19 and developing leadership skills.


We’re looking forward to building on these steps with more initiatives to encourage women entrepreneurs in Asia Pacific and around the world. We hope you’ll take a look at the report, and join the online conversation on the Women Will Instagram channel. 

Joining the European Commission’s Pact for Skills

During the pandemic, online tools have been a lifeline, helping us to stay connected, learn and work remotely and support local businesses. These same tools are vital to help Europe’s economic recovery, where we see an urgent need for new sets of digital skills. In fact, research conducted by Google and The McKinsey Global Institute before COVID-19 shows that, to ensure job creation, more than 90 million workers may need to develop significant new skills.


The pandemic has only accelerated this trend. Google has responded by renewing our commitment to skills training through our Grow with Google program, which has trained millions of people on digital skills since it was founded five years ago, and contributed to two million Europeans finding a new job or growing their business or career. Since lockdowns started in March, we’ve trained an additional one million people in Europe alone. This includes Korina in Greece, who after attending our local training, went on to build an app that connects farmers in need for support with workers looking for jobs. Or Noemi in Italy, who learned new skills so she could help local small businesses to digitize and grow. 

Supporting Europe’s Pact for Skills

This would not have been possible without our many partners across Europe—from e-learning experts and universities, to governments, chambers of commerce and trade unions. This is why we’re proud to support the European Commission’s newly launched Pact for Skills—an approach that brings together the public and private sectors, social partners, education, training and employment agencies to help people across Europe learn new skills.


As part of this commitment, we’re providing scholarships for 100,000 people in Europe, the Middle East and Africa to take the new Google Career Certificates hosted on Coursera. These certificates will prepare learners with no prior experience to apply for jobs in high-growth career areas such as IT support, project management, user experience and design, and data analytics. The programs are product agnostic and are designed to help people prepare for jobs at any company, in any sector. We’ll be working with our partners in the coming months to launch these certificates and make them available all over Europe and beyond. 

Economic recovery that works for everyone

Research shows that some groups will be disproportionately affected, with those without a tertiary education (e.g. university degree) being twice as likely to have their jobs at risk as those with a university degree.


To address this, we are dedicating fifty thousand of these scholarships to members of underserved groups who face significant social and economic barriers to accessing and completing these courses.


As part of this effort, Google.org is giving an initial grant of €4.6 million to INCO to work with local nonprofit partners across 17 European countries. Together, they will provide learners with wrap-around services at every step of the learning journey, including career advice, interview preparation, childcare vouchers, learning groups, language support and peer-to-peer networks.


Of course, training is just the first step. To connect people with in-demand skills with real job opportunities, we’re also gathering a consortium of companies interested in hiring people who have earned Google Career Certificates. We're excited to be joined by members such as Bayer and ARD, and we’re inviting all types of businesses to join Google in this initiative. 


As Europe faces the next phase of this pandemic, we’re as committed as ever to working together on these pressing challenges. By supporting this flagship initiative under the European Skills Agenda, we look forward to helping to build an economic recovery that is digital, sustainable and that works for everyone.

Un vistazo a los recursos de Google para la comunidad militar

Como comandante de la California Army National Guard (Guardia Nacional del Ejército de California), generalmente sé de antemano cuándo estaré activo para el servicio militar. Pero este año todo cambió: Entre la respuesta a la COVID-19 y los incendios forestales en California, me tomé una licencia militar de mi trabajo en Google como gerente de programas de integración de hardware varias veces. Estuve en servicio por tres meses para ayudar con la respuesta a la COVID-19, seguido de una activación de incendios forestales durante una semana.

Ayudar a mi comunidad durante estos tiempos difíciles ha sido agotador y satisfactorio a la vez. Cuando entro en servicio con poca anticipación, mi equipo de Google interviene de inmediato para cubrir mi trabajo en mi ausencia. Me siento muy acompañado por mis colegas y el gerente, y reconozco lo afortunado que soy de trabajar en una compañía que respeta y acepta a las personas con cargos militares en servicio activo de medio tiempo como yo, así como a otros veteranos y sus familias. 

No solo siento el apoyo de mis compañeros de Google, sino que también estoy muy orgulloso de que Google apoye financieramente a las personas activas e inactivas en servicio militar con una política de licencia militar generosa. Google les paga a los soldados de la Guardia Nacional y a los reservistas la totalidad de su salario de Google los primeros 30 días calendario de servicio. Luego, Google pagará la diferencia entre el salario de un Googler en licencia por servicio militar y el salario militar para que el reservista o soldado de la Guardia Nacional reciba casi la totalidad de su salario de Google durante el servicio por hasta cinco años.

Mientras honramos a los veteranos el Día de los Veteranos, Google realmente se compromete a apoyar a la comunidad todo el año con programas, capacitaciones y herramientas.

Solo en las últimas semanas, Google anunció losleave benefits for military spouses (beneficios de licencia para cónyuges de militares) yServing Veterans, un nuevo centro de recursos de bienestar de salud mental para los veteranos y sus familias. Además, Google lanzó recientemente unavirtual career series for veterans (serie de carreras virtuales para veteranos) para aquellos interesados en explorar carreras en Google. Si busca un nuevo empleo, escriba “jobs for veterans” (trabajos para veteranos) en la Búsqueda de Google y, luego, ingrese su código de especialidad ocupacional militar o el equivalente para ver qué trabajos pueden requerir las habilidades que aprendió durante su experiencia militar. En la página de inicio de EE. UU. de hoy, verá un doodle especial creado por Jenn Hassin, artista invitada y veterana de la Fuerza Aérea de Texas. El doodle escultural se creó con miles de rollos de papel hechos a mano con los uniformes que cada rama militar donó.   

Google también acompaña desde hace mucho tiempo a las familias de los veteranos y militares que tienen su propia empresa. Las empresas manejadas por veteranos pueden agregar la característica de “Veteran-Led” (Liderada por veteranos) en su Google Business Listing (Ficha de empresa de Google) en la Búsqueda de Google y en Maps en unos pocos pasos sencillos. Como en noviembre no solo se celebra el Día de los Veteranos, sino también la National Veterans Small Business Week (Semana nacional de pequeñas empresas de veteranos), me gustaría mencionar los recursos deGrow with Google for Veterans and Military Families (Crecimiento con Google para veteranos y familiares de militares) desarrollados para veteranos y cónyuges de militares que deseen mejorar sus habilidades profesionales o formar sus empresas.

Grow with Google presentó recientemente un taller virtual para ayudar a las empresas lideradas por veteranos a prosperar y un panel de discusión con Jen Pilcher dePatriot Boot Camp y Charles Cathlin deTruGenomix sobre cómo han desarrollado sus empresas en línea. VisiteGrow with Google On Air para disfrutar la grabación gratuita de este evento. 

Uno de ellos es la lección de la aplicación Primer de Grow with Google llamada “Build Digital Skills to Adapt And Grow Your Veteran-led Business” (Desarrolle habilidades digitales para adaptar y desarrollar su empresa liderada por veteranos). Este tutorial rápido presenta sugerencias sobre cómo gestionar las ventas, las operaciones, las finanzas y otros aspectos de su empresa mediante herramientas fáciles en línea. Puede descargarla aplicación Primer en Google Play Store o Apple App Store para acceder a este contenido en su dispositivo móvil. Simplemente busque “veteranled” (liderada por veteranos) en la aplicación para encontrar esta lección. 

Google no solo centra su apoyo en los miembros militares: Los familiares de militares son igualmente importantes. Muchos de estos esfuerzos están dirigidos porMary Spence, una Directora de Programas de Google y esposa de militar. 

Un recurso que Grow with Google ayudó a crear es laMilSpouse Career Roadmap (hoja de ruta de carreras para cónyuges de militares). En asociación con Hiring our Heroes, esteestudio de investigación financiado por subvenciones encuestó a más de 1,500 cónyuges de militares para crear un centro interactivo. Ofrece una variedad de herramientas y recursos que ayudan a los cónyuges de militares a encontrar y desarrollar carreras compatibles, incluida laGoogle’s remote work search feature (función de búsqueda de trabajo remoto de Google) y recursos de educación y empleo delSpouse Education and Career Opportunities Program (Programa de oportunidades laborales y educativas para cónyuges) del Departamento de Defensa de los Estados Unidos.

Estas son solo algunas de las formas en que los miembros militares como yo y los veteranos y nuestras familias recibimos apoyo como parte de la comunidad de Google. Para conocer mi historia y la de otros empleados de Google en la comunidad militar, visite el canal de YouTube Life at Google que muestra a veteranos de Google.  

Un vistazo a los recursos de Google para la comunidad militar

Como comandante de la California Army National Guard (Guardia Nacional del Ejército de California), generalmente sé de antemano cuándo estaré activo para el servicio militar. Pero este año todo cambió: Entre la respuesta a la COVID-19 y los incendios forestales en California, me tomé una licencia militar de mi trabajo en Google como gerente de programas de integración de hardware varias veces. Estuve en servicio por tres meses para ayudar con la respuesta a la COVID-19, seguido de una activación de incendios forestales durante una semana.

Ayudar a mi comunidad durante estos tiempos difíciles ha sido agotador y satisfactorio a la vez. Cuando entro en servicio con poca anticipación, mi equipo de Google interviene de inmediato para cubrir mi trabajo en mi ausencia. Me siento muy acompañado por mis colegas y el gerente, y reconozco lo afortunado que soy de trabajar en una compañía que respeta y acepta a las personas con cargos militares en servicio activo de medio tiempo como yo, así como a otros veteranos y sus familias. 

No solo siento el apoyo de mis compañeros de Google, sino que también estoy muy orgulloso de que Google apoye financieramente a las personas activas e inactivas en servicio militar con una política de licencia militar generosa. Google les paga a los soldados de la Guardia Nacional y a los reservistas la totalidad de su salario de Google los primeros 30 días calendario de servicio. Luego, Google pagará la diferencia entre el salario de un Googler en licencia por servicio militar y el salario militar para que el reservista o soldado de la Guardia Nacional reciba casi la totalidad de su salario de Google durante el servicio por hasta cinco años.

Mientras honramos a los veteranos el Día de los Veteranos, Google realmente se compromete a apoyar a la comunidad todo el año con programas, capacitaciones y herramientas.

Solo en las últimas semanas, Google anunció losleave benefits for military spouses (beneficios de licencia para cónyuges de militares) yServing Veterans, un nuevo centro de recursos de bienestar de salud mental para los veteranos y sus familias. Además, Google lanzó recientemente unavirtual career series for veterans (serie de carreras virtuales para veteranos) para aquellos interesados en explorar carreras en Google. Si busca un nuevo empleo, escriba “jobs for veterans” (trabajos para veteranos) en la Búsqueda de Google y, luego, ingrese su código de especialidad ocupacional militar o el equivalente para ver qué trabajos pueden requerir las habilidades que aprendió durante su experiencia militar. En la página de inicio de EE. UU. de hoy, verá un doodle especial creado por Jenn Hassin, artista invitada y veterana de la Fuerza Aérea de Texas. El doodle escultural se creó con miles de rollos de papel hechos a mano con los uniformes que cada rama militar donó.   

Google también acompaña desde hace mucho tiempo a las familias de los veteranos y militares que tienen su propia empresa. Las empresas manejadas por veteranos pueden agregar la característica de “Veteran-Led” (Liderada por veteranos) en su Google Business Listing (Ficha de empresa de Google) en la Búsqueda de Google y en Maps en unos pocos pasos sencillos. Como en noviembre no solo se celebra el Día de los Veteranos, sino también la National Veterans Small Business Week (Semana nacional de pequeñas empresas de veteranos), me gustaría mencionar los recursos deGrow with Google for Veterans and Military Families (Crecimiento con Google para veteranos y familiares de militares) desarrollados para veteranos y cónyuges de militares que deseen mejorar sus habilidades profesionales o formar sus empresas.

Grow with Google presentó recientemente un taller virtual para ayudar a las empresas lideradas por veteranos a prosperar y un panel de discusión con Jen Pilcher dePatriot Boot Camp y Charles Cathlin deTruGenomix sobre cómo han desarrollado sus empresas en línea. VisiteGrow with Google On Air para disfrutar la grabación gratuita de este evento. 

Uno de ellos es la lección de la aplicación Primer de Grow with Google llamada “Build Digital Skills to Adapt And Grow Your Veteran-led Business” (Desarrolle habilidades digitales para adaptar y desarrollar su empresa liderada por veteranos). Este tutorial rápido presenta sugerencias sobre cómo gestionar las ventas, las operaciones, las finanzas y otros aspectos de su empresa mediante herramientas fáciles en línea. Puede descargarla aplicación Primer en Google Play Store o Apple App Store para acceder a este contenido en su dispositivo móvil. Simplemente busque “veteranled” (liderada por veteranos) en la aplicación para encontrar esta lección. 

Google no solo centra su apoyo en los miembros militares: Los familiares de militares son igualmente importantes. Muchos de estos esfuerzos están dirigidos porMary Spence, una Directora de Programas de Google y esposa de militar. 

Un recurso que Grow with Google ayudó a crear es laMilSpouse Career Roadmap (hoja de ruta de carreras para cónyuges de militares). En asociación con Hiring our Heroes, esteestudio de investigación financiado por subvenciones encuestó a más de 1,500 cónyuges de militares para crear un centro interactivo. Ofrece una variedad de herramientas y recursos que ayudan a los cónyuges de militares a encontrar y desarrollar carreras compatibles, incluida laGoogle’s remote work search feature (función de búsqueda de trabajo remoto de Google) y recursos de educación y empleo delSpouse Education and Career Opportunities Program (Programa de oportunidades laborales y educativas para cónyuges) del Departamento de Defensa de los Estados Unidos.

Estas son solo algunas de las formas en que los miembros militares como yo y los veteranos y nuestras familias recibimos apoyo como parte de la comunidad de Google. Para conocer mi historia y la de otros empleados de Google en la comunidad militar, visite el canal de YouTube Life at Google que muestra a veteranos de Google.  

How Google supports military communities

As a major in the California Army National Guard, I generally know in advance when I'll be activated for military service. But this year, everything was different: Between the COVID-19 response and the California wildfires, I've taken military leave from my job at Google as a strategy and operations lead more than a few times. I was gone for three months to help with the COVID-19 response, followed by another week-long activation.

Helping my community during these difficult times has been both draining and fulfilling. When I’m activated on short notice, my team at Google immediately steps in to cover my work while I’m gone. I feel remarkably supported by my peers and manager and recognize how fortunate I am to work at a company that respects and welcomes people with part-time active duty military roles like me, as well as other veterans and their families. 

Not only do I feel supported by my colleagues at Google, I am incredibly proud that Google financially supports those of us on active and inactive military duty through a generous military leave policy. Google pays 100 percent of their Google salary for the first 30 calendar days of their duty. After that, Google will pay the difference military pay so the reservist, guardsman or guardswoman continues to receive close to 100 percent of their Google salary for the duration of their service for up to five years.

While we honor veterans on Veterans Day, Google is deeply committed to supporting the community through programs, training and tools all year round. Just in the past few weeks, Google announcedleave benefits for military spousesand Serving Veterans, a new mental wellness resource hub for veterans and their families. Google also recently launched a virtual career series for veterans who might be interested in exploring Google careers. If you are looking for a new job, you can type “jobs for veterans” into Google Search and then enter your military occupation specialty code or equivalent to  see jobs that match the skills you’ve learned in your military experience. On today’s U.S. homepage, you’ll see a very special Doodle created by Texas-based Air Force veteran and guest artist, Jenn Hassin. The sculptural Doodle is created with thousands of handmade paper rolls made from donated uniforms of each branch of the military.     

Google has also long-supported veterans and military families who run their own businesses. Businesses run by veterans can add the “Veteran-Led” attribute to their Google Business Listing on Google Search and Mapsin a few easy steps. Since November includes not only Veterans Day, but is also National Veterans Small Business Week, I also want to mention the Grow with Google for Veterans and Military Families resources developed for veterans and military spouses who want to boost their career skills or build their businesses.

Grow with Google recently hosted a virtual workshop to help veteran-led businesses thrive and a panel discussion with Jen Pilcher of Patriot Boot Camp and Charles Cathlin of TruGenomix about how they’ve grown their businesses online. Visit Grow with Google On Air to watch the free recording of this event. 

One of these is Grow with Google’s Primer app lesson called “Build Digital Skills to Adapt And Grow Your Veteran-led Business.” The quick tutorial features tips for how to manage your business’ sales, operations, finances and more—all with easy online tools. You can download the Primer app in the Google Play Store or Apple App Store to access this content on your mobile device. Just search for “veteranled” in the app to find this lesson.

Google doesn’t only focus its support on military members; military families are just as important. Many of these efforts are led by Mary Spence, a Google program manager and  an Army spouse. 

One resource Grow with Google helped create is the MilSpouse Career Roadmap. In partnership with Hiring our Heroes, this Google.org grant-funded research study surveyed more than 1,500 military spouses to create an interactive hub. It provides a variety of tools and resources that help military spouses find and build portable careers—including Google’s remote work search feature—plus education and employment resources from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Spouse Education and Career Opportunities Program.  

These are just some of the ways military members like myself, veterans, and our families are supported as part of the Google community. To hear my story and those of other Googlers in the military community, visit the Life at Google YouTube channel featuring Veterans at Google.