Tag Archives: grow with google

An expanded skills program to empower Singaporeans

Like many young people in Singapore last year, Gaviota Rajendhiran graduated in a tough environment. The economic impact of COVID-19 meant there were fewer jobs to apply for and more competition for the positions that were available. So when she heard about Skills Ignition SG, a Grow with Google program, Gaviota rushed to put in an application — earning a placement with Omnicom Media Group. She impressed the team there so much that they offered her a full-time job, making her one of eight Skills Ignition trainees to secure permanent roles with Omnicom. 


Gaviota’s story is testament to her talent and determination. But it also shows the power of governments and businesses working together to create opportunity. We created Skills Ignition last year as a partnership between Google and three Singapore government agencies: the Economic Development Board, Infocomm & Media Development Authority and SkillsFuture Singapore. The program equips trainees with the skills they need for an economy becoming increasingly reliant on technology — helping build a talent pipeline that will benefit Singapore for years to come. 


When we launched Skills Ignition, we set a goal of training 3,000 Singaporeans and permanent residents: 2,400 through online vocational training and 600 through a combination of online training and on-the-job learning with 38 (and counting) global and local host companies. We’re on track to meet that target, and 90% of the trainees who’ve been through the program so far feel it’s allowed them to gain the right skills to succeed in the digital economy. The 100 trainees we hosted at Google certainly made a huge impact with their energy and enthusiasm.

A screenshot of Skills Ignition trainees smiling and making thumbs-up and victory gestures on a Meet video call.

Some of the 100 Skills Ignition trainees we hosted at Google catching up via Google Meet.

Today, we announced that we’re expanding the program with 600 new vocational training places, taking our overall target to 3,600. We’ll be welcoming another 100 on-the-job trainees to Google in October. And we’re also working on a  new training track — Data Engineering with Machine Learning Fundamentals — to add to the two existing tracks: Digital Marketing and Cloud Technology.


Over the past five years, the demand for data analytics skills has grown by 86% globally, and Singapore needs world-class business analysts, data scientists and machine learning engineers to be competitive in this fast-changing area of technology. The new Skills Ignition track will help meet that demand, marking the next step in our growing collaboration with Singapore on AI — including a recently-announced partnership between Google Cloud and AI Singapore


Deepening the long-term partnership between Google and Singapore


The expansion of Skills Ignition into its second year deepens our long-standing commitment to Singapore — our headquarters in Asia-Pacific since 2007 and a community that more than 2,000 Googlers call home.  


Over the past 18 months, we’ve worked with Singapore’s government agencies, the private sector and nonprofits to support the response to the pandemic, from sharing health information like vaccine locations to helping small business owners adopt digital tools and promoting food and beverage businesses affected by COVID-19 restrictions


But Singapore has always kept its eyes on the longer term. Our mission here is ‘empowering Singaporeans today, for tomorrow’. Together with our Skills Ignition partners, we’re looking forward to making sure more Singaporeans can use technology to reach their potential as the digital economy grows.  

An expanded skills program to empower Singaporeans

Like many young people in Singapore last year, Gaviota Rajendhiran graduated in a tough environment. The economic impact of COVID-19 meant there were fewer jobs to apply for and more competition for the positions that were available. So when she heard about Skills Ignition SG, a Grow with Google program, Gaviota rushed to put in an application — earning a placement with Omnicom Media Group. She impressed the team there so much that they offered her a full-time job, making her one of eight Skills Ignition trainees to secure permanent roles with Omnicom. 


Gaviota’s story is testament to her talent and determination. But it also shows the power of governments and businesses working together to create opportunity. We created Skills Ignition last year as a partnership between Google and three Singapore government agencies: the Economic Development Board, Infocomm & Media Development Authority and SkillsFuture Singapore. The program equips trainees with the skills they need for an economy becoming increasingly reliant on technology — helping build a talent pipeline that will benefit Singapore for years to come. 


When we launched Skills Ignition, we set a goal of training 3,000 Singaporeans and permanent residents: 2,400 through online vocational training and 600 through a combination of online training and on-the-job learning with 38 (and counting) global and local host companies. We’re on track to meet that target, and 90% of the trainees who’ve been through the program so far feel it’s allowed them to gain the right skills to succeed in the digital economy. The 100 trainees we hosted at Google certainly made a huge impact with their energy and enthusiasm.

A screenshot of Skills Ignition trainees smiling and making thumbs-up and victory gestures on a Meet video call.

Some of the 100 Skills Ignition trainees we hosted at Google catching up via Google Meet.

Today, we announced that we’re expanding the program with 600 new vocational training places, taking our overall target to 3,600. We’ll be welcoming another 100 on-the-job trainees to Google in October. And we’re also working on a  new training track — Data Engineering with Machine Learning Fundamentals — to add to the two existing tracks: Digital Marketing and Cloud Technology.


Over the past five years, the demand for data analytics skills has grown by 86% globally, and Singapore needs world-class business analysts, data scientists and machine learning engineers to be competitive in this fast-changing area of technology. The new Skills Ignition track will help meet that demand, marking the next step in our growing collaboration with Singapore on AI — including a recently-announced partnership between Google Cloud and AI Singapore


Deepening the long-term partnership between Google and Singapore


The expansion of Skills Ignition into its second year deepens our long-standing commitment to Singapore — our headquarters in Asia-Pacific since 2007 and a community that more than 2,000 Googlers call home.  


Over the past 18 months, we’ve worked with Singapore’s government agencies, the private sector and nonprofits to support the response to the pandemic, from sharing health information like vaccine locations to helping small business owners adopt digital tools and promoting food and beverage businesses affected by COVID-19 restrictions


But Singapore has always kept its eyes on the longer term. Our mission here is ‘empowering Singaporeans today, for tomorrow’. Together with our Skills Ignition partners, we’re looking forward to making sure more Singaporeans can use technology to reach their potential as the digital economy grows.  

Supporting LGBTQ+ spaces on the road to recovery

When I first moved to the United States from India, I visited Chicago’s Northalsted area (also known as “Boystown”), an LGBTQ+ neighborhood. I was still in the process of coming out, and I was amazed to see so many businesses welcoming the LGBTQ+ community and building a space that felt safe. For the first time, I felt comfortable in my skin as a gay man and experienced the feeling of truly belonging.


This past year, LGBTQ+ businesses and service organizations — that are at the heart of LGBTQ+ life — were hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. These businesses are more than just bars, restaurants, bookstores, salons or health clinics. They’re places of validation where LGBTQ+ folks are able to gather, find community, commiserate in tough times and celebrate the good times. 


That’s why Google is continuing to show up year-round with dedicated resources to help small and medium-sized businesses — owned by or serving the LGBTQ+ community — on their road to recovery. 

A moving image that starts with the rainbow pride flag (red, orage, yellow, green, blue, purple) and text “Show that your business is LGBTQ friendly on Google”. Next a Google Business Profile page with the rainbow flag and LGBTQ frienldy badge. Last image is the Google logo

New hub for LGBTQ-friendly small businesses and LGBTQ+ business owners

We’re launching a new LGBTQ+ small business resource hub where small business owners can learn about our growing number of product features that help the LGBTQ+ community find safe and welcoming spaces. Businesses like Nos Casa Cafe in Roxbury, Massachusetts and Orhan London Tailoring in London, UK proudly show they are “LGBTQ friendly” on their Business Profile on Google Search and Maps. Others like gc2b, a Black and Latinx transgender-owned company, use Google Ads to reach and help the trans community worldwide.

We’re also connecting LGBTQ+ entrepreneurs with StartOut, an LGBTQ+ nonprofit organization that helps facilitate mentorship, access to capital and tools to create an equitable playing field for the community. 

Tools and resources for LGBTQ+ business owners 

Our economic opportunity initiative, Grow with Google, is helping LGBTQ+ small businesses, like TomboyX, learn how to use digital tools that can drive business growth. We’re partnering with the National LGBT Chamber of Commerce (NGLCC), the “business voice of the LGBT community,” to provide their network of affiliate chambers with training curriculums and resources that help small businesses adapt, grow and better serve their community. Together over the next year, we’ll deliver more than 100 digital skills workshops for LGBTQ+ small businesses. 

Supporting Black LGBTQ+ founders

StartOut's Pride Economic Impact Index shows that over the last 20 years, "out" LGBTQ+ entrepreneurs in the U.S. raised only about 10% as much funding as their non-LGBTQ+ counterparts. This is why Google for Startups is committed to fostering a global startup community that’s diverse and inclusive, leading to more equitable outcomes for underrepresented groups. 


Earlier this month, we announced the second $5 million Google for Startups Black Founders Fund in the U.S., which was created to spur economic opportunity for Black entrepreneurs who are consistently locked out of access to capital. StartOut is nominating founders from their community to receive up to $100,000 non-dilutive cash investments, in addition to other benefits like free access to Google products and mentorship.

A group of seven racially diverse and gender expansive people stand together lovingly in front of a red and white mural at Junior High.

Space to belong

In January 2020, before COVID-19 spread worldwide, U.S. search interest for “lgbt friendly” had reached an all-time high. But by March, search interest for “lgbt friendly” dropped dramatically as the pandemic shut down small businesses and gathering places around the country.


This summer, Google is launching a global campaign to help support and celebrate LGBTQ+ friendly spaces on their road to recovery – from queer and trans owned auto repair shops to historic gay bars and community art centers. You can learn more at our Pride hub: pride.google.

Today I live in the Castro, a neighborhood at the heart of San Francisco’s LGBTQ+ community. Like most people, I have my neighborhood go-tos, a coffee shop where I’m always greeted with a smile and a friendly bark from customers’ dogs that gather outside in the morning. Across the street are other beloved neighborhood restaurants and shops that are LGBTQ+ friendly, many of which were empty or less vibrant during the pandemic. That’s why at Google we feel strongly about supporting LGBTQ+ friendly businesses and safe spaces so that we can build towards a world that fosters belonging for all. 

Google Career Certificates launch in the UK

Today, we’re launching U.K.-wide Google Career Certificates in partnership with the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). 

With people in the U.K. gaining the opportunity to explore new freedoms each week, we know that many people, through both necessity and personal drive, are looking for ways to grow skill sets to prepare for the jobs of the present and the future. 

Technology and automation were already fundamentally changing the way we work, a trend only accelerated by the additional upheaval of jobs markets due to the pandemic. In fact, research conducted by Google and The McKinsey Global Institute before COVID-19 shows that, to ensure job creation, more than 90 million workers may need to develop significant new skills by 2030.

Our Search data in the U.K. suggests we’re already looking to get ahead of this with an increase in Searches for ‘information technology online course’ up 780%, ‘business management course online’ up 296% and ‘online courses with certificates’ up 259% in just the last week alone. 

On top of this, people are turning to the internet to ask their most pressing questions about ‘skills' with some top-ranked questions in Search being ‘How to improve leadership skills?’ ‘How to improve problem solving skills?’ and ‘How to improve communication skills?’

To support the need to learn these new skills, we’re distributing 9,500 Google Career Certificate scholarships in the U.K. through government partnerships with the DWP (9,000) and Camden Council (500). We’re also providing grant funding to The Prince’s Trust and INCO Academy via Google.org to ensure that an additional 1,500 young people from underrepresented and disadvantaged communities across the U.K. can take advantage of the training opportunity.  

Those who sign up to Google Career Certificates can select any number of the four courses available to help grow the necessary skills to support a career in technology. The courses available include IT Support, Data Analyst, Project Manager and UX Designer. Typically learners take up to six months to complete the course, no degree level experience is needed and they’re recognised by industry experts and employers, including Google. 

We know that technology is only becoming more important for the U.K. economy. The amount technology contributes to the UK economy has grown on average by 7% year on year since 2016. And U.K.-based venture capital investment is third in the world, reaching a record high of $15 billion in 2020, despite the challenging conditions. 

As the U.K. embarks upon the biggest recovery challenge in recent history, technology must help everyone, no matter their location, race, age or education level. We must harness the opportunity to prepare people across the country for the jobs of the not-so-distant future. We hope that with these new efforts and the support of our public sector partners, even more people can develop the skills to thrive and continue growing their careers through technology.

Bringing digital skills to previously incarcerated jobseekers

When I was in federal prison, I witnessed firsthand how incarceration affects people's lives — even long after they're released. After my own release in 2015, I created The Ladies of Hope Ministries (The LOHM), which helps previously incarcerated women transition back into society through education, entrepreneurship, spiritual empowerment and advocacy. 


In the U.S., more than 600,000 people make the transition from prisons to the community each year. While many are ready to start working, they often face systemic barriers to entering the workforce. The unemployment rate for people impacted by incarceration is five times the national average. Because of systemic racism in the justice system, this disproportionately impacts the Black community, who also experiences higher unemployment rates than any other racial group. Additionally, 82% of middle-skill jobs in the U.S. require digital proficiency, but many incarcerated individuals lack digital literacy after being removed from technology in prison. The research is clear: Ensuring people have jobs is key to helping them stay out of prison and contributes to our country’s economic health


Everyone should have access to economic opportunity. That’s why my nonprofit, along with the Center for Employment Opportunities, Defy Ventures, Fortune Society and The Last Mile, is partnering with Google on the Grow with Google Career Readiness for Reentry program. This program will train more than 10,000 people who have been impacted by incarceration on digital skills they can use to get a job or start businesses. This initiative builds upon Google’s existing criminal justice work — which includes more than $40 million in Google.org grants to organizations advancing reform in the U.S. justice system over the last six years — and is part of Google’s racial equity commitment to help Black job seekers grow their digital skills. 


The Grow with Google Career Readiness for Reentry program provides free training on digital fundamentals — like how to search and apply for jobs online, how to make a resume using web-based tools and how to send professional emails — as well as more advanced topics like including entrepreneurship and using spreadsheets to make a budget for your business. Several partners will also provide job placement support or help place learners into paid apprenticeships and entrepreneur-in-residence programs.


Partnering organizations like mine have worked with Google to develop the curriculum, designed as an easy-to-use guide to help community organizations deliver digital skills training to people returning from incarceration. Any nonprofit organization offering training to the reentry population can also join the Grow with Google Partner Program and access resources, workshop materials and hands-on help, completely free of cost. 


We can’t change the past, but we can build toward a better tomorrow. The ability to secure a job or start a business can pave the way for a brighter future, and I’m thrilled to work with Google to give others like me the opportunity for a fresh start.

Bringing digital skills to previously incarcerated jobseekers

When I was in federal prison, I witnessed firsthand how incarceration affects people's lives — even long after they're released. After my own release in 2015, I created The Ladies of Hope Ministries (The LOHM), which helps previously incarcerated women transition back into society through education, entrepreneurship, spiritual empowerment and advocacy. 


In the U.S., more than 600,000 people make the transition from prisons to the community each year. While many are ready to start working, they often face systemic barriers to entering the workforce. The unemployment rate for people impacted by incarceration is five times the national average. Because of systemic racism in the justice system, this disproportionately impacts the Black community, who also experiences higher unemployment rates than any other racial group. Additionally, 82% of middle-skill jobs in the U.S. require digital proficiency, but many incarcerated individuals lack digital literacy after being removed from technology in prison. The research is clear: Ensuring people have jobs is key to helping them stay out of prison and contributes to our country’s economic health


Everyone should have access to economic opportunity. That’s why my nonprofit, along with the Center for Employment Opportunities, Defy Ventures, Fortune Society and The Last Mile, is partnering with Google on the Grow with Google Career Readiness for Reentry program. This program will train more than 10,000 people who have been impacted by incarceration on digital skills they can use to get a job or start businesses. This initiative builds upon Google’s existing criminal justice work — which includes more than $40 million in Google.org grants to organizations advancing reform in the U.S. justice system over the last six years — and is part of Google’s racial equity commitment to help Black job seekers grow their digital skills. 


The Grow with Google Career Readiness for Reentry program provides free training on digital fundamentals — like how to search and apply for jobs online, how to make a resume using web-based tools and how to send professional emails — as well as more advanced topics like including entrepreneurship and using spreadsheets to make a budget for your business. Several partners will also provide job placement support or help place learners into paid apprenticeships and entrepreneur-in-residence programs.


Partnering organizations like mine have worked with Google to develop the curriculum, designed as an easy-to-use guide to help community organizations deliver digital skills training to people returning from incarceration. Any nonprofit organization offering training to the reentry population can also join the Grow with Google Partner Program and access resources, workshop materials and hands-on help, completely free of cost. 


We can’t change the past, but we can build toward a better tomorrow. The ability to secure a job or start a business can pave the way for a brighter future, and I’m thrilled to work with Google to give others like me the opportunity for a fresh start.

Digital tools create a safety net for European businesses

Alongside the public health crisis, the economic impact of the pandemic is being felt heavily around the world. As entrepreneurs, business leaders and Governments work to protect jobs and accelerate a return to prosperity in the long term, it's clear that digital tools and skills are going to be more important than ever. That’s why Google is investing in new tools and training to ensure all businesses can build resilience and recover quickly. These are helping companies such as handmade accessories retailer MoonDot in Poland who used digital tools to improve online sales by 70%, and La Maison Des Soeurs Macarons in France who gained 200 new customers after its team took online training courses in digital skills. 

A new report released today by the Connected Commerce Council, funded by Google, shows how a “digital safety net” can serve as a support system for small businesses. The survey of more than 5,000 small businesses across Europe found that businesses that used digital tools to rapidly change how they find customers, sell products and operate reported 80 percent better sales during COVID-19 than those who didn’t, and hired three times as many people. And without such tools, many would have gone out of business.


Digital drives jobs and sales for small businesses

Whilst almost all (80 percent) of European small businesses increased their use of digital tools during the pandemic, the report identified three different types of small businesses based on their adoption of digital tools, and how this impacts their business:

  • Digitally Advanced small businesses (42 percent of small businesses in Europe) use more than 10 digital tools and prioritize their importance, leading to better business outcomes such as higher revenue and jobs 

  • Digitally Evolving small businesses (40 percent) viewed tools as supporting or essential for their business, but were deploying an average of six 

  • Digitally Uncertain small businesses (18 percent) use less digital tools and don’t prioritize their importance, leading to worse business outcomes

Digital drives jobs and sales for small businesses

There is clear untapped potential for European businesses to benefit from digital tools 

From consulting with small businesses, the researchers identified a “stack” of digital tools —  e-commerce, data analytics and talent management, cloud services and collaboration tools — that created significant revenue advantages for small businesses if they were being used prior to the pandemic. This ultimately showed that not only is digital driving revenue and jobs for these businesses, but also that Europe is missing out on significant untapped growth from businesses who are not yet convinced about the usefulness of digital tools. 

The pandemic had a dramatic, and uneven, impact on small businesses

The impact on small businesses was, and continues to be, extreme, with 90 percent saying they were negatively impacted and 44 percent having to adjust their business models. And certain industries and groups faced greater challenges than others, particularly female, older and solo-operator business owners. 

Impact of digital tools on different business owners

What’s next 

It’s clear from this research that there is an opportunity to drive jobs and revenue for European small businesses. However, the research shows that governments and companies need to narrow the gap between the digitally advanced and uncertain, particularly for underrepresented groups. As new digital habits like online shopping and remote working are here to stay even after the pandemic, the research also highlights the risk of some small businesses falling further behind their competitors if they don’t increase their use of digital tools. The barriers those businesses face include being unsure of the return on investment and also a lack of skills and knowledge about digital tools. 

This is why new skills are such an important part of economic recovery efforts across Europe. It’s also why we are committed to investing in research like this to inform and build on the tools and training we already provide. Google is joining policy makers, public agencies, training partners and others to develop products and partnerships to help tackle these barriers, like ourZukunftHandel program, in partnership with HDE, the German Retail Association, to help German retail businesses or Ma Vitrine En Ligne, in partnership with the French Federation of Trade Associations, to connect artisans and traders with digital experts for remote support courses, and providing personalized product recommendations for small business owners on our Google for Small Business hub

By removing these barriers, we can achieve an accelerated, sustainable recovery which works for everyone. 

Read the full report and methodology from the Connected Commerce Council.


Key stats at a glance:

  • Key stats at a glance:

    • The impact: 

      • 80% of small businesses increased their use of digital tools during the pandemic

      • 44% had to to adjust their business models

      • Small businesses with a sophisticated use of digital tools fared nearly twice as better financially (80% better sales; 60% better revenue) during COVID-19, and hired over three times as many people

    • The challenge: 

      • 90% of small businesses were negatively impacted by the pandemic 

      • Digitally advanced small businesses are about 2.5X more likely to be led by someone under 45 years old versus a leader over 45. 

      • Female small business leaders face more than 10% greater revenue challenges than men if they don’t use digital tools, but conversely these tools help women more when deployed successfully

    • The future

      • 62% of small businesses believe they will fully recover to pre-pandemic levels during the next year

      • 50% of small businesses plan to increase their use of digital tools

Job-training solutions in Europe, the Middle East and Africa

As the pandemic accelerates changes in how and where we work, many of us will need to upgrade our skills or even change careers. Today we’re announcing more help, in partnership with expert organizations and with the public sector, building on our experience in training over 17 million people in Europe, the Middle East and Africa over the last six years through Grow with Google.

Even before COVID-19, research by Google and McKinsey showed that more than 90 million European workers may need to develop significant new skills within their current roles, while up to 21 million may have to leave occupations with declining labor needs like agriculture or in-person retail. The global crisis has sped up many of these predicted changes: McKinsey now estimates that 25% more people in Europe may need to transition to new jobs after the pandemic. Many people will need to learn new skills, as almost all growth in labor demand will continue to be for higher skill, higher wage jobs. 

Today, we are announcing three new Google Career Certificates available online on Coursera, which enable people to become job-ready for growing career areas such as IT Support, Project Management, UX Design and Data Analytics. These low-cost programs help people who want to learn online at their own pace, or who may want to change careers and don't have the time or means to access traditional education. They can be completed in under six months, do not require relevant experience or a degree, and are recognized by industry experts and employers. 

These certificates help meet surging demand by workers to get the skills they need to secure good jobs. At the start of the lockdowns, we saw atripling of demandfor online learning, and the interest has been mostly sustained throughout the year, as people need to find new jobs or learn new skills that employers are looking for today — and in the years ahead.

These certificates help meet surging demand by workers to get the skills they need to secure good jobs. In the last year, we've seen increased interest in online learning as more workers lose their jobs or as they seek the skills employers are looking for today — and in the years ahead.

Addressing the challenges of the future of work requires collaboration between governments, companies and community organizations. We are proud to support the European Commission’s Pact for Skills, and, as part of our commitment to help people overcome barriers to learning, we will provide scholarships for the certificates for 100,000 people in EMEA. Scholarships will be distributed through local organizations like Fundae and SEPE in Spain, APDC and IEFP in Portugal, the London Borough of Camden in the UK, OAED in Greece, Czechitas in Czech Republic and Slovakia, the Agency for Digital Development (ADD) in Morocco and RootHub in Nigeria. Additional local collaborations will be announced soon. 

We’re also focused on ways to address gender and economic inequalities, which have been further widened by the pandemic. Underrepresented groups, low-income workers and women are more exposed to hard-hit sectors, like food service or hospitality, and are therefore more at risk of losing their jobs. Older workers without computer experience also face unique challenges as they struggle more to get back into work. Google.org will allocate 50,000 of these scholarships for people from underserved communities, providing access to people from all backgrounds.

Google.org through an initial €5 million grant to INCO, a global nonprofit organisation, will work with over 50 local nonprofits to provide services like career advice, interview preparation, childcare vouchers and language support. These organisations include Riga Tech Girls, a woman-led nonprofit in Latvia that will distribute scholarships to underprivileged women to help get more women into tech jobs.

While there are people that cannot find a job because they don't have the right skills, 40% of employers in Europe also struggled to find qualified people. Joining policy efforts led by the European Commission and others to help bridge the skills gap between employers and workers, we’re committed to gathering companies and organizations who, like us, recognize the Google Career Certificates and openly express their interest in receiving applications from graduates. Certificate graduates can also apply for our apprenticeship programs

Technology must help everyone, no matter their location, race, age or education level. Governments and companies must rethink how we equip people with new skills by removing barriers to learning and investing in innovative partnerships — otherwise these inequalities will only grow.  We hope that with these new efforts and the support of our public sector partners, even more people can develop the skills to thrive and continue growing their careers through technology.

Career certificates and more ways we’re helping job seekers

At Google, our mission has always been to make sure that information serves everyone in important moments, whether it’s helping you find a COVID vaccine near you or get a new job that creates a better life for you and your family.


For Rey Justo, the last year has been full of important moments. When the pandemic hit, he lost his job installing fireplaces in Sacramento, Calif., and he and his family had to move in with his grandparents. He had always been interested in technology, so he enrolled in the Google IT Support Certificate through Merit America. After completing the program in three months, he was hired as an apprentice at Zennify, a computer software company.


With more businesses embracing digital ways of working, it’s estimated that 50% of all employees will need reskilling by 2025. As U.S. job growth returns with more people getting vaccinated, we are committed to ensuring that all Americans have the skills they need to benefit from greater economic opportunity. To help, today we’re announcing new efforts, including opening up enrollment for our latest career certificates, expanding our employer consortium, and introducing new tools to improve the job search.

Enroll now: More Google Career Certificates

Starting today, enrollment is open for our latest Google Career Certificates, in the fields of Data Analytics, Project Management, and User Experience (UX) Design. We’re also announcing a new Associate Android Developer Certification, which prepares learners for entry level jobs in Android development. With 1.3 million jobs open in these fields right now in the U.S., the opportunity is significant.


We’re also providing 100,000 scholarships to be distributed through nonprofits, workforce development boards, and other community organizations such as Per Scholas, NPower and Goodwill. And we’re working closely with the National Association of Workforce Boards to make sure that local workforce programs, one-stop centers, and community employers know how to refer local job seekers to these certificate programs, as well as connect graduates to local jobs. 


These certificates have already been successful in bringing in more talent from groups traditionally underrepresented in tech: 53% of graduates of the IT Support Certificate in the U.S. have been female, Black, Latino or veterans. And 82% of graduates overall say the program helped them advance their career within six months, including getting a raise, finding a new job, or starting a new business. 

Get hired: Expanding our consortium to 130+ employers

More than 130 employers have joined our employer consortium, eager to hire people who have earned these certificates. Graduates can share their resumes directly with employers like Anthem, Verizon, Bayer, Deloitte, SAP, and Better.com, who are joining Accenture, Walmart, Infosys and, of course, Google. We’re also partnering with Guild Education, which works with Fortune 1000 companies, to bring Google Career Certificates to help some of the country’s largest employers upskill their workforce.


Not only is Google hiring these certificate graduates, we’re using the certificates themselves to upskill and reskill Google teams, from IT support techs to data analysts. We’re also opening applications for Google's apprenticeship program in our Career Certificate fields in addition to a few other professional tracks. We will hire hundreds of apprentices over the coming years to participate in on-the-job training and applied learning.


Globally, we’re sponsoring 100,000 scholarships for our Career Certificates in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. In India, we’re working to make certificates more accessible and launch an employer consortium. And in addition to our Career Certificates, today we’re also making our cloud computing, big data and machine learning trainings free for U.S. job seekers to help prepare for jobs in these high-growth fields.

Improving the Job Search experience

For many job seekers, it can be difficult to find open roles that match their experience and education. Over the past year, Google Search queries like “great jobs without a degree” spiked 850% in the U.S. Now when you search for “no degree jobs” in the U.S., you’ll see a new job carousel highlighting relevant opportunities near you. You can also filter by education and experience requirements, and there will be new labels on positions that do not mention degrees in their requirements. We’re also working with job sites — including Glassdoor, LinkedIn, ZipRecruiter, Snagajob and CareerBuilder — and U.S. employers to make education and experience requirements clearer on job postings.

View of the new job search experience when searching for jobs with “no degree”

View of the new job search experience when searching for jobs with “no degree”

A more inclusive economic recovery

Since launching Grow with Google in 2017, we’ve helped 6 million Americans get training in digital skills and nearly 170,000 Americans get a new job and increase their income. Now, as economic recovery accelerates in communities around the U.S. and across the globe, we have an opportunity to help build an economy that is more inclusive and equitable. That’s what today’s announcements are designed to do, and we’re excited to partner with employers, community colleges, nonprofits and job seekers to make it happen.

How Google is helping Latina business owners like me

Making the leap to start a small business is daunting, to say the least. But I had a crazy dream and the drive to see it through, so in 2013 I left my law career and created Reina Rebelde, a makeup brand focused on Latinas. Latinas are a significant population of cosmetics consumers, but corporate brands were selling to us in a way that lacked authenticity. I felt like they were taking us for granted. With Reina Rebelde, I wanted to create products and a brand that celebrates Latinas and our diverse heritage. 


I had to learn so much to get this company started, but one of the most important steps I took was to make sure I was making the most of digital tools. My website is critical to sharing our mission and showcasing our products. I use insights from Google Analytics to help me understand changing shopping habits and demands so I can best optimize my website to meet the needs of my customers. As the business has grown, Google Workspace tools like Gmail, Google Meet and Google Drive have been instrumental in ensuring my team is always connected and engaged with customers, especially now that we’re all working from home. 


The pandemic has shown us that it’s crucial to be able to quickly pivot and be flexible. I know that many businesses in my community are struggling right now: 32% of Latino-owned businesses have been forced to close due to COVID-19. So I wanted to share some resources, available in both Spanish and English, to help businesses learn how to best use digital tools and stand out online. 


  • Google for Small Business is now available in Spanish. This tool gives small business owners a personalized plan with recommendations for the right Google products to help your business meet its goals.  

  • Grow with Google has a library of free, on-demand workshops in Spanish, for business owners in a variety of industries and of all skill levels. 

  • Grow with Google has Digital Coaches based in 20 cities who regularly host workshops in English and Spanish specifically designed to help Latino and Black business owners thrive online. Coaches like Mary Rábago in Phoenix, Arizona, teach Latino entrepreneurs how to build a searchable website, use Google tools to stay productive and use tools, like YouTube or Google Maps, to connect with customers. 

  • If you're a local business that identifies as women-led, you can add the attribute to your Business Profile on Google. By doing so, your business can potentially appear for users on Google Maps and Search who search for queries like “women-led shops” or “women-led restaurants.”

Google para Empresas Pequeñas

g.co/empresaspequenas

Owning my own business has been such a challenging and rewarding experience. This International Women’s Day, I’m celebrating all of my fellow women business owners who are working hard to make their dreams a reality and their communities a better place.