Tag Archives: grow with google

Bringing new digital skills trainings to HBCUs

Status quo doesn’t survive, especially in education. I’ve seen this firsthand in my role as the President and CEO of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF). At TMCF, the nation’s largest organization exclusively representing the Black college community, we aim to ensure student success by promoting educational excellence and preparing the next generation of workforce talent through leadership development. As a Black, first-generation college student, I experienced the power education has to not only catapult a career, but also change a life. But standard education alone isn’t sufficient to prepare college students: In a report by the Economist Intelligence Unit, it was found that only 44 percent of 18 to 25-year-olds believe their education gives them the skills they need to enter the workforce.

There’s no question technology is changing the future of work. Nearly two-thirds of all jobs in the U.S. require medium or advanced digital skills, but 50 percent of Black jobseekers lack digital skills. To help meet this need, today TMCF is announcing a partnership with Google to launch the Grow with Google Career Readiness Program, bringing Grow with Google training into the career centers of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The program will help train 20,000 HBCU students in digital skills over the next school year. 

While the student bodies of HCBUs are incredibly diverse, HBCUs disproportionately serve low-income and first-generation students who may be less academically ready than their peers. The Grow with Google HBCU Career Readiness Program aims to help these students by providing funding, digital skills workshops and custom jobseeker content to HBCU career centers to help students and alumni gain the tools and training needed to secure a job and excel in the workplace.

We’re starting in four HBCUs—Bowie State University, Virginia State University, Winston-Salem State University and Southern University A&M College—and will enter 20 HBCUs total by January. The program will be available to all HBCUs by fall 2021.

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The first four HBCUs in the program. (Left to right: Southern University A&M College, Virginia State University, Bowie State University and Winston-Salem State University.)

Since 2017, the Grow with Google initiative has trained more than five million Americans on digital skills. Google has long been committed to HBCUs. Since 2013, the Google In Residence program has placed Google software engineers at HBCUs and Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) to teach introductory computer science classes, and the company’s virtual Tech Exchange program works in partnership with select HBCUs and HSIs to teach applied computer science skills and social capital among Black and Latinx students. Grow with Google’s $1 million investment is part of a $15 million commitment the company announced in June to help Black jobseekers grow their digital skills.  

The digital skills gap for Black workers can’t be bridged alone. For over 30 years, TMCF has helped  thousands of students to journey to college, through college and into a career. We rely on partnerships and initiatives like the Grow with Google HBCU Career Readiness program to help us continue our work and expand our impact. All sectors and organizations have a part to play to ensure everyone has access to education and economic mobility. We’re proud of the lives that will be touched and the careers that will be shaped through the start of this program. We invite you to visit TMCF’s website to learn how your institution can be involved.

Jimmy Fallon and Google support NYC small businesses

These days, nearly all businesses have experienced some sort of disruption to their day-to-day operations, from reduced hours and customer demand to disrupted supply chains. Despite the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, small businesses are finding ways to adapt and support their local communities—especially right here in New York, the city that thousands of Googlers and I call home. And who better to take us for a tour of a few beloved New York spots than “The Tonight Show” host and native New Yorker, Jimmy Fallon?


To kick off National Small Business Week, we teamed up with “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” to visit some of Jimmy’s favorite New York City small businesses. Along the way, he shared ways that you can help out the small businesses near you.

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Lakou Cafe in Brooklyn uses its Business Profile on Google to post updates for customers and to show that it offers takeout options, sells gift cards, accepts donations, and more.

Jimmy and “The Tonight Show” introduced us to Sabrina Brockman of Grandchamps and Cassandre Davilmar of Lakou Cafe, the owners of two Brooklyn restaurants in his backyard. Like Jimmy, Cassandre and Sabrina have pitched in over the last couple of months to support World Central Kitchen, a not-for-profit devoted to providing meals for those in need. Together, Sabrina and Cassandre have donated more than 11,000 meals to healthcare workers, first responders, protesters and families in need since May. 


Small business owners like Cassandre are also finding ways to reach customers and keep them informed, using digital tools like their free Business Profile on Google. Lakou Cafe updated their Business Profile with takeout options, and added buttons to sell gift cards and accept donations.


We also joined Jimmy at GupShup, his go-to Indian restaurant, a family-owned spot in Manhattan founded by Jimmy Rizvi. GupShup has partnered with World Central Kitchen to provide nearly 12,000 meals since May to frontline workers and hospitals. Jimmy Fallon reminds us how important it is—and how easy it can be—to support local businesses by giving a rave review (fun fact: he loves GupShup’s Crispy Okra and Guacamole).

YouTube video showing Jimmy Fallon's visit to GupShup in New York City.

You can also book reservations, order take out, post photos, buy gift cards, and more to support your local businesses directly from Google Search and Maps.


Are you a small business owner?

If you own a small business and are looking for free tools and training to grow your business, visit grow.google/smallbusiness


And if you’re a small business based in New York state and don’t have an e-commerce presence yet, Google has partnered with COOP to help 150 qualified New York small businesses set up and promote an e-commerce site in preparation for doing business during the holidays. Application opens Monday, September 28 at the MainStreet ONLINE website.

How we’re helping military spouses find job success

Having grown up with a Marine veteran father, and then marrying a commissioned Air Force officer, I know firsthand the challenges that spouses and families face when it comes to military life. One month before my wedding, I learned that my partner would be relocating for his role in the military. Though my career was flourishing, I needed to quickly find a new role, in a new office, with a completely different culture. Though it all worked out in the end, my spouse and I had to live apart for some time, making the first few months of our marriage a little more challenging than your typical newlywed experience. 


These days, I’m proud to work at Google, a company that supports transitioning service members, veterans, and military spouses in meaningful ways every day, whether they are looking to grow their skills, find a job, or start a business. One of those ways is with Google committing to offering paid leave benefits up to 5 days to military spouses and domestic partners experiencing changes of location due to military orders or those preparing for a deployment or activation. We recently conducted research surveying more than 1,500 military spouses to learn more about the military spouse experience. Below are some of our key learnings from the survey, which was conducted in partnership with Hiring our Heroes, a nationwide initiative of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, with the support of a Google.org grant. As I read through this report, I related to so much of what these spouses said, and saw their stories reflected in my own. 


COVID-19 has changed a lot about the way we work, in a very short period of time. And even though the landscape of work has changed, this research remains relevant as so many Americans are looking to adjust to the new normal of remote work, while still others are seeking out opportunities to up-skill, re-skill or start new businesses. 


Many military spouses face challenges when looking for work, but we always get creative to make career and business choices that work for us and our families. Some want to open their own businesses, in an attempt to maximize flexibility and portability. While 76 percent of military spouses indicated that they were interested in starting a business, fewer had actually made the leap into business ownership.

Those who had already started their own businesses often did so with an initial investment of less than $1,000, but felt that aside from raising capital, they lacked skills in marketing and social media to maximize their business potential. 


To help military spouses learn the skills they need to help their businesses succeed, we’ve worked with Hiring our Heroes to curate a series of custom-made minicourses in the Primer app for military spouses, on topics like running a business and maximizing productivity while maintaining work-life balance. These new minicourses build on a series Grow with Google launched last year


Whether starting a business, finding a new position or exploring training and education opportunities, military spouses said they often felt overwhelmed and unsure of how to get started. While the outpouring of support for the military spouse community has been incredibly positive, navigating the vast array of government, nonprofit and corporate programs designed to support our community  sometimes creates anxiety and confusion.


That’s why Google is continuing our work with Hiring our Heroes by launching the MilSpouse Career Roadmap. This interactive hub combines a variety of tools and resources that support military spouses in building careers that move with them, like Google’s remote work search feature, and education and employment resources provided by the Department of Defense’s Spouse Education and Career Opportunities office.  


More than 80 percent of survey respondents said they would pursue additional training and education to build careers that were portable. To help, we’ve made Google.org grants to support scholarships through Syracuse University’s Institute for Veterans and Military Families to make Google’s IT Professional Certificate available to military spouses to get them the skills they need to find work in a fast-growing field. 


Audri Vergara, a mom who left her career to become a stay-at-home parent, is one heartening example from the research. Though working at home and taking care of her son kept Audri busy, she decided to complete the Google IT Professional Certificate through the Institute for Veterans and Military Families. Afterwhich, Audri was able to boost her resume and find a new full-time position where she uses skills from the certificate program. 


I hope that Google’s research and actions to support military families will continue to support people like Audri while also encouraging other organizations to help empower military spouses, too. To learn more about Grow with Google’s tools and resources for the military community, visit grow.google/militaryspouses.


“Buscándole:” Finding ways to help Latino small businesses

Every day for the past 47 years, my mother-in-law, who my kids and I love to call Nana, wakes up, has her required cup of cafecito and gets ready to go to work. She’s a hairstylist and the owner of Carmen’s Beauty Salon in Imperial Beach, California, and she wouldn’t give it up for anything in the world. She’s seen her regulars for decades, cutting and styling their hair through weddings, graduations and more. 

Carmen's Beauty Salon

My mother-in-law giving my son a trim at her salon. 

But in 2020, being a hairstylist—or any type of business owner—is tough. She is just one of the more than 30 million small business owners across the country who are struggling with the impact from the global pandemic. In many cases they are also trying to juggle other responsibilities like distance learning, taking care of sick or elderly family members and simply making ends meet. People like my Nana have been top of mind for me as we all cope with our current reality.

As we kick off Hispanic Heritage Month, a time to celebrate Latino culture, regardless of who you are or how you identify—whether it’s Hispanic, Latinx, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Black, Brazilian, Latino or any other way.  I also can't help but try to buscarle, which means to find a way around a problem or challenge, how to help small businesses like my Nana’s hair salon. And I'm glad to say Google is finding a way, too.

Today, we’re announcing a $3 million Google.org grant to the Hispanics in Philanthropy PowerUp Fund, to directly support hundreds of Latino-owned small businesses with access to capital and the training they need to successfully recover and continue to grow. This grant builds on Google’s $180 million commitment to support minority- and women-led small businesses across the country through the Grow with Google Small Business Fund and Google.org Grants Program.

We’re also providing free tools and training to help any Latino-owned businesses adapt and grow through Grow with Google’s "Paso a Paso" workshops and online training programs. Businesses can sign up for our new Google Ads workshop in Spanish, a special panel featuring resilient Latino entrepreneurs via OnAir En Español and continue their digital marketing training with Primer app minicourses in English or Spanish. We’re expanding our Digital Coaches program and kicking off a partnership with the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce so Latino-owned businesses can get more localized support in their communities.

Beyond helping small businesses, we have lots more in store during Hispanic Heritage Month at Google. I encourage you to explore our updated Latino Cultures in the U.S. collection within Google Arts & Culture, where J. Balvin can share with you the untold story behind Fernando Botero’s “July 20th." Also, be on the lookout for our collaboration with Pop-Up Magazine, where we’ll celebrate Latinos across the country through virtual storytelling and art.

You'll also see us spotlighting Latino businesses around the country in our new "Buscándole" national campaign encouraging people to support neighborhood businesses. And today's Doodle features Felicitas Mendez, a Puerto Rican American civil rights pioneer who was a small business owner herself. Combined, we hope all these efforts can not only celebrate the Latino community during Hispanic Heritage Month, but also help members of our community thrive for the long term.

“Buscándole:” Finding ways to help Latino small businesses

Every day for the past 47 years, my mother-in-law, who my kids and I love to call Nana, wakes up, has her required cup of cafecito and gets ready to go to work. She’s a hairstylist and the owner of Carmen’s Beauty Salon in Imperial Beach, California, and she wouldn’t give it up for anything in the world. She’s seen her regulars for decades, cutting and styling their hair through weddings, graduations and more. 

Carmen's Beauty Salon

My mother-in-law giving my son a trim at her salon. 

But in 2020, being a hairstylist—or any type of business owner—is tough. She is just one of the more than 30 million small business owners across the country who are struggling with the impact from the global pandemic. In many cases they are also trying to juggle other responsibilities like distance learning, taking care of sick or elderly family members and simply making ends meet. People like my Nana have been top of mind for me as we all cope with our current reality.

As we kick off Hispanic Heritage Month, a time to celebrate Latino culture, regardless of who you are or how you identify—whether it’s Hispanic, Latinx, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Black, Brazilian, Latino or any other way.  I also can't help but try to buscarle, which means to find a way around a problem or challenge, how to help small businesses like my Nana’s hair salon. And I'm glad to say Google is finding a way, too.

Today, we’re announcing a $3 million Google.org grant to the Hispanics in Philanthropy PowerUp Fund, to directly support hundreds of Latino-owned small businesses with access to capital and the training they need to successfully recover and continue to grow. This grant builds on Google’s $180 million commitment to support minority- and women-led small businesses across the country through the Grow with Google Small Business Fund and Google.org Grants Program.

We’re also providing free tools and training to help any Latino-owned businesses adapt and grow through Grow with Google’s "Paso a Paso" workshops and online training programs. Businesses can sign up for our new Google Ads workshop in Spanish, a special panel featuring resilient Latino entrepreneurs via OnAir En Español and continue their digital marketing training with Primer app minicourses in English or Spanish. We’re expanding our Digital Coaches program and kicking off a partnership with the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce so Latino-owned businesses can get more localized support in their communities.

Beyond helping small businesses, we have lots more in store during Hispanic Heritage Month at Google. I encourage you to explore our updated Latino Cultures in the U.S. collection within Google Arts & Culture, where J. Balvin can share with you the untold story behind Fernando Botero’s “July 20th." Also, be on the lookout for our collaboration with Pop-Up Magazine, where we’ll celebrate Latinos across the country through virtual storytelling and art.

You'll also see us spotlighting Latino businesses around the country in our new "Buscándole" national campaign encouraging people to support neighborhood businesses. And today's Doodle features Felicitas Mendez, a Puerto Rican American civil rights pioneer who was a small business owner herself. Combined, we hope all these efforts can not only celebrate the Latino community during Hispanic Heritage Month, but also help members of our community thrive for the long term.

Why digital tools are a safety net for small businesses

For businesses trying to stay afloat, like Morgan Miller Plumbing in Grandview, Missouri, digital tools are instrumental. While the onset of COVID-19 was full of unknowns, CEO Stella Crewse says it gave her an opportunity to make her business stronger. “This experience has given us the confidence that we will be able to continue operations seamlessly no matter what comes our way,” Stella says.

Stella’s company was already using digital tools when COVID-19 hit, but in recent months has realized how necessary they are. Her team uses G Suite to share documents and stay organized and video conferencing to stay connected. They’ve even used  Google Maps to identify new sewer line paths without leaving the office in order to follow social distancing guidelines. 

A new report, released today by the Connected Commerce Council in partnership with Google, shows how a “digital safety net” can serve as a support system for small businesses like Morgan Miller Plumbing, and helps to mitigate the negative business effects of COVID-19.

According to the report, practically all small businesses—93 percent—were disrupted by the pandemic, facing reduced customer demand and hours of operations as well as employee layoffs. Eighty-five percent of small businesses say COVID–19 made them rethink their approach to digital tools, allowing them to adapt. 

The study also found that businesses that had a digital safety net in place and used a variety of digital tools—like digital ads, digital payments, data analytics and customer insights tools—not only felt better prepared, but also experienced dramatically better business outcomes, expecting less than a quarter of the revenue reduction compared to their digitally unprepared counterparts. And states with a higher share of digitally prepared businesses anticipate better revenue outcomes in 2020.
Drivers business index v. Projected revenue loss SMBs

This research also found that small business leaders of color have been disproportionately impacted by this pandemic and are roughly half as likely as white-run businesses to have received aid through public loans for their business needs. Businesses that have remained open despite a lack of funding attribute their resilience to embracing technology.

The crisis expedited digital momentum for small businesses: Nearly three-in-four increased their use of digital tools, particularly video conferencing, over the last five months. But not all American small- and medium-sized businesses have a digital safety net. To best serve the needs of every business, we’re introducing new Grow with Google lessons, helping business owners learn how to build an online presence, find more customers, sell online or work remotely. The content varies from two-minute tutorial videos to live workshops, and ranges from beginner level to advanced, so every business can find what they need to become more prepared. 

On the Google for Small Business website, business owners can find personalized Google product recommendations for their business, as well as helpful tips and practical guides to help small businesses get the most of these tools. 

And to reach even more small businesses, Grow with Google is partnering with SCORE and the International Downtown Association(iDA)  to complete a series of affordable and easily accessible Grow with Google workshops for 50,000 small businesses across the U.S. We will continue our partnerships with more than 7,500 organizations to bring virtual training events to local communities across the country. 

With this plan, we’re hopeful we’ll be able to help more leaders like Stella acquire the digital skills they need to help their business recover and grow moving forward. 

Digital talent and Taiwan’s economic recovery

Taiwanese graduate Katie knows the power of self-belief. As COVID-19 hit towards the end of her time at university, she was worried about the prospects of getting a job and nervous going into her interviews with potential employers. In the end, it wasn’t just her technical skills that helped her get a role with Phillips Taiwan—it was her ability to explain what she offered them, something she’d learned in the Google Digital Garage training program. "There are many topics, but the one I especially remember is about building your confidence — that’s even more important with the need for online interviews during a pandemic,” Katie said.  


Taiwan’s response to COVID-19 was fast and effective, but the economic impact of the pandemic means that many Taiwanese share Katie’s concerns about what comes next. Having provided digital tools to help Taiwan combat the health crisis, we want to do everything we can to support its longer-term recovery.  

Helping job-seekers and businesses

At our Google for Taiwan event today, we spoke about our ambitions for the Digital Talent Exploration Program— a partnership with 104 Job Bank that will give more than 10,000 people the chance to learn digital marketing skills, work toward certification, and then be matched with job opportunities with more than 40 companies.

We also heard from the Taiwanese government on the importance of supporting Taiwanese businesses when they need it most. One way we’re seeking to do this is through programs with the Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA) and the Taiwan Institute of Economic Research to help exporters make the most of opportunities in overseas markets. The Taiwan Think Export Report 2.0 provides insights and advice to business owners as they plan for expansion, while Digital Trade Academy is giving hands-on training in how to apply those lessons. For tourism businesses that have been hit especially hard, Google and the Ministry of Transportation and Communications are offering courses on digital tools.

Taiwan GwG

The broader theme of Google for Taiwan was building a strong digital economy for the long-term, with partnerships focused on three key areas.


Digital literacy


As well as combating online misinformation, Taiwan is working to ensure people of all ages can use the internet safely and confidently, and think critically about the information they see. Nonprofits the Taiwan FactCheck Center, the Association for the Promotion of Community Universities, Fakenews Cleaner and ECPAT are our partners on three new digital literacy programs aimed at community college students, senior citizens, and schoolchildren and teachers.


Digital learning


When the pandemic hit, Taiwanese schools and students quickly adjusted to remote learning. Students are now back in the classroom, but Taiwan wants to help its teachers continue to improve their ability to use digital tools through programs like the Cloud Innovation Teacher Training Program: an initiative with Junyi Academy and Taipei City to train 600 teachers from 300 schools. Junyi is also working to incorporate Google’s CS First computer science curriculum in Taiwanese primary schools, so kids can grasp the fundamentals of technology as part of their education. 


Advancing knowledge


Taiwan has great potential in fields like artificial intelligence and machine learning, with a talented generation of Taiwanese developers beginning to come through. To meet their appetite for new skills, we and our partners are developing programs like AI Boot Camp — a joint initiative with the Ministry of Science and Technology and the Artificial Intelligence Research Center — the ML Study Jam program, and the Google University Relations Program, which provides university scholarships. 


With these new and expanded efforts, we hope to contribute to a strong economic recovery from COVID-19, and continue creating new digital opportunities for all Taiwanese in the years ahead.  

“Accelerating Retail” in Europe, Middle East and Africa

Online tools have been a lifeline for many in lockdown, helping people stay connected with loved ones, work remotely, access news and information, and shop for essentials. The use of technology by people and businesses leapt forward perhaps five years over a period of eight weeks, and internet usage increased by 60 percent. Changes in consumer behavior are driving businesses to adapt the way they communicate with customers, while retailers around the world have seen their business models turned upside down.


Because of this big shift, digital tools and skills will be a vital catalyst to accelerate an economic comeback. Earlier this summer we pledged to help 10 million people and businesses in Europe, the Middle East and Africa find jobs, digitize and grow over the next 18 months. Retail, which accounts for more than 9 percent of jobs in the EU alone, will play a pivotal role in the recovery.


Today we’re kicking off "Accelerating Retail," a month of activities dedicated to helping retailers in Europe, the Middle East and Africa accelerate their business recovery and growth to be ready for what comes next. We’re helping retailers of all sizes across the region be ready for the peak shopping season, and working in close partnership with local commerce and trade associations in many countries. Over the next month, we'll introduce new products, tools, free training, unique real time insights and other resources—what follows is a brief snapshot of some of this.

Consumer needs have changed, and retailers need to respond

As the world around us has changed, consumer online shopping has leapt forward and decision-making has become more complex. Our Decoding Decisions study identified a “messy middle,” the space between a consumer starting their research and making a purchase, where they navigate the explosion of choice and information available to them both online and offline. 


The messy middle has become even messier over the course of the pandemic—our needs changed, product and store availability became unpredictable. Shoppers have become more open to new brands and outlets, but they also need more help than ever to find the right product at the right price at the right time and place. This big shift is an opportunity for retail businesses large and small. 


We’re here to help retailers respond effectively—so they can quickly understand and act on consumer changes while building their brand both at store and online.

Recovery and growth through digital 

Online retail demand has grown exponentially, and businesses need a great customer experience to be competitive and build brand recognition. That’s why we’re rolling out a new version of Grow My Store in multiple countries, including Germany, France, Netherlands and Turkey. Grow My Store helps local businesses improve digital shopping, grow customer traffic and optimize online customer experience,  to successfully complete  transactions. Any business can enter their website URL into the tool to receive a customized report, industry benchmarks, digital traffic trends and actionable tips to improve. 

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We’re also making it easier for retailers to reach the right potential customers. We’ll be upgrading Smart Shopping campaigns to help with new customer acquisition and simplify advertiser onboarding. 

Meanwhile, for the first time we’ve released insights for specific fast-rising retail categories around the world via a new interactive tool in Google Search—including the queries associated with them.

What's next for online shopping

As online spend continues to grow, retail success will depend on delivering an integrated online/offline purchase experience. New research we’ve conducted in collaboration with Euromonitor found that in the next five years, most purchases will still be made in store—but retailers who bring together their digital and in-store offerings will make the biggest gains even if customers eventually choose to buy in store. Since consumers shop both online and offline, multichannel retailers and online marketplaces will drive 86 percent of the sales growth by 2024. The future of retail is not about either physical or online presence but an integrated consumer experience.

While there might be more change and uncertainty on the horizon, retail is critical to every region’s broader economic recovery. By embracing digital opportunities, retail businesses can drive resilience and growth. 

Look out for our "Accelerating Retail" updates through September—we're here to help retailers make the most of digital opportunities and prepare for what's next.

Being there for Thailand’s small businesses

Around 1.3 million Thai small businesses have been affected by the impact of COVID-19—from clothes manufacturer Chu Su Mo in Chiang Mai, to coffee shops like Hidden Tree Garden in Samut Songkhram. These businesses are often at the heart of their communities, supporting local jobs and services. They’re also critical to the Thai economy as a whole, accounting for more than 90 percent of all businesses in the country. As Thailand rebuilds from the pandemic, we’re focused on supporting its business owners through the economic recovery. 


Digital skills training in a time of need


Today, at our virtual Google for Thailand event, we launched Saphan Digital: a new Grow with Google program to help small businesses and other organisations learn digital skills and make the most of online opportunities. (In Thai, “Saphan” means bridge, and this program is designed to help bridge the digital gap between Thais who know how to use the internet and those that can’t.)
Hidden Tree Cafe inside

While the owners of Hidden Tree Cafe had to close during COVID-19, they kept posting photos of their drinks and desserts on Google My Business — meaning demand was strong as soon as they reopened. 

Throughout the pandemic, we’ve seen the importance of the internet in enabling businesses to continue operating—even if it’s something simple like letting customers know they’re still open, or offering information about online shopping and delivery options. Saphan Digital will equip business owners, NGOs and workers to use digital tools and set up a basic online presence, as well as provide online training courses in business and digital skills—covering topics like e-commerce and creating a digital storefront. After completing the training, people taking part will be able to “pair” with a small business or NGO to apply what they’ve learned.  


The program is a partnership with Thailand’s Ministry of Commerce and backed by local and international businesses, with corporate partners like LnwShop  and BentoWeb providing tools and mentoring.
Saphan Digital logos

Saphan is part of a bigger effort to ensure Thais can use technology with confidence—one we’re expanding to support the country’s coronavirus response. 

Skills and education beyond COVID-19


Existing Google initiatives like Academy Bangkok are now offering online courses for graduates and experienced professionals, while The Asia Foundation’s Go Digital ASEAN program—supported by Google.org—is helping Thai micro-entrepreneurs in 20 provinces who wouldn’t otherwise have access to digital training. For students and teachers, we announced today that we’ll be integrating G Suite for Education into Thailand’s Digital Education Excellence Platform, meaning that all Thai public schools will be able to access Google’s education tools free of charge. 


Our mission in Thailand is to “leave no Thai behind,” as we work with our partners to build a stronger, more inclusive digital economy. With these new initiatives, we’re reaffirming that commitment to this amazing country’s future.  


From IT Certificate completers to Googlers

Like many success stories, our journey to create the Google IT Support Certificatewas inspired by a challenge: We had issues finding qualified candidates to fill our own IT support team. We developed the Google IT Support Certificate (IT Cert for short), which requires no experience or degree, and helps prepare people for entry-level jobs in IT support in three to six months. In addition to helping us fill roles at Google, we created a hiring consortiumof over 50 national employers, including companies like Hulu, Sprint and Walmart, which consider graduates for roles.

In today’s economic environment, we’re committed to creating further access to job training to help people grow their career and economic potential. We’ve seen great results with the IT Cert: 80 percent of program participants report a positive career impact like a raise or a promotion, and 58 percent of participants identify as Black, Latino, female and/or veteran. But our work is not done. We recently created more pathways to jobs, including new Google Career Certificates in high-paying, high-growth career fields that do not require a degree, a new apprenticeship program at Google that teaches the certificate and a program that will bring the IT Cert to 100 career and technical education high schools for free by the end of 2021. 


Learn more today by joining our Grow with Google OnAir session, Plan Your Next Career Move with Google's IT Certificate. And read on to hear from graduates who experienced everything from homelessness to unemployment before taking the Google IT Cert and starting a role at Google.

Chelsea, who works at a Google data center

Chelsea Rucker, Data Center Technician, Google

Chelsea Rucker had recently moved out of a shelter for homeless women in Nashville with her two young daughters. After taking a job at her local Goodwill, she learned the organization had partnered with Google to offer its IT Cert program. She received a program scholarship and spent the next several months enrolled in the self-directed course, carving out time to study while balancing her duties as a single mother and her 40-hour work week at Goodwill. After completing the program, she found an open IT role at Google, but struggled with imposter syndrome. 

“I thought there was no way Google would hire me,” she says. “After I gathered up the courage, I sent them my resume.” Chelsea landed the job at Google and credits the IT Cert program with giving her the foundational knowledge she needed to succeed. 

“Nobody ever talks about how this is possible—if we become well-versed in technology, we’ll find all kinds of opportunities..I’m a firm believer that difficult does not mean impossible,” Chelsea says. 

Xavier, a Google IT Resident

Xavier Heydt, IT Resident, Google

Xavier had always been good with computers, even helping family and friends build them, but had never really considered an IT career. He started with Linux and Python courses at a community college, but then heard about the Google IT Cert and finally saw a career he was interested in. He enrolled in the program. “It was like a fire hose of knowledge,” Xavier says. 

After completing the program, he shared his resume with several companies from the program’s hiring consortium. Within two weeks, a Google recruiter reached out and encouraged him to apply to Google’s Information Technology Residency program. Thanks to the courses, he was ready for the technical interviews and got a job in internal IT support at Google’s Ann Arbor office. “I don't know what my career trajectory would have been without the certificate program,” he says. “My experience at Google has been life-changing and the Google IT Cert is what opened that door for me.”

Aldi, who works as a Google IT Resident

Aldi Suryoutom, IT Resident, Google

Aldi first was introduced to computers when he was around 7, growing up in Indonesia. His father brought home a PC with a Pentium 1 microprocessor in it. He would spend hours exploring how this new machine worked, trying to understand how the programs operated and tinkered with the hardware until the computer would freeze up. 

Aldi enrolled in the IT Cert program and loved the process and lessons. “The IT Cert program does a great job of preparing us for interviews with real word examples and practice,” he says. “I used to program to prepare for my interview questions that the recruiters asked me.”  Aldi was offered a job within Google’s IT services and went from being a student technician to working in an IT support role. “Everything I learned from the IT Cert program led me to Google,” he says.