Tag Archives: student programs

A milestone to celebrate: 10 years of GCI!

 
This year we celebrated the best of program milestones—10 years of bringing together 13-17 year old students from around the world into open source software development with our Google Code-in (GCI) contest. The contest wrapped up in January with our largest numbers ever; 3,566 students from 76 countries completed an impressive 20,840 tasks during the 7-week contest!

Students spent their time working online with mentors from 29 open source organizations that provided help to answer questions and guide students throughout the contest. The students wrote code, edited and created documentation, designed UI elements and logos, and conducted research. Additionally, they developed videos to teach others about open source software and found (and fixed!) hundreds of bugs.

Overview

  • 2,605 students completed three or more tasks (earning a Google Code-in 2019 t-shirt)
  • 18.5% of students were girls
  • 79.8% of students were first time participants in GCI (same percentage as in 2018- weird!)
  • We saw very large increases in the number of students from Japan, Mongolia, Sri Lanka, and Taiwan.

Student Age


Participating Schools

School NameNumber of Student ParticipantsCountry
Dunman High School138Singapore
Liceul Teoretic ''Aurel Vlaicu''47Romania
Indus E.M High School46India
Sacred Heart Convent Senior Secondary School34India
Ananda College29Sri Lanka

Students from 1,900 schools (yes, exactly 1,900!) competed in this year’s contest; plus, 273 students were homeschooled. Many students learn about GCI from their friends or teachers and continue to spread the word to their classmates. This year the top five schools that had the most students with completed tasks were:

Countries

The chart below displays the top 10 countries with students who completed at least 1 task.

We are thrilled that Google Code-in was so popular this year!

Thank you again to the people who make this program possible: the 895 mentors—from 59 countries—that guided students through the program and welcomed them into their open source communities.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2020 now open for student applications!

If you’re a university student and want to sharpen your software development skills while doing good for the open source community, check out Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2020! This will be our 16th year of GSoC!

We are now accepting student applications for our program that introduces university students from around the world to open source software communities, as well as our enthusiastic and generous community of mentors. For three months students code from the comfort of their homes (the program is entirely online!) and receive stipends based on the successful completion of their project milestones.

Past participants say the real-world experience that GSoC provides honed their technical skills, boosted their confidence, expanded their professional network, and enhanced their resume, all while making them better developers.

Interested students can submit proposals on the program site between now and Tuesday, March 31, 2020 at 18:00 UTC.

While many students began preparing in February when we announced the 200 participating open source organizations, it’s not too late for you to start! The first step is to browse the list of organizations and look for project ideas that appeal to you. Next, reach out to the organization to introduce yourself and determine if your skills and interests are a good fit. Since spots are limited, we recommend writing a strong proposal and submitting a draft early so you can communicate with the organization and get their feedback to increase your odds of being selected.

You can learn more about how to prepare by watching the video below and checking out the Student Guide and Advice for Students.



You can find more information on our website, including a full timeline of important dates. We also highly recommend reviewing the FAQ and Program Rules.

Remember to submit your proposals early as you only have until Tuesday, March 31 at 18:00 UTC. Good luck to all who apply!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2020 mentoring orgs announced!

We are delighted to announce the open source projects and organizations that have been accepted for Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2020, the 16th year of the program!

After careful review, we have chosen 200 open source projects to be mentor organizations this year, 30 of which are new to the program. Please see the program website for a complete list of the accepted organizations.

Are you a student interested in participating in GSoC this year? We will begin accepting student applications on Monday, March 16, 2020 at 18:00 UTC and the deadline to apply is Tuesday, March 31, 2020 at 18:00 UTC.


The most successful applications come from students who start preparing now. Here are some proactive tips for a successful before the application period begins:
You can find more information on our website which includes a full timeline of important dates. We also highly recommend perusing the FAQ and Program Rules and watching some of our other videos with more details about GSoC for students and mentors.

A hearty congratulations—and thank you—to all of our mentor organizations! We look forward to working with all of you during Google Summer of Code 2020.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Announcing our Google Code-in 2019 Winners!

Google Code-in (GCI) 2019 was epic in every regard. Not only did we celebrate 10 years of the Google Code-in program, but we also broke all of our previous records for the program. It was a very, very busy seven weeks for everyone—we had 3,566 students from 76 countries complete 20,840 tasks with a record 29 open source organizations!

We want to congratulate all of the students who took part in this year’s 10th anniversary of Google Code-in. Great job!

Today we are excited to announce the Grand Prize Winners, Runners Up, and Finalists with each organization.

The 58 Grand Prize Winners completed an impressive 2,158 tasks while also helping other students.

Each of the Grand Prize Winners will be awarded a four-day trip to Google’s campus in northern California to meet with Google engineers, one of the mentors they worked with during the contest, and enjoy some fun in California with the other winners. We look forward to seeing these winners in a few months!

Grand Prize Winners

The Grand Prize Winners hail from 21 countries, listed by full name alphabetically below:
Name
Organization
Country
Aayushman Choudhary
JBoss Community
India
Abdur-Raheem Idowu
Haiku
Norway
Abhinav Kaushlya
The Julia Programming Language
India
Aditya Vardhan Singh
The ns-3 Network Simulator project
India
Anany Sachan
OpenWISP
India
Andrea Gonzales
Sugar Labs
Malaysia
Anmol Jhamb
Fedora Project
India
Aria Vikram
Open Roberta
India
Artur Grochal
Drupal
Poland
Bartłomiej Pacia
Systers, An AnitaB.org Community
Poland
Ben Houghton
Wikimedia
United Kingdom
Benjamin Amos
The Terasology Foundation
United Kingdom
Chamindu Amarasinghe
SCoRe Lab
Sri Lanka
Danny Lin
CCExtractor Development
United States
Diogo Fernandes
Apertium
Luxembourg
Divyansh Agarwal
AOSSIE
India
Duc Minh Nguyen
Metabrainz Foundation
Vietnam
Dylan Iskandar
Liquid Galaxy
United States
Emilie Ma
Liquid Galaxy
Canada
Himanshu Sekhar Nayak
BRL-CAD
India
Jayaike Ndu
CloudCV
Nigeria
Jeffrey Liu
BRL-CAD
United States
Joseph Semrai
SCoRe Lab
United States
Josh Heng
Circuitverse.org
United Kingdom
Kartik Agarwala
The ns-3 Network Simulator project
India
Kartik Singhal
AOSSIE
India
Kaustubh Maske Patil
CloudCV
India
Kim Fung
The Julia Programming Language
United Kingdom
Kumudtiha Karunarathna
FOSSASIA
Sri Lanka
M.Anantha Vijay
Circuitverse.org
India
Maathavan Nithiyananthan
Apertium
Sri Lanka
Manuel Alcaraz Zambrano
Wikimedia
Spain
Naman Modani
Copyleft Games
India
Navya Garg
OSGeo
India
Neel Gopaul
Drupal
Mauritius
Nils André
CCExtractor Development
United Kingdom
Paraxor
Fedora Project
United Arab Emirates
Paweł Sadowski
OpenWISP
Poland
Pola Łabędzka
Systers, An AnitaB.org Community
Poland
Pranav Karthik
FOSSASIA
Canada
Pranay Joshi
OSGeo
India
Prathamesh Mutkure
OpenMRS
India
Pratish Rai
R Project for Statistical Computing
India
Pun Waiwitlikhit
The Mifos Initiative
Thailand
Rachit Gupta
The Mifos Initiative
India
Rafał Bernacki
Haiku
Poland
Ray Ma
OpenMRS
New Zealand
Rick Wierenga
TensorFlow
Netherlands
Sayam Sawai
JBoss Community
India
Sidaarth “Sid” Sabhnani
Copyleft Games
United States
Srevin Saju
Sugar Labs
Bahrain
Susan He
Open Roberta
Australia
Swapneel Singh
The Terasology Foundation
India
Sylvia Li
Metabrainz Foundation
New Zealand
Umang Majumder
R Project for Statistical Computing
India
Uzay Girit
Public Lab
France
Vladimir Mikulic
Public Lab
Bosnia and Herzegovina
William Zhang
TensorFlow
United States

Runners Up

And a big kudos to our 58 Runners Up from 20 countries. They will receive a GCI backpack, jacket and a GCI tshirt. The Runners Up are listed alphabetically by First name below:
Name
Organization

Name
Organization
Adev Saputra
Drupal

Kunal Bhatia
Score Lab
Adrian Serapio
R Project for Statistical Computing

Laxya Pahuja
The Mifos Initiative
Alberto Navalón Lillo
Apertium

Łukasz Zbrzeski
Score Lab
Alvii_07
Liquid Galaxy

Madhav Mehndiratta
Fedora Project
Amar Fadil
OpenWISP

Marcus Chong
Sugar Labs
Ananya Gangavarapu
TensorFlow

Mateusz Samkiewicz
JBoss Community
Andrey Shcherbakov
Wikimedia

Maya Farber Brodsky
CCExtractor Development
Antara Bhattacharya
Metabrainz Foundation

Michał Piechowiak
Fedora Project
Anthony Zhou
Public Lab

Moodhunt
Metabrainz Foundation
Bartosz Dokurno
Circuitverse.org

Muhammad Wasif
FOSSASIA
Ching Lam Choi
The Julia Programming Language

name not shown
Haiku
Chirag Bhansali
AOSSIE

Nathan Taylor
Sugar Labs
Chiranjiv Singh Malhi
BRL-CAD

Nishanth Thumma
Open Roberta
Daksha Aeer
Systers, An AnitaB.org Community

Panagiotis Vasilopoulos
Haiku
Devansh Khetan
OpenMRS

Rachin Kalakheti
TensorFlow
Dhanus SL
OSGeo

Regan Iwadha
JBoss Community
Dhhyey Desai
AOSSIE

Ribhav Sharma
OpenMRS
Eric Xue
Copyleft Games

Richard Botez
Open Roberta
Eryk Mikołajek
BRL-CAD

Rishabh Verma
The Mifos Initiative
Hannah Guo
The Terasology Foundation

Rishank Kanaparti
Copyleft Games
Harsh Khandeparkar
Public Lab

Rishi R
R Project for Statistical Computing
Hirochika Matsumoto
CloudCV

Sai Putravu
The ns-3 Network Simulator project
Ilya Maier
Systers, An AnitaB.org Community

Samuel Sloniker
Apertium
Irvan Ayush Chengadu
Drupal

Shivam Rai
OSGeo
Jakub Niklas
The Terasology Foundation

Siddharth Sinha
FOSSASIA
Jun Rong Lam
Circuitverse.org

Soumitra Shewale
The Julia Programming Language
Karol Ołtarzewski
OpenWISP

Stanisław Howard
The ns-3 Network Simulator project
Kripa Kini
Liquid Galaxy

Suryansh Pathak
CloudCV
Krzysztof Krysiński
CCExtractor Development

Taavi Väänänen
Wikimedia

Finalists

And a hearty congratulations to our 58 Finalists from 20 countries. The finalists will win a special GCI jacket and a GCI tshirt. They are listed alphabetically by first name below:
Name
Organization

Name
Organization
Abinav Chari
CloudCV

Musab Kılıç
CCExtractor Development
Andre Christoga Pramaditya
CloudCV

Nail Anıl Örcün
The Terasology Foundation
Anish Agnihotri
OSGeo

Natalie Shapiro
Circuitverse.org
Aryan Gulati
FOSSASIA

Nate Clark
The Terasology Foundation
Ayush Sharma
Fedora Project

Nicholas Gregory
Wikimedia
Ayush Sharma
SCoRe Lab

Nikita Ermishin
OpenWISP
Daniel Oluojomu
JBoss Community

Nishith P
FOSSASIA
Dhruv Baronia
TensorFlow

Oliver Fogelin
R Project for Statistical Computing
Diana Hernandez
Systers, An AnitaB.org Community

Oussama Hassini
The Mifos Initiative
Gambali Seshasai Chaitanya
Apertium

Param Nayar
Copyleft Games
Hao Liu
R Project for Statistical Computing

Peter Terpstra
The ns-3 Network Simulator project
Hardik Jhalani
Systers, An AnitaB.org Community

Piyush Sharma
The Mifos Initiative
Hrishikesh Patil
OpenMRS

Robert Chen
Public Lab
Jackson Lewis
The ns-3 Network Simulator project

Rohan Cherivirala
Open Roberta
Jan Rosa
Wikimedia

Ruixuan Tu
Haiku
Janiru Hettiarachchi
Liquid Galaxy

Saptashwa Mandal
Drupal
Janiru Wijekoon
Metabrainz Foundation

Sashreek Magan
Sugar Labs
Joshua Yang
Apertium

Sauhard Jain
AOSSIE
Kevin Liu
Open Roberta
Sharman Maheshwari
SCoRe Lab
Krishna Rama Rao
AOSSIE

Sumagna Das
BRL-CAD
Li Chen
Fedora Project

Tanvir Singh
OSGeo
Madhav Shekhar Sharma
The Julia Programming Language

Techno-Disaster
CCExtractor Development
Mbah Javis
TensorFlow

Thusal Ranawaka
BRL-CAD
Merul Dhiman
Liquid Galaxy

Vivek Mishra
Copyleft Games
Michelle (Wai Man) Lo
OpenMRS

Yu Fai Wong
JBoss Community
Mihir Bhave
OpenWISP

Yuqi Qiu
Metabrainz Foundation
Mohit S A
Circuitverse.org

Zakhar Vozmilov
Public Lab
Mokshit Jain
Drupal

Zakiyah Hasanah
Sugar Labs
Mudit Somani
The Julia Programming Language

Zoltán Szatmáry
Haiku

Our 794 mentors, the heart and soul of GCI, are the reason the contest thrives. Mentors volunteer their time to help these bright students become open source contributors. They spend hundreds of hours during their holiday breaks answering questions, reviewing submitted tasks, and welcoming the students to their communities. GCI would not be possible without their dedication, patience and tireless efforts.

We will post more numbers from GCI 2019 here on the Google Open Source Blog over the next few weeks, so please stay tuned.

Congratulations to our Grand Prize Winners, Runners Up, Finalists, and all of the students who spent the last couple of months learning about, and contributing to, open source. We hope they will continue their journey in open source!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2020 is now open for mentor organization applications!

We are looking for open source projects and organizations to participate in the 16th annual Google Summer of Code (GSoC)! GSoC is a global program that draws university student developers from around the world to contribute to open source projects. Each student will spend three months working on a coding project with the support of volunteer mentors from participating open source organizations, mid-May to mid-August.

Last year, 1,276 students worked with 206 open source organizations and over 2,000 mentors. Organizations include small and medium sized open source projects, as well as a number of umbrella organizations with many sub-projects under them (Apache Software Foundation, Python Software Foundation, etc.).

Our 2020 goal is to accept more organizations into their first GSoC than ever before! We ask that veteran organizations refer other organizations they think would be a good fit to participate in GSoC.

You can apply to be a mentoring organization for GSoC starting today. The deadline to apply is February 5 at 19:00 UTC. Organizations chosen for GSoC 2020 will be publicly announced on February 20.

Please visit the program site for more information on how to apply and review the detailed timeline of important deadlines. We also encourage you to check out the Mentor Guide and our short video on why open source projects apply to be a part of the program.

Best of luck to all of the open source mentoring organization applicants!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Announcing Google Summer of Code 2020!

Google Open Source is proud to announce Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2020—the 16th year of the program! We look forward to introducing the 16th batch of student developers to the world of open source and matching them with open source projects, while earning a stipend so they can focus their summer on their project.

Over the last 15 years GSoC has provided over 15,000 university students, from 109 countries, with an opportunity to hone their skills by contributing to open source projects during their summer break.

And the ‘special sauce’ that has kept this program thriving for 16 years: the mentorship aspect of the program. Participants gain invaluable experience working directly with mentors who are dedicated members of these open source communities; mentors help bring students into their communities while teaching them, guiding them and helping them find their place in the world of open source.

We’re excited to keep the tradition going! Applications for interested open source project organizations open on January 14, 2020, and student applications open March 25.

Are you an open source project interested in learning more? Visit the program site and read the mentor guide to learn more about what it means to be a mentor organization, how to prepare your community and create appropriate project ideas, and tips for preparing your application. We welcome all types of organizations—large and small—and are very eager to involve first time projects. For 2020, we hope to welcome more organizations into GSoC than ever before and are looking to accept 40-50 new organizations into their first GSoC.

Are you a university student interested in learning how to prepare for the 2020 GSoC program? It’s never too early to start thinking about your proposal or about what type of open source organization you may want to work with. You should read the student guide for important tips on preparing your proposal and what to consider if you wish to apply for the program in mid-March. You can also get inspired by checking out the 200+ organizations that participated in Google Summer of Code 2019, as well as the projects that students worked on.

We encourage you to explore other resources and you can learn more on the program website.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Code-in 2019 Contest for Teenagers

Today is the start of the 10th consecutive year of the Google Code-in (GCI) contest for teens. We anticipate this being the biggest contest yet!

The Basics

What is Google Code-in?
Our global, online contest introducing students to open source development. The contest runs for seven weeks until January 23, 2020.

Who can register?
Pre-university students ages 13-17 that have their parent or guardian’s permission to register for the contest.

How do students register and participate?
Students can register for the contest beginning today at g.co/gci. Once students have registered, and the parental consent form has been submitted and approved by Program Administrators, students can choose which “task” they want to work on first. Students choose the task they find interesting from a list of thousands of available tasks created by 29 participating open source organizations. Tasks take an average of 3-5 hours to complete. There are even beginner tasks that are a wonderful way for students to get started in the contest.

The task categories are:
  • Coding
  • Design
  • Documentation/Training
  • Outreach/Research
  • Quality Assurance
Why should students participate?
Students not only have the opportunity to work on a real open source software project, thus gaining invaluable skills and experience, but they also have the opportunity to be a part of the open source community. Mentors are readily available to help answer their questions while they work through the tasks.

Google Code-in is a contest so there are prizes*! Complete one task and receive a digital certificate, three completed tasks and you’ll also get a fun Google t-shirt. Finalists earn a jacket, runners-up earn backpacks, and grand prize winners (two from each organization) will receive a trip to Google headquarters in California in 2020!

Details
Over the past nine years, more than 11,000 students from 108 countries have successfully completed over 55,000 tasks in GCI. Curious? Learn more about GCI by checking out the Contest Rules, short videos, and FAQs. Please visit our contest site and read the Getting Started Guide.

Teachers, if you are interested in getting your students involved in Google Code-in we have resources available to help you get started.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

* There are a handful of countries we are unable to ship physical goods to, as listed in the FAQs.

From "let’s try" to "woah, this is awesome!": Three years of GSoC for InterMine

GSoC Experience Series

InterMine is an open source data warehouse for biological data. In 2017, we decided at short-ish notice to participate in a call from Open Genome Informatics for Google Summer of Code (GSoC) mentoring organisations. InterMine had never participated in a program like this before, and we weren’t entirely sure if the time investment was actually going to be worth it. We nervously said “no more than two projects”, but we had so many great applications, we ended up taking on five brilliant students.
Fast forward to 2019, GSoC is firmly embedded in our organisation it’s hard to imagine that this is only our third time participating. The benefits to us (and hopefully the students as well!) were immeasurable, allowing us to explore open-ended projects we thought might be fun and implement concrete ideas that we’ve been wanting to do for years, all while interacting with a really smart bunch of talented students. 

From the 2017 cohort of students, we ended up with one of our students, Konstantinos Krytsis, authoring a scientific paper about the work they did: InterMineR: an R package for InterMine databases. Another student, Nadia Yudina, returned to our org as a mentor the next year.
In 2018, student engagement got even better: of six students, Adrián Rodríguez-Bazaga applied for an internal vacancy and joined us full time, Nupur Gunwant spent her next summer break working on an internship in our office, and two students returned as mentors the next year (Aman Dwivedi and Arunan Sugunakumar).

By this point, any questions we might have had about whether or not GSoC was “worth it” were firmly answered: GSoC had become an integral part of our team’s operations. There were still things we needed to improve, though—we ran a student debrief after GSoC 2018, and one student expressed that despite having worked with our API and data for three months, they still didn’t have a firm idea of why or how someone might wish to use InterMine. ? whoops! This definitely had never been our intent, and I felt mortified that we’d overlooked something so basic.

In 2019, we set out to provide our students with a firm grounding by running cohort calls. All students were invited, giving them the chance to meet one another and interact—not quite face to face, but video calls still give a great sense of “group” compared to just text chat. We structured the calls to run over several months, liberally borrowing from the Mozilla Open Leaders curriculum to teach students about open source good practices, presentation skills, code review, providing effective and kind feedback (an essential part of code review), and of course—talking about what InterMine is, how it was founded, and what type of people might use it. We made heavy use of Zoom’s breakout room feature, to allow small sub-groups of students and mentors to have private discussions about topics, before re-convening to report their experiences to the group.

Feedback from students was very positive about the calls, so we expect to continue this in later years. I think my favourite comment after our very first call was “Are there going to be more of these group calls? This was awesome!” We also repeatedly had the group calls mentioned positively in free-text feedback from student evaluations.

With this in mind, we’d like to share our call agenda templates with other organisations so others can run the same student cohort calls if they wish,and remix/modify, etc. as needed. As part of our GSoC site repo, all content including our call templates, GSoC grading criteria and advice, etc. is Apache licensed and open for reuse. You can see all of our call templates on our GSoC repo site, or fork our GSoC GitHub repo;and I’m happy to discuss ideas (email: [email protected], twitter: @yoyehudi or @intermineorg) or help others get similar group call programs off the ground if you’d like advice.

The 2019 GCI Organizations!

We are excited to welcome 29 open source organizations to mentor students as part of Google Code-in 2019. The contest, now in its tenth year, offers students ages 13-17 from around the world, an opportunity to learn and practice their coding skills while contributing to open source projects—all virtually!
Google Code-in starts for students on December 2nd this year! Students are encouraged to research and learn about the participating organizations ahead of time. You can get started by clicking on the links below:

Apertium – A free/open-source machine translation platform.

Australian Open Source Software Innovation and Education – Australian umbrella organization for open-source projects.

BRL-CAD – Computer graphics, 3D modeling, 3D printing, and rendering!

CCExtractor Development – Accessibility tools with a focus on subtitles.

CircuitVerse.org – Have fun exploring logic circuits right from your browser!

CloudCV – Make AI research more reproducible.

Copyleft Games – Tools and engines for making games.

Drupal – Content management software used to make many of the websites and applications you use every day.

Fedora Project – Advance Free/Open Source Software and content.

FOSSASIA – Developing open source software applications and open hardware together with a global developer community from its base in Asia, improving people’s lives and create a sustainable future.

Haiku – Operating system that specifically targets personal computing.

JBoss Community – Community of open source projects primarily written in Java.

Liquid Galaxy project – A remarkable panoramic system and visualization tool.

MetaBrainz Foundation – Crowd sourced open data projects: MusicBrainz, BookBrainz, ListenBrainz, AcousticBrainz, CritiqueBrainz and Cover Art Archive.

Open Roberta – Online IDE introducing kids to the world of coding by teaching them how to program robots with NEPO®.

OpenMRS – Write Code, Save Lives — Open source medical records platform improving health-care in resource-constrained environments.

OpenWISP – Network management system aimed at low cost networks: from public wifi, to university wifi, mesh networks and IoT.

OSGeo – An umbrella organization for the Open Source Geospatial community.

Public Lab – Open hardware and software to help communities measure and analyze pollution.

R Project for Statistical Computing – R is a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics.

SCoRe Lab – Research lab that seeks sustainable solutions for various problems in developing countries.

Sugar Labs – Learning platform and activities for elementary education.

Systers, an AnitaB.org community – Helping women find their potential in code. You are not alone.

TensorFlow – An open-source machine learning framework for everyone.

The Julia Programming Language – A fresh approach to Technical Computing.

The Mifos Initiative – FinTech non-profit leveraging the cloud, mobile, and open source community to deliver digital financial services to the world’s 3 billion poor and underbanked.

The ns-3 Network Simulator Project – A discrete event network simulator for Internet systems, research, and education.

The Terasology Foundation – An open source voxel world - imagine the possibilities! Makers of video games and a small slew of libraries & frameworks for game development.

Wikimedia – The non-profit foundation dedicated to bringing free content to the world, operating Wikipedia and maintaining the MediaWiki software.

These 29 organizations are working diligently to create thousands of tasks for students to work on, including code, documentation, design, quality assurance, outreach, research and training tasks. The contest starts for students on December 2nd.

You can learn more about GCI on the contest site where you’ll find Frequently Asked Questions, Important Dates and other helpful information, including the Getting Started Guide.

Want to chat with other students, mentors, and organization administrations about the contest? Check out our discussion mailing list. We can’t wait to get started!

By Radha Jhatakia, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code: Being Happy While Working is Possible

GSoC Experience Series

I am proud to have been part of GSoC 2019, which was without a doubt, a motivating experience that gives strength to continue improving and working in open source. I participated with the project: New rules for the Topology Framework in gvSIG Desktop, and received mentoring by the OSGeo organization and gvSIG association. Being a part of this project has been one of the best experiences I have had—from a professional point of view and because the freedom the mentors gave me to work and the interaction with the community, allowed me to enjoy the environment while learning simultaneously. Achieving the objectives was a challenge but thanks to the motivation and support it was possible.

With the project it was possible to implement a new set of topology rules for the validation and correction of vector data sets, which improve and extend the characteristics of previously existing tools in gvSIG. These tools allow browsing, searching and correcting validation errors. With the rules implementation are automated tasks, allowing to reduce errors and eliminating repetitive tasks. For more information, you can read the final report or the repository with all the documentation of the project documentation is available in English, Spanish and Italian.

What I love about this project is working on time optimization—perhaps the most precious and scarce resource—The user is allowed to focus on logic to be solved, leaving aside repetitive tasks and optimizing the use of time.

Defining rule implementation: “Must be Coincident with”


Rule “Must be Coincident with” working to find the topological errors.

Beyond the technical contribution, what gave me the most value is the spirit of the program that allows you to work professionally, and through a motivating context really allows you to enjoy the process and this enhances the results. It was essential that as the project progressed the mentors were transparent and allowed me to work with more freedom; their trust and the community interaction was of great importance.

It has been a great experience and I appreciate the opportunity to participate in a project with these characteristics, which also helps optimize the use of time. I encourage anyone who is interested in adding value in any area of open source to participate in GSoC, don’t hesitate due to your age.

By Mauro Carlevaro