Tag Archives: Diversity and Inclusion

Seeking aspiring designers looking to Change The Game

Though women are playing mobile games at record numbers and make up 45% of gamers, they are heavily underrepresented in the gaming industry and as protagonists in video games. At Google Play, we have a mission to make mobile gaming truly for everyone by enabling women to be celebrated and empowered as both players and creators.   

In 2017, we launched the Change The Game Design Challenge to inspire teens to turn their passion for gaming into careers. The Design Challenge has grown from just a five-winner program at its start, to now educating 100 students across the U.S. and Canada this year. Since our launch, we have been humbled by the creativity and drive of the teens who have participated in the program. Some have used their Design Challenge experience as a springboard to their gaming education in college. Others have taken the path of service, using their experience to mentor the next generation of young women in gaming. As the Design Challenge grows and reaches more applicants, what remains constant is the genuine interest and commitment our participants share for driving positive change for the industry. 

Starting today, we’ll be accepting submissions for our 2021 Change The Game Design Challenge. We’re calling on teens to become Game Changers by sharing an original game idea and a unique vision for the future of the gaming industry. With school being virtual for the past year, and with a lot of us spending more extra time at home than usual, we’re hoping applicants think of our challenge as a fun way to switch things up while learning something new.  

Much like last year, the 2021 Design Challenge will be virtual. Participants whose game ideas are chosen will be invited to an online game development workshop hosted by our partner, Girls Make Games. The workshop will consist of four sessions that will kick off in June and run through the end of the summer. At the end of the workshop, participants can expect to have made new friends and learned skills needed to create a playable game, no coding experience required. These Game Changers will also receive the materials from the workshop, a certificate of completion, custom swag and a brand-new Chromebook to help them continue to grow in their game development journey.

For a chance to participate in this workshop and join a group of innovators, applicants should fill out this entry form and share an original game idea. We’ll be reviewing entries on a rolling basis between now and July 31. The Change the Game Design Challenge is open to U.S. and Canadian residents only, subject to exceptions. For more details on submission guidelines and how to enter, please visit g.co/ctgdesignchallenge.  At Google Play, we are excited to invest in a new class of Game Changers.

Google women celebrate being the “first…”

Earlier this month, we celebrated women who achieved historical firsts. From the first woman astronaut to the first woman to climb Mount Everest, in the past year, the world searched for “the first woman” more than ever before. These trailblazers continue to inspire new generations, especially young women and girls striving to achieve their own firsts today. 

Our own workplace is filled with inspiring women who have achieved their own personal “firsts,” too. These accomplishments show how women everywhere are breaking down barriers, finding their passions and changing the world. As Women’s History Month comes to an end, we asked 10 amazing women who work at Google offices all over the world to tell us their stories.   

Breaking down barriers

Maria Medrano

Maria Medrano
Director, Diversity & Inclusion
San Francisco, California


“My mom had me when she was only 16 and school was not an option for her. Her biggest dream was for me to graduate high school, and it was important to me to do so. I was the first woman in my family to graduate high school, and I didn’t stop there.Eventually, I went on to graduate with a BS, MA and MBA from San Jose State University. Today, I have three degrees and three kids and I help  oversee Google’s diversity efforts.”

Nisha Nair

Nisha Nair
Industry Manager, Large Customer Sales
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

I was thefirst in my family to pursue education and career after getting married. In my family, all the women got married soon after they finished University. I had the support of my husband which really helped. I studied hard, managed to finish my Masters with a Distinction and a Dean's Award. And this set the stage for other women in my family to do the same."

Jayanthi Sampathkumar

Jayanthi Sampathkumar
Engineering Manager
Hyderabad, India

I’m thefirst woman to run a full marathon wearing a sari. It took place in  Airtel Hyderabad in 2017. I ran 26.2 miles in under five hours. I got into the Guinness  World Records book for that. I  also ran two 50Ks, or ultra marathons,  wearing a sari, the best one completing in under six hours. I continue to run all events in a sari in order to inspire the women in the local community to take up an active lifestyle and to feel confident wearing  saris on a regular basis.”

Neeta Tolani

Neeta Tolani
Internal Communications Manager
Southeast Asia, Singapore

I was thefirst woman to start working in my Hindu joint family (or extended family) of 48 members who still largely live together. My mother always encouraged me to think beyond the ‘usual’ courses that a girl is ‘supposed to take’ in school. I joined a computer course in school instead of picking a needlework class, for example. I went on to do a few more programming courses after college. Today, I’ve been at Google for 11 years!”

Karen Yamaguchi Ogawa

Karen Yamaguchi Ogawa 
Benefits Specialist
Sao Paulo, Brazil

"I am the first woman (with a disability) in my family to complete postgraduate studies, work in a multinational company, travel abroad alone and have financial independence."

Finding their passions

Angelica McKinley

Angelica McKinley
Art Director, Doodles 
San Francisco, California

I was thefirst news design internat a national newspaperand it changed the trajectory of my career. It exposed me to a variety of creative roles that brought together my love for art, history, film, fashion and current events. Today, my curiosity and passion for visual storytelling has led me to the Doodle team where I craft uplifting and inclusive stories about interesting subjects with diverse artists from all around the world.”

Catherine Hsiao

Catherine Hsiao
Product Manager, Stadia
Mountain View, California

I was the first female lead on all things VOD (Video on Demand) at my previous company. I was part of the team that built the first VOD upload business and all the features surrounding it, and I was the only product manager. Today, I’m a lead product manager for Stadia, which I’ve worked on since before its launch.

Changing the world

Bushra Amiwala

Bushra Amiwala
Sales Associate, Large Customer Sales
Chicago, Illinois

I was the first Muslim woman to be elected to my office at age 21 — and I still hold the title of youngest Muslim elected official in the United States.I first ran for office at the age of 19, and lost. With the support of the person I ran against, I was encouraged to try again and was elected in April 2019. This taught me how to nurture and cultivate relationships, which I carry with me in my role at Google as a Large Customer Sales Associate.”

Naomi Ventour

Naomi Ventour
Administrative Business Partner
London, United Kingdom

I was the first to help introduce a Black History curriculum into my children’s school. I am also the first woman of color called to join the Amniotic Fluid Embolism (AFE) board. AFE is a rare but life threatening birth complication that took my sister’s life nearly seven years ago, shortly after the birth of her second child. I recently took part in the documentary ‘The Black Maternity Scandal: Dispatches’ to highlight both AFE and the shocking statistic that Black women are four times more likely to die in childbirth than their white counterparts."

Ana Ramalho

Ana Ramalho
Copyright Counsel
Amsterdam, The Netherlands

I was thefirst woman to create a pro bono legal servicefor independent artists in the Netherlands.Today, I try to practice helpfulness by engaging as much as possible in Diversity, Equity and Inclusion issues at Google.”

Learn more about our “First Woman” campaign and apply for roles at Google by visiting https://careers.google.com

Women who code: “I just want to see us win”

Naia Johnson knows what it’s like to feel outnumbered. 

“I have a computer science program at my school but I’m one of five girls in my class and of all the Black girls, I’m maybe one of two.” Naia explains. “It’s never deterred me, though — if anything, it has made me want to do better.” 

Naia is a high school senior at Oakland Technical High School as well as a student at Google’s Code Next Lab in Oakland, a free computer science education program aimed at preparing and uplifting the next generation of Black and Latinx tech leaders. Naia is the first Code Next student to facilitate a workshop — she’s currently leading a virtual “Creative Coding” club for other Code Next students. 

“I’ve always had an idea of running my own business,” Naia explains “Before Code Next, it wasn’t so tech-focused, but there was always this idea that I was going to do something, [that] I was going to be somebody and that I was going to make that happen.”

At Code Next, Naia works with Amber Morse, the lab’s Community Manager. “I try to stay as relevant and creative as possible to continue to keep [students] engaged,” Amber says. “There is so much light, vibrancy and possibility already being met in Oakland, so fostering community doesn’t take much.”

Both Amber and Naia are working within Code Next and the Oakland community to reshape what the tech industry looks like — and more precisely, who it works for. For Women’s History Month, we asked Naia and Amber to interview one another so we could get to know them, and their work, a little better. 

Amber and Naia standing next to each other, smiling and looking at the camera.

Naia and Amber

Amber: What got you interested in Computer Science, Naia? In other words, when did that spark... spark?

Naia: I think it’s always been sparked. Since a young age, I was a “maker” kid. One time I made a functioning radio out of snap circuits. It barely picked up anything unless I held it in a very specific place in the middle of my brother’s rooms and we had the windows wide open. It would pick up sports channels..in Spanish...but it worked. It's cool to think, ‘Wow I made this.’

Amber:I know you also had some involvement with Black Girls Code. That’s why we have this synergy, I think. Before Google, I worked for Black Girls Code and I’m sure at some point I was at one of your workshops. 

Naia: Yes! I loved it. By far my favorite class with Black Girls Code was when we worked with Raspberry Pi’s [small circuit board computers]. We connected them to little go-karts and made cars move around. That was also my favorite group of girls. I’m still in contact with a lot of them today. 

Amber:Aw, that’s so cool, I love to hear that! Yes to sisterhood!

Naia: I actually met [one of the girls] at Google one day. It’s really cool to think I met her through technology and to see she’s still interested in it—and that I’m still interested in it! I think Black Girls Code was that first introduction to a community of people that were not only interested in tech but looked like me and were interested in tech. 

Amber: What one’s lesson you carry with you from Code Next? 

Naia:As cliche as it sounds, there’s no such thing as a silly question or a silly answer; it's something that needs to be said and something to be heard. It sticks better when you’re wrong because your brain is like, “Well I don’t want to be wrong again first of all.” Sometimes, not knowing the answer is better than knowing what to do. It’s not just about knowing why answer B is right; it’s also understanding why A, C and D are wrong. You learn more when you’re not just trying to be right. I really focus on these ideas in the Creative Coding Club that I facilitate.

Amber: What are your dreams and aspirations in life? 

Naia: It goes back to the younger me living here somewhere. I want to be my own boss. That's my biggest dream. I also want to be a role model, because not only is it a tribute to my own success, but it will end up being a tribute to other black and brown girls interested in the tech field. I want to nurture and support more programs that cultivate an interest in CS from a young age.

Amber:You know, it’s already happening Naia. You’re a student ambassador for Code Next, and you are an example for so many students looking up to you. You may not know you’re in it, but you’re in it. 

Naia: What about you?

Amber: I just want to see us win. When I think about all of our leaders and all of our supporters along the way, and when I see you and what the future might look like, I’m always inspired. That’s my inspiration, my aspiration... to continue to support women like you in ways to [get into] leadership positions, so that we can then support one another.

How my startup uses AI to reimagine water utilities

History repeats itself, but it doesn’t have to. I was inspired to launch my startup, Varuna, when Austin Water released its first-ever boil water warning in 2018 — a moment eerily similar to the massive winter storm in Texas just a few weeks ago. Because the water utility companies didn’t have enough real-time data to measure water quality in individual neighborhoods, they took the blanket approach of asking all of the city’s 950,000 residents to boil any water ingested through drinking or cooking. After several days of substantially reducing water usage — and seeing more than 625,000 plastic bottles of water handed out across the city — I set out to find a solution. 


A systems engineer by trade and a problem-solver by nature, I repurposed our dishwasher’s sensor to create my first water-quality measurement device. Excited, I called up my Chicago-based friend and former employee Jamail Carter to talk about my idea. We agreed that water quality issues like the crisis in Flint are symptoms of a bigger problem: operational inefficiencies within water utilities. 


When technicians don’t have real-time visibility into what’s going on across the water distribution system, utilities companies either splurge on a single sensor bound to one location or rely on manual measurement, which can be costly and time-consuming. By simply getting access to the right information, each community water system in the U.S. could save thousands of dollars — and lives — annually for every sample collection point they have on-site. 


After months of prototyping and research, Jamail and I launched Varuna, named for the Vedic deity associated with water, truth and enlightenment. The platform provides cities and towns with Google AI-powered alerts, recommendations and predictions to reduce inefficiencies and violations in their water management operations. With a series of connected sensors in the distribution systems, Varuna reduces the number of times technicians need to collect water samples to lab test for quality issues. Google Maps Platform provides the “where” to the what and the why of water quality contamination issues, while Google Cloud gives users a way to access this information whenever they need it—all essential for adopting a proactive, preventive approach to water treatment.


Varuna is founded on the belief that when people know better, they do better. Research shows that water systems in communities of color have a disproportionate amount of EPA violations. By taking away excuses and providing key information, we can positively impact underserved communities. That’s why we first piloted programs in historically diverse locations across Louisiana, Texas, New Jersey and Alabama — and are tackling Chicago and New York City next. 


As a Black immigrant founder building a startup in Texas, I understand firsthand the frustration of being denied access to needed resources. Despite the inherent humanity of Varuna’s mission and our proven entrepreneurial track record, Jamail and I faced systemic obstacles as we attempted to raise capital and network in a predominately white industry. Less than 3% of U.S. venture capital funding went to Black-led companies in 2020, despite the fact that 10% of American companies are Black-owned, according to U.S. Census data.


Thankfully, doors are getting opened — forced open in some cases — that have been previously closed to teams like ours. Receiving a $100,000 cash award from theGoogle for Startups Black Founders Fund last October wasn’t just a financial investment; it was a vote of confidence. Only three months after being selected for the Black Founders Fund, we've raised an additional $1.6 million, added two team members and a design agency partner, all while redesigning and halving the cost of our hardware. When you fund Black founders, you not only create equal access to economic opportunity, but also empower us to create real change with our tech, one glass of clean water at a time. 

Today, we #ShareTheMicInCyber

We know diverse security teams are more innovative, produce better products and enhance an organization's ability to defend against cyber threats. 

This is part of why Googler Camille Stewart cofounded #ShareTheMicInCyber, an initiative that pairs Black security practitioners with prominent allies who lend their social media platforms to the practitioners for a day. The goal is to break down barriers, engage the security community and promote sustained action to eradicate systemic racism.

Today, cybersecurity and privacy practitioners across Google and industry are elevating the voices and expertise of Black women who specialize in cybersecurity and privacy as part of #ShareTheMicInCyber’s Women’s History Month campaign. 

I’m honored to #ShareTheMicinCyber with a few of the Black women security and privacy practitioners I work alongside everyday at Google.

Camille Stewart

Camille Stewart, Head of Security Policy, Google Play + Android

“I work in this space to empower people in and through technology by translating and solving the complex challenges that lie at the intersection of technology, security, society and the law. 

Security is core to everything we do here. As creators of technology, we work to be intentional about how we build and educate users on safety and security. To do this effectively, we must be more intentional about diversity. More often than not, I am the only woman and only person of color in meetings where decisions are being made. To make truly inclusive technology and combat abuse, we need a diverse workforce.

I believe technical and policy mitigations to cybersecurity challenges will never reach their full potential until systemic racism is addressed and diverse voices are reflected among our ranks at all levels. That’s why I co-founded #ShareTheMicInCyber. ”

Brooke Pearson

Brooke Pearson, Program Manager for Chrome Privacy Sandbox 

“I work in security and privacy to protect people and their personal information. It’s that simple.

At Google, we’re tackling some of the world's biggest security and privacy problems, and everyday my work impacts billions of people around the world. Most days, that's pretty daunting, but it's also humbling and inspiring.

If we want to encourage people to engage in more secure behavior, we have to make it easy to understand, easy to act on and inclusive. 

I’m proud to work for a company that promotes active allyship and has stepped forward in such a prominent way to support Black women security and privacy professionals through the #ShareTheMicInCyber campaign.”

Michee Smith

Michee Smith, Product Manager, Privacy, Safety & Security

“Protecting user data is core to our mission. We build privacy into everything we do, which is why I am so passionate about my job. I work on products that make it easier for users to understand and control what happens with their data. My interest in this work was sparked when I learned how nuanced and technical these topics are, and how much they impact people.

For me, relationships and representation in tech really matter. Oftentimes, people of color don’t see people who look like us in these roles and on stages. There’s a sense of gratitude, belonging and relief to see someone who looks like you. I want to show up to help others imagine themselves in similar roles — that’s why I’m a huge fan of #ShareTheMicInCyber. This initiative is lifting people and communities up and creating an echo chamber that can be heard beyond cyber to the technology industry as a whole.”

Esther Ndegwa

Esther Ndegwa, Program Manager Security,  Privacy, Safety & Security

“My passion for security lies in the challenges the industry faces — especially with regard to the evolving expectations and requirements we face to protect data wherever it is. 

The right place to start is to ensure we define our principles through policy.

To get security right requires diverse thinking, drawn from different backgrounds and perspectives. I often encourage minority professionals in technology, who are starting off their career, to explore opportunities in security. 

For me, nothing resonates more than hearing someone tell their story and #ShareTheMicInCyber has created a much needed platform for amplifying those stories. While there is still work to be done to make the security industry more diverse, I believe that having conversations like these makes a big difference.”


I encourage you to follow, share, and retweet #ShareTheMicInCyber on Twitter and LinkedIn, today, March 19. By strengthening our commitment to racial equity and inclusion we can build safer and more secure products for everyone.

If you are interested in participating or learning more about #ShareTheMicInCyber, you can visit the site

Why I’m speaking out against anti-Asian hate

Editor’s note: This week, we were deeply saddened by the shootings in Atlanta that left eight people dead, including six women of Asian descent. Google is a proud supporter of the Asian American and Pacific Islander community, and we stand with them in the fight against hatred. In this post, Eva Tsai, Director, Marketing Analytics and Operations, shares her personal experiences and reflections on racism and discrimination as an Asian American.


When a stranger asks you where you’re from, the question is often not as simple as it seems. As an Asian American, when someone asks me that question, I run through a quick mental calculation to figure out what they really mean. 


Some people just use it as an innocuous way to start a conversation. Others, however, have an underlying assumption: To them, someone like me can never truly be an American. They’re really asking, “Which foreign country are you really from?” 


Years ago, in the Houston airport, a white man in a suit decided to single me out. I was the only Asian person in sight. “Where are you from?” he shouted across the packed airport train car. I had just finished a grueling week of business travel and meetings, and I just wanted to be left alone. Despite my silence, the man continued asking the question, with increasing exasperation. Soon, he started to cycle through different Asian languages, intertwined with increasingly loud and slow English, assuming I was a foreigner. “Are you Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Vietnamese … what are you?” he asked. 


The tension in the air was palpable, until someone else spoke up. “How about American?” a white woman with purple hair yelled. “She is American, period!” Her answer stunned the man into silence. A stranger’s curiosity to know the origin of my Asianness does not trump my privacy. And everyone should be able to feel like they belong, instead of feeling “othered” by questions like that. 

Outrunning and dismissing injustice is no longer an option.

Microaggressions like this contradict the long-held idea of the American dream: If you work hard enough, you will overcome any obstacles. For a while, I tried to outrun those microaggressions. (I once laughed off the “where are you from?” question by joking I was from Bulgaria, even though I don’t speak a word of Bulgarian.) I focused on achieving my version of the American dream and buried those incidents deep, wishfully thinking they would eventually fade away without a trace. 


But they didn’t. 


Two years ago, in an attempt to push myself outside of my comfort zone, I attended a meditation retreat, alone among hundreds of strangers. During group discussions, the topic of racial justice came up — and I was unsure how to respond. What am I as an Asian American? In the reductive narrative of the haves and the have nots, Asian Americans are not the oppressors. But are we the oppressed? Talking about the microaggressions I have experienced seemed self-indulgent; they don’t compare to the blatant injustices Black people have endured. 


I continued to harbor my conflicted feelings until later that year, at a Google Asian Women Leadership Summit, when another attendee articulated the struggles I had been going through. “A cut is a cut. Each trauma is unique,” she said. “For Asian Americans, it’s death by a thousand cuts.” That explanation confirmed the baggage I have carried, despite my attempts to minimize it. Surrounded by people with similar lived experiences and mental baggage, I felt liberated. 


Unfortunately, for Asian Americans, “death by a thousand cuts” has recently escalated to “death by assaults,” with the sudden spike in racist and xenophobic violence across the United States. The injustice has always been there, but increasingly, it is shifting from covert actions like “where are you really from?” to overt violence. As I see the rise in horrific attacks, I realize it’s time I confront the feelings I’ve repressed. 


I never thanked the woman who called out the aggressor who questioned my right of belonging in the Houston airport. Her act of kindness, however, has inspired me to pay it forward. Outrunning and dismissing injustice is no longer an option.


Photo: Getty Images

Join the Women of AdSense summit

Google AdSense is proud to partner with so many inspiring and successful businesses in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. We believe that the uniqueness of the people running these businesses is integral to what we do, and we love to see this diversity shining through the content you produce. 

We’d like to show our support by inviting you to the Women of AdSense summit, which fosters leadership, inclusion and connection in the AdSense community. March is Women's History Month, a time to highlight the contributions of women throughout history and in contemporary society. We’d love to celebrate with you at the summit, which will take place on Wednesday, March 31 and is free to registered participants.

During the event you will: 

  • Discover opportunities to grow your publishing business through monetization and content development.

  • Hear stories from your fellow women publishers.

  • Learn more about balance and resilience from our guest keynote speaker.

This virtual event is aimed at empowering Women of AdSense across Europe, the Middle East and Africa. However, we welcome anyone who's interested in attending as an ally and supporting women in the workplace and beyond.

Applications will be accepted until Sunday, March 21. Apply to participate in the event and get ready to be inspired!


Source: Inside AdSense


Supporting diversity in European newsrooms

As European newsrooms seek to attract new talent, the Google News Initiative is again partnering with the European Journalism Centre to launch the 2021 Journalism Fellowship, with a new focus on diversity, equity and inclusion.

Starting today, students and recent graduates from 14 European countries who want to explore the intersection between journalism and technology can apply for a placement with a stipend in one of the 30 newsrooms selected by the EJC. Work placements on offer include Der Spiegel in Germany, Agence France-Presse in Paris and The Guardian in London.

The aim of the program is to provide the Fellows — chosen by the participating newsrooms — with valuable work experience over the summer months. This year, we expect many of the placements to be offered remotely, and we hope a new application process will help newsrooms to broaden their search for talent. Prior to selecting applicants, hiring managers in each news organization will be given the opportunity to learn about unconscious bias.

The European Fellowship program has run since 2016, after the original program, based in the U.S., started in 2013. Fellows receive a stipend for the duration of their placement and have access to a skills training bootcamp, including a self-empowerment workshop.

This year, the Google News Initiative and the European Journalism Centre will pilot a new alumni network program to help new Fellows connect with those from past cohorts. This will include peer-to-peer mentorship allowing Fellows to support one another with opportunities, career development and professional advice. 

Finally, as part of its ongoing partnership with the EJC, the Google News Initiative will support two News Impact Summit events in 2021, one entirely devoted to diversity, equality and inclusion, while the other will focus on data journalism. These one-day online events will feature renowned international speakers and provide training opportunities for journalists across Europe. 

Applications for The GNI Fellowship close April 25, 2021. For full application requirements, visit the fellowship website.

Eight women kicking butt and taking (domain) names

Posted by Christina Yeh, Google Registry Team

Who do you think of when you hear the words sister, daughter, mother? How about when the words are leader, founder, CEO? As a mom of three, I want my kids to grow up in a world where the second set of words is as likely as the first to bring a woman to mind. Which is why we’re elevating the voices of women and making sure their stories are heard in today’s #MyDomain series. On this International Women’s Day, Google Registry is sharing eight new videos — all featuring female leaders who are taking care of business on their .app and .dev domains.

Alice Truswell

Alice Truswell is co-founder of Snoop.app, a money-saving app. “Fear being forgettable more than fearing not fitting in,” she says, “because the earlier you get comfortable with your voice, the earlier you can start refining results.”

Annie Hwang

Annie Hwang is co-founder of Jemi.app, a company that helps creators and public figures interact with their audiences and make money. “Don't let imposter syndrome ever stop you,” she advises.“We've grown up in a society where we are constantly told that we should be a follower. Don't be a follower anymore; be a leader!”

Elena Czubiak

Elena Czubiak is the developer and designer behind saturdaydesign.dev and co-founder of imaginarie.app. She quit her day job in 2018 to start her own business and hasn’t looked back since. Elena says, "Remember that although it might feel like starting over, you'll quickly see that your unique experiences will help you solve problems and make connections that nobody else could."

Ifrah Khan

Ifrah Khan is co-founder of Clubba.app, a platform that provides virtual creative extracurricular clubs (led by college students) for kids ages 6 to 12. Ifrah encourages entrepreneurial women to find and connect with other women who are also working on their own ventures. “Really talk to them and get to know their journey,” she says. “If they fundraised, how did they fundraise? Fundraising is so hard when you start your own business in general, but as a woman it’s even harder.”

Rita Kozlov

Rita Kozlov is a product manager who leads the Cloudflare Workers product, which uses the workers.dev domain. Rita’s advice for women who want to become a product manager is, “Don’t be afraid to ask lots of questions. In product management that’s definitely 100% a strength and never a weakness.”

Romina Arrigoni Samsó

Romina Arrigoni Samsó is founder and CEO of ADDSKIN.app, a social marketplace for skincare, where community recommendations help customers choose the best products. Romina says, “La gracia de la tecnología es que como dice el dicho, el avión se construye en el aire. Lo importante es lanzarse,” which translates to, “The grace of technology is that, as the saying goes, the plane is built in the air. The important thing is to launch.”

Soraya Jaber

Soraya Jaber is co-founder and CEO of Minsar.app, a no-code AR-VR creative and publishing platform. “We don't care about your age, your gender, your race, or sexual orientation — there is no space where you are not allowed,” Soraya says.“Don't hinder yourself, jump into entrepreneurship. I can assure you that's a hell of a great adventure!”

Stefania Olafsdóttir

Stefania Olafsdóttir is the co-founder and CEO of Avo.app, a next-generation analytics governance company. Her advice? “It’s way more important to be brave than to be perfect.”

To see a special video featuring all these amazing women, check out goo.gle/mydomain. If you have a unique story to share about a .app, .dev, or .page domain and would like to be considered for our series, please fill out this short application form. Here’s to helping tell the stories of women everywhere so that we may inspire generations to come.

Eight women kicking butt and taking (domain) names

Who do you think of when you hear the words sister, daughter, mother? How about when the words are leader, founder, CEO? As a mom of three, I want my kids to grow up in a world where the second set of words is as likely as the first to bring a woman to mind. Which is why we’re elevating the voices of women and making sure their stories are heard in today’s #MyDomain series. On this International Women’s Day, Google Registry is sharing eight new videos — all featuring female leaders who are taking care of business on their .app and .dev domains. 

Alice Truswell

Alice Truswell is co-founder of Snoop.app, a money-saving app. “Fear being forgettable more than fearing not fitting in,” she says, “because the earlier you get comfortable with your voice, the earlier you can start refining results.”

Annie Hwang

Annie Hwang is co-founder of Jemi.app, a company that helps creators and public figures interact with their audiences and make money. “Don't let imposter syndrome ever stop you,” she advises. “We've grown up in a society where we are constantly told that we should be a follower. Don't be a follower anymore; be a leader!”

Elena Czubiak

Elena Czubiak is the developer and designer behind saturdaydesign.dev and co-founder of imaginarie.app. She quit her day job in 2018 to start her own business and hasn’t looked back since. Elena says, "Remember that although it might feel like starting over, you'll quickly see that your unique experiences will help you solve problems and make connections that nobody else could."

Ifrah Khan

Ifrah Khan is co-founder of Clubba.app, a platform that provides virtual creative extracurricular clubs (led by college students) for kids ages 6 to 12.  Ifrah encourages entrepreneurial women to find and connect with other women who are also working on their own ventures. “Really talk to them and get to know their journey,” she says. “If they fundraised, how did they fundraise? Fundraising is so hard when you start your own business in general, but as a woman it’s even harder.”

Rita Kozlov

Rita Kozlov is a product manager who leads the Cloudflare Workers product, which uses the workers.dev domain. Rita’s advice for women who want to become a product manager is, “Don’t be afraid to ask lots of questions. In product management that’s definitely 100% a strength and never a weakness.”

Romina Arrigoni Samsó 

Romina Arrigoni Samsó is founder and CEO of ADDSKIN.app, a social marketplace for skincare, where community recommendations help customers choose the best products. Romina says, “La gracia de la tecnología es que como dice el dicho, el avión se construye en el aire. Lo importante es lanzarse,” which translates to, “The grace of technology is that, as the saying goes, the plane is built in the air. The important thing is to launch.”

Soraya Jaber

Soraya Jaber is co-founder and CEO of Minsar.app, a no-code AR-VR creative and publishing platform. “We don't care about your age, your gender, your race, or sexual orientation — there is no space where you are not allowed,” Soraya says.“Don't hinder yourself, jump into entrepreneurship. I can assure you that's a hell of a great adventure!”

Stefania Olafsdóttir

Stefania Olafsdóttir is the co-founder and CEO of Avo.app, a next-generation analytics governance company. Her advice? “It’s way more important to be brave than to be perfect.”

To see a special video featuring all these amazing women, check out goo.gle/mydomain. If you have a unique story to share about a .app, .dev, or .page domain and would like to be considered for our series, please fill out this short application form. Here’s to helping tell the stories of women everywhere so that we may inspire generations to come.