Tag Archives: Search

Get the scoop: The ice cream America is searching for

Nothing says summer like the jingle of an ice cream truck—and cooling off with a (quickly melting) tasty treat. But these days, Americans aren’t just settling for chocolate and vanilla.  To celebrate National Ice Cream Day on July 21, we’ve rounded up this year’s top trending ice cream-related searches across the U.S.—and found more people are looking to experience new flavors, types, forms and even temperatures. 

Global treats    

This year, searches for ice cream have moved away from your typical neighborhood ice cream truck and gone international. Searches for Mexican ice cream have gone up, thanks to people looking to have a taste of the raw milk, hand-churned, wooden-barrelled, sweet and spicy creation. Japan’s creations are also trending, with chewy and colorful mochi sparking interest, along with “fish ice cream,” or taiyaki, fish-shaped cakes that make tasty ice cream cones. And the Italian classic, gelato, has U.S. searchers craving its dense, silky texture. 

Gym worthy

“Keto ice cream” has reached the dessert menu, with people searching for options that cut out carbs. Similarly, Americans are searching for “protein ice cream,” which boosts protein levels by using milk protein concentrate or whey protein. Others who aren’t so diet conscious are searching for fried ice cream. After breading, the scoop is quickly deep-fried to create a crispy shell around it. It’s served warm from the outside, but with a cold, sweet heart.

Unconventionally frosty   

Chocolate, vanilla and strawberry are still ice cream royalty when it comes to searches. But they have some competition. Filipino Ube ice cream has warmed up to Americans with its intense purple color. And green ice cream, like matcha and avocado varieties, has also seen searches grow this year. Snow ice cream is also a big thing this year, and you won’t believe its main ingredient: actual snow!

In case you need a little push to decide what to order, here’s the full list of trending searches on this tasty topic:  

Top trending ice cream types in 2019 in the U.S: 

  1. Snow ice cream

  2. Keto ice cream

  3. Mexican ice cream

  4. Ice cream bars

  5. Fish ice cream

  6. Mochi ice cream

  7. Gelato

  8. Ice cream sundae

  9. Fried ice cream

  10. Protein ice cream

Top trending ice cream flavors in 2019 in the U.S.: 

  1. Strawberry ice cream

  2. Ube ice cream

  3. Chocolate ice cream

  4. Coffee ice cream

  5. Vanilla ice cream

  6. Oreo ice cream

  7. Mango ice cream

  8. Coconut ice cream

  9. Matcha ice cream

  10. Avocado ice cream

Source: Search


How we keep Search relevant and useful

When you come to Google Search, our goal is to connect you with useful information as quickly as possible. That information can take many forms, and over the years the search results page has evolved to include not only a list of blue links to pages across the web, but also useful features to help you find what you’re looking for even faster. Some examples include featured snippets, which highlight results that are likely to contain what you’re looking for; Knowledge Panels, which can help you find key facts about an individual or other topic in the world; and predictive features like Autocomplete that help you navigate Search more quickly.

Google Search Features

Left-right: Examples of a featured snippet, a Knowledge Panel and an Autocomplete prediction

Because these features are highlighted in a unique way on the page, or may show up when you haven’t explicitly asked for them, we have policies around what should and should not appear in those spaces. This means that in some cases, we may correct information or remove those features from a page.

This is quite different from how we approach our web and image search listings and how those results rank in Search, and we thought it would be helpful to explain why, using a few examples.

Featured Snippets
One helpful information format is featured snippets, which highlight web pages that our systems determine are especially likely to contain what you’re looking for. Because their unique formatting and positioning can be interpreted as a signal of quality or credibility, we’ve published standards for what can appear as a featured snippet.

We don’t allow the display of any snippets that violate our policies by being sexually explicit, hateful, violent, harmful or lacking expert consensus on public interest topics. 

Our automated systems are designed to avoid showing snippets that violate these policies. However, if our systems don’t work as intended and a violating snippet appears, we’ll remove it. In such cases, the page is not removed as a web search listing; it’s simply not highlighted as a featured snippet.


The Knowledge Graph
The Knowledge Graph in Google Search reflects our algorithmic understanding of facts about people, places and things in the world. The Knowledge Graph automatically maps the attributes and relationships of these real-world entities from information gathered from the web, structured databases, licensed data and other sources. This collection of facts allows us to respond to queries like "Bessie Coleman" with a Knowledge Panel with facts about the famous aviator.

Information from the Knowledge Graph is meant to be factual and is presented as such. However, while we aim to be as accurate as possible, our systems aren’t perfect, nor are all the sources of data available. So we collect user feedback and may manually verify and update information if we learn something is incorrect and our systems have not self-corrected. We have developed tools and processes to provide these corrections back to sources like Wikipedia, with the goal of improving the information ecosystem more broadly. 

Furthermore, we give people and organizations the ability to claim their Knowledge Panels and provide us with authoritative feedback on facts about themselves, and if we otherwise are made aware of incorrect information, we work to fix those errors. If an image or a Google Images results preview that’s shown in a Knowledge Panel does not accurately represent the person, place or thing, we’ll also fix the error. 

Predictive features
There are other features that are “predictive,” like Autocomplete and Related Searches, which are tools to help you navigate Search more quickly. As you type each character into the search bar, Autocomplete will match what you’re typing to common searches to help you save time. On the search results page, you may see a section of searches labeled “People also search for,” which is designed to help you navigate to related topics if you didn’t find what you were looking for, or to explore a different dimension of a topic.

Because you haven’t asked to see these searches, we’re careful about not showing predictions that might be shocking or offensive or could have a negative impact on groups or individuals. Read more about our policies.

You can still issue any search you’d like, but we won’t necessarily show all possible predictions for common searches. If no predictions appear or if you’re expecting to see a related search and it’s not there, it might be that our algorithms have detected that it contains potentially policy-violating content, the prediction has been reported and found to violate our policies, or the search may not be particularly popular.

While we do our best to prevent inappropriate predictions, we don’t always get it right. If you think a prediction violates one of our policies, you can report a prediction.

Across all of these features, we do not want to shock or offend anyone with content that they did not explicitly seek out, so we work to prevent things like violence or profanity from appearing in these special formats.

Organic search results
While we’ve talked mostly about helpful features that appear on the search results page, the results that probably come to mind most are our organic listings—the familiar “blue links” of web page results, thumbnails displayed in a grid in Google Images or videos from the web in video mode.

In these cases, the ranking of the results is determined algorithmically. We do not use human curation to collect or arrange the results on a page. Rather, we have automated systems that are able to quickly find content in our index--from the hundreds of billions of pages we have indexed by crawling the web--that are relevant to the words in your search.

To rank these, our systems take into account a number of factors to determine what pages are likely to be the most helpful for what you’re looking for. You can learn more about this on our How Search Works site.

While we intend to provide relevant results and prioritize the most reliable sources on a given topic, as with any automated system, our search algorithms aren’t perfect. You might see sites that aren’t particularly relevant to your search term rising to the top, or perhaps a page that does not contain trustworthy information rank above a more official website. 

When these problems arise, people often take notice and ask us whether we intend to “fix” the issue. Often what they might have in mind is that we’d manually re-order or remove a particular result from a page. As we’ve said many times in the past, we do not take the approach of manually intervening on a particular search result to address ranking challenges.

This is for a variety of reasons. We receive trillions of searches each year, so “fixing” one query doesn’t improve the issue for the many other variations of the same query or help improve search overall. 

So what do we do instead? We approach all changes to our Search systems in the same way: we learn from these examples to identify areas of improvement. We come up with solutions that we believe could help not just those queries, but a broad range of similar searches. We then rigorously test the change using insights from live experiments and data from human search rater evaluations. If we determine that the change provides overall positive benefits-- making a large number of search results more helpful, while preventing significant losses elsewhere-- we launch that change.

Our search algorithms are complex math equations that rely on hundreds of variables, and last year alone, we made more than 3,200 changes to our search systems. Some of these were visible launches of new features, while many others were regular updates meant to keep our results relevant as content on the web changes. And some are also improvements based on issues we identified, either via public reports or our own ongoing quality evaluations. Unlike with Search features where we are able to quickly correct issues that violate our policies, sometimes identifying the root cause of ranking issues can take time, and improvements may not happen immediately.. But as we have been for more than 20 years, we are always committed to identifying these challenges and working to make Search better.

Spam Protections
This is not to say that there aren’t policies and guidelines that apply to our organic listings. Content there has to meet our long-standing webmaster guidelines, which protect users against things like spam, malware and deceptive sites. Our spam protection systems automatically work to prevent our ranking systems from rewarding such content. 

In cases where our spam systems don’t work, we have long taken manual actions against pages or sites. We report these actions through the Manual Actions report in our Search Console tool, in hopes that site owners will curb such behavior. These actions are not linked to any particular search results or query. They’re taken against affected content generally.

Legal and Policy-based Removals
As our mission is to provide broad access to information, we remove pages from our results in limited circumstances, when required by law--such as child abuse imagery and copyright infringement claims--and in narrow cases where we have developed policies to protect people, such as content that has sensitive personal information

Some of these legal and policy actions do remove results for particular searches, such as someone’s name. However, none of these removals happen because Google has chosen to “fix” poor results. Rather, these are acts of legal compliance and applications of publicly documented policies to help keep people safe.

Overall, we’re constantly striving to make our search results and features on the results page as useful and reliable as possible, and we value your feedback to help us understand where we can do better.


Bringing the Power of Knowledge Graph to Custom Search

We're happy to announce that Custom Search Engine (CSE) owners can now use Knowledge Graph entities to configure their CSE.  The Knowledge Graph (KG) is used by Google Search to help users discover information more quickly and easily, and contains millions of entries that describe real-world entities like people, places, and things.

CSE owners can use KG Entities to

  • Define which pages the CSE searches
  • Create Refinements to narrow down search results within a CSE.

For more information about using Knowledge Graph Entities to define and refine your Custom Search Engine, visit our developer documentation.

Here are some examples of what you can do:


Searching the entire web for specific Entities

CSE's KG Entity support makes it easy to search the entire web for pages (or images) about specific topics.
We've configured this CSE to search the entire web for pages about Alphabet companies, using the CSE control panel as shown below:


Try out the CSE here: https://cse.google.com/cse?cx=000888210889775888983:b2bhygxt4le


Searching specific pages for Entities

Instead of searching the entire web, you can combine KG entities with CSE's existing site search functionality.
For example, we've configured this CSE to search Wikipedia for pages about the entity Pittsburgh:

Try out the CSE here: https://cse.google.com/cse?cx=000888210889775888983:x1jaj-jlc3e


Defining Refinements with Entities

CSE's refinements feature allows users to drill down into their search results. Now, CSE owners can use KG entities to define the refinements if their CSE.

For example, we defined this CSE to be about the Knowledge Graph Entity "basketball":



Then we add refinements for basketball subtopics, like the NBA, WNBA, College, Olympic basketball, and basketball gear.  For example, this refinement returns pages that are about both Basketball (from the top-level CSE definition) and Sports Equipment, Shoes, or Jerseys:


Try out the CSE here: https://cse.google.com/cse?cx=000888210889775888983:-nzsrilglze

A different sort of moonshot: looking back on Apollo 11

When astronauts set foot on the Moon 50 years ago, it was a technological triumph that sparked curiosity across the globe. Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins inspired us to learn more about space and life here on Earth. A similar spirit of curiosity and exploration has always been core to Google, with our mission to make the universe of knowledge accessible to people around the world. So on the anniversary of the Moon landing, we’re bringing you new ways to learn about this milestone of human achievement, including new perspectives and stories that celebrate the lesser-known figures who made it happen.


Starting today, in collaboration with the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, you can get up close to the command module that carried Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins to the Moon. To get started, search for “Apollo 11” from your AR-enabled mobile device. You’ll get the option to see the module in 3D, so you can zoom in and check it out from all angles. Using augmented reality, you can then bring the command module into your space—your bedroom, the kitchen or wherever you are—to get a better sense of its size. And later this month, you can do the same thing with Neil Armstrong’s spacesuit and examine what astronauts wore on the surface of the Moon.

Command module AR

You can also explore 20 new visual stories related to the lunar mission directly from Search. When you enter a space-related query—like “Apollo 11 mission”—on your mobile device, you’ll see visual stories from the Smithsonian about the mission, the spacecraft, and the people who made it possible. These full screen, tappable visual stories feature photos, videos and information about the space journey. 

Moon landing Stories GIF

One of the stories that I found personally inspiring was of Margaret Hamilton, known for helping coin the term “software engineering,” and creating the on-board software for Apollo 11. Among other tasks, this software made sure the Apollo 11 lunar module’s system could manage the information it was receiving and safely land on the lunar surface.

Google Arts & Culture has 40 new exhibits about Apollo 11, like Walter Cronkite’s reflections on humankind’s first steps, or a lesson on how to put on a space suit and pack snacks for the journey. There’s a lot to learn--the inside of your command module is a good place to take notes. And there’s more: starting July 15, Google Earth will have several new tours and quizzes to help you visually explore more about the Moon mission, NASA and the world of space exploration.


Space has always been near and dear to our hearts, whether it’s helping you explore the International Space Station through Street View, celebrate the first photo of a black hole, or simply satisfy your curiosity on Google Search. Try searching for “moon” (or “🌙”) on Google Photos to see your snapshots of our neighbor. Ask the Google Assistant questions to learn fun facts about the Moon, like what sports have been played on the surface. And be sure to visit Google.com on the 20th for another special Moon-related surprise. 

Apollo 11 continues to have a profound impact on our planet’s history. We hope this is just the beginning of your space explorations. 🚀

Source: Search


Hit the sauce: What barbecue lovers are searching for across the U.S.

Hot dog! It’s BBQ season. If the increasing number of dads in aprons and bucket hats doesn’t give it away, an uptick in Google searches for “sauce” certainly has. We just couldn’t keep this information bottled up, so let’s ketchup on the uniquely searched sauces that reveal each state’s taste for BBQ. Here’s what the U.S. is relishing this summer.

Keeping tradition alive

Barbecue is America’s summertime fuel—it’s what gives us the energy to swim all day and stay awake for fireworks at night. And when it comes down to it, basic BBQ is delicious on its own without the bells and whistles. More than 30 percent of states agreed by opting for traditional barbecue sauce recipes—and 13 of those states were willing to go the extra mile by preparing homemade concoctions, searching for “homemade bbq sauce” the most. As my mother would say, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Fixin’ to eat

Speaking of tradition, everyone knows that southerners take their barbecue seriously—and have a serious sense of pride. Nearly 25 percent of U.S. states searched for “white” barbecue sauce recipes, also known as Alabama white sauce. You know what they say, mayo for dayos. But six states (and DC) preferred what’s known as Carolina sauce, including the Carolinas (naturally), where they’re just searching for “vinegar sauce.”

Shaking it up

Some states are bored with standard barbecue sauces and are looking to mix things up. Take Colorado and Minnesota, who are hankering for korean-style sauce. Folks in Florida are craving tropical, guava flavor. Our New Jersey friends are in the market for more meat (how much bacon is too much bacon?). And in Illinois, some families are looking to spike, oops, I mean spice up their barbecue by adding bourbon. But the award for the most original barbecue sauce flavor goes to Hawaii, where … get this … they’ve been searching for “Hawaiian” bbq sauce.

Slim pickings

While many are looking for a new flavor this year, a good chunk of the U.S. will be passing on the potato salad and opting for healthy options around the grill with searches for diet-friendly recipes. Here are the highlights: Iowa and Texas are looking for sugar-free alternatives, while folks in Arizona, Michigan, Missouri, Oregon, Washington and Virginia are on the Hunt(’s) for keto-friendly sauces. New Hampshire and Nebraska are cutting back by finding “low carb” options, while Massachusetts is taking it one step further by searching for “calorie free.” Uh, good luck there, MA.

BBQ sauce_US Map.jpg

So for anyone who's standing over the grill this week, wondering what to slather on: there is no right answer, just freedom to choose from a vast array of options.

Hit the sauce: What barbecue lovers are searching for across the U.S.

Hot dog! It’s BBQ season. If the increasing number of dads in aprons and bucket hats doesn’t give it away, an uptick in Google searches for “sauce” certainly has. We just couldn’t keep this information bottled up, so let’s ketchup on the uniquely searched sauces that reveal each state’s taste for BBQ. Here’s what the U.S. is relishing this summer.

Keeping tradition alive

Barbecue is America’s summertime fuel—it’s what gives us the energy to swim all day and stay awake for fireworks at night. And when it comes down to it, basic BBQ is delicious on its own without the bells and whistles. More than 30 percent of states agreed by opting for traditional barbecue sauce recipes—and 13 of those states were willing to go the extra mile by preparing homemade concoctions, searching for “homemade bbq sauce” the most. As my mother would say, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Fixin’ to eat

Speaking of tradition, everyone knows that southerners take their barbecue seriously—and have a serious sense of pride. Nearly 25 percent of U.S. states searched for “white” barbecue sauce recipes, also known as Alabama white sauce. You know what they say, mayo for dayos. But six states (and DC) preferred what’s known as Carolina sauce, including the Carolinas (naturally), where they’re just searching for “vinegar sauce.”

Shaking it up

Some states are bored with standard barbecue sauces and are looking to mix things up. Take Colorado and Minnesota, who are hankering for korean-style sauce. Folks in Florida are craving tropical, guava flavor. Our New Jersey friends are in the market for more meat (how much bacon is too much bacon?). And in Illinois, some families are looking to spike, oops, I mean spice up their barbecue by adding bourbon. But the award for the most original barbecue sauce flavor goes to Hawaii, where … get this … they’ve been searching for “Hawaiian” bbq sauce.

Slim pickings

While many are looking for a new flavor this year, a good chunk of the U.S. will be passing on the potato salad and opting for healthy options around the grill with searches for diet-friendly recipes. Here are the highlights: Iowa and Texas are looking for sugar-free alternatives, while folks in Arizona, Michigan, Missouri, Oregon, Washington and Virginia are on the Hunt(’s) for keto-friendly sauces. New Hampshire and Nebraska are cutting back by finding “low carb” options, while Massachusetts is taking it one step further by searching for “calorie free.” Uh, good luck there, MA.

BBQ sauce_US Map.jpg

So for anyone who's standing over the grill this week, wondering what to slather on: there is no right answer, just freedom to choose from a vast array of options.

GIF-ing you a way to say LOL, haha or jajaja from Google Images

GIFs have become an essential part of communicating with friends and family. Whether we’re texting, emailing, or posting online, we’re always on the hunt for that perfect GIF. In fact, over the past five years, GIF search interest on Google Images has nearly tripled, as people search for the GIF that speaks most to them.


To make it easier to say “surprised,” “good morning” or “buenas noches” with the perfect GIF, Google Images now has a “Share GIFs” section that lets you share GIFs directly into different apps, including Gmail, Hangouts, Android Messages and Whatsapp.

Share-GIF-hangout.gif

This section is powered by our GIF search engine, something we've been investing in since our acquisition of Tenor last year. Shareable GIFs are made available by content creators, including our partners from streaming services, movie studios, and the YouTube community. Any content provider, GIF creator or GIF platform can submit GIFs to the new section on Google Images by either uploading GIFs to Tenor.com, or connecting with Google’s partnership team via this form.

GIFs appear in this section based on how likely they are to be shared, so that you can find a GIF that captures exactly what you want to say. This feature will be available starting today on the Google app for iOS and Android, as well as Chrome on Android. Over time, we'll bring directly shareable GIFs to more surfaces and mobile browsers, so it’s as easy as possible to share your personality with a cartoon, animal, or something else entirely.

Panda!

Source: Search


Introducing Callbacks for even more rendering control

For our power users that are interested in customizing the rendering of search results beyond what is possible through our standard controls in the Custom Search Engine control panel, we are introducing a new set of Callback functions that will unlock new capabilities to customize your search result rendering even further.

Callbacks provide an opportunity to customize the experience during the rendering flow of the search results in powerful new ways. We are introducing callbacks for when the search begins, when the results are ready, and when the results are rendered. If you would like to augment your results with additional information or increased interactivity, callbacks provide an easy way to build on top of the already existing customizations you have for Custom Search Engine.

Please note that this feature only applies to the Custom Search Element API of the Custom Search Engine. These Callbacks are not applicable to the JSON API of the Custom Search Engine. Also, these callbacks only modify the organic search results; they do not modify any of the advertising or the rendering of the advertising returned from the Custom Search Element API.

Learn how to use these new functions in the Search Callbacks section of the Custom Search Element API for more details.

We are excited to see what new customizations our vibrant and creative publisher ecosystem will bring to Customized Search Engines with these new callbacks.

We would like to hear your feedback and comments on this new functionality. We invite you to share your thoughts in our user forum.

The Google Custom Search Engine Team

How we help you find lyrics in Google Search

When you’re searching for a song’s lyrics, often you’ll see an information box in Search that shows the lyrics on the page. This feature has been under scrutiny this week, so we wanted to explain how it works and where the lyrics come from.

How lyrics appear in Search

Lyrics can appear in information boxes and on Knowledge Panels in Search when you’re looking for songs or lyrics. While we do this to help you find that information quickly, we also ensure that the songwriters are paid for their creative work. To do that, we pay music publishers for the right to display lyrics, since they manage the rights to these lyrics on behalf of the songwriters.

Where the lyrics text comes from

Here’s something you might not know: music publishers often don’t have digital copies of the lyrics text. In these cases, we—like music streaming services and other companies—license the lyrics text from third parties.


We do not crawl or scrape websites to source these lyrics. The lyrics that you see in information boxes on Search come directly from lyrics content providers, and they are updated automatically as we receive new lyrics and corrections on a regular basis.


News reports this week suggested that one of our lyrics content providers is in a dispute with a lyrics site about where their written lyrics come from. We’ve asked our lyrics partner to investigate the issue to ensure that they’re following industry best practices in their approach. We always strive to uphold high standards of conduct for ourselves and from the partners we work with.


To help make it clearer where the lyrics come from, we’ll soon include attribution to the third party providing the digital lyrics text. We will continue to take an approach that respects and compensates rights-holders, and ensures that music publishers and songwriters are paid for their work.


Source: Search


Kick off the Women’s World Cup with Google

Kick off the FIFA Women's World Cup with Google

Futebol, Fußball, football, soccer ... No matter where you’re from, it’s one of the most popular sports all over the world. Tomorrow, the FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019™ will kick off, and here’s how Google can help you keep up with the tournament and your favorite teams.

Be in the know with Search and the Assistant

If you’re busy during a match, Search can help you find the information you need including stats, news, and lineups. If you search for any match, you’ll see a timeline with photos, commentary and every important play as it happens. You can also subscribe to receive notifications and updates about your favorite team by looking it up on the Google Search app and tapping “Follow.”

You’ll also be able to track up to three real-time game scores right on your Android phone screen. Search for the match you’re looking for, then tap and drag to pin the match anywhere on your screen. Once the matches are over, click the pinned score to go back the game summary on Google Search and you will find a video with highlights and exciting plays immediately after every game.


As always, the Google Assistant is here to help with questions like, “Hey Google, when does France play next in the Women's World Cup?” or ”Ok Google, show me the Women's World Cup standings.” And if your country is competing, you’ll see custom Google Doodles by local artists from the participating countries. All Google Doodles will all be available as they are unveiled at google.com/doodles.

France_WWC-ANIMATION.gif

Women’s World Cup Doodles from around the world.

See more on YouTube

FIFA, alongside a number of their FIFA World Cup broadcast partners, will upload comprehensive highlights to every game on their YouTube channels, as well as top FIFA World Cup moments and behind-the-scenes content. Broadcasters include the BBC in the UK, ARD and ZDF in Germany, J SPORTS in Japan, Fox Sports and Telemundo in the U.S. and beIN in the Middle East, North Africa and selected Asian territories.

Don’t miss a moment with Google News

Keep your eye on the ball as the action happens with a dedicated FIFA Women’s World Cup Google News interactive tracker for Android. Quickly find scores, upcoming matches and watch game highlights. From the group stage to the final showdown, explore the tournament through full coverage and analysis of your favorite teams and players.

Contribute to the history of women in soccer

It was not long ago when women were actually prohibited from playing in countries such as Brazil, England, France and Germany. To rediscover the history of women in soccer, Google Arts & Culture is working with the Football Museum in Brazil to create a living digital archive of the years when women were banned. Everyone is invited to contribute with photos, articles from local newspapers, audio and video files about women's soccer from their personal collections. Together we can fill the historical gaps and tell the history of women in soccer.

Grab your jersey and claim your spot on the couch—the games start tomorrow!