Tag Archives: Search

What’s for dinner? Order it with Google

French fries, lettuce wraps, massaman curry, chicken wings, cupcakes—I could go on. When I was pregnant with my son last year, my cravings were completely overpowering. Lucky for me, I didn’t have to jump into the car and go to my favorite restaurants to get my fill—food delivery services saved my bacon on more occasions than I’d be comfortable admitting to the world.

Ever since then, I’ve counted myself as one of the millions of people who regularly order food for home delivery. Starting today, we’re making it even easier to get food delivered to your doorstep.

Find food and order faster
Now you can use Google Search, Maps or the Assistant to order food from services like DoorDash, Postmates, Delivery.com, Slice, and ChowNow, with Zuppler and others coming soon. Look out for the “Order Online” button in Search and Maps when you search for a restaurant or type of cuisine. For participating restaurants, you can make your selections with just a few taps, view delivery or pickup times, and check out with Google Pay.  

Let the Google Assistant handle dinner
To use the Assistant on your phone to get your food fix, simply say, “Hey Google, order food from [restaurant].” You can also quickly reorder your go-to meal with some of our delivery partners by saying, “Hey Google, reorder food from [restaurant].” The Assistant pulls up your past orders, and in just a few seconds, you can select your usual dish.

Now's the perfect time to let Google help with your cravings. So, what are we ordering tonight?

A new look for Google Search

Our goal with Search always has been to help people quickly and easily find the information that they’re looking for. Over the years, the amount and format of information available on the web has changed drastically—from the proliferation of images and video, to the availability of 3D objects you can now view in AR.


The search results page, too, has changed to help you discover these new types of information and quickly determine what’s most useful for you. As we continue our ongoing efforts to improve Search and provide a modern and helpful experience, today we’re unveiling a visual refresh of the mobile search results page to better guide you through the information available on the web.


Google Search Redesign_2

With this new design, a website’s branding can be front and center, helping you better understand where the information is coming from and what pages have what you’re looking for.  


The name of the website and its icon appear at the top of the results card to help anchor each result, so you can more easily scan the page of results and decide what to explore next. Site owners can learn more about how to choose their prefered icon for organic listings here.


When you search for a product or service and we have a useful ad to show, you'll see a bolded ad label at the top of the card alongside the web address so you can quickly identify where the information is coming from.


As we continue to make new content formats and useful actions available—from buying movie tickets to playing podcasts—this new design allows us to add more action buttons and helpful previews to search results cards, all while giving you a better sense of the web page’s content with clear attribution back to the source.


This redesign is coming first to mobile and will be rolling out over the next few days. Stay tuned for even more fresh ways that Search can help you find what you’re looking for.

Helpful new visual features in Search and Lens

Sometimes, the easiest way to wrap your head around new information is to see it. Today at I/O, we announced features in Google Search and Google Lens that use the camera, computer vision and augmented reality (AR) to overlay information and content onto your physical surroundings -- to help you get things done throughout your day.

AR in Google Search

With new AR features in Search rolling out later this month, you can view and interact with 3D objects right from Search and place them directly into your own space, giving you a sense of scale and detail. For example, it’s one thing to read that a great white shark can be 18 feet long. It’s another to see it up close in relation to the things around you. So when you search for select animals, you’ll get an option right in the Knowledge Panel to view them in 3D and AR.

ar-search-shark.gif

Bring the great white shark from Search to your own surroundings.

We’re also working with partners like NASA, New Balance, Samsung, Target, Visible Body, Volvo, Wayfair and more to surface their own content in Search. So whether you’re studying human anatomy in school or shopping for a pair of sneakers, you’ll be able to interact with 3D models and put them into the real world, right from Search.

ar-search-visible-body.gif

Search for “muscle flexion” and see an animated model from Visible Body.

New features in Google Lens

People have already asked Google Lens more than a billion questions about things they see. Lens taps into machine learning (ML), computer vision and tens of billions of facts in the Knowledge Graph to answer these questions. Now, we’re evolving Lens to provide more visual answers to visual questions.

Say you’re at a restaurant, figuring out what to order. Lens can automatically highlight which dishes are popular--right on the physical menu. When you tap on a dish, you can see what it actually looks like and what people are saying about it, thanks to photos and reviews from Google Maps.

Consumer_Menu.gif

Google Lens helps you decide what to order

To pull this off, Lens first has to identify all the dishes on the menu, looking for things like the font, style, size and color to differentiate dishes from descriptions. Next, it matches the dish names with the relevant photos and reviews for that restaurant in Google Maps.

Consumer_TrainTicket.gif

Google Lens translates the text and puts it right on top of the original words

Lens can be particularly helpful when you’re in an unfamiliar place and you don’t know the language. Now, you can point your camera at text and Lens will automatically detect the language and overlay the translation right on top of the original words, in more than 100 languages.

We're also working on other ways to connect helpful digital information to things in the physical world. For example, at the de Young Museum in San Francisco, you can use Lens to see hidden stories about the paintings, directly from the museum’s curators beginning next month. Or if you see a dish you’d like to cook in an upcoming issue of Bon Appetit magazine, you’ll be able to point your camera at a recipe and have the page come to life and show you exactly how to make it.

Consumer_BonAppetit.gif

See a recipe in Bon Appetit come to life with Google Lens

Bringing Lens to Google Go

More than 800 million adults worldwide struggle to read things like bus schedules or bank forms. So we asked ourselves: “What if we used the camera to help people who struggle with reading?”

When you point your camera at text, Lens can now read it out loud to you. It highlights the words as they are spoken, so you can follow along and understand the full context of what you see. You can also tap on a specific word to search for it and learn its definition. This feature is launching first in Google Go, our Search app for first-time smartphone users. Lens in Google Go is just over 100KB and works on phones that cost less than $50.

Consumer_LensGo.gif

All these features in Google Search and Google Lens provide visual information to help you explore the world and get things done throughout your day by putting information and answers where they are most helpful—right on the world in front of you.

Source: Search


Introducing auto-delete controls for your Location History and activity data

Whether you’re looking for the latest news or the quickest driving route, we aim to make our products helpful for everyone. And when you turn on settings like Location History or Web & App Activity, the data can make Google products more useful for you—like recommending a restaurant that you might enjoy, or helping you pick up where you left off on a previous search. We work to keep your data private and secure, and we’ve heard your feedback that we need to provide simpler ways for you to manage or delete it.


You can already use your Google Account to access simple on/off controls for Location History and Web & App Activity, and if you choose—to delete all or part of that data manually. In addition to these options, we’re announcing auto-delete controls that make it even easier to manage your data. Here’s how they’ll work:

Gif showing how to choose how long to keep your web and app activity. gif

Choose a time limit for how long you want your activity data to be saved—3 or 18 months—and any data older than that will be automatically deleted from your account on an ongoing basis. These controls are coming first to Location History and Web & App Activity and will roll out in the coming weeks.


You should always be able to manage your data in a way that works best for you--and we’re committed to giving you the best controls to make that happen.

A new way to find work-from-home (or wherever) opportunities

Whether you’re a parent needing more flexibility or someone looking for the freedom to work wherever you’d like, a work from home job might meet your lifestyle needs. Many people already use Search to find work-from-home roles, and today we’re announcing an improved experience within job search in the U.S. to connect people with quality remote jobs.

Work-from-home Google job search

Now, you can search for jobs that match your skill set, like “customer support jobs” and filter your location to “work from home” to see a list of relevant job listings that meet your criteria. Whether the jobs are listed as “remote,” “work from home” or “telecommute” opportunities, this filter does the work for you, and helps you explore the opportunities available. Unsure what kind of job you want? Try searching “work from home jobs” to explore open roles across industries.


For employers looking to help potential remote workers better discover these opportunities, we’re using new Schema.org markup for job locations and applicant location requirements to indicate work-from-home roles and any related geographic restrictions. Regardless of the specific words employers use to describe remote jobs, those marked up listings will be discoverable through this new feature.


We’re already working with a wide range of job listing sites, including Working Nomads, We Work Remotely and ZipRecruiter, and the number of remote jobs you can find via Google is growing by the day as providers from across the web implement this markup. We’re also making this capability available to any employer or job board to use on their own property through our Cloud Talent Solution.


We hope these tools are useful in finding your next work from home opportunity or finding the right candidates, regardless of where they call home.

Improving our mobile layout

We are pleased to announce a new mobile layout that should provide an improved experience for mobile device users. We’ve changed the look of the search box and refinements, increased the size of the thumbnails, and simplified the pagination.
Before                                                                                  After
Most of these changes only affect mobile devices, but the refinements have also been updated for desktop.
Before                                                                                  After
The mobile-specific changes can be optionally disabled by setting the "mobileLayout" attribute of the search element to “disabled”.

How we search for bow wows and meows

It’s not quite caturday, and we’re a few months away from the dog days of summer, but searches for pets never paws. Around the world, people constantly ask Google questions about their furry friends, so there’s no time like the present for a good old fashioned (OMG-look-at-that-little) face-off.


Data visualization designer Nadieh Bremer, lover of canines and felines alike, worked with our News Lab team to capture all your cat-like curiosity about why your purr-fect pals (or barky buds) act the way they do using Google Trends data. Today we’re sharing a delightful new site that digs into those questions, and even throws us a bone and answers a few.

Why do cats and dogs title

Quirky Questions

Why do cats like boxes? Why are they afraid of cucumbers? (Scaredy cats!) Why do they like to knead soft surfaces? You asked (literally), and we (attempt to) answer. Visit the site to explore these questions, and more!

Dog eat grass

Why do dogs...

  • Lick

  • Eat grass

  • Eat poop

  • Howl

  • Hump

  • Smell

  • Bark

  • Shake

  • Scratch

  • Bite

Cat knead

Why do cats...

  • Purr

  • Knead

  • Lick

  • Meow

  • Bite

  • Rub

  • Scratch

  • Eat grass

  • Sleep so much

  • Like boxes


Global Pet Preferences

We may not all definitively be a cat or dog “person,” but when it comes to searches, every country leans one way or another. Dive in and doggie-paddle around in nation-by-nation data.


Dog and Cat Searches Globally

If the site didn’t quite satiate your need for pet knowledge, I’ll leave you with my own assessment that answers some of the most iconic cat and dog questions of all time:


Do cats really rule? Inconclusive. Do dogs really drool? I’ve seen some evidence.

Source: Search


Bringing new voices, and communities, to the world of podcasts

Editor’s note: The Google Podcasts creator program, run by PRX, provides 20 weeks of training, mentorship, and seed funding to promising podcasters, with the aim of promoting underrepresented voices throughout the industry and around the world. Applications for the next round are currently open and will be accepted until 11:59pm ET, Sunday, April 14.

Catalina May and Martín Cruz, the team behind “Las Raras” (“The Outsiders”), are independent podcasters based in Santiago, Chile. They are one of the six teams participating in the first round of the program. Their training began in January 2019 with a week-long intensive “bootcamp” at the PRX Podcast Garage in Boston and will culminate in a final showcase on June 19 in Boston.

A few days ago, while reporting about Chilean countrymen fighting for their land, we contacted a source to request an interview. Our source asked us where the story would appear.

“We have an independent podcast,” we explained. “It’s called ‘Las Raras,’ and we are part of the Google Podcasts creator program.”

Then, silence. For many seconds. We knew what we had to ask.

“Do you know what a podcast is?”

She did not.

This is a very common situation for us. Not only in Chile where we live, but also in Latin America broadly, many people haven’t even heard the word podcast, much less listened to one.

Catalina and Martin

Cruz and May at the Google Podcasts creator program.

When we arrived in Boston for the Google Podcasts creator program bootcamp, we experienced the total opposite of our situation in Santiago. At the PRX Podcast Garage, we met amazing trainers and the five other teams in the program. It was a dream to talk about podcasting for twelve hours a day with a diverse group of people who share our passion.

Through the other teams, we learned how many different goals a podcast might have: raise awareness about LGBTQ+ people’s lives in a place where homosexuality is illegal (“AfroQueer”), tell stories from the Filipino diaspora (“Long Distance”), reflect on modern beauty standards (“The Colored Girl Beautiful”), introduce children to Puerto Rican history (“Timestorm”), or talk about car culture and road rage (“Who Taught You How to Drive?!”).

We created our podcast, “Las Raras,” in 2015, inspired (like many) by the first season of “Serial.” As a journalist and a sound engineer, we heard right away what podcasts could do. This intimate medium is perfect for telling stories of people who are frequently overlooked, stories of people challenging norms and stories of people defying the status quo.

In other words, podcasts let us tell stories we feel passionate about and are not often heard in Chile. Right away, we loved the innovation and openness podcasting offered. But it was daunting, too. We had to learn a new way of interviewing and structuring stories, and how to use sound without visuals. There were almost no other podcasts in Chile at that time, too.

It was also financially risky. Our first two seasons were self-financed. Luckily, for our third season, we got some support from the International Women’s Media Foundation. It helped, but we were still feeling quite alone and facing an uncertain road ahead. When we first heard about the Google Podcasts creator program, it seemed perfect for us, because its goal is to increase the diversity of voices in the podcasting industry.

We put our hearts and souls into the application, making clear that we were at a critical time for our podcast. Two days before Christmas, we received an email confirming that we had been chosen. It took us a couple of weeks to really believe that it was happening. It’s an honor, but also a huge responsibility.

We know the stories we want to tell, and the support of the Google Podcasts creator program will allow us to take “Las Raras” to the next level. Our goal in the program is to find a way to be successful on a long-term basis. With the support of Google, PRX, our mentors and our fellow podcasters, we are focusing our attention on better understanding the needs of our audience, and developing a sustainable business model for “Las Raras.” The program offers the training to improve the quality of the stories we love to tell, and those we know our audience wants to hear.

Searches for “Black girl magic” are on the rise

As Black History Month comes to a close and we look toward International Women’s Day, people are searching for “Black girl magic” more than ever before. Searches hit an all-time high in February of this year.


To me, “Black girl magic” is an empowering phrase that celebrates the achievements, beauty and irrepressibility of Black women and girls. The phrase is appropriate for moments both big and small, and ignites the internal spark that motivates both personal and professional achievements.


As black women, it’s rare to see our own, varied images reflected back to us in media and pop culture. But this film celebrates women—past and present, famous and unknown—who have broken down barriers in many fields and industries. It reminds me that whether you’re getting your diploma, winning your 23rd grand slam, or simply putting one foot in front of the other, you’re making magic.


To learn more about magic created by women all over the world, visit g.co/IWD.

To help fight the opioid crisis, a new tool from Maps and Search

In 2017, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency, with over 130 Americans dying every day from opioid-related drug overdoses.  Last month, we saw that search queries for “medication disposal near me” reached an all-time high on Google.

opioids_data

53 percent of prescription drug abuse starts with drugs obtained from family or friends, so we’re working alongside government agencies and nonprofit organizations to help people safely remove excess or unused opioids from their medicine cabinets. Last year, we partnered with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for National Prescription Take Back Day by developing a Google Maps API  locator tool to help people dispose of their prescription drugs at temporary locations twice a year. With the help of this tool, the DEA and its local partners collected a record 1.85 million pounds of unused prescription drugs in 2018.

Today, we’re making it easier for Americans to quickly find disposal locations on Google Maps and Search all year round. A search for queries like “drug drop off near me” or “medication disposal near me” will display permanent disposal locations at your local pharmacy, hospital or government building so you can quickly and safely discard your unneeded medication.



opioid_gif

This pilot has been made possible thanks to the hard work of many federal agencies, states and pharmacies. Companies like Walgreens and CVS Health, along with state governments in Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan and Pennsylvania have been instrumental in this project, contributing data with extensive lists of public and private disposal locations. The DEA is already working with us to provide additional location data to expand the pilot.

For this pilot, we also looked to public health authorities—like HHS—for ideas on how technology can help communities respond to the opioid crisis. In fact, combining disposal location data from different sources was inspired by a winning entry at the HHS’s Opioid Code-A-Thon held a year ago.

We’ll be working to expand coverage and add more locations in the coming months. To learn more about how your state or business can bring more disposal locations to Google Maps and Search, contact RXdisposal-data@google.com today.


Source: Google LatLong