Tag Archives: Search

Friendsgiving? More like #trendsgiving

Across America, people celebrate next week’s day of thanks with their own unique traditions, and many come to Search for help to pull off Turkey Day like a pro. (In fact, you can simply search “Thanksgiving” and find video tips from expert chefs on how to master mashed potatoes or ideas to elevate a pumpkin pie!)

But there’s a cornucopia of searches you can do, and we took a look at some of the top and trending ideas that people are gobbling up to hone their side dish skills and perfect their pie game.

Pardon me, but how do you plan to prep your turkey?

There are many ways to toast a turkey, but here are the preferred cooking methods across the U.S. this year. While the Eastern Seaboard and some of the Southwest is fond of frying, smoked birds are booming in nearly half the country. Hawaii joins New England in sticking to the classic roasted turkey.

turkey across america

Top turkey cooking methods in each state

Party fowl

As people gear up for one of the year’s biggest get-togethers for family and friends, questions arise about how to make sure that their fowl doesn’t flop and, this year, how to ensure that the bird they select is safe to eat. Here are some top turkey searches trending right now:

Let’s dish on sides

For many, Thanksgiving meals are more about the sweet and salty sides and the gravy train that goes along with them. But making a dinner that satisfies the dietary needs of all of your guests can be a challenge—and many of you are coming to search for ideas to tailor your menus accordingly. Here are a few insights around these diet-specific dish trends:

  • “Keto Thanksgiving” searches are hitting an all time high in 2018, with “keto Thanksgiving sides” up 70% YoY.

  • Vegan Thanksgiving” has the highest interest among diet-specific searches, more than double the search interest of “keto Thanksgiving” and “vegetarian Thanksgiving” searches.

  • “Gluten free Thanksgiving” is also on the rise, with searches for “gluten free thanksgiving sides” (+300% YoY), desserts (+100% YoY) and stuffing (+90% YoY) all trending up since last year.

Pie, in charts

Everyone has their own festive favorite when it comes to Thanksgiving Day dessert. Here’s a slice of the top pies people are searching for:


pie chart

Many of these pie preferences can be regional, too. Here are the places where the top pies are poppin’ on Search.

thanksgiving pies

No matter how you celebrate and give thanks, you can find all the ideas you need on Search, get to your friends and family quickly and safely with help from Google Maps, and get to gobbling up that grub.

Source: Search


May we GIF you a suggestion? Emojis and more on Gboard

We communicate in pictures more than ever before. Emoji, stickers, or GIFs often get your point across better than just words. Can you imagine celebrating a birthday without the cake emoji, or *life* without the Carlton GIF? Conversations would be so much more boring—and more misunderstood—without them.


For those of us who just can’t even without the perfect GIF ( … or emoji, or sticker), never fear, Gboard is here! On Gboard, you can search for stickers, emoji and GIFs, all at once. It also has a sticker store, regularly updated with stickers for people all over the world.


But with thousands of emoji and stickers, and an endless number of GIFs, it can sometimes take awhile to find the perfect way to say “I love you,” “hooray,” or anything else you’re trying to communicate.


Starting today for all Android users, Gboard will use AI to suggest GIFs, emoji and stickers to you related to your conversation. This makes it faster and easier to share your #feelings and your glowing personality with whoever you’re chatting with. Keep your eyes peeled for the “GIF” icon to appear in the top left corner of Gboard. Tap it, and you’ll see a selection of GIFs, emoji and stickers that Gboard thinks you might want to share.

glowg_expression.gif

So if you’re typing “Awesome!” Gboard will suggest this sticker:

bull stars

Or if you type “I’m sleepy”, you’ll get this emoji:

emoji

To make sure these suggestions are private to you and take place as fast as possible, this feature is processed entirely on your device. You can read more about the benefits of on-device AI here.


This feature is initially available globally in English only. Over time, we’ll expand Gboard suggestions to more languages, and more types of content to help you do and say more right from your conversation. In the meantime, we’ll leave you with this:

rocket

Source: Search


Protecting what we love about the internet: our efforts to stop online piracy

The internet has enabled people worldwide to connect, create and distribute new works of art like never before. A key part of preserving this creative economy is ensuring creators and artists have a way to share and make money from their content—and preventing the flow of money to those who seek to pirate that content. Today, we're releasing our latest update on those efforts..

Our 2018 "How Google Fights Piracy" report explains the programs, policies, and technology we put in place to combat piracy online and ensure continued opportunities for creators around the world.

We invest significantly in the technology, tools and resources that prevent copyright infringement on our platforms. We also work with others across the industry on efforts to combat piracy. These efforts appear to be having an effect: around the world, online piracy has been decreasing, while spending on legitimate content is rising across content categories.

Here are a few of our findings from this year's Piracy report:

  • $3 billion+:The amount YouTube has paid to rights holders who have monetized use of their content in other videos through Content ID, our industry-leading rights management tool.
  • $100 million+: The amount we’ve invested in building Content ID, including staffing and computing resources.
  • $1.8 billion+:The amount YouTube paid to the music industry from October 2017 to September 2018 in advertising revenue alone
  • 3 billion+:The number of URLs that were removed from Search for infringing copyright since launching a submission tool for copyright owners and their agents.
  • 10 million+:The number of ads that were disapproved by Google in 2017 that were suspected of copyright infringement or that linked to infringing sites.

As we continue our work in the years ahead, five principles guide our substantial investments in fighting piracy:

Create more and better legitimate alternatives: Piracy often arises when it's difficult for consumers to access legitimate content. By developing products that make it easy for users to access legitimate content, like Google Play Music and YouTube, Google helps drive revenue for creative industries and give consumers choice.

Follow the money: As the vast majority of sites dedicated to online piracy are doing so to make money, one way to combat them is to cut off their supply. We prevent actors that engage in copyright infringement from using our ads and monetization systems and we enforce these policies rigorously.

Be efficient, effective, and scalable: We strive to implement anti-piracy solutions that work at scale. For example, as early as 2010, we began making substantial investments in streamlining the copyright removal process for search results. As a result, these improved procedures allow us to process copyright removal requests for search results at the rate of millions per week.

Guard against abuse: Some actors will make false copyright infringement claims in order to have content they don't want online taken down. We’re committed to detecting and rejecting bogus infringement allegations, such as removals for political or competitive reasons.

Provide transparency: We’re committed to providing transparency. In our Transparency Report, we disclose the number of requests we receive from copyright owners and governments to remove information from our services.

Today, our services are generating more revenue for creators and rights holders, connecting more people with the content they love, and doing more to fight back against online piracy than ever before. We’re proud of the progress this report represents. Through continued innovation and partnership, we’re committed to curtailing infringement by bad actors while empowering the creative communities who make many of the things we love about the internet today.

Source: Search


Election Day with Search

Today is Election Day—less commonly known as the first Tuesday after the first Monday of November—and people all across the country are heading to the polls to cast their votes. With many candidates, measures, and propositions on your ballot, Google tools are here to help you navigate the process, understand your choices, and view the results of races across the country.


Navigating the process

Whether you're registering to vote for the first time, voting absentee, or seeking directions to your local polling place, we can help you find the information you need to make your voice heard in this election. When you search for “how do I register to vote” or “how do I vote,” a box will appear on the results page with authoritative and easy-to-understand information about the deadlines, requirements, eligibility, and logistics of casting a ballot where you live. And if you aren't sure where to vote, a query for “where do I vote” will guide you to the right place.

Vote_Search.png

Understanding the choices

To help you make knowledgeable decisions about your ballot, we’re making information about candidates and ballot measures readily available. If you search for any federal or gubernatorial candidate, a panel of information will appear on the results page. This will include candidate-authored statements about platforms and legislative priorities for all campaigns that have chosen to post them. Likewise, a query for any statewide ballot measure will render a panel of information and the full text for that initiative.

Vote_Prop.png

Viewing the outcomes

Once the polls have closed and the votes are being counted, you can come to Search to find minute-to-minute updates as the results begin to come in. A search for “Senate results” or “House results” on Election Day will give you a box with a real-time summary of each chamber, while searching for any congressional or gubernatorial contest will give you results for those specific races.

At Google, our mission is to make the world's information accessible and useful, and we hope these features help you participate in this election. So if you haven't already, go get your "I voted" sticker, and come back to Google when the results come in.


Green hair, don’t care: create emoji that look exactly like you on Gboard

There might be thousands of emoji, but for a lot of people, it’s hard to find one that looks and feels like *you*. Today, we’re introducing emoji style Mini stickers for Gboard, designed for those who may have stared into the eyes of emoji and not seen yourself staring back. These sticker versions of the emoji you use every day are customizable so you can make them look just like you. Have a beard and long gray curly hair? No problem. Nose piercing and baseball cap? We gotcha.

Mini sticker styles

Three Mini flavors: Bold, Sweet, and Emoji

Minis use a combination of machine learning and artistry to create illustrated stickers based on your selfie. Mini stickers also come in two other styles: “bold,” for when you might be feeling a little extra, and “sweet,” for when you want a softer touch.

After you take a selfie, emoji Minis use Google’s machine learning algorithms, known as neural networks, to suggest a skin tone, hair style and accessories that you can fine tune. Then, you choose a color for your hair, facial hair or different types of head coverings and eyewear. Add freckles or wrinkles—a little or a lot—if you'd like. Design your Minis so they resemble what you look like in your eyes—or in your mind. 🤗

Emoji stickers

Customizable emoji Minis

With Mini emojis, redheads (and other hair types) won’t just get a single redheaded emoji, but instead a selection of redheaded options, including redheaded zombies 🧟, redheaded mages 🧙 and redheaded shruggies 🤷.


Start stickerising with your new, more YOU emojis! Emoji Minis start rolling out today in all Gboard languages and countries, on both iOS and Android.
Mini UX flow

Celebrate Halloween with Ghoul-gle

You know what they say: if you’ve got it, haunt it. Halloween is almost here and we want to make sure you’ve got what you need to celebrate with some help from Maps, Search and the Assistant.

Spookiest Spots

If you’re in the mood for a ghostly encounter, we’ve got you covered. Using historical Google Maps data, we’ve ranked 20 U.S. cities by their spook factor so you know exactly where to get your fill of restless spirits, haunted places, and inexplicable occurrences. Tap each link to see a list of some of the spookiest locations in your city, and check out the Street View imagery below to see what makes some of these places so spooktacular—if you dare 😱.

  1. New York

  2. Los Angeles

  3. Chicago

  4. Dallas

  5. Houston

  6. Washington D.C.

  7. San Francisco

  8. Atlanta

  9. Philadelphia

  10. Boston

  11. Seattle

  12. Phoenix

  13. Denver

  14. Orlando

  15. Minneapolis/St. Paul

  16. Detroit

  17. Portland

  18. Charlotte

  19. Sacramento

  20. Cleveland


Last-minute tips to get festive with your Google Assistant

Forget to pick up candy for trick-or-treaters? Still haven’t had a chance to get pumpkins to carve? Out of creative ideas on what to wear?


Whether you’re seeking last-minute costume inspiration, creepy sounds for your spooky soiree or monster facts to stump your friends and family, your Google Assistant is here to help just in the nick of time!  


Start by saying “Hey Google …”

  • “What should I be for Halloween?” (Take a guided quiz and let the Assistant help you pick out the perfect, unexpected costume.)

  • “Get directions to the nearest pumpkin patch.”

  • “Add Halloween candy to my shopping list.”

  • “Trick or treat.” (Enjoy a spooky experience with sound effects and guest appearances from famous monsters.)

  • “Share facts about monsters.” (Spoiler alert: did you know that people accused of witchcraft also found themselves accused of being werewolves?)

  • “What does a werewolf sound like?”

  • “What does a ghost sound like?”

  • “Share facts about monsters?”


Google Assistant Halloween

Pretty up some pumpkins

You might be carving out some time over the next day to create a gourd-eous masterpiece for your mantle or front porch. Here are some of the top pumpkin carving searches on Google Images to give you some ideas and how-to’s for a contemporary take on this classic Halloween decor:

A massive Doodle duel

Get your game on with our first-ever multiplayer, interactive Google Doodle. Host a session of “The Great Ghoul Duel” with up to seven friends and family via a custom invitation link or put your ghostly gaming powers to the test by competing with randomized players around the globe. Your goal is to collect as many spirit flames for your team as possible and bring them to home base before time expires. But BEWARE!, opposing teams can swipe your flames—and as a team collects more flames, their powers get stronger, including speed boosts, night vision and much more. Best of luck against your frightening foes!


Learn and do more with Lens in Google Images

On Google’s 20th anniversary last month, we announced updates to make Google Images a more useful place to explore the web through images. One of the ways we’re doing this is by bringing Lens to Google Images. We launched Lens to help you do more with what you see. People already love using it in their camera and on their photos–to find items in an outfit they like, learn more about landmarks, and identify that cute dog in the park. Lens is a natural fit for Google Images.

Starting today, when you see something in an image that you want to know more about, like a landmark in a travel photo or wallpaper in a stylish room, you can use Lens to explore within the image.

Similar to Lens in the Google Assistant and Google Photos, Lens in Google Images identifies things within an image you might want to learn about, and shows you similar ones. When you press the Lens button in Google Images, dots will appear on objects you can learn more about.

Lens in Google Images can also make it easier to find and buy things you like online. For example, you might come to Google Images looking for ideas to redecorate your living room. During your search, you come across a couch you like in an image, but you may not know what style it is or where to buy it. All you need to do is press the Lens button, then either tap on a dot on the couch, or draw around it, and Google Images will show you related information and images. From there, you can learn more about it, or find places where you might be able to buy a similar couch.

Lens in Google Images also helps website owners by giving them a new way to be discovered through a visual search, similar to a traditional Google Search.

Lens - couch

To start, the dots will appear on products and other objects Lens has identified, and in the coming months the dots will appear in more types of images, such as landmarks, animals and plants. You can still draw around anything you’re interested in inside of an image to get more information and see related content.

Start exploring today. Lens in Images is now live on the mobile web for people in the U.S. searching in English, and will soon be rolled out to other countries, languages and Google Images locations.

Making it easier to control your data, directly in Google products

We’re always working on making it easier for you to understand and control your data so you can make privacy choices that are right for you. Earlier this year, we launched a new Google Account experience that puts your privacy and security front and center, and we updated our Privacy Policy with videos and clearer language to better describe the information we collect, why we collect it, and how you can control it.


Today, we’re making it easier for you to make decisions about your data directly within the Google products you use every day, starting with Search. Without ever leaving Search, you can now review and delete your recent Search activity, get quick access to the most relevant privacy controls in your Google Account, and learn more about how Search works with your data.

Control your data, directly in the Google products

Control your data, directly in the Google products you use every day


When you use Google products, you generate data about your activity. For Search, this data includes the terms you search for, links you interact with and other information like your current location when you search.

Before today, if you were searching on Google and wanted to review or manage this data, the best way for you to do that would have been to visit your Google Account. Now, we’re bringing these controls to you – from directly within Search, you can review or delete your Search activity and quickly get back to finding what you were searching for.     

We’re also providing quick access to the privacy controls in your Google Account that are most relevant as you use Search. For example, to control the ads you see when you search, we give you access to your Ad Settings. Additionally, you can access your Activity Controls to decide what information Google saves to your account and uses to make Search and other Google services faster, smarter and more useful.

Your data in search

If you want to learn more about what data is being generated as you use Google services and how we use data to improve your experience, you can now find a short video that helps explain this information.

Google Privacy Advisor

We’re launching this improvement in Google Search on desktop and mobile web today, and in the Google app for iOS and Android in the coming weeks. Next year, we’ll expand this to Maps, followed by many other Google products. Having access to relevant and actionable privacy controls directly from the Google products you use every day is just one way that we are continuously working to build privacy that works for everyone. 

Source: Search


Tru Biz: A conversation with Deaf artist Jessica Flores about sign language, stickers, and more

Gboard, Google’s on-screen keyboard, is a tool that helps people communicate exactly the way they want on a mobile device. Gboard supports over 400 languages, thousands of emoji and stickers, and an endless number of GIFs.


Part of helping people communicate is making sure Gboard is accessible for all people, and the languages they speak. One language not supported by Gboard, however, is American Sign Language. ASL isn’t a written language, so it’s not suited for a typical keyboard. However, ASL is one of the most expressive languages, and similar to other languages, has its own slang and regional variations. This makes it perfect for a visual communication format like stickers.


We collaborated with Jessica Flores, a Deaf artist, advocate and popular YouTube creator, to design a series of animated stickers for Gboard that feature ASL. We talked to Jessica about her background, her experience creating the stickers, and how she hopes people might use them.
Jessica

Ryan: How did you get started doing YouTube videos?


Jessica: I started my YouTube channel about two years ago. At the time, I was working at a coffee shop, and a lot of the customers would ask me the same questions about my hearing loss over and over again, which I totally don’t mind. But once I started noticing this, I began to wonder if there was a way I could educate a much larger audience, instead of just one person at a time.


Ryan: What feedback have you received from other Deaf or Hard of Hearing people on your work?


Jessica: I grew up being the only Deaf person I really knew, so I felt very alone and isolated. When I started my YouTube channel years later, I thought there was only going to be a few people who could relate to my content, but boy, was I wrong! I get messages and comments all the time from both Deaf and Hard of Hearing adults and kids telling me they can relate to my videos. Whenever I get these messages, it’s hands down, one of the best feelings in the world.


Ryan: How do you typically use expressions like stickers/GIFs/emoji? What do you like/dislike about this experience?


Jessica: I use stickers, emojis, and GIFs really often. Some might tell you, too often or, more-than-one-normally-should often. (Insert wide eye, straight big smile emoji here)


Personally, a text message just doesn’t allow me to fully express what I am trying to say, or how I am feeling. I probably feel this way because I am a very animated person. Whenever I sign or talk, I feel like I always need to use all of my facial expressions and body language to express what I am trying to say. Even if it is just something simple like, “Hey can you pass the salt?” it ends up being very animated.


Ryan: What was your vision for these stickers? How did the end product compare to your vision?


Jessica: At the beginning of the project, I had no idea what direction these stickers were going to go in. I thought for sure the stickers would feature one character signing all the words.


But after looking at all of our sketches, I realized I wanted a sticker set that would help spread Deaf awareness and expose American Sign Language to more people, even just a little bit. I knew that if we designed a character for the stickers who signed, only those who knew ASL would know what the signs meant, and those who didn’t know ASL might end up ignoring the set completely.


We settled on the perfect solution: making the words become the characters. Now, if you know ASL, you will understand the whole set, as well as the slang. And if you don’t know ASL you will still be able to follow along with most of the signs their meanings.

asl stickers

Ryan: Were there any challenges you encountered as an artist creating the stickers?


Jessica: A lot of people don’t realize that, in sign language, a simple change in facial expression or body language can change a sign’s meaning completely. Just like how a tone of someone’s voice will allow you to figure out if they are mad at you, or if they’re asking you a question.


So when I had a word like “No”, I had to think about what kind of “No” I wanted to sign. Did I want it to be a sad “no”, a happy “no”, a sarcastic “no”? Then, if I picked sad, I had to ask myself, “How sad is it? Is it so sad it’s crying or is it just bummed out sad?” There are so many ways to sign and say “no” that it was hard to pick just one.


Ryan: How do you hope people will use them?


Jessica: I hope it will inspire people to start learning basic ASL or the other many different types of sign language: Mexican Sign Language, British Sign Language, Filipino Sign Language, etc.


My other hope is that the set will encourage people to start learning about Deaf/Hard of Hearing history, community, and culture. People still have a lot to learn about Deaf people. And the faster we can all learn about each other, the faster we can work towards making the world more accessible for one another.


Source: Search