Tag Archives: Search

Pick up where you left off on Search

While we’ve probably all turned to Google to settle a bet, often we need more than just a quick answer.


You might be looking for information to help you complete a longer-running task, whether it’s meal planning for a new food regimen, researching new stretching routines for post-gym recovery or picking up a new hobby. You might come back to Search to find information on the same topic, hoping to retrace your steps or discover new, related ideas.


To help you with these ongoing search journeys, we’re launching new activity cards to help you pick up where you left off. If you’re logged into your Google account and search for topics and hobbies like cooking, interior design, fashion, skincare and beauty, fitness, photography and more, you may find an activity card at the top of the results page that provides easy ways to continue your exploration.

Search Activity Card

You’ll find links to pages you’ve visited in the past along with searches you’ve done. From there, you can easily click back to that recipe that you tried and loved, or re-issue a search to discover new facets of that topic.


If you want to mark a page to read or reference later, just touch and hold the link to quickly add items on your activity card to a collection. You can access  your collections by tapping the menu on the top left of the Search page (on mobile web), or through the bottom bar of the Google app.

Save from Search activity card

You can control what appears in your activity card by pressing to delete an item or turn off cards by tapping the 3-dot icon. For more options to customize your Search experience, you can access your full history and settings right in Search.


Activity cards will roll out today on mobile web and the Google app in English in the U.S. As you’re looking to build new habits or pick up new tasks in the new year--whether sticking to an exercise regimen, sprucing up your winter wardrobe, or collecting new ideas for your home--we hope this new feature helps you along your way and makes your search history more accessible and useful.

Source: Search


Test your knowledge of the year’s top trends with Game of the Year

Is Wakanda real? What’s up with that racoon on the skyscraper? Is it Laurel, or is it Yanny? And who exactly is Kiki?

Take a stroll through Google Search trends and you’ll discover a lot of fun stuff about the year, from royal weddings and major news events to unexpected memes and breakthrough stars. And while the headlines of 2018 will look pretty familiar, what trended the most on Search can be quite surprising. How well do you know what the world searched for this year?

Meet Game of the Year. Part of Year in Search 2018—our annual roundup of top trends of the past 12 months—Game of the Year is the first game based on Google Search trends that puts your knowledge of 2018 to the test in an interactive way.

The game is simple: Each player must answer a series of questions about this year’s trending searches, collecting points along the way. The questions get harder as you progress through the game. A special bonus round increases the difficulty even more. Players can also challenge their friends to test their own Google Search trendiness. 

Game of the Year 2018

The game’s host was built using Google Cloud and WaveNet, Google’s text-to-speech technology powered by machine learning. Players can adjust the pitch and speed of the game host’s voice, and if a player enters their name at the start, the audio updates on the fly, providing encouragement to players as they progress through the game.

Want to test your own Google Search trendiness? You might even find the answer to the burning question on everyone’s mind: which famous Justin won the Search battle— Bieber, Timberlake, or Trudeau? Play Game of the Year to find out.

Say مرحبا, msawa, mihofnima or hello! to 500 languages on Gboard

Our goal with Gboard is to help you communicate in a way that’s comfortable and natural, regardless of the language you speak. While the ten most common languages cover about half of the world's population, many more thousands of languages are spoken by the other half. As the Next Billion Users come online, technology needs to support their languages so they can get the most out of using the internet. Today, Gboard offers more than 500 language varieties on Android, bringing a smart, AI-driven typing experience to many more people around the world. This means that more than 90% of the world can now type in their first language with Gboard, with keyboard layouts tailored to each language and typing smarts like autocorrect and predictive text.


In December 2016, Gboard first launched on Android with about 100 language varieties. Over the last few months, more than one hundred new languages have been added to Gboard, such as Nigerian Pidgin (~30 million speakers), Rangpuri (~15 million speakers), Balinese (~3 million speakers), Pontic Greek (~800,000 speakers) and many more.


A quick look at the layouts below shows the sheer diversity of input methods used across the world every day:

Gboard currently supports more than 40 writing systems across the world, ranging from alphabets used across many languages, like Roman and Cyrillic, to scripts that are used for only one language, like Ol Chiki (used for Santali).

Building technology that works across languages is important: without a keyboard tailored to your language, simple things like messaging friends or family can be a challenge. Often, keyboard apps don’t support the characters and scripts used for languages with a smaller speaking population. As an example, the Nigerian language "Ásụ̀sụ̀ Ị̀gbò" is impossible to type on an English keyboard. Plus, wouldn't it be frustrating to see nearly every word you type incorrectly autocorrected into another language?


Many of Gboard’s newly added languages are traditionally not widely written, such as in newspapers or books, so they’re rarely found online. But as we spend more time on our phones on messaging apps and social media, people are now typing in these languages more than ever. The ability to easily type in these languages lets people communicate with others in the language they would normally speak face-to-face as well.


How we add new languages to Gboard

In addition to designing a new keyboard layout, every time a new language is added to Gboard we create a new machine learning language model. This model trains Gboard to know when and how to autocorrect your typing, or to predict your next word. For languages like English, which has only about 30 characters and large amounts of written materials widely available, this is easy. For many of the world's languages, though, this process is much harder.


In order to train our machine learning language models, we need a text corpus (which is a database of lots of available texts written in a particular language). Often, finding text data in these languages can be challenging. When we can’t find data online, we’ll share a list of writing prompts with native speakers, so we can create new text corpora from scratch. (You can read more about our crawling efforts for these languages in one of our recent research papers.)


Next, we focus on the layout design. Layout design for a new language on Gboard requires careful investigation and research to fit in all the characters in a way that makes sense to native speakers. If there isn’t a lot of information for the language available online, we'll analyze text corpora to figure out which characters to include and to determine how frequently they’re used.


Depending on the language, we may tailor aspects of the layout, like the set of digits—for example, while English uses 0123456789, Hindi and other Indian languages written in Devanagari use ०१२३४५६७८९. Once we've built support for a language, we always invite a group of native speakers to test and fill out a survey to understand their typing experience.


To see if your language is already supported in our latest Gboard release in the Play Store, check out the list of supported languages in our help center.

Source: Search


Year in Search: Movies, TV, music and sports we searched for in 2018

Curious which flicks, footballers and masters of falsetto have the fiercest fans? Year in Search might have a clue for you.

You can explore both the global and country-specific trend lists here, but we also wanted to dive deeper into the leagues, genres and styles that captured people’s attention in the world of sports and entertainment in 2018.

Music

Our feet were tapping and our fingers were typing as we searched for these artists, the top trending in each major musical genre this year:

yis-2018-lists_music.jpg

Movies

These are the big gainers from the big screen, trending the most in 2018:

yis-2018-lists_movies.jpg

TV

Any of these shows have you glued to the tube? Here are the binge watches that shot up the charts as top trending shows in 2018.

yis-2018-lists_tv.jpg

Sports Teams

From championship teams to blockbuster trades, these are the franchises that got people searching this year and are top trending within their leagues:

yis-2018-lists_sports teams.jpg

The Year in Search 2018

Every day, people turn to Search to explore the world of information on the web. They come looking for everything from news and helpful how-tos to song lyrics and easy dinner recipes.


As each year closes, Google Trends data reflects not only these everyday queries, but also the moments, people, ideas, and questions that made that trip around the sun so unique. During a year of highs and lows, the Year in Search highlights all the ways people continued to search for “good”—and this year, it was more than ever.
Searching for good

2018 saw a number of major elections around the world—in the U.S. the top searched “how to” question was “how to register to vote.”  In a year when we said goodbye to many cultural icons, like Anthony Bourdain and Aretha Franklin, people searched for how they, too, could influence the next generation, asking ”how to be a good role model.” And when first responders rescued a team of soccer players from a cave in Thailand, the world was inspired — searches for “scuba diving lessons near me” increased by 110% that week.


We searched for good news of championships, medal counts and royal weddings, and sought out bright spots throughout the year. We also searched for how to be a good citizen, how to be a good friend, and how to be a good dancer. (Perhaps with the help of some Fortnite GIFs.)


Celebrate all the good the world searched for in 2018, and explore the top trending lists this year at Google.com/2018.

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Imagining new ways to learn Morse code’s dots and dashes

We first met Emmett at Adaptive Design Association, an organization near Google’s NYC office that builds custom adaptations for children with disabilities. Communicating for him is difficult—he uses a clear plastic word board and looks at specific squares to try and get across what he wants to say. We thought we might be able to help.

At the time, we were working on a special Morse Code layout for Gboard. With its simple dot and dash encoding, Morse is a good fit for assistive tech like switch access and sip-and-puff devices. Emmett was hoping to learn Morse as a more robust form of communication, and we wanted to make a small game to help him learn the new alphabet.

Our first attempt was a small connect-the-dots spelling toy that drew Emmett's favorite cartoon character and only took a few days to build. After watching Emmett get set up with his switches and start excitedly conquering pieces of the little Morse toy, we knew we wanted to do more. We partnered with Adaptive Design on a 48 hour hackathon, where independent designers and game developers worked with Emmett and another 4 kids to prototype games that made Morse code fun to learn.

The kids played the role of creative directors, using their imagination to set the vision for their own games. Each game reflected their interests and personalities. Hannah’s passion for music led to a game where you play notes by typing them in Morse. Matthew combined his interest in soccer and spy thrillers to make a game where you shoot soccer balls at targets by typing their corresponding Morse letters. Emmett made a maze you solve writing different letters. Ben, who likes trains, made a game where YouTube videos are shown on a train once the correct letters are typed in Morse Code. And Olivia’s love for talent shows led to a game called “Alphabet’s Got Talent.”

We’re posting the code for each independent team's games on the Experiments with Google website, where you can also find open-source examples that will help you get started with your own Morse-based apps. If you’re a developer, we hope these resources will inspire you to get involved with the community and make a difference by building your own accessibility projects.

Source: Search


Friendsgiving? More like #trendsgiving

Across America, people celebrate next week’s day of thanks with their own unique traditions, and many come to Search for help to pull off Turkey Day like a pro. (In fact, you can simply search “Thanksgiving” and find video tips from expert chefs on how to master mashed potatoes or ideas to elevate a pumpkin pie!)

But there’s a cornucopia of searches you can do, and we took a look at some of the top and trending ideas that people are gobbling up to hone their side dish skills and perfect their pie game.

Pardon me, but how do you plan to prep your turkey?

There are many ways to toast a turkey, but here are the preferred cooking methods across the U.S. this year. While the Eastern Seaboard and some of the Southwest is fond of frying, smoked birds are booming in nearly half the country. Hawaii joins New England in sticking to the classic roasted turkey.

turkey across america

Top turkey cooking methods in each state

Party fowl

As people gear up for one of the year’s biggest get-togethers for family and friends, questions arise about how to make sure that their fowl doesn’t flop and, this year, how to ensure that the bird they select is safe to eat. Here are some top turkey searches trending right now:

Let’s dish on sides

For many, Thanksgiving meals are more about the sweet and salty sides and the gravy train that goes along with them. But making a dinner that satisfies the dietary needs of all of your guests can be a challenge—and many of you are coming to search for ideas to tailor your menus accordingly. Here are a few insights around these diet-specific dish trends:

  • “Keto Thanksgiving” searches are hitting an all time high in 2018, with “keto Thanksgiving sides” up 70% YoY.

  • Vegan Thanksgiving” has the highest interest among diet-specific searches, more than double the search interest of “keto Thanksgiving” and “vegetarian Thanksgiving” searches.

  • “Gluten free Thanksgiving” is also on the rise, with searches for “gluten free thanksgiving sides” (+300% YoY), desserts (+100% YoY) and stuffing (+90% YoY) all trending up since last year.

Pie, in charts

Everyone has their own festive favorite when it comes to Thanksgiving Day dessert. Here’s a slice of the top pies people are searching for:


pie chart

Many of these pie preferences can be regional, too. Here are the places where the top pies are poppin’ on Search.

thanksgiving pies

No matter how you celebrate and give thanks, you can find all the ideas you need on Search, get to your friends and family quickly and safely with help from Google Maps, and get to gobbling up that grub.

Source: Search


May we GIF you a suggestion? Emojis and more on Gboard

We communicate in pictures more than ever before. Emoji, stickers, or GIFs often get your point across better than just words. Can you imagine celebrating a birthday without the cake emoji, or *life* without the Carlton GIF? Conversations would be so much more boring—and more misunderstood—without them.


For those of us who just can’t even without the perfect GIF ( … or emoji, or sticker), never fear, Gboard is here! On Gboard, you can search for stickers, emoji and GIFs, all at once. It also has a sticker store, regularly updated with stickers for people all over the world.


But with thousands of emoji and stickers, and an endless number of GIFs, it can sometimes take awhile to find the perfect way to say “I love you,” “hooray,” or anything else you’re trying to communicate.


Starting today for all Android users, Gboard will use AI to suggest GIFs, emoji and stickers to you related to your conversation. This makes it faster and easier to share your #feelings and your glowing personality with whoever you’re chatting with. Keep your eyes peeled for the “GIF” icon to appear in the top left corner of Gboard. Tap it, and you’ll see a selection of GIFs, emoji and stickers that Gboard thinks you might want to share.

glowg_expression.gif

So if you’re typing “Awesome!” Gboard will suggest this sticker:

bull stars

Or if you type “I’m sleepy”, you’ll get this emoji:

emoji

To make sure these suggestions are private to you and take place as fast as possible, this feature is processed entirely on your device. You can read more about the benefits of on-device AI here.


This feature is initially available globally in English only. Over time, we’ll expand Gboard suggestions to more languages, and more types of content to help you do and say more right from your conversation. In the meantime, we’ll leave you with this:

rocket

Source: Search


Protecting what we love about the internet: our efforts to stop online piracy

The internet has enabled people worldwide to connect, create and distribute new works of art like never before. A key part of preserving this creative economy is ensuring creators and artists have a way to share and make money from their content—and preventing the flow of money to those who seek to pirate that content. Today, we're releasing our latest update on those efforts..

Our 2018 "How Google Fights Piracy" report explains the programs, policies, and technology we put in place to combat piracy online and ensure continued opportunities for creators around the world.

We invest significantly in the technology, tools and resources that prevent copyright infringement on our platforms. We also work with others across the industry on efforts to combat piracy. These efforts appear to be having an effect: around the world, online piracy has been decreasing, while spending on legitimate content is rising across content categories.

Here are a few of our findings from this year's Piracy report:

  • $3 billion+:The amount YouTube has paid to rights holders who have monetized use of their content in other videos through Content ID, our industry-leading rights management tool.
  • $100 million+: The amount we’ve invested in building Content ID, including staffing and computing resources.
  • $1.8 billion+:The amount YouTube paid to the music industry from October 2017 to September 2018 in advertising revenue alone
  • 3 billion+:The number of URLs that were removed from Search for infringing copyright since launching a submission tool for copyright owners and their agents.
  • 10 million+:The number of ads that were disapproved by Google in 2017 that were suspected of copyright infringement or that linked to infringing sites.

As we continue our work in the years ahead, five principles guide our substantial investments in fighting piracy:

Create more and better legitimate alternatives: Piracy often arises when it's difficult for consumers to access legitimate content. By developing products that make it easy for users to access legitimate content, like Google Play Music and YouTube, Google helps drive revenue for creative industries and give consumers choice.

Follow the money: As the vast majority of sites dedicated to online piracy are doing so to make money, one way to combat them is to cut off their supply. We prevent actors that engage in copyright infringement from using our ads and monetization systems and we enforce these policies rigorously.

Be efficient, effective, and scalable: We strive to implement anti-piracy solutions that work at scale. For example, as early as 2010, we began making substantial investments in streamlining the copyright removal process for search results. As a result, these improved procedures allow us to process copyright removal requests for search results at the rate of millions per week.

Guard against abuse: Some actors will make false copyright infringement claims in order to have content they don't want online taken down. We’re committed to detecting and rejecting bogus infringement allegations, such as removals for political or competitive reasons.

Provide transparency: We’re committed to providing transparency. In our Transparency Report, we disclose the number of requests we receive from copyright owners and governments to remove information from our services.

Today, our services are generating more revenue for creators and rights holders, connecting more people with the content they love, and doing more to fight back against online piracy than ever before. We’re proud of the progress this report represents. Through continued innovation and partnership, we’re committed to curtailing infringement by bad actors while empowering the creative communities who make many of the things we love about the internet today.

Source: Search


Election Day with Search

Today is Election Day—less commonly known as the first Tuesday after the first Monday of November—and people all across the country are heading to the polls to cast their votes. With many candidates, measures, and propositions on your ballot, Google tools are here to help you navigate the process, understand your choices, and view the results of races across the country.


Navigating the process

Whether you're registering to vote for the first time, voting absentee, or seeking directions to your local polling place, we can help you find the information you need to make your voice heard in this election. When you search for “how do I register to vote” or “how do I vote,” a box will appear on the results page with authoritative and easy-to-understand information about the deadlines, requirements, eligibility, and logistics of casting a ballot where you live. And if you aren't sure where to vote, a query for “where do I vote” will guide you to the right place.

Vote_Search.png

Understanding the choices

To help you make knowledgeable decisions about your ballot, we’re making information about candidates and ballot measures readily available. If you search for any federal or gubernatorial candidate, a panel of information will appear on the results page. This will include candidate-authored statements about platforms and legislative priorities for all campaigns that have chosen to post them. Likewise, a query for any statewide ballot measure will render a panel of information and the full text for that initiative.

Vote_Prop.png

Viewing the outcomes

Once the polls have closed and the votes are being counted, you can come to Search to find minute-to-minute updates as the results begin to come in. A search for “Senate results” or “House results” on Election Day will give you a box with a real-time summary of each chamber, while searching for any congressional or gubernatorial contest will give you results for those specific races.

At Google, our mission is to make the world's information accessible and useful, and we hope these features help you participate in this election. So if you haven't already, go get your "I voted" sticker, and come back to Google when the results come in.