Tag Archives: ACL

Robust Neural Machine Translation



In recent years, neural machine translation (NMT) using Transformer models has experienced tremendous success. Based on deep neural networks, NMT models are usually trained end-to-end on very large parallel corpora (input/output text pairs) in an entirely data-driven fashion and without the need to impose explicit rules of language.

Despite this huge success, NMT models can be sensitive to minor perturbations of the input, which can manifest as a variety of different errors, such as under-translation, over-translation or mistranslation. For example, given a German sentence, the state-of-the-art NMT model, Transformer, will yield a correct translation.

“Der Sprecher des Untersuchungsausschusses hat angekündigt, vor Gericht zu ziehen, falls sich die geladenen Zeugen weiterhin weigern sollten, eine Aussage zu machen.”

(Machine translation to English: “The spokesman of the Committee of Inquiry has announced that if the witnesses summoned continue to refuse to testify, he will be brought to court.”),

But, when we apply a subtle change to the input sentence, say from geladenen to the synonym vorgeladenen, the translation becomes very different (and in this case, incorrect):

“Der Sprecher des Untersuchungsausschusses hat angekündigt, vor Gericht zu ziehen, falls sich die vorgeladenen Zeugen weiterhin weigern sollten, eine Aussage zu machen.”

(Machine translation to English: “The investigative committee has announced that he will be brought to justice if the witnesses who have been invited continue to refuse to testify.”).

This lack of robustness in NMT models prevents many commercial systems from being applicable to tasks that cannot tolerate this level of instability. Therefore, learning robust translation models is not just desirable, but is often required in many scenarios. Yet, while the robustness of neural networks has been extensively studied in the computer vision community, only a few prior studies on learning robust NMT models can be found in literature.

In “Robust Neural Machine Translation with Doubly Adversarial Inputs” (to appear at ACL 2019), we propose an approach that uses generated adversarial examples to improve the stability of machine translation models against small perturbations in the input. We learn a robust NMT model to directly overcome adversarial examples generated with knowledge of the model and with the intent of distorting the model predictions. We show that this approach improves the performance of the NMT model on standard benchmarks.

Training a Model with AdvGen
An ideal NMT model would generate similar translations for separate inputs that exhibit small differences. The idea behind our approach is to perturb a translation model with adversarial inputs in the hope of improving the model’s robustness. It does this using an algorithm called Adversarial Generation (AdvGen), which generates plausible adversarial examples for perturbing the model and then feeds them back into the model for defensive training. While this method is inspired by the idea of generative adversarial networks (GANs), it does not rely on a discriminator network, but simply applies the adversarial example in training, effectively diversifying and extending the training set.

The first step is to perturb the model using AdvGen. We start by using Transformer to calculate the translation loss based on a source input sentence, a target input sentence and a target output sentence. Then AdvGen randomly selects some words in the source sentence, assuming a uniform distribution. Each word has an associated list of similar words, i.e., candidates that can be used for substitution, from which AdvGen selects the word that is most likely to introduce errors in Transformer output. Then, this generated adversarial sentence is fed back into Transformer, initiating the defense stage.
First, the Transformer model is applied to an input sentence (lower left) and, in conjunction with the target output sentence (above right) and target input sentence (middle right; beginning with the placeholder “<sos>”), the translation loss is calculated. The AdvGen function then takes the source sentence, word selection distribution, word candidates, and the translation loss as inputs to construct an adversarial source example.
During the defend stage, the adversarial sentence is fed back into the Transformer model. Again the translation loss is calculated, but this time using the adversarial source input. Using the same method as above, AdvGen uses the target input sentence, word replacement candidates, the word selection distribution calculated by the attention matrix, and the translation loss to construct an adversarial target example.
In the defense stage, the adversarial source example serves as input to the Transformer model, and the translation loss is calculated. AdvGen then uses the same method as above to generate an adversarial target example from the target input.
Finally, the adversarial sentence is fed back into Transformer and the robustness loss using the adversarial source example, the adversarial target input example and the target sentence is calculated. If the perturbation led to a significant loss, the loss is minimized so that when the model is confronted with similar perturbations, it will not repeat the same mistake. On the other hand, if the perturbation leads to a low loss, nothing happens, indicating that the model can already handle this perturbation.

Model Performance
We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by applying it to the standard Chinese-English and English-German translation benchmarks. We observed a notable improvement of 2.8 and 1.6 BLEU points, respectively, compared to the competitive Transformer model, achieving a new state-of-the-art performance.
Comparison of Transformer model (Vaswani et al., 2017) on standard benchmarks.
We then evaluate our model on a noisy dataset, generated using a procedure similar to that described for AdvGen. We take an input clean dataset, such as that used on standard translation benchmarks, and randomly select words for similar word substitution. We find that our model exhibits improved robustness compared to other recent models.
Comparison of Transformer, Miyao et al. and Cheng et al. on artificial noisy inputs.
These results show that our method is able to overcome small perturbations in the input sentence and improve the generalization performance. It outperforms competitive translation models and achieves state-of-the-art translation performance on standard benchmarks. We hope our translation model will serve as a robust building block for improving many downstream tasks, especially when those are sensitive or intolerant to imperfect translation input.

Acknowledgements
This research was conducted by Yong Cheng, Lu Jiang and Wolfgang Macherey. Additional thanks go to our leadership Andrew Moore and Julia (Wenli) Zhu‎.

Source: Google AI Blog


Google at ACL 2019



This week, Florence, Italy hosts the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL 2019), the premier conference in the field of natural language understanding, covering a broad spectrum of research areas that are concerned with computational approaches to natural language.

As a leader in natural language processing and understanding, and a Diamond Level sponsor of ACL 2019, Google will be on hand to showcase the latest research on syntax, semantics, discourse, conversation, multilingual modeling, sentiment analysis, question answering, summarization, and generally building better systems using labeled and unlabeled data.

If you’re attending ACL 2019, we hope that you’ll stop by the Google booth to meet our researchers and discuss projects and opportunities at Google that go into solving interesting problems for billions of people. Our researchers will also be on hand to demo the Natural Questions corpus, the Multilingual Universal Sentence Encoder and more. You can also learn more about the Google research being presented at ACL 2019 below (Google affiliations in blue).

Organizing Committee includes:
Enrique Alfonseca

Accepted Publications
A Joint Named-Entity Recognizer for Heterogeneous Tag-sets Using a Tag Hierarchy
Genady Beryozkin, Yoel Drori, Oren Gilon, Tzvika Hartman, Idan Szpektor

Do Neural Dialog Systems Use the Conversation History Effectively? An Empirical Study
Chinnadhurai Sankar, Sandeep Subramanian, Chris Pal, Sarath Chandar, Yoshua Bengio

Generating Logical Forms from Graph Representations of Text and Entities
Peter Shaw, Philip Massey, Angelica Chen, Francesco Piccinno, Yasemin Altun

Extracting Symptoms and their Status from Clinical Conversations
Nan Du, Kai Chen, Anjuli Kannan, Linh Trans, Yuhui Chen, Izhak Shafran

Stay on the Path: Instruction Fidelity in Vision-and-Language Navigation
Vihan Jain, Gabriel Magalhaes, Alexander Ku, Ashish Vaswani, Eugene Le, Jason Baldridge

Meaning to Form: Measuring Systematicity as Information
Tiago Pimentel, Arya D. McCarthy, Damian Blasi, Brian Roark, Ryan Cotterell

Matching the Blanks: Distributional Similarityfor Relation Learning
Livio Baldini Soares, Nicholas FitzGerald, Jeffrey Ling, Tom Kwiatkowski

Transformer-XL: Attentive Language Models Beyond a Fixed-Length Context
Zihang Dai, Zhilin Yang, Yiming Yang, Jaime Carbonell, Quoc Le, Ruslan Salakhutdinov

HighRES: Highlight-based Reference-less Evaluation of Summarization
Hardy Hardy, Shashi Narayan, Andreas Vlachos

Zero-Shot Entity Linking by Reading Entity Descriptions
Lajanugen Logeswaran, Ming-Wei Chang, Kristina Toutanova, Kenton Lee, Jacob Devlin, Honglak Lee

Robust Neural Machine Translation with Doubly Adversarial Inputs
Yong Cheng, Lu Jiang, Wolfgang Macherey

Natural Questions: a Benchmark for Question Answering Research
Tom Kwiatkowski, Jennimaria Palomaki, Olivia Redfield, Michael Collins, Ankur Parikh, Chris Alberti, Danielle Epstein, Illia Polosukhin, Matthew Kelcey, Jacob Devlin, Kenton Lee, Kristina N. Toutanova, Llion Jones, Ming-Wei Chang, Andrew Dai, Jakob Uszkoreit, Quoc Le, Slav Petrov

Like a Baby: Visually Situated Neural Language Acquisition
Alexander Ororbia, Ankur Mali, Matthew Kelly, David Reitter

What Kind of Language Is Hard to Language-Model?
Sebastian J. Mielke, Ryan Cotterell, Kyle Gorman, Brian Roark, Jason Eisner

How Multilingual is Multilingual BERT?
Telmo Pires, Eva Schlinger, Dan Garrette

Handling Divergent Reference Texts when Evaluating Table-to-Text Generation
Bhuwan Dhingra, Manaal Faruqui, Ankur Parikh, Ming-Wei Chang, Dipanjan Das, William Cohen

BAM! Born-Again Multi-Task Networks for Natural Language Understanding
Kevin Clark, Minh-Thang Luong, Urvashi Khandelal, Christopher D. Manning, Quoc V. Le

Dynamically Composing Domain-Data Selection with Clean-Data Selection by “Co-Curricular Learning" for Neural Machine Translation
Wei Wang, Isaac Caswell, Ciprian Chelba

Monotonic Infinite Lookback Attention for Simultaneous Machine Translation
Naveen Arivazhagan, Colin Cherry, Wolfgang Macherey, Chung-Cheng Chiu, Semih Yavuz, Ruoming Pang, Wei Li, Colin Raffel

On the Robustness of Self-Attentive Models
Yu-Lun Hsieh, Minhao Cheng, Da-Cheng Juan, Wei Wei, Wen-Lian Hsu, Cho-Jui Hsieh

Neural Decipherment via Minimum-Cost Flow: from Ugaritic to Linear B
Jiaming Luo, Yuan Cao, Regina Barzilay

How Large Are Lions? Inducing Distributions over Quantitative Attributes
Yanai Elazar, Abhijit Mahabal, Deepak Ramachandran, Tania Bedrax-Weiss, Dan Roth

BERT Rediscovers the Classical NLP Pipeline
Ian Tenney, Dipanjan Das, Ellie Pavlick

Can You Tell Me How to Get Past Sesame Street? Sentence-Level Pretraining Beyond Language Modeling
Alex Wang, Jan Hula, Patrick Xia, Raghavendra Pappagari, R. Thomas Mccoy, Roma Patel, Najoung Kim, Ian Tenney, Yinghui Huang, Katherin Yu, Shuning Jin, Berlin Chen, Benjamin Van Durme, Edouard Grave, Ellie Pavlick, Samuel R. Bowman

Robust Zero-Shot Cross-Domain Slot Filling with Example Values
Darsh Shah, Raghav Gupta, Amir Fayazi, Dilek Hakkani-Tur

Latent Retrieval for Weakly Supervised Open Domain Question Answering
Kenton Lee, Ming-Wei Chang, Kristina Toutanova

On-device Structured and Context Partitioned Projection Networks
Sujith Ravi, Zornitsa Kozareva

Incorporating Priors with Feature Attribution on Text Classification
Frederick Liu, Besim Avci

Informative Image Captioning with External Sources of Information
Sanqiang Zhao, Piyush Sharma, Tomer Levinboim, Radu Soricut

Reducing Word Omission Errors in Neural Machine Translation: A Contrastive Learning Approach
Zonghan Yang, Yong Cheng, Yang Liu, Maosong Sun

Synthetic QA Corpora Generation with Roundtrip Consistency
Chris Alberti, Daniel Andor, Emily Pitler, Jacob Devlin, Michael Collins

Unsupervised Paraphrasing without Translation
Aurko Roy, David Grangier

Workshops
Widening NLP 2019
Organizers include: Diyi Yang

NLP for Conversational AI
Organizers include: Thang-Minh Luong, Tania Bedrax-Weiss

The Fourth Arabic Natural Language Processing Workshop
Organizers include: Imed Zitouni

The Third Workshop on Abusive Language Online
Organizers include: Zeerak Waseem

TyP-NLP, Typology for Polyglot NLP
Organizers include: Manaal Faruqui

Gender Bias in Natural Language Processing
Organizers include: Kellie Webster

Tutorials
Wikipedia as a Resource for Text Analysis and Retrieval
Organizer: Marius Pasca

Source: Google AI Blog


Google at ACL 2017



This week, Vancouver, Canada hosts the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL 2017), the premier conference in the field of natural language understanding, covering a broad spectrum of diverse research areas that are concerned with computational approaches to natural language.

As a leader in natural language processing & understanding and a Platinum sponsor of ACL 2017, Google will be on hand to showcase research interests that include syntax, semantics, discourse, conversation, multilingual modeling, sentiment analysis, question answering, summarization, and generally building better systems using labeled and unlabeled data, state-of-the-art modeling and learning from indirect supervision.

If you’re attending ACL 2017, we hope that you’ll stop by the Google booth to check out some demos, meet our researchers and discuss projects and opportunities at Google that go into solving interesting problems for billions of people. Learn more about the Google research being presented at ACL 2017 below (Googlers highlighted in blue).

Organizing Committee
Area Chairs include: Sujith Ravi (Machine Learning), Thang Luong (Machine Translation)
Publication Chairs include: Margaret Mitchell (Advisory)

Accepted Papers
A Polynomial-Time Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Phrase-Based Decoding with a Fixed Distortion Limit
Yin-Wen Chang, Michael Collins
(Oral Session)

Cross-Sentence N-ary Relation Extraction with Graph LSTMs
Nanyun Peng, Hoifung Poon, Chris Quirk, Kristina Toutanova, Wen-Tau Yih
(Oral Session)

Neural Symbolic Machines: Learning Semantic Parsers on Freebase with Weak Supervision
Chen Liang, Jonathan Berant, Quoc Le, Kenneth D. Forbus, Ni Lao

Coarse-to-Fine Question Answering for Long Documents
Eunsol Choi, Daniel Hewlett, Jakob Uszkoreit, Illia Polosukhin, Alexandre Lacoste, Jonathan Berant

Automatic Compositor Attribution in the First Folio of Shakespeare
Maria Ryskina, Hannah Alpert-Abrams, Dan Garrette, Taylor Berg-Kirkpatrick

A Nested Attention Neural Hybrid Model for Grammatical Error Correction
Jianshu Ji, Qinlong Wang, Kristina Toutanova, Yongen Gong, Steven Truong, Jianfeng Gao

Get To The Point: Summarization with Pointer-Generator Networks
Abigail See, Peter J. Liu, Christopher D. Manning

Identifying 1950s American Jazz Composers: Fine-Grained IsA Extraction via Modifier Composition
Ellie Pavlick*, Marius Pasca

Learning to Skim Text
Adams Wei Yu, Hongrae Lee, Quoc Le

Workshops
2017 ACL Student Research Workshop
Program Committee includes: Emily Pitler, Brian Roark, Richard Sproat

WiNLP: Women and Underrepresented Minorities in Natural Language Processing
Organizers include: Margaret Mitchell
Gold Sponsor

BUCC: 10th Workshop on Building and Using Comparable Corpora
Scientific Committee includes: Richard Sproat

CLPsych: Computational Linguistics and Clinical Psychology – From Linguistic Signal to Clinical
Reality
Program Committee includes: Brian Roark, Richard Sproat

Repl4NLP: 2nd Workshop on Representation Learning for NLP
Program Committee includes: Ankur Parikh, John Platt

RoboNLP: Language Grounding for Robotics
Program Committee includes: Ankur Parikh, Tom Kwiatkowski

CoNLL 2017 Shared Task: Multilingual Parsing from Raw Text to Universal Dependencies
Management Group includes: Slav Petrov

CoNLL-SIGMORPHON-2017 Shared Task: Universal Morphological Reinflection
Organizing Committee includes: Manaal Faruqui
Invited Speaker: Chris Dyer

SemEval: 11th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation
Organizers include: Daniel Cer

ALW1: 1st Workshop on Abusive Language Online
Panelists include: Margaret Mitchell

EventStory: Events and Stories in the News
Program Committee includes: Silvia Pareti

NMT: 1st Workshop on Neural Machine Translation
Organizing Committee includes: Thang Luong
Program Committee includes: Hieu Pham, Taro Watanabe
Invited Speaker: Quoc Le

Tutorials
Natural Language Processing for Precision Medicine
Hoifung Poon, Chris Quirk, Kristina Toutanova, Wen-tau Yih

Deep Learning for Dialogue Systems
Yun-Nung Chen, Asli Celikyilmaz, Dilek Hakkani-Tur



* Contributed during an internship at Google.

Meet Parsey’s Cousins: Syntax for 40 languages, plus new SyntaxNet capabilities



Just in time for ACL 2016, we are pleased to announce that Parsey McParseface, released in May as part of SyntaxNet and the basis for the Cloud Natural Language API, now has 40 cousins! Parsey’s Cousins is a collection of pretrained syntactic models for 40 languages, capable of analyzing the native language of more than half of the world’s population at often unprecedented accuracy. To better address the linguistic phenomena occurring in these languages we have endowed SyntaxNet with new abilities for Text Segmentation and Morphological Analysis.

When we released Parsey, we were already planning to expand to more languages, and it soon became clear that this was both urgent and important, because researchers were having trouble creating top notch SyntaxNet models for other languages.

The reason for that is a little bit subtle. SyntaxNet, like other TensorFlow models, has a lot of knobs to turn, which affect accuracy and speed. These knobs are called hyperparameters, and control things like the learning rate and its decay, momentum, and random initialization. Because neural networks are more sensitive to the choice of these hyperparameters than many other machine learning algorithms, picking the right hyperparameter setting is very important. Unfortunately there is no tested and proven way of doing this and picking good hyperparameters is mostly an empirical science -- we try a bunch of settings and see what works best.

An additional challenge is that training these models can take a long time, several days on very fast hardware. Our solution is to train many models in parallel via MapReduce, and when one looks promising, train a bunch more models with similar settings to fine-tune the results. This can really add up -- on average, we train more than 70 models per language. The plot below shows how the accuracy varies depending on the hyperparameters as training progresses. The best models are up to 4% absolute more accurate than ones trained without hyperparameter tuning.
Held-out set accuracy for various English parsing models with different hyperparameters (each line corresponds to one training run with specific hyperparameters). In some cases training is a lot slower and in many cases a suboptimal choice of hyperparameters leads to significantly lower accuracy. We are releasing the best model that we were able to train for each language.
In order to do a good job at analyzing the grammar of other languages, it was not sufficient to just fine-tune our English setup. We also had to expand the capabilities of SyntaxNet. The first extension is a model for text segmentation, which is the task of identifying word boundaries. In languages like English, this isn’t very hard -- you can mostly look for spaces and punctuation. In Chinese, however, this can be very challenging, because words are not separated by spaces. To correctly analyze dependencies between Chinese words, SyntaxNet needs to understand text segmentation -- and now it does.
Analysis of a Chinese string into a parse tree showing dependency labels, word tokens, and parts of speech (read top to bottom for each word token).
The second extension is a model for morphological analysis. Morphology is a language feature that is poorly represented in English. It describes inflection: i.e., how the grammatical function and meaning of the word changes as its spelling changes. In English, we add an -s to a word to indicate plurality. In Russian, a heavily inflected language, morphology can indicate number, gender, whether the word is the subject or object of a sentence, possessives, prepositional phrases, and more. To understand the syntax of a sentence in Russian, SyntaxNet needs to understand morphology -- and now it does.
Parse trees showing dependency labels, parts of speech, and morphology.
As you might have noticed, the parse trees for all of the sentences above look very similar. This is because we follow the content-head principle, under which dependencies are drawn between content words, with function words becoming leaves in the parse tree. This idea was developed by the Universal Dependencies project in order to increase parallelism between languages. Parsey’s Cousins are trained on treebanks provided by this project and are designed to be cross-linguistically consistent and thus easier to use in multi-lingual language understanding applications.

Using the same set of labels across languages can help us understand how sentences in different languages, or variations in the same language, convey the same meaning. In all of the above examples, the root indicates the main verb of the sentence and there is a passive nominal subject (indicated by the arc labeled with ‘nsubjpass’) and a passive auxiliary (‘auxpass’). If you look closely, you will also notice some differences because the grammar of each language differs. For example, English uses the preposition ‘by,’ where Russian uses morphology to mark that the phrase ‘the publisher (издателем)’ is in instrumental case -- the meaning is the same, it is just expressed differently.

Google has been involved in the Universal Dependencies project since its inception and we are very excited to be able to bring together our efforts on datasets and modeling. We hope that this release will facilitate research progress in building computer systems that can understand all of the world’s languages.

Parsey's Cousins can be found on GitHub, along with Parsey McParseface and SyntaxNet.

ACL 2016 & Research at Google



This week, Berlin hosts the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL 2016), the premier conference of the field of computational linguistics, covering a broad spectrum of diverse research areas that are concerned with computational approaches to natural language. As a leader in Natural Language Processing (NLP) and a Platinum Sponsor of the conference, Google will be on hand to showcase research interests that include syntax, semantics, discourse, conversation, multilingual modeling, sentiment analysis, question answering, summarization, and generally building better learners using labeled and unlabeled data, state-of-the-art modeling, and learning from indirect supervision.

Our systems are used in numerous ways across Google, impacting user experience in search, mobile, apps, ads, translate and more. Our work spans the range of traditional NLP tasks, with general-purpose syntax and semantic algorithms underpinning more specialized systems.
Our researchers are experts in natural language processing and machine learning, and combine methodological research with applied science, and our engineers are equally involved in long-term research efforts and driving immediate applications of our technology.

If you’re attending ACL 2016, we hope that you’ll stop by the booth to check out some demos, meet our researchers and discuss projects and opportunities at Google that go into solving interesting problems for billions of people. Learn more about Google research being presented at ACL 2016 below (Googlers highlighted in blue), and visit the Natural Language Understanding Team page at g.co/NLUTeam.

Papers
Generalized Transition-based Dependency Parsing via Control Parameters
Bernd Bohnet, Ryan McDonald, Emily Pitler, Ji Ma

Learning the Curriculum with Bayesian Optimization for Task-Specific Word Representation Learning
Yulia Tsvetkov, Manaal Faruqui, Wang Ling (Google DeepMind), Chris Dyer (Google DeepMind)

Morpho-syntactic Lexicon Generation Using Graph-based Semi-supervised Learning (TACL)
Manaal Faruqui, Ryan McDonald, Radu Soricut

Many Languages, One Parser (TACL)
Waleed Ammar, George Mulcaire, Miguel Ballesteros, Chris Dyer (Google DeepMind)*, Noah A. Smith

Latent Predictor Networks for Code Generation
Wang Ling (Google DeepMind), Phil Blunsom (Google DeepMind), Edward Grefenstette (Google DeepMind), Karl Moritz Hermann (Google DeepMind), Tomáš Kočiský (Google DeepMind), Fumin Wang (Google DeepMind), Andrew Senior (Google DeepMind)

Collective Entity Resolution with Multi-Focal Attention
Amir Globerson, Nevena Lazic, Soumen Chakrabarti, Amarnag Subramanya, Michael Ringgaard, Fernando Pereira

Plato: A Selective Context Model for Entity Resolution (TACL)
Nevena Lazic, Amarnag Subramanya, Michael Ringgaard, Fernando Pereira

WikiReading: A Novel Large-scale Language Understanding Task over Wikipedia
Daniel Hewlett, Alexandre Lacoste, Llion Jones, Illia Polosukhin, Andrew Fandrianto, Jay Han, Matthew Kelcey, David Berthelot

Stack-propagation: Improved Representation Learning for Syntax
Yuan Zhang, David Weiss

Cross-lingual Models of Word Embeddings: An Empirical Comparison
Shyam Upadhyay, Manaal Faruqui, Chris Dyer (Google DeepMind)Dan Roth

Globally Normalized Transition-Based Neural Networks (Outstanding Papers Session)
Daniel Andor, Chris Alberti, David Weiss, Aliaksei Severyn, Alessandro Presta, Kuzman GanchevSlav Petrov, Michael Collins

Posters
Cross-lingual projection for class-based language models
Beat Gfeller, Vlad Schogol, Keith Hall

Synthesizing Compound Words for Machine Translation
Austin Matthews, Eva Schlinger*, Alon Lavie, Chris Dyer (Google DeepMind)*

Cross-Lingual Morphological Tagging for Low-Resource Languages
Jan Buys, Jan A. Botha

Workshops
1st Workshop on Representation Learning for NLP
Keynote Speakers include: Raia Hadsell (Google DeepMind)
Workshop Organizers include: Edward Grefenstette (Google DeepMind), Phil Blunsom (Google DeepMind), Karl Moritz Hermann (Google DeepMind)
Program Committee members include: Tomáš Kočiský (Google DeepMind), Wang Ling (Google DeepMind), Ankur Parikh (Google), John Platt (Google), Oriol Vinyals (Google DeepMind)

1st Workshop on Evaluating Vector-Space Representations for NLP
Contributed Papers:
Problems With Evaluation of Word Embeddings Using Word Similarity Tasks
Manaal Faruqui, Yulia Tsvetkov, Pushpendre Rastogi, Chris Dyer (Google DeepMind)*

Correlation-based Intrinsic Evaluation of Word Vector Representations
Yulia Tsvetkov, Manaal Faruqui, Chris Dyer (Google DeepMind)

SIGFSM Workshop on Statistical NLP and Weighted Automata
Contributed Papers:
Distributed representation and estimation of WFST-based n-gram models
Cyril Allauzen, Michael Riley, Brian Roark

Pynini: A Python library for weighted finite-state grammar compilation
Kyle Gorman


* Work completed at CMU