Tag Archives: Nonprofits

Google for Nonprofits adds new countries and G Suite discounts

With the spread of coronavirus, nonprofits need access to tools to help them work remotely and raise awareness online. To serve the unique needs of the nonprofit community, the Google for Nonprofits team is expanding the program to new countries and offering discounts for nonprofits who use G Suite Business and Enterprise editions.

Reaching nonprofits in more countries 

In the program’s first expansion in years, we’re bringing Google for Nonprofits to 6 new countries—Portugal, Greece, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Peru. Google for Nonprofits is now available in 57 countries, helping thousands ofeligible organizations get access to Google’s nonprofit tools and continue business operations amid COVID-19. 

Nonprofits can activate G Suite for Nonprofits at no cost and collaborate online with apps like Gmail, Docs, and Calendar. In addition, advanced features of Google Meetare available to all editions of G Suite through September 30, 2020. To help organizations raise awareness online, the Ad Grants Crisis Response Program is extending Ad Grants, up to $10,000 worth of text-based Search ads at no cost, in these countries through October 2020. The YouTube Nonprofit Program and Google Earth and Maps also offer nonprofits storytelling tools to amplify their cause. 

Discounting G Suite Business and Enterprise editions for nonprofits

Many nonprofits are learning how to transition their staff and programs to online-only formats, and with that comes challenges around cloud storage, security and virtual collaboration. To give nonprofits access to G Suite’s advanced features, we’re launching nonprofit discounts globally for G Suite Business ($4 per user per month, normally offered at $12) and G Suite Enterprise ($8 per user per month, normally offered at $25). As always, G Suite for Nonprofits will continue to be offered at no charge.

G Suite Business for Nonprofits offers 1 TB storage per user, access to Google Vault for data management, video conferencing for up to 150 people, along with more security and administrative options. With G Suite Enterprise for Nonprofits, organizations have all the features of G Suite Business and G Suite for Nonprofits, with the addition of email encryption, live streaming and video conferencing for up to 250 people, as well as Cloud Identity to manage users and apps. 

G Suite Nonprofits pricing

Google for Nonprofits is on a mission to empower nonprofits with technology. See our full list of COVID-19 resources on the Google for Nonprofits website, Coronavirus Resources page. Subscribe to our YouTube channel to get notifications for upcoming live streams and to learn more about our products.

Words of wisdom from three women in nonprofits

Every day, I work with incredible women. I feel fortunate because it hasn’t always been this way. I’ve been the only woman in meetings before, and I’ve definitely felt like the odd woman out. When I started working with Google for Nonprofits, I was excited to discover a community of women who deserve as much attention as the nonprofits they power. For International Women’s Day coming up on March 8, I asked three of them to share their stories, inspiration and advice.

Kimberlin Bolton, Executive Director, re:imagine/ATL

Kimberlin Bolton

On inspiring others

The best way to inspire others is by being the example. People—especially women—need to see that you did it even though you were afraid, vulnerable, imperfect and constantly learning. I try to live and speak as authentically as possible so that my staff, students, and the greater community can say, “If she can do it, then I can definitely do it!” 

On gender equality in nonprofits

While it appears that there is still a lack of women leadership at larger organizations, I think the bigger concern is the lack of support for young, emerging leaders of color. How can we build systems that foster an inclusive ecosystem for emerging women in the nonprofit sector?

On setting boundaries

This is “heart work” and if you’re not careful, you can overdraft your mental and emotional bank accounts. There is so much burnout in this industry and it’s because women are natural nurturers. We constantly feel the need to save everyone. I quickly had to learn the importance of boundaries in order to be more effective.

Rochelle Byrne, Executive Director, A Greener Future

Rochelle Byrne

On taking chances

When I first started out, I gathered my courage and reached out to someone I thought might have answers I was seeking. I didn’t expect to get much more than a quick telephone chat. To my surprise a chat turned into tea, and then lunch, and now it’s one of the most valuable relationships I have. Taking chances is so important. I wouldn’t be where I am now if I didn’t do things that scare me.

On reaching goals

I enjoy setting a goal and trying to figure out all the steps it will take to work backward to where I am now. When I look back to where A Greener Future started it’s unbelievable to me how far it’s come and I know it’s simply from achieving one small goal at a time.

On connecting with others

Communicating in an effective and charismatic way will ensure more doors open. Be fearless when asking for what you really want. Have meaningful conversations and get to know people. Building relationships is the key to moving forward and making more connections. 

Taking chances is so important. I wouldn’t be where I am now if I didn’t do things that scare me.

Dr. Annise Mabry, CEO, Dr. Annise Mabry Foundation

Dr. Annise Mabry

On career planning

My mentor once told me, “When you find what you love, you will do it for the impact not the income.” Working with homeless LGBTQ youth, sex trafficking survivors, and high school dropouts is what I love. They are my career plan. 

On the power of saying no

Women have a tendency to always say, “Yes, I will,” and then they go insane trying to figure it out. I usually say “no” first. By saying “no,” it gives me time to really think—not “Can I do this?” but “Do I want to do this?” Do what you want to do not what you feel obligated to do. 

On letting go

One skill I feel women have to develop to be successful in the nonprofit world is stop allowing passion to become possession. I see this a lot when women have had to fight to earn their place in an organization. They hold on to everything—from projects to committees. They end up crushing the very thing they loved the most. If you have a team, let go and let your team step up. 

For more inspiration, visit Google for Nonprofits’ success stories.

Words of wisdom from three women in nonprofits

Every day, I work with incredible women. I feel fortunate because it hasn’t always been this way. I’ve been the only woman in meetings before, and I’ve definitely felt like the odd woman out. When I started working with Google for Nonprofits, I was excited to discover a community of women who deserve as much attention as the nonprofits they power. For International Women’s Day coming up on March 8, I asked three of them to share their stories, inspiration and advice.

Kimberlin Bolton, Executive Director, re:imagine/ATL

Kimberlin Bolton

On inspiring others

The best way to inspire others is by being the example. People—especially women—need to see that you did it even though you were afraid, vulnerable, imperfect and constantly learning. I try to live and speak as authentically as possible so that my staff, students, and the greater community can say, “If she can do it, then I can definitely do it!” 

On gender equality in nonprofits

While it appears that there is still a lack of women leadership at larger organizations, I think the bigger concern is the lack of support for young, emerging leaders of color. How can we build systems that foster an inclusive ecosystem for emerging women in the nonprofit sector?

On setting boundaries

This is “heart work” and if you’re not careful, you can overdraft your mental and emotional bank accounts. There is so much burnout in this industry and it’s because women are natural nurturers. We constantly feel the need to save everyone. I quickly had to learn the importance of boundaries in order to be more effective.

Rochelle Byrne, Executive Director, A Greener Future

Rochelle Byrne

On taking chances

When I first started out, I gathered my courage and reached out to someone I thought might have answers I was seeking. I didn’t expect to get much more than a quick telephone chat. To my surprise a chat turned into tea, and then lunch, and now it’s one of the most valuable relationships I have. Taking chances is so important. I wouldn’t be where I am now if I didn’t do things that scare me.

On reaching goals

I enjoy setting a goal and trying to figure out all the steps it will take to work backward to where I am now. When I look back to where A Greener Future started it’s unbelievable to me how far it’s come and I know it’s simply from achieving one small goal at a time.

On connecting with others

Communicating in an effective and charismatic way will ensure more doors open. Be fearless when asking for what you really want. Have meaningful conversations and get to know people. Building relationships is the key to moving forward and making more connections. 

Taking chances is so important. I wouldn’t be where I am now if I didn’t do things that scare me.

Dr. Annise Mabry, CEO, Dr. Annise Mabry Foundation

Dr. Annise Mabry

On career planning

My mentor once told me, “When you find what you love, you will do it for the impact not the income.” Working with homeless LGBTQ youth, sex trafficking survivors, and high school dropouts is what I love. They are my career plan. 

On the power of saying no

Women have a tendency to always say, “Yes, I will,” and then they go insane trying to figure it out. I usually say “no” first. By saying “no,” it gives me time to really think—not “Can I do this?” but “Do I want to do this?” Do what you want to do not what you feel obligated to do. 

On letting go

One skill I feel women have to develop to be successful in the nonprofit world is stop allowing passion to become possession. I see this a lot when women have had to fight to earn their place in an organization. They hold on to everything—from projects to committees. They end up crushing the very thing they loved the most. If you have a team, let go and let your team step up. 

For more inspiration, visit Google for Nonprofits’ success stories.

Google helps Switchboard support UK LGBT+ communities

Every February people across the UK celebrate LGBT+ History Month, raising awareness about  LGBT+ communities. Based in London, Switchboard LGBT+ Helpline has supported LGBT+ people since the 1970s, just a few years after the partial decriminalization of homosexuality in the UK. Since then, they’ve witnessed and shaped many more milestones of UK LGBT+ history, helping millions of people. 

As an entirely volunteer-led organization, Switchboard keeps its phone lines open every day from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. (yes, even during the holidays!), and offers additional support on email and text. Volunteers are there to listen and assist callers, offering a safe space for anyone to discuss what’s on their mind, including sexuality, gender identity, sexual health, and emotional wellbeing. No matter where you are, no matter how you identify, you can call Switchboard and speak openly, in confidence, without any judgment. 

Running an always-on program with more than 200 volunteers on a small budget requires the right tools. Volunteers need to be trained and prepared—calls can be emotionally challenging, and many topics require detailed, in-depth knowledge. For this reason, Switchboard consolidates all their training securely into Google Drive and gives every volunteer access via their own G Suite for Nonprofits account. “As an organization we try to move with the evolving nature of culture, education, and society, and G Suite for Nonprofits has really helped us to do that,'' says Tash Walker, Co-Chair. Watch the video to learn more about Switchboard’s impact and how they use G Suite and other Google for Nonprofits products to offer high quality, reliable services to the LGBT+ community. 

Young coders are shaping Singapore’s future

You’re never too young to take up coding—just ask 10-year-old Sephia Rindiani Binte Andi. Sephia only took up coding a year ago, and sharpened her skills so quickly she created an online game shortly after. The game challenges players to navigate their way out of a maze (I admittedly kept getting lost). Today, Sephia continues dabbling in code at home with the help of her mom, Kamzarini.  


Sephia is a graduate of Code in the Community, a program that brings coding classes to young Singaporeans from less affluent backgrounds. The grassroots initiative is run by local education organizations like Saturday Kids and 21C Girls, with the help of more than 1,000 volunteers and the backing of Google and Singapore's Infocomm and Media Development Authority (IMDA). 


Since 2017, Code in the Community has reached more than 2,000 Singaporean students. And this week, we’re proud to announce that Google will provide a new grantto help expand the program for another three years.   


Together with a matching grant from IMDA, the new funds mean two things: First, they’ll allow the program to bring basic coding classes to 6,700 more kids by 2022.  Second, they’ll support new courses for the 2,300 existing graduates—encouraging talented young students like Sephia to apply what they’ve learned and explore new concepts like design thinking.  

We hope Code in the Community will shape Singapore’s future as a smart nation, growing the city-state’s $12 billion internet economy—one of the most advanced in Southeast Asia—with new jobs and opportunities. 


As a Singaporean myself, I’ve found it incredibly inspiring to see the way local communities have come together to make technology real, accessible and fun for children. I can’t wait to see what the next generation of graduates do as they develop their skills and go wherever their imagination takes them. 


One year, three highlights: Google for Nonprofits looks back

Imagine ending homelessness, solving climate change, or guaranteeing a sustainable future for the world. Nonprofits work hard to make these goals a reality. They tackle the most urgent issues facing society, and Google products help make their missions more visible and far-reaching. Let’s look at three ways the nonprofit community thrived in 2019 with the support of Google for Nonprofits and partner teams.

1. Staying in the know

Followers of Google for Nonprofits’ monthly newsletters and livestreams enjoyed a steady stream of news and tips about Google products. They learned how to spread their messages on YouTube, how to make a bigger impact with Google Earth and Maps, and gained insights from Google Analytics. 

Nonprofits also learned from each other. Thrive DC shared their mission to end homelessness in Washington, D.C., and how Google for Nonprofits helped them drastically improve their efficiency and productivity. GoVolunteer described how Google helps them grow and develop inclusion programs for immigrants and refugees in Germany.

Along with hearing these inspiring stories, nonprofits asked questions and supported each other on the newly launched Google for Nonprofits community forum. And they discovered an updated Google for Nonprofits site that’s more useful for everyone, including visitors with accessibility needs.

Thrive DC culinary arts

Thrive DC clients attend Culinary Arts, a program to teach culinary skills and provide new job opportunities to vulnerable populations.

2. Connecting with the community

Sixty-five nonprofits attended a day-long workshop that Google for Nonprofits held at Google’s Community Space in San Francisco. They received training on using YouTube to spread awareness and heard Invisible People speak about building empathy and support for those affected by homelessness.

In April, attendees of Google Cloud Next listened to the Google for Nonprofits team discuss how G Suite empowers nonprofits to collaborate and communicate more effectively. Two nonprofits also shared their experiences and best practices (watch the recording).

3. Putting themselves (and trees) on the map

In 2019, around 2,000 nonprofits across 59 countries used Google Maps Platform credits to raise their profiles and encourage others to join their mission.

Worldwide Opportunities on Organic Farms USA, which helps travelers find and work on organic farms, added Maps to their site so visitors could zoom in on any area in the U.S., see all the available farms and filter their search to narrow in on the right farms for them. After the switch to Google Maps Platform, WWOOF-USA’s page views increased to 8 million and the number of paying members nearly tripled since May 2018. 

EcoFarm Florida

A cow in an WWOOF-USA eco farm.

People also relied on YouTube to get more eyes on fundraising campaigns. In October, YouTube creator Mr. Beast vowed to get 20 million trees planted by the end of the year. The campaign, #TeamTrees, engaged other YouTube creators to promote the effort. More than 200 creators either posted videos about #TeamTrees or promoted it by using YouTube Giving.

We’re looking forward to more partnerships and stories in 2020. To stay up to date on all the latest nonprofit news, you can subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel, and join us at the Nonprofit Technology Conference in Maryland this March where we’ll be a platinum sponsor.

International Volunteer Day: a spotlight on GoVolunteer

In 2015, more than 1 million people sought asylum in Germany. Faced with this overwhelming humanitarian crisis, many Germans wanted to help but didn’t know how. Inspired by his fellow citizens’ willingness to lend a hand, Malte Bedürftig founded GoVolunteer, an online platform connecting people and corporations to volunteering opportunities and social initiatives. After GoVolunteer joined the Google for Nonprofits program, they gained more online visibility through Ad Grants and more team structure and efficiency through G Suite for Nonprofits. 

“We were a group of people who wanted to help others, inspired by the dream of changing things,” says Malte. Since then, Malte and his friends have built GoVolunteer into a full-fledged nonprofit, connecting 250,000 people to more than 3,500 volunteer opportunities in 250 cities across Germany. 

Today, in honor of the UN’s International Volunteer Day, we’re recognizing GoVolunteer and everyone else who makes time to help others. Watch the video to learn more about GoVolunteer’s journey and how Google for Nonprofits has supported their growth.

Share your own volunteer story with #IVD2019 and #InternationalVolunteerDay.

Google Ad Grants help a U.K. nonprofit save lives

Editor’s note: Today is World Mental Health Day, a day run by the World Health Organization with the aim of breaking down the stigma of mental health and draw attention to resources and organizations available to help people cope. One of those organizations is Samaritans, which is a recipient of Google Ad Grants

Every six seconds, someone contacts Samaritans in need of support. And for the more than half a million people we reach each year, our more than 20,000 volunteers are here.

Founded in 1953, Samaritans is a U.K.-based organization dedicated to making sure fewer people die by suicide. We provide more than 20,000 volunteers over the phone, by email and face to face. My team manages the digital side, including search, social media, video and email outreach to raise awareness and connect with people who need our services. 

For over 13 years, my team has been a recipient of Google Ad Grants, which provides eligible nonprofits with free Search ads to connect people to causes. We use Ad Grants uniquely to help two types of people: Those struggling to cope with mental health issues, and those trying to help loved ones who are struggling.

People struggling to cope often turn to Google for several reasons: to better understand their symptoms, to find resources or—at worst—with the intent of harming themselves. For some searches with intent to self-harm, Google has a feature that surfaces our help line at the top of results to provide people with resources in their time of need. 

But beyond that, there’s more we can do with ads. Our Ad Grants ads ensure that the many different ways we provide help is front and center for people in need of support. For example, when someone comes to Google struggling to cope themselves, our ads proactively offer resources to get them help and shift the focus toward ways to get better.

The Google Ad Grants program helps us save lives.

Uniquely, Search ads from the Ad Grant also allow us to provide resources to people who want to help others. We run ads targeting people who are looking for information on how to start difficult conversations or how to support friends and family who might need it.

Overall, Google Ad Grants has been a critical tool in supporting our organization’s mission and connecting people to life-saving mental health resources in real time. Our free Search ads have incredible reach and help us drive measurable results in the real world, such as raising awareness of our helpline, driving donations and increasing volunteer signups. All of these results from Ad Grants enable us to serve more people in need.

Last year, our Ad Grants ads were seen 2.6 million times. More than 320,000 people, seeking either support services or expressing interest in volunteering, clicked on our ads. A key part of our success is using free Google tracking tools (such as Analytics and Conversion Tracking) to measure the impact of our ads, learn what support offerings are most desired and see firsthand in our reports how many lives we are touching. Samaritans relies on Google to help us reach hundreds of people a day who are in need and might not otherwise know our services exist. The Google Ad Grants program helps us save lives.

A new way for job seekers to stand out to IT recruiters

Almost two years ago, Grow with Google introduced the IT Support Professional Certificate, a program that helps people prepare for entry-level roles in IT, with no experience or degree necessary. IT support skills are highly teachable, and a four-year degree isn’t typically required to build a successful career in this field. We knew that if we could train beginners on technical skills, we could create paths to real jobs—both at Google and at other companies across the country. So we created a hands-on curriculum and made it available on Coursera to prepare learners for IT support jobs in under six months.

Google and CompTIA badge

Now, Google is teaming up with CompTIA, a nonprofit trade association, to provide a dual badge of completion. Employers widely recognize the CompTIA A+ certification as a valued credential for high-growth IT support roles. Now, learners who complete the Google IT Support Professional Certificate and pass the CompTIA A+ certification exams will have access to a new dual credential from CompTIA and Google: a badge that can be posted on LinkedIn to catch the attention of potential employers. 

One recipient of the dual credential is Leo Chui, who was a personal trainer for 12 years when he decided he was ready for a career change. “I have always been passionate about technology and I always wanted to work in that field, but I didn’t have a university degree,” he says. “I simply did not have the means to take on student loans in order to pursue my dreams and also keep a roof over my head.” Leo believes that the IT Support Professional Certificate aligns with the training in CompTIA’s certification exams. He says the training and the badge gave him the confidence to start applying for positions in the field, and he just landed his first IT job. 

With this dual badge, people who complete the Google IT Support Professional Certificate and receive the CompTIA A+ certification are better set up to share their skills with potential employers. 

Google helps a nonprofit train young storytellers

Georgia is the number one filming location in the world, with a film and television industry worth $7 billion a year—a huge economic opportunity for local communities. On the flip side, Georgia is also home to about 180,000 disconnected youth. Disconnected (or opportunity) youth is defined as people ages 16-24 who are neither in school nor working. In Georgia, they represent 13.5 percent of people in that age range, two percentage points above the national average. Training programs to develop media production skills could give a new opportunity to thousands of young adults in the state.

Founded in 2014 in Atlanta, re:imagine/ATLis a nonprofit that trains the next generation of representative storytellers, to create a safe, inclusive and equitable workforce in the film and digital media industry. Partnering with schools and opportunity youth in metro Atlanta over the past five years, re:imagine/ATL has trained more than 3,000 young people who have produced more than 100 movies, documentaries, podcasts and other digital content.

Where I'm From | Westside Storytelling Competition

Where I'm From | Westside Storytelling Competition

This video produced by re:imagine/ATL is featured on the Best of Social Impact playlist in the YouTube Social Impact channel.

Google for Nonprofits spoke to re:imagine/ATL’s Executive Director Kimberlin Bolton to understand how they use Google products.

What’s one Google product that helped you explore new frontiers in storytelling?

Cardboard has been instrumental. Since 2015 we’ve offered three virtual reality training events per year. We hope to produce more 360 content and use Cardboard during screening events for the public.

How has Google for Nonprofits helped you become more visible?

We use Ad Grants for advertising our summer camp, in-school program and events. Through Ads we’ve reached new audiences. For example, a library in Doraville, Georgia, discovered our mobile workshops, and we provided an acting class for their filmmaking club. We had not previously considered libraries as a venue for our programming, and Doraville is outside of our usual service zone.

Our YouTube Channel is our primary distribution platform and has been a place to amplify youth voices and the next generation of leaders. The content our students create using Google products helps us raise awareness about different social issues in the community. Whether a video makes it to a film festival, a curated platform, or even network TV, they all begin on YouTube.

Any secret tips or tricks to share with other nonprofits?

We are using Google Alerts to discover every time we’re mentioned in the media. It also allows us to stay updated on the issues we care about most, find opportunities and celebrate our film and media community.

For an afterschool workshop, we used Google’s free CS First computer science curriculum to teach students to create animations using code. We are also starting to use Classroom for our film fellowship program, “No Comment.” Classroom allows us to send out assignments, track progress and communicate with all of our students, taking a great deal of administrative load off of our teachers.

How did G Suite for Nonprofits impact the way you work?

We rely on Sheets to track donations, program and operations budgets as well as student demographics and participation. Docs has been the bedrock of our administrative processes. In Docs we have our letterhead, we write grants and proposals collaboratively  and we plan programs and agendas. We also created a shared company calendar to coordinate equipment and space efficiently, or to know when employees are traveling.


Having a unified professional email system that is separate from our personal inboxes has made such a difference. G Suite for Nonprofits provides security for us and our constituents, communicates professionalism, and makes information more compartmentalized and easy to find.