Tag Archives: UK

Increasing Google’s investment in the UK

Image credit: Pollitt & Partners 2015

For almost two decades Google has been proud to have a home in the UK. Today, we have more than 6,400 employees and last year we added nearly 700 new people. We also strengthened our commitment to the UK in 2021 with the laying of a new subsea cable — Grace Hopper — which runs between the United States and the UK.

Building on our long-term commitment to the UK, we are purchasing the Central Saint Giles development — the site many Googlers have long called home — for $1 billion. Based in London’s thriving West End, our investment in this striking Renzo Piano-designed development represents our continued confidence in the office as a place for in-person collaboration and connection.

Across all our UK sites, Google will have capacity for 10,000 employees, as we continue to commit to the UK’s growth and success. This includes our new King’s Cross development, which is currently under construction.

Investing in the future flexible workplace

We believe that the future of work is flexibility. Whilst the majority of our UK employees want to be on-site some of the time, they also want the flexibility of working from home a couple of days a week. Some of our people will want to be fully remote. Our future UK workplace has room for all of those possibilities.

Over the next few years, we’ll be embarking on a multi-million pound refurbishment of our offices within Central Saint Giles to ensure that they are best equipped to meet the needs of our future workplace.

We'll be introducing new types of collaboration spaces for in-person teamwork, as well as creating more overall space to improve wellbeing. We’ll introduce team pods, which are flexible new space types that can be reconfigured in multiple ways, supporting focused work, collaboration or both, based on team needs. The new refurbishment will also feature outdoor covered working spaces to enable work in the fresh air.

Supporting digital growth across the UK

More than ever, technology is enabling people and businesses across the UK. In 2021, we achieved our target to help one million small British businesses stay open by helping them be found online.

It’s important that everyone is able to take advantage of the increasing innovation in the UK and grow skill sets to prepare for the jobs of the present and the future. Since we launched our Digital Garage programme in Leeds in 2015, we have provided free digital skills training to more than 700,000 people across the UK .

Thousands more UK jobseekers will also be helped to upgrade their digital skills in 2022 thanks to our expanded partnership with the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). Nearly 10,000 job-seekers are able to gain access to free scholarships to earn a Google Careers Certificate in high-growth, high-demand career fields including IT support, data analysis, project management and UX design.

We’re optimistic about the potential of digital technology to drive an inclusive and sustainable future in the UK. We’re excited to be making this investment in January as a fitting way to start the new year.

Honoring Stephen Hawking’s scientific legacy

As we welcome in another year, and reflect on the turbulent one that’s passed, the existential words of Professor Stephen Hawking are as poignant as ever: “Remember to look up at the stars, and not down at your feet.”

It was not just the great scientific body of work that British-born cosmologist Hawking gave to the world, but also his reminders to reflect on the universe we live in — and the fragility and the beauty of existence.

And today, on January 8, the day Professor Stephen Hawking would have turned 80, we are launching a Google Doodle in more than 50 countries worldwide to celebrate one of history’s most influential scientific minds.

A picture of Stephen Hawking outside the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge

Stephen Hawking at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge. Photo courtesy of the Hawking family.

British Doodler Matthew Cruickshank created the two-minute video Doodle animation, taking people on a journey from Hawking’s early years right into outer space. The challenge, according to Cruickshank, was bringing such a body of work together creatively, from black holes to the Big Bang, as well as theories on the origins and mechanics of the universe.

In the Doodle, the voice of Hawking was generated and used to narrate some of his most impactful quotes with a chronological look at his life and legacy. With guidance from his family and estate, the Doodle also plays with Hawking's humour, love of animation and gaming.

Continue the exploration on Google Arts & Culture

Alongside the Doodle, the Google Arts & Culture Institute is celebrating Stephen Hawking with a new exhibition available to view from today.

Meet the man who changed our understanding of the universe, courtesy of interactive information about his life and work.

Hawking's legacy

Hawking’s theories on the origins and nature of the universe revolutionised modern physics, while his best-selling books made the field widely accessible to millions of readers worldwide. To many, Hawking’s astronomical impact is so widely recognised, it changed how the world understands the universe.

A picture showing Stephen Hawking with his son Robert and baby Lucy sleeping on his lap.

Stephen Hawking with his children Robert and baby Lucy. Photo courtesy of the Hawking family.

As his daughter, Lucy, put it, “He would have been very entertained to see his long, distinguished life expressed so creatively in this briefest history of all, a two-minute animation!” His family hopes the physical challenges he overcame to make an impact on the world will inspire those bracing for potentially tough times ahead.

Rightmove sets up home with Google Cloud

Rightmove’s mission is simple: make home moving easier. In 2020, its app and website saw over two billion visits from people looking to find the right property for them. In fact, the online property titan has had a bumper year, with over 100 of the company’s busiest ever days for visits all happening in the last 12 months.

Having led the charge in transforming the UK property market for both home-hunters and estate agents since 2000, Rightmove is no stranger to innovation. Its mature multi-site data centre infrastructure and CI/CD tooling has served it well. However, to meet increasing demand for its services and continue its market-leading innovation, it needed to take its technology platform to the next level. This meant finding a solution that would enable more agility and velocity for the product and platform teams, in a highly efficient way, all while delivering on its sustainability goals.

And so, boxes (theoretically, of course) were packed and the moving van was on the way to a new life with Google Cloud.

Moving with containers

While Rightmove’s audience may use boxes to move, Rightmove is using containers - over 1,000 of them at any time — and has chosen to start using Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE), a managed, production-ready environment for running containerised applications. “We are continuously striving to provide a better experience for consumers on the Rightmove website and better products for our customers. We release over 2,000 updates a year to our applications, so a key focus area for us is reducing time to production and, in turn, time to market,” explains Andrew Tate, Head of Technology Operations at Rightmove. GKE will enable the company to build and deliver new services faster, automate upgrades, and importantly, scale in line with traffic peaks. In the UK, that’s at 8.48 pm on Wednesday during the final ad break on prime-time TV. With this approach it will also reduce its operational overheads, enabling engineers to focus on higher value work, experimentation and innovation.

A sustainable Rightmove

As part of Rightmove's own sustainability journey to net-zero, it wants to be able to run services more environmentally consciously. Our commitment to 24/7 carbon-free energy by 2030 was another key driver for the move. Through Google Cloud, theindustry’s cleanest cloud, the company will be able to not only run workloads in the places that have the most carbon-free energy supply, but also ensure that it is consuming the minimum amount of power that is needed to support maximum users at a given point in time.

Looking to the future

Already utilising Google Cloud’s data analytics capabilities to inform its marketing campaigns, Rightmove is also looking to expand its use of BigQuery — our serverless, highly scalable data warehouse — in order to transform the way it uses data internally, and eventually create a more centralised data solution on Google Cloud. By unifying different data sources internally, it will be able to gain valuable insights that will enable its teams to make more effective, data-led decisions and enhance its product set further.

We’re delighted the UK’s #1 property website is moving in the right direction with Google Cloud.

An update on our Privacy Sandbox commitments

For further background on this topic, please see our blog from June.

Since we announced our Privacy Sandbox commitments earlier this year, we have continued to work with the UK’s Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) to address feedback that was raised as part of its public consultation process. We have also continued to update and seek feedback from the market and the UK Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) on our proposals.

We are determined to ensure that the Privacy Sandbox is developed in a way that works for the entire ecosystem and, as part of this process, we have now offered revised commitments, which can be found in full on the CMA’s website.

These revisions underline our commitment to ensuring that the changes we make in Chrome will apply in the same way to Google’s ad tech products as to any third party, and that the Privacy Sandbox APIs will be designed, developed and implemented with regulatory oversight and input from the CMA and the ICO. We also support the objectives set out yesterday in the ICO’s Opinion on Data protection and privacy expectations for online advertising proposals, including the importance of supporting and developing privacy-safe advertising tools that protect people’s privacy and prevent covert tracking.

The revised commitments incorporate a number of changes including:

  1. Monitoring and reporting. We have offered to appoint an independent Monitoring Trustee who will have the access and technical expertise needed to ensure compliance.
  2. Testing and consultation. We have offered the CMA more extensive testing commitments, along with a more transparent process to take market feedback on the Privacy Sandbox proposals.
  3. Further clarity on our use of data. We are underscoring our commitment not to use Google first-party personal data to track users for targeting and measurement of ads shown on non-Google websites. Our commitments would also restrict the use of Chrome browsing history and Analytics data to do this on Google or non-Google websites.

If the CMA accepts these commitments, we will apply them globally.

We continue to appreciate the thoughtful approach and engagement from the CMA and ICO as we develop our Privacy Sandbox proposals. We welcome, and will carefully consider, any comments that people provide during the consultation process.

An update on our Privacy Sandbox commitments

For further background on this topic, please see our blog from June.

Since we announced our Privacy Sandbox commitments earlier this year, we have continued to work with the UK’s Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) to address feedback that was raised as part of its public consultation process. We have also continued to update and seek feedback from the market and the UK Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) on our proposals.

We are determined to ensure that the Privacy Sandbox is developed in a way that works for the entire ecosystem and, as part of this process, we have now offered revised commitments, which can be found in full on the CMA’s website.

These revisions underline our commitment to ensuring that the changes we make in Chrome will apply in the same way to Google’s ad tech products as to any third party, and that the Privacy Sandbox APIs will be designed, developed and implemented with regulatory oversight and input from the CMA and the ICO. We also support the objectives set out yesterday in the ICO’s Opinion on Data protection and privacy expectations for online advertising proposals, including the importance of supporting and developing privacy-safe advertising tools that protect people’s privacy and prevent covert tracking.

The revised commitments incorporate a number of changes including:

  1. Monitoring and reporting. We have offered to appoint an independent Monitoring Trustee who will have the access and technical expertise needed to ensure compliance.
  2. Testing and consultation. We have offered the CMA more extensive testing commitments, along with a more transparent process to take market feedback on the Privacy Sandbox proposals.
  3. Further clarity on our use of data. We are underscoring our commitment not to use Google first-party personal data to track users for targeting and measurement of ads shown on non-Google websites. Our commitments would also restrict the use of Chrome browsing history and Analytics data to do this on Google or non-Google websites.

If the CMA accepts these commitments, we will apply them globally.

We continue to appreciate the thoughtful approach and engagement from the CMA and ICO as we develop our Privacy Sandbox proposals. We welcome, and will carefully consider, any comments that people provide during the consultation process.

Encouraging better diabetes management through wearable technology

The latest insights from Diabetes UK show that over 4.9 million people are currently living with diabetes in the UK, with rates almost doubling in the last 15 years. At the current prevalence rates, the NHS spends around £10 billion on average each year in managing and treating the condition, which will also increase alongside growing rates. However, research consistently shows that combined lifestyle interventions can be effective in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes by ~50%.

The pandemic has significantly impacted patient access to healthcare and millions of patients with diabetes have been unable to get regular health checks with their healthcare team. With many GP appointments still being held remotely, wearable devices are increasingly being piloted to help people monitor long-term health conditions and, as a result, the value of wearable devices to help people better manage such conditions is becoming increasingly recognised.

Focusing on holistic health

In November, people in the UK and particularly those living with diabetes, will be able to use a new blood glucose logging tool from Fitbit. They will be able to track their glucose levels by manually logging them throughout the day. Users can then view those levels right in the app alongside other metrics from Fitbit such as physical activity, sleep and their logged nutrition, to help better manage their holistic health and wellness all in one place. Within the app, users will be able to set personalized ranges so they can see when they are outside their target range to better identify important changes. They can also receive reminders to log their glucose levels so they can view their trends over time.

Fitbit has a multi-year partnership with Diabetes UK to help raise awareness of the condition and help educate people on the importance of getting to know their body and how it works. This is in order to encourage behavior changes that may help lessen the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and help people to understand and manage their diabetes, in addition to benefiting overall health and wellbeing.

“We want to help empower people with cardiometabolic conditions such as diabetes so they can better manage their health and wellbeing,” says Nicola Maxwell, head of Fitbit Health Solutions in EMEA. “We hope that by making the blood glucose logging feature available through our app, it will help provide accessibility for more people. We are passionate that our work with Diabetes UK will continue to raise awareness for and help improve the health of those living with diabetes.”

Useful tools and technology

The increasing rates of diabetes, coupled with increasing focus on patient self-management, highlights the need for tools and technology to help people with diabetes better manage their condition.

“Often when people are diagnosed with diabetes, they feel overwhelmed and in reality have to spend most of the time self-managing their condition,” says Emma Elvin, Senior Clinical Advisor at Diabetes UK. “By logging their blood glucose levels in the Fitbit app, users can see what types of lifestyle factors affect their diabetes and how their blood sugar fluctuates. Seeing all their trends in one place can help people to gain back control. This can give them a greater sense of control and help them to begin to make small changes to manage their diabetes more effectively.


  • The Blood Glucose feature is not a replacement for medical advice and is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical condition. It is intended to simply help you monitor and keep track of your information. You should talk to your healthcare provider for more guidance on blood glucose management.
  • This feature is rolling out to all UK users, English only in November.

Are we stronger than we give ourselves credit for?

Fitbit is working with Professor Ilona Boniwell as part of paid collaboration to develop insights and guidance on positive psychology. This blog is based on that information as well as the results of a survey conducted by an independent third party, Course5 Intelligence, of general consumers in 12 countries across Europe, Middle East and Africa.

What do you think of when you hear the word strong? An image of a weightlifter, Olympian or someone that can withstand a lot of exertion? Strong, based on its traditional dictionary definition, is a word that evokes images of physical fitness and being ‘tough.’ However, perceptions of the word are shifting as more people prioritize inner strength and self care. Here at Fitbit, we think the last 19 months in particular has shown how a holistic approach to health, prioritizing both our mental and physical well-being, can help us feel strong in uncertain times.

In a recent survey conducted by Course5 Intelligence on behalf of Fitbit in August 2021 of more than 13,000 people in France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, UAE and the UK1, one in ten people surveyed believe the traditional, or dictionary definition, concept of ‘strength’ as being physically strong. 46% of those surveyed recognize that the definition of true strength is a combination of mental and physical traits while 39% of respondents define it as the ability to deal with the stresses and challenges that life can present us with. So how can we lean into our inner strength to enhance our lives? Strength looks different for everyone and most of the time we can easily define someone else who we perceive as strong — but don't necessarily think of ourselves as strong based on our own personal definition of it.

This tendency to overlook our own strengths is reflected in our survey whereby 68% of respondents cited someone other than themselves when asked to name the strongest person they know, and instead naming a parent (20%), friend (10%) or spouse (10%). Though it’s great to recognize other people in our lives as strong individuals, honing in on our own strength and flexing it can help shift one's mindset.

What makes you feel strong?

Positive Psychologist, Professor. Ilona Boniwell who teaches positive leadership at l’Ecole Centrale Paris and HEC Business School, states: “If something doesn’t feel right people automatically look for what is wrong, what am I not doing right. I encourage people to think differently. Instead, look at what is working for you — when do you feel stronger? - and focus on that to affect any changes you want to make. A shift in mindset and strengthening your self-belief will help build resilience that will help you better cope with daily stressors and challenges — which is something we all face.”

When it comes to how people build mental strength to feel ready to take on each day, sleep comes out on top with 66% of people surveyed saying a good night’s rest helps them feel strong. Physical exercise came second for 52% of those surveyed, while the mindful activity of setting goals came third with 32% of people.

Tools to improve mental well-being

“The idea of ‘self-care’ is much more than a buzzword, it is a continuous practice and, like strength, it doesn't mean the same thing to everyone. Mental strength is increasingly recognized as a major part of our overall health, but it takes time to nurture. Fitbit can help support your self-care practices with over 300 sleep and meditation relaxation session in Fitbit Premium2, including content from Calm, the #1 App for Sleep and Meditation3 and Deepak Chopra, M.D., Pioneer of Integrative Medicine, and Founder of The Chopra Foundation and Chopra Global, whose exclusive Mindful Method sessions are designed to help improve your emotional well-being,” Joanne Savage, Marketing Director in EMEA, Fitbit at Google.

So, more people are checking in with themselves, but what about how we speak to ourselves? Much of self-talk depends on your personality. In the survey, the findings show that men are more likely to engage in a more positive internal dialogue (42%) or what’s known as ‘positive self-talk’ compared to 33% of women. Alongside gender discrepancies, there were also differences in generations as well. According to the findings, when it comes to discussing mental resilience, 71% of those aged 25-44 were more likely to feel comfortable talking about their mental and physical strength with friends, family members or colleagues, as opposed to 67% of those aged 18 – 25.

“This is a strength in itself, recognizing how important it is to talk, to share how we are feeling with others,” said Professor Boniwell. “If you take time to focus on the positive aspects of your daily experiences you will begin to recognize just how strong you are. Before going to bed every night, think back over your day and remember three good things that happened - things that went well, that you succeeded in, enjoyed or were grateful for. This is more important than you think — appreciation helps you realize what you have accomplished, which, in turn, fuels your self-belief.”

As people move towards a more holistic approach to health, our recent survey shows that sleep and exercise are a top priority in feeling mentally stronger. To build on this, Professor Boniwell’s advice in shifting our mindset can help build resilience and therefore our coping skills with the inevitable daily challenges that arise. Fitbit can support your goals to help feel stronger through the community and tools which can help with your sleep, mindfulness and activity. Visit www.fitbit.com for more inspiration.

Professor Boniwell is one of the European leaders in Positive Psychology, having founded and led the first Masters Degree in Applied Positive Psychology at the University of East London. Today, she leads the International MSc in Applied Positive Psychology (I-MAPP) at Anglia Ruskin University and teaches Positive Management at l’Ecole Centrale Paris and HEC Business School, and consults around the world as a director of Positran. Her main teaching expertise lies in the areas of Positive Psychology and Positive Psychology applications.


1 A survey by Course5 Intelligence conducted on behalf of Fitbit in August 2021 of 13,053 adults in 12 countries across Europe, Middle East and Africa. (UK, Ireland, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Poland, South Africa, and UAE). The participants are a representative sample as selected by Course5 Intelligence.

2 Fitbit Premium is only available in select languages. Content & features subject to change. Access these services in the Fitbit app. Fitbit app is only available for compatible Android and iOS devices. Internet connection required for use.

3 Calmcontent is only available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, German, Japanese, and Korean.

How Google Workspace is helping the RSPCA

For nearly 200 years, the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has worked to ensure that animals of all kinds, from household pets to livestock and animals in sport, have a good life. It is an extraordinary mission that involves 1,400 people, including around 270 inspectors and 100 animal rescue officers across England and Wales. Together they rescue animals in distress, investigate suspected incidents of cruelty, place animals in new homes, train volunteers, and educate the public about suitable animal care.

Last year, the RSPCA’s dedicated frontline team handled over 1.2 million phone calls, investigated more than 140,000 suspected incidents of cruelty, found homes for over 29,000 animals and secured over 1,400 convictions for abuse. They also coordinated a network of 150 branches in England and Wales, along with 56 regional and branch animal centres, plus animal hospitals, clinics and wildlife centres. It's a mammoth task.

We're proud that for over nine years the RSPCA has relied on Google Workspace to help coordinate this work. Clear communication and collaboration, wherever it's needed, takes many forms. Workspace helps with everything from email and video calls, to collaborative documents and spreadsheets, slides and other visual tools for education. This is available from wherever it’s needed, whether via desktop, laptop, or mobile device. The RSPCA has even trialled new digital rehoming initiatives, which use video conferencing via Google Meet to virtually visit the new homes of animals that have been rescued. It does what technology does at its best: focus on the human need, and the human connection.

During the COVID lockdown, Workspace became an even more critical tool for the RSPCA, enabling virtual experiences in place of face-to-face staff interactions, volunteer and staff onboarding and check-ins with people who were caring for rescued animals. That's how tens of thousands of animals could be looked after despite the lockdowns, and how more than 500 RSPCA meetings could take place every day in 2020.

“Our strategic mantra is ‘Together for animal welfare’. Everyone in every department is all working towards that same goal,” says Alan Moynihan, Head of IT Customer Solutions at the RSPCA. Workspace, he says, is "a system that gives us effective collaboration and communication tools without geographical boundaries.”

Some of those tools, like Chromeboxes and Chromebooks, complement Workspace while reducing hardware costs, improving team coordination and enabling Alan Moynihan and his IT staff to better control software creation and management. Android and iOS mobile devices give field workers like inspectors and animal rescue officers instant access to files they need in the field.

We stand in admiration of the dedication of the thousands of people involved with the RSPCA and are proud that solutions like Google Workspace help them continue to do this critical work.

Celebrating Black History Month in the UK

Each year we celebrate Black History Month in the United Kingdom through the month of October. It’s a time for learning, reflecting on and celebrating the impact of Black heritage and culture. To support the importance of learning about our shared histories, today we are launching over 80 new stories in collaboration with a range of cultural partners across the UK; from Bristol to Liverpool, Manchester to London.

The Black and British hub on Google Arts & Culture has been created alongside contributing partners, many of whom are coming online for the first time. This includes Bristol Museums, National Museums Liverpool, andFar From the Norm joining our growing collection of cultural institutions to share their stories from across the UK.

From football, to photography, and statues to sound systems

You can discover a range of new, young talents making waves across disciplines from dance, photography and sport. Find out about the community response to the nowiconic mural of Marcus Rashford MBE in Withington, Manchester, or discover more about award-winning choreographer, director and dance artist Botis Seva’s company and seminal production BLKDG. Or get acquainted with a host of stunning creatives like the powerful, colourful photography of artist Tayo Adekunle and the five talents selected by photographer and creative champion Misan Harriman in the second installment of his series Black Lenses Matter.

You’ll find stories covering prominent events in British history like the Empire Windrush and more recent events such as the Colston statue in Bristol. This is in addition to profiles on influential figures such as Carnival pioneer Claudia Jones and broadcaster and poetUna Marson. Why not take a moment to learn about the story of Princess Campbell, a Bristol nurse? Or perhaps explore the garden of Sybil Phoenix OBE, the first Black British woman to receive an MBE?

And if you are suffering from Notting Hill Carnival withdrawals, take a deep dive from your living room into the Mas bands, sound systems and steel bands who make Carnival the vibrant, sonic experience it is today.

There’s so much more to explore on the Black & British hub on Google Arts & Culture from today.

Visit g.co/blackhistoryuk, or download Google Arts & Culture’s Android or iOS app

Our Grace Hopper subsea cable has landed in the UK

Last year, we announced a new subsea cable — named Grace Hopper after the computer science pioneer — that will run between the United States, the United Kingdom and Spain. The cable will improve the resilience of the Google network that underpins our consumer and enterprise products. The 16-fibre pair Google-funded cable will connect New York (United States) to Bude (United Kingdom) and Bilbao (Spain).

Today, the Grace Hopper cable has landed in Bude, Cornwall. 

Many people around the world use Google products every day to stay in touch with friends and family, travel from point A to point B, find new customers or export products to new markets. As our first Google-funded cable to the U.K., Grace Hopper is part of our ongoing investment in the country, supporting users who rely on our products and customers using our tools to grow their business.

We know that technology is only becoming more important for the U.K. economy. The amount technology contributes to the U.K. economy has grown on average by 7% year on year since 2016. And U.K.-based venture capital investment is ranked third in the world, reaching a record high of $15 billion in 2020, despite the challenging conditions from the COVID-19 pandemic. What’s more, 10% of all current U.K. job vacancies are in tech roles, and the number of people employed in the tech sector has grown 40% in two years. With this in mind, improving the diversity and resilience of Google’s network is crucial to our ability to continue supporting one of the U.K.’s most vital sectors, as well as its long-term economic success.  

Grace Hopper represents a new generation of trans-Atlantic cable coming to the U.K. shores and is one of the first new cables to connect the U.S. and the U.K. since 2003. Moreover, with the ongoing pandemic fostering a new digital normal, Google-funded subsea cables allow us to plan and prepare for the future capacity needs of our customers, no matter where they are in the world. Grace Hopper will connect the U.K. to help meet the rapidly growing demand for high-bandwidth connectivity and services.

An image of the Google buoy landing on the sandy beach of Bude, Cornwall

Grace Hopper buoy landing on the beach in Bude, Cornwall

Alongside CurieDunantEquiano and Firmina, Grace Hopper is the latest cable to connect continents along the ocean floor with an additional layer of security beyond what’s available over the public internet. We’ve worked with established channels and experts for years to ensure that Grace Hopper will be able to achieve better reliability in global communications, and free flows of data.

Following a successful Bilbao landing earlier in September, Grace Hopper also marks our first ever Google-funded route to Spain, taking a unique path from our existing cables, such as Dunant, which connects the U.S. and France, and Havfrue, which links the U.S. and Denmark. The cable will use novel “fibre switching,” which allows us to better move traffic around outages for increased reliability. Once it is complete, Grace Hopper will carry traffic quickly and securely between the continents, increasing capacity and powering Google services like Meet, Gmail and Google Cloud.

Grace Hopper will use this new switching architecture to provide optimum levels of network flexibility and resilience to adjust to unforeseen failures or traffic patterns. The multi-directional switching architecture is a significant breakthrough for uncertain times, and will more tightly integrate the upcoming Google Cloud region in Madrid into our global infrastructure. 

With the landing of the Grace Hopper cable in Cornwall, we look forward to supporting the next great U.K. tech innovations.