Tag Archives: Google in Asia

Wear a mask, wash your hands, don’t reuse your password!

Parenting was especially challenging in 2020. Our families needed to learn new habits like social distancing, wearing masks and frequently washing our hands. As a large part of our everyday lives moved online, it was necessary to teach our children to take extra precautions as well.

I am part of a team at Google that teaches online safety habits to people from all walks of life. Parents have always been concerned for the digital safety of their families, and with online learning becoming the main mode of school for many, this might be even more of a concern.

We worked with our Trust Research team to survey parents all over Asia-Pacific (Australia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam) and Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico) and found that parents with children attending school online were more concerned about online safety than ones whose children attended school in-person.

As a father of three kids who use the internet in very different ways, instilling safe habits can be a challenge. So today, on Safer Internet Day, I would like to share some tips to address the top three parental concerns when it comes to keeping our children safe online. 

1. Protect their digital identities.

The privacy and security of their children’s information was the top concern of parents we surveyed. Parents cited concerns around scams or hacking of their child’s accounts. Here are some simple ways to safeguard your kids’ information: 


  • Teach your children how to choose strong passwords that cannot be easily guessed. Avoid simple passwords that use names, birthdates or even favourite cartoon characters. 

  • It is also useful to stick to platforms that have a strong reputation for user safety. For instance, using an email service like Gmail comes with built-in safety filters to detect phishing emails, blocking 99.9% of phishing attacks from ever reaching your inbox.

Infographic explaining top concerns of parents in APAC when it comes to online safety, which are: safety of their children's information, children receiving unwanted attention from strangers and children seeing inappropriate content online.

2. Know who they talk to.

Social isolation is a difficult outcome of the COVID-19 pandemic, and our children connect with their friends online, whether through messaging apps or voice chat while playing games. It is important for parents to be aware that these channels can also be used by ill-intentioned strangers to reach out to our children. Just as in real life, it is important to be aware of who our children talk to online. 


  • Try to talk to your kids about the games they play or the videos they watch, and also the people they play with online. I always remind my kids to come to me immediately if they face any situation online that makes them feel uncomfortable. More than 70% of parents in Asia-Pacific were not very confident that their children would come to them if they encountered unsafe situations online. In fact, more than a third of the parents we interviewed had never spoken to their children about online safety. We need to work hard to reassure our children that we are here to guide and protect them. 

  • When assessing if a game is suitable for your child, it is important to check not only the content of the game, but also whether the app allows online communications with others. Some multiplayer games allow only a few options for social interaction, like a thumbs up rather than a text chat. This reduces risks of unwanted social interactions by quite a lot.

3. Offer appropriate content at the appropriate age.

The fear of children encountering inappropriate content has long been among the top concerns of parents in surveys. There are family safety features that parents can use to help guard their children from content that may not be suitable for their age. However, we learned that only about half (52%) of parents we surveyed are using these features. Here are some features that you can start using today: 


  • Turning on SafeSearch on Google helps filter out explicit content in Google’s search results for all searches, including images, videos and websites. SafeSearch is designed to help block explicit results like pornography from Google search results.

  • Manage your child’s device by creating a Google account for your child and using Family Link. This allows you to add filters on Google Search, block websites or only give access to the ones you allow or track the location of your child if they have their own device.

  • Many parental controls are available on YouTube Kids. You are able to limit screen time, only show videos that you approve or select suitable content based on the age of your child.

Some other time-tested tips include allowing children to use the internet only in common areas in the home such as the living room. But the tough part is leading by example!

I hope these tips are helpful for you and your families. If you are interested in learning more about online safety, you can also check out a new resource that we’ve launched together with the ASEAN Foundation: the ASEAN Online Safety Academy, where we have tips for parents and kids, as well as learning sessions on navigating topics such as misinformation or cyberbullying. 

At the end of the day, the core of our parenting journey lies in the relationships we build with our children. They require our guidance on the internet as much as they do in the real world. Tiring as 2020, and now 2021, has been, I am grateful that I have had more time with my family and to appreciate what each of them brings to my life.

Let’s work together to make the internet a safe place for our children to learn, create and explore.


Sharpen your founder skills at Startup School

Last year, Hanna Kim, the founder of Grip, a live-streaming e-commerce platform in Korea, graduated from our Google for Startups’ Immersion: Women Founders program. This was an eight-week mentorship program for female founders across the Asia Pacific region. “It’s been really helpful to get insights about business and HR,” Hannah says. “The program made me dream even bigger.” Using her new skills, she is now gearing up to take her startup global. 

I work on a team that connects startups with the right people, products and best practices to help them thrive and grow. Over the years, I’ve been fortunate to meet many inspiring founders like Hanna, who are eager to learn, and ready to take their startups to the next level. Especially in the last year, I’ve heard from founders that they’re looking for more tools and skills to pivot and scale their startups to face today’s challenges. 


Today, we’re launching Startup School — a series of free, hands-on virtual courses for startup founders and their teams across Asia Pacific. We’ve provided training programs for startups for years, but last year was the first time we fully went digital. Though it had its challenges, I was excited to still be able to connect with and support startups, especially as many of them navigated new obstacles brought about by the global pandemic. Startup School expands on that experience. With this new program, we hope to arm startups to help them tackle the major issues of our region.


The interactive sessions will cover a range of topics, from digital marketing and product knowledge to business strategy. The sessions will be led by Googlers, entrepreneurs and industry leaders from around the world. We will host one training per week for the next 12 weeks, with the first one happening this Thursday. Participants can choose from a variety of topics, and register for the courses that will best support their goals.  


Around the world, I’ve seen startups stepping up to solve new and unforeseen challenges, from an app that provides online sign language to a chatbot servicethat assists online sellers. This kind of agility and innovative thinking is precisely what we need to face today’s challenges. We are committed to helping startups succeed, and know that their success will help solve community problems and bolster our local economies. If you’re a founder or part of a startup in the Asia Pacific region, we hope you’ll register for Startup Schoolnow. See you in class! 


Google Taiwan turns 15 with a new engineering hub

As a Taiwanese and an engineer, it's extremely heartwarming to see how Taiwan has grown to be a critical hub for global innovation and hardware manufacturing. Not everyone knows that Taiwan has contributed to the development of many Google products, including Pixel phones, Nest devices, Chromebooks, and Chromecast. 

We first opened our Taipei 101 office in 2006 with just one employee. Today, we have offices across six cities in Taiwan, and our workforce has grown ten times in the last five years. We plan to keep the momentum going in order to build helpful products for Taiwan and the world. 

Today, on Google’s 15th anniversary in Taiwan, and the third anniversary of bringing in the HTC family (including myself!), I’d like to share the five things I’m excited about as we look to the future of Google in Taiwan. 

1. New spaces for our teams to innovate in:We first shared our plans to build a new engineering hub in New Taipei City, an emerging hub for innovation, in 2019. Today, we’re opening the new campus, with its very own hardware engineering facility—the first and biggest outside the U.S. This facility will enable our teams to collaborate, brainstorm and experiment with hardware prototypes. The space will also be used to develop our hardware products including Next devices, Pixel phones, Chromecast and more. 

2. Continued growth and expansion:We are already working towards our next milestone, where we plan to open another building in the same compound in 2023 to accommodate our future growth. We look forward to sharing more about these plans down the road. 


3. Recruiting the next generation of tech talent:We will provide more opportunities for students interested in a career in tech by offering new internship roles in manufacturing engineering, Google Cloud and Technical Program Management. This is in addition to our current offerings in software and hardware engineering, data centers, sales and business operations and marketing. Interested candidates can find out more through our careers site, or join us at one of our virtual recruitment visits that we’re holding at 50 universities throughout the year.

4. Building a more diverse workforce:We care deeply about making Google a workplace that's inclusive and diverse. In 2019, we launched our Google Taiwan Student Associate program, the first pilot program in the region to provide opportunities for students with disabilities to develop skills and on-the-job experience. We plan to extend this program and increase the number of Google scholarships offered this year. 

5. Offering free technical courses for Taiwanese talent:We plan to introduce free online development courses related to Hardware, Software and Cloud, so potential candidates and interested individuals can gain practical skills and prepare themselves when interviewing for technical roles.

I’m energized about our long-term growth plans here in Taiwan. Together with our expanding teams, we look forward to building more helpful and innovative products for Taiwan and the world. 

Vietnam awaits you with wonders

With its beautiful beaches, lush green landscapes, fresh food and vibrant culture, travelers the world over have been enchanted by Vietnam. In fact, in 2019, Vietnam welcomed 18 million international guests and Da Nang was named the top trending destination for 2020. 

Sadly, the pandemic has had severe implications for travel, and that is one reason we’re excited to share this new project. Before the pandemic, Google Arts & Culture partnered with Vietnam’s Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism, the Vietnam National Administration of Tourism, the local tourism boards of Da Nang, Quang Nam, Thua Thien Hue and Quang Binh and National Geographic award-winning photographer Tran Tuan Viet to capture the unique corners of Vietnam. The result is a project made more precious in today’s travel-restricted world: Wonders of Vietnam on Google Arts & Culture. 

Featuring 35 stories and over 1,300 sumptuous photos of iconic sites, historical heritage, nature, cuisine and culture, the project is a unique way for us hungry travelers to virtually explore. The project is an important part of Google’s overall support of the local tourism industry, which has been badly affected by pandemic-related travel restrictions. By showcasing the wonders of Vietnam, specifically from the Central region, we hope to also raise awareness on preserving the sites affected by the recent floods. 

Of course, nothing compares to experiencing the real thing in person. But while many of us aren’t able to do that, this is the next best thing. Here are my top 5 things to explore on a virtual visit to Vietnam on Google Arts & Culture: 


1. Dive into the world’s largest cave

Son Doong cave

Along with breathtaking photos of Son Doong Cave, you can learn about how it is home to an underground river where you can kayak and dive. The cave is so large it even has its own forest and climate. 


2. Learn about Vietnamese culture, such as  royal court music, or Nha Nhac 

Fan dance

Nha Nhac, meaning “elegant music”, refers to a broad range of musical and dance styles performed at the Vietnamese royal court from the fifteenth to the mid-twentieth century. The photos show meticulous details, like colorful costumes and large elaborate fans.  


3. Feast your eyes on the colors of Vietnam

Color filter on Wonders of Vietnam

With our Color Filter feature, you can explore Vietnam by color, taking in the sumptuous reds of temples alongside fiery food or the lush greens of farmers harvesting hairgrass in Hoi An alongside the green wrapper of Bánh nậm. What a feast for the eyes!


4. Sightsee with a soundtrack

Enjoy beautiful sites such as Xep Beach, the Meridian Gate at night or the Linh Ung Pagoda on Son Tra Peninsula while being serenaded by traditional Vietnamese music. 


5. Learn about the Hoi An Lantern Festival

Lanterns at Hoi An market

In the spirit of the coming Lunar New Year, we feature the famous Hoi An Lantern Festival, a monthly celebration of the full moon. The Hoi An lantern making tradition has lasted for over 400 years! 

Wonders of Vietnam walks you through how the lanterns are made with bamboo structures and covered with very fine and vibrant silk. You can learn about the tradition of releasing the lanterns on the river, said to bring good fortune and love, as well as health and happiness. 

With this new project, we hope locals can gain a new appreciation for the wonders of their country, and eager travelers all over the world can discover more of Vietnam, hopefully building more excitement for when they can visit in person. We invite you to visit Wonders of Vietnam and check out some of the other treasures our partners make available—including the Tomb of Tu Duc in 3D—on Google Arts & Culture.  


Changing the narrative around mental health at work

It can be debilitatingly lonely to live with a mental health disorder. I began my mental health journey in 2013, when I was diagnosed with depression in my final year of college. Soon after, I began publicly writing about my experience. I found that sharing about my mental health helped me and others in so many ways, especially in places where there is still a lot of stigma. People would message me and say, “Thank you, I thought I was the only one going through this.” I’ve been a mental health advocate ever since. Building a sense of shared experience and normalizing these conversations is so important. 

I was reminded of the value of open communication when I first joined Google in Singapore in early 2019. I am currently diagnosed with bipolar disorder and complex post-traumatic stress disorder (cPTSD). Because of my PTSD, situations like one-on-one meetings in enclosed spaces could be panic-inducing. Thankfully, I trusted my manager enough to share this, and she was incredibly supportive. She suggested meeting at our open cafes or taking calls from home, and she shared about mental health resources available at Google. Her compassion, understanding and guidance meant a lot and helped me find my way.  

Through her recommendation, I also became an active member of Blue Dot at Google, our global peer support network that aims to destigmatize mental health conversations. In Singapore, we organize programs like mental health conferences and Blue Dot booths to raise awareness of these issues. I also spoke on an internal panel called “You Can’t Ask That,” aimed at addressing potentially sensitive questions around stigma and mental health. These programs create spaces for community, learning and compassionate listening. 

I’ve learned people just want to have a safe space where they can put down their armor and be vulnerable—yes, even in the workplace. Organizations of all sizes need to place a stronger emphasis on employees’ mental wellbeing, especially during tough times, like the COVID-19 pandemic.

After working at Google for almost two years, seeing how the company approaches mental health has been reaffirming—from employee resource groups and assistance programs that offer confidential counselling to company-wide days off to make sure people aren’t burnt out. I am heartened that we also often see leaders speaking openly about their mental health, encouraging an open, supportive and inclusive work culture. 

Being able to share my experience, and listen to how others are going through their journey has helped me feel less alone and find meaning. Whether in the workplace or outside, I want to tell those who may be struggling in silence: You’re never alone. Help is available, don’t be afraid to ask for it. You’ve got this! 


A new way to engage Taiwanese news readers

In India, a respected magazine is working out how to better serve Hindi-speaking readers. In Indonesia, a media group is creating new career development opportunities for young newsroom leaders. In Singapore, a publisher is consolidating their digital and non-digital news offerings to appeal to younger audiences. 


These diverse news organizations have one thing in common: they’re exploring new ways to get news and information to their communities, serve customers and become stronger businesses. And through the Google News Initiative’s Design Accelerator, we’re privileged to have had the opportunity to help them along the way.  


An accelerator program is a series of workshops to help everyone at an organization think about business problems differently, share ideas and try new things, using the principles of design thinking. Together with our partners at Splice and Echos, GNI hosted accelerators with nine publishers from across Asia Pacific,  including READr, a Taiwanese media organization founded in 2018 to help fight disinformation.

READr has created a community of readers who contribute data for its reporting. We asked Hsin-Chan Chien, Chief Technology Officer of Mirror Media Inc, which owns READr, to tell us a bit more about how it works.

Creating a reliable platform for citizen journalism is a big undertaking. Why was it so important for READr? 

An open newsroom is a new concept. In the past, traditional newsrooms were exclusive places, and wouldn’t make their materials public. However, the internet has given readers access to more information than ever before. So we decided to change our mindset and invite readers in. 


We want readers to be able to get to know the data and materials behind the news, and have a dialogue around what actually makes news—for example, by making readers aware of upcoming topics that we will write stories about, and enabling them to contribute. We hope this will allow them to build a more personal and trusting relationship with the media. 


Can you tell us about your experience going through the program?

We believe in the power of openness, transparency and crowdsourcing, especially after witnessing how Taiwan’s tech community has influenced society on issues like politics, the environment and open data. When we entered the GNI Design Accelerator Program, our first priority was to ask ourselves how to apply these principles to news platforms—which have suffered from the impact of fake news and the commercial pressure to chase traffic. Through the program, we were able to understand our readers and how they experience the news, and ultimately to develop reader-centric ways of writing news—such as inviting readers to discuss their concerns on a story like the introduction of electronic IDs in Taiwan, before the journalist does further research and interviews.


What advice would you give to an organization wanting to do something similar?

News readers nowadays are very different from what we were used to in the past. Today, we need to take their opinions on board and make changes in the way we deliver information. The news media of the future should serve readers and help them sort out the topics they care about, rather than tell readers what the publication thinks they should know.

AI helps protect Australian wildlife in fire-affected areas

Editor’s note: Today's guest post comes from Darren Grover, Head of Healthy Land and Seascapes at the World Wide Fund For Nature Australia.

Over the next six months, more than 600 sensor cameras will be deployed in bushfire-affected areas across Australia, monitoring and evaluating the surviving wildlife populations. This nationwide effort is part of An Eye on Recovery, a large-scale collaborative camera sensor project, run by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and Conservation International, with the support of a $1 million grant from Google.org. Using Wildlife Insights, a platform powered by Google’s Artificial Intelligence technology, researchers across the country will upload and share sensor camera photos to give a clearer picture of how Australian wildlife is coping after the devastating bushfires in the past year.  

Why is this important? 

For many Aussies, the horror of last summer’s fires is still very raw and real. Up to 19 million hectares were burned (more than 73,000 square miles), with 12.6 million hectares primarily forest and bushland. Thirty-three lives were lost and 3,094 homes destroyed. And the wildlife toll? A staggering three billion animals were estimated to have been impacted by the flames. 

Australian bushfire devastation

The scale of the damage is so severe that one year on—as we prepare for the next bushfire season—WWF and scientists are still in the field conducting ecological assessments. Our findings have been sobering. Nearly 61,000 koalas, Australia’s most beloved marsupial, are estimated to have been killed or impacted. Over 300 threatened species were affected, pushing more of our precious wildlife on the fast-track towards extinction.

Hope will prevail

In November, I travelled to Kangaroo Island in South Australia to place the first 100 of the sensor cameras in bushfire-ravaged areas. Though much of the native cover has been decimated by the flames, the island’s wildlife has shown signs of recovery. 

One animal at risk from the flames is the Kangaroo Island dunnart, an adorable, grey-coloured, nocturnal marsupial so elusive that a researcher told WWF that she’d never seen one in the field. We were fortunate to capture this creature of the night on one of our cameras.

Kangaroo Island dunnart

Thou art a dunnart.

But if I hadn’t told you that was a dunnart, you might have thought it was a mouse. And as anyone with thousands of holiday photos will tell you, sorting and organizing heaps of camera pictures and footage can be labor-intensive and time-consuming. Analyzing camera sensor pictures traditionally requires expertise to determine the best pictures (and which ones you can just delete), and you can get hundreds of empty images before you strike gold.

How AI can help 

With the Wildlife Insights platform, we can now identify over 700 species of wildlife in seconds and quickly discard empty images, taking the tedium out of the process and helping scientists and ecologists make better and more informed data assessments.  

The platform will help us identify wildlife in landscapes impacted by last summer’s bushfires, including the Blue Mountains, East Gippsland, South East Queensland, and of course Kangaroo Island. We’re particularly keen to see species like the Hastings River Mouse, a native rodent that was already endangered before fire tore through its habitat in northern New South Wales, and the brush-tailed rock-wallaby, which lost vital habitat and food to blazes in the Blue Mountains.

These images will help us to understand what species have survived in bushfire zones and determine where recovery actions are needed most.

Checking camera traps

WWF-Australia / Slavica Miskovich

Join us to safeguard species

The platform is still growing, and the more images we feed it, the better it will get at recognizing different types of animals. While we’re already rolling out hundreds of sensor cameras across the country, we are calling for more images—and asking Australians to help. If you have any sensor camera footage, please get in touch with us. We’re looking for images specifically from sensor cameras  placed in animal’s habitats, rather than wildlife photography (as beautiful as these pictures may be). 

With your help, we can help safeguard species such as the Kangaroo Island dunnart, marvel at their bright beaming eyes on film, and protect their environment on the ground--so future generations can continue to enjoy the richness of Australia’s wildlife.

Googler volunteers teach (and learn) important lessons

The COVID-19 pandemic has made distance learning the default option for many school-age children around the world. But many students, especially those in underserved communities, still aren’t familiar with using technology to learn.


Over the past few months, I’ve had the opportunity to help address this challenge as a Google volunteer mentoring with Ini Budi, a nonprofit organization in Indonesia that creates digital learning materials for teachers and students. This volunteering opportunity was part of Ashoka: Innovators for the Public’s Changemaker Journey program, supported by Google.org and aimed at helping nonprofits get the tools, knowledge and skills to meet their immediate priorities and sustain their efforts over the long term. 


It was really rewarding to work with Indi Budi’s team to help them develop a learning hub using YouTube, and teach staff members how to use Google’s analytics tools to see how engaged students were with their classes. But what surprised me most was just how much I gained from the experience. 


Despite being the mentor, I felt I was learning from the Ini Budi team as much as they were learning from me. I started to better understand the challenges the education sector faced, and how we can begin to tackle these systemic issues. I realized that you can solve any problem with the power of collaboration. 


I want to highlight a few other Googlers who have been dedicating their time as mentors to help various Google.org grantees and show how helping others can lead you to learn more about yourself. 

Pat Choa

Pat Choa, gTech Ads Operations Director, Philippines

Being Filipino, I want local businesses to succeed, so I signed up to be a mentor to Filipino startups through a local enterprise, QBO Innovation Hub

Tapping my media and digital marketing knowledge, I reviewed these startups' media plans and shared my perspective on using digital platforms to grow their businesses. 

These group mentoring sessions made me feel like I was part of a broader community, where I, too, was learning from these startups’ challenges, motivations and ideas.

Talking to these entrepreneurs and hearing what they're trying to achieve brings me so much joy— just knowing that there are so many businesses trying to create better opportunities for other Filipinos inspires me to strive to do more to help my own community.

Brian Weidenbaum, Software Engineer, Singapore

I had the chance to be a hackathon mentor to pre-college students working on exciting software ideas at Engineering Good, a Singaporean nonprofit that empowers disadvantaged communities through engineering.

Brian Weidenbaum

Our hackathon team worked on a feature to make it easier for visually-impaired people to read screens that lack integrated screen readers. 


I was deeply impressed by how motivated the students were and how quickly they picked up machine learning techniques to create a prototype. Watching them build some compelling features in such a short period of time was inspiring, and seeing their idea come to life during the hackathon was a proud moment for me. Volunteering is such a great way to serve the community and, in this case, to help build the next generation of engineers. I want the engineers of the future to be more skilled than I am, and I am happy to see what people are capable of when you invest in them.

Max Tsai, Google Customer Solutions Direct Sales Lead, Taiwan  

I spent the last few months volunteering with the Institute for Information Industry, a local nonprofit that supports the development of the information industry in Taiwan.

Max Tsai

I was tasked with designing and developing a series of webinars to help local businesses gain new knowledge on topics like finding the right talent for building a great workplace culture. 

Together with five other Google volunteers, we were able to produce three webinars, with more sessions to come in the coming weeks. 

More than 900 entrepreneurs attended these sessions, with many reaching out to share how useful our insights and tips were. 

Through this experience, I learned how valuable knowledge-sharing sessions could be. It felt good knowing that we had this opportunity to use our skills to help these organizations as they continue to evolve.

Enjoy a special visit to the Palace Museum

The Palace Museum is one of the world’s most renowned cultural heritage sites. As the largest and the best-preserved wooden imperial architecture complex in the world, it served as the home of 24 emperors during the Ming and Qing dynasties. The Museum consists of 9046 rooms and maintains more than 1.86 million pieces in its collection.

Building on our online collection of treasures of the Palace Museum, today, Google Arts & Culture unveils a new exhibition that allows people everywhere to explore parts of this famous site virtually.

The Palace Museum
10:25

The Palace Museum

Visitors can enjoy a 360-degree virtual tour of three main structures—the Hall of Supreme Harmony, the Meridian Gate, and the Gate of Supreme Harmony.  The Hall of Supreme Harmony was the venue for grand imperial ceremonies and, with its double layer of eaves and portico, is among the most prominent examples of ancient Chinese architecture.

360° virtual visit to the Gate of Supreme Harmony, the Hall of Supreme Harmony and the Meridian Gate

360° virtual visit to the Gate of Supreme Harmony, the Hall of Supreme Harmony and the Meridian Gate

In addition, we’re launching 19 new online exhibitions with high-resolution images of thrones and decorations in the Palace Museum, some of which are not usually accessible to visitors. These include rare paintings that show the splendour of life in the Forbidden City, such as an Album Leaf from The Grand Wedding of the Guangxu Emperor, which is being displayed online for the first time.

The Palace Museum is truly a global treasure. We hope this new exhibition allows people everywhere to learn more about its heritage and grandeur. 

Enjoy a special visit to the Palace Museum

The Palace Museum is one of the world’s most renowned cultural heritage sites. As the largest and the best-preserved wooden imperial architecture complex in the world, it served as the home of 24 emperors during the Ming and Qing dynasties. The Museum consists of 9046 rooms and maintains more than 1.86 million pieces in its collection.

Building on our online collection of treasures of the Palace Museum, today, Google Arts & Culture unveils a new exhibition that allows people everywhere to explore parts of this famous site virtually.

The Palace Museum
10:25

The Palace Museum

Visitors can enjoy a 360-degree virtual tour of three main structures—the Hall of Supreme Harmony, the Meridian Gate, and the Gate of Supreme Harmony.  The Hall of Supreme Harmony was the venue for grand imperial ceremonies and, with its double layer of eaves and portico, is among the most prominent examples of ancient Chinese architecture.

360° virtual visit to the Gate of Supreme Harmony, the Hall of Supreme Harmony and the Meridian Gate

360° virtual visit to the Gate of Supreme Harmony, the Hall of Supreme Harmony and the Meridian Gate

In addition, we’re launching 19 new online exhibitions with high-resolution images of thrones and decorations in the Palace Museum, some of which are not usually accessible to visitors. These include rare paintings that show the splendour of life in the Forbidden City, such as an Album Leaf from The Grand Wedding of the Guangxu Emperor, which is being displayed online for the first time.

The Palace Museum is truly a global treasure. We hope this new exhibition allows people everywhere to learn more about its heritage and grandeur.