Tag Archives: Chromebooks

Building for all learners with new apps, tools, and resources

Everyone deserves access to a quality education—no matter your background, where you live, or your abilities. We’re recognizing this on Global Accessibility Awareness Day, an effort to promote digital accessibility and inclusion for people with disabilities, by sharing new features, training, and partners, along with the many new products announced at Google I/O.

Since everyone learns in different ways, we design technology that can adapt to a broad range of needs and learning styles. For example, you can now add captions in Slides and turn on live captions in Hangouts Meet, and we’ve improved discoverability in the G Suite toolbar. By making these features available—with even more in the works—teachers can help students learn in ways that work best for them.

Working with our partners to expand access

We’re not the only ones trying to make learning more accessible, so we’ve partnered with companies who are building apps to make it easier for teachers to communicate with all students.

One of our partners, Crick Software, just launched Clicker Communicator, a child-friendly communication tool for the classroom: bridging the gap between needs/wants and curriculum access, empowering non-verbal students with the tools to initiate and lead conversations, and enabling proactive participation in the classroom. It’s one of the first augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) apps specifically created for Chromebook users.

Learn more about the Clicker Communicator for Chromebooks, one of the first augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) apps specifically created for Chromebook users.

Learn more about Clicker Communicator, an AAC app for Chromebooks.

Assessing with accessibility in mind

Teachers use locked mode when giving Quizzes in Google Forms, only on managed Chromebooks, to eliminate distractions. Locked mode is now used millions of times per month, and many students use additional apps for accommodations when taking quizzes. We’ve been working with many developers to make sure their tools work with locked mode. One of those developers is our partner Texthelp®. Coming soon, when you enable locked mode in Quizzes in Google Forms, your students will be able to access Read&Write for Google Chrome and EquatIO® for Google that they rely on daily.

Another partner, Don Johnston, supports students with their apps including Co:Writer for word prediction, translation, and speech recognition and Snap&Read for read aloud, highlighting, and note-taking. Students signed into these extensions can use them on the quiz—even in locked mode. This integration will be rolling out over the next couple of weeks.

Learn more about the accessibility features available in locked mode, including ChromeVox, select-to-speak, and visual aids including high contrast mode and magnifiers.

Tools, training, and more resources

Assistive technology has the power to transform learning for more students, but educators need training, support, and tutorials to help their students get the most from the technology.

The new Accessibility section on our Google for Education website has information on Chromebooks and G Suite for Education, a module on our Teacher Center and printable flashcards, and EDU in 90 YouTube videos on G Suite and Chromebook accessibility features. Check out our accessibility tools and find training on how to use them to create more engaging, accessible learning experiences.

EDU in 90 video of Chromebook accessibility features

Watch the EDU in 90 on Chrome accessibility features.

We love hearing stories of how technology is making learning more accessible for more learners, so please share how you're using accessibility tools to support all types of learners, and requests for how we can continue to improve to meet the needs of more learners.

More science in more places with Science Journal and Google Drive

We first launched Science Journal in 2016 so that students, teachers and science enthusiasts could conduct hands-on science experiments using their phones, tablets and Chromebooks. Since then, we've heard one request from teachers loud and clear: students need to be able to access their experiments no matter what device they're using or where they are. Learning doesn't just happen in the classroom, it happens outdoors, at home and everywhere in between. So today, we’re bringing a new Google Drive syncing feature to Science Journal. Now, you can access your experiments on any device using a Google Account.

Drive Sync with Science Journal

Accessing your experiment from Google Drive is easy: you can sign in with any Google Account and all of your experiments will be backed up to a Science Journal folder in Google Drive. If you have existing experiments on your device, you can add them to your Google Drive account. Many viewing, sharing and collaboration features will be coming to Science Journal in the future.


If you don't have a Google Account or you don't want to sign in, you can still use Science Journal—but your data won't be saved to Google Drive. If your school doesn't have Google Accounts, you can sign up for G Suite for free—just remember that G Suite for Education accounts need a domain administrator to activate Science Journal in the G Suite Admin console.


In addition to today’s syncing feature, we have a lot of new resources in Science Journal, just for teachers. Check out the new fundamentals and advanced professional development modules in the Google for Education Teacher Center. For introductory science activities, head over to Scholastic's Science in Action initiative, and for more hands-on physics content, you can pre-order Arduino's Science Kit. If you're looking for new ways to enhance Science Journal's capabilities, check out Vernier's Go Direct line of classroom sensors. Science Journal activities can now be found on the Workbench site, and you can always find activities and more on the Science Journal website and get support in our new help center. Finally, the Science Journal iOS app is now open source, so the app's code is available to the public, making it a great opportunity for students, hobbyists and companies who want to see how Science Journal works and even contribute code back to us.


Our goal with Science Journal is to help you enhance scientific thinking and data literacy in your classroom. Stay tuned for more updates in the coming months, and let us know what you think on our forum. You can tweet at us @GScienceJournal, or just use the #myScienceJournal hashtag on Twitter.

Source: Drive


How Dutch educators use Chromebooks to transform classrooms

When I first moved to Amsterdam in 2014, there were a small number of passionate educators using Google tools to shape digital teaching and learning. Schools like Corlaer College, a secondary school in Nijkerk, were already working with Chromebooks at the time. Over the next few years, organizations like Corlaer invited others to learn from what they were doing. I saw educators sharing their stories and experiences with one another through communities like Google Educator Groups.

Across these schools, one common thread we noticed was that teachers were using Chromebooks as a way to make learning more accessible and prepare every student for a future where they’ll need digital skills. “The role that schools play in society is shifting. They no longer just impart facts and theories. It’s just as important that students learn skills such as cooperation, communication, reflection and research, which prepare them to play a role in society,” says Ronald Schaefer, Vice Principal at Corlaer College.

This school-led movement brought Chromebooks and G Suite to more classrooms, enabling students to work together and learn from one another efficiently and effectively. Since then, Chromebook adoption across The Netherlands has been rapidly growing. At the same time, our partners have developed an ecosystem of tools which extend the functionality of the G Suite Admin Console and the G Suite for Education experience for students and Chromebooks in collaboration with Dutch IT admins and teachers. One of these is Cloudwise’s “COOL picture login,” which allows young students to get started in a simple way by using pictures to log into their Chromebook, instead of memorizing their email address and password.

At ds. Pierson College, students are also using G Suite and Classroom to work at their own pace, in their own way. Teachers can see exactly where students are with the content of the curriculum and take into account differences between pupils. “I sometimes have thirty pupils in my English class, none of whom are doing exactly the same lesson at any one time. As a teacher, you take on more of a coaching role,” says Frank Klumpers, who’s an IT coordinator at the school.

Schools in the Dr. Schaepman Foundation prepare students for a digital future by creating their own Google Sites and linking them to Classroom and Forms, developing their own digital portfolios. The school’s ICT coordinator Björn de Wals explains, “This portfolio will contain everything that they’ve done. If they’re proud of a project, a drawing or something they made in craft lessons, they can share it with their parents and grandparents.”

Children using Chromebooks in a classroom.

Students at a primary school get started with G Suite for Education.

Futuresource, a leading market analyst, released a new report showing Chromebooks were the top-selling device in Benelux schools in 2018. With this news, they join the U.S., Canada, Sweden and New Zealand, where Chromebooks are also the top devices used in classrooms.

Today, there are 80 million educators and students around the world using G Suite for Education, while 40 million students and educators rely on Google Classroom to stay organized and support creative teaching techniques. Meanwhile, Chromebooks are opening up a world of possibilities both inside and outside the classroom for 30 million students worldwide.

For the coming years, I know that teachers in the Netherlands will continue to amaze me with their use of technology in the classroom and make learning more accessible for every student. And that’s the real goal.

Using technology to support project-based learning

How can we reduce plastic in our oceans? In today’s classrooms, teachers use project-based learning (or PBL) so that students can come up with potential solutions to real-world problems like this. With PBL, students identify the problem, research a solution and support it with evidence—all while learning valuable skills they’ll use long after graduation. Brainstorming these dynamic solutions can be an exciting and creative challenge for young minds. Technology can help motivate and spark imagination in ways that static textbooks can’t.


Last week at SXSW EDU, we helped educators experience the power of technology-enhanced PBL first-hand, with a demo on how to create differentiated and personalized learning using technology in the classroom. The interactive demo let people get hands-on with educational tools from G Suite for Education, Chromebooks, Jamboard, Google Expeditions AR and VR and engaging third-party applications.

The demo in action at SXSW EDU

Even if you didn’t attend SXSW EDU, you can recreate the lesson on removing plastic from our oceans with your students. Follow this guide to bring the magic of Google tools to your students and facilitate a collaborative, intelligent, connected and creative learning space.

Assignment 1: Setting the stage

First, you’ll need to introduce the challenge of reducing plastic in our oceans and identify key facts about pollution in our oceans.

Step 1: Use Google Classroom to introduce the task.

You can use Google Classroom to create individual copies of materials for each student, in just one click. As an example, click here to make a copy of this lesson plan. If you’re using a different Learning Management System (LMS), Course Kit lets you integrate that LMS with G Suite.

Step 2: Use “Explore” to find and cite a key quote.

Open the Google Doc provided in Step 1 and click the “Explore” button in the bottom-right of the document. The “Explore” functionality makes it easy to add citations to materials you referenced across the web.

Step 3: In the Google Sheet, use “Explore” to analyze waste data for Austin, Texas.

Here, the “Explore” feature leverages the same machine learning technology used by Google Search and Google Assistant.

Step 4:Takethis quiz in Google Forms to test your knowledge on the topic.

Google Forms automatically grades your students’ work—saving you from having to do it manually—and give them feedback on how they did.

Bonus:Test out the new “locked mode", only available on managed Chromebooks.

This new feature (which is currently in beta) prevents students from navigating away from the Quiz until they submit their answers.

Assignment 2: Dissect the problem and dig deeper

Next, students will use research skills to understand the root of the plastic problem and collaborate with experts and peers.  

Step 1:Use Google Earth to explore real data on plastic moving across the oceans.

You can also use have your students use Google MyMaps to compare the size of the Pacific garbage patch to several US states.

Step 2: Use Hangouts Meet to meet experts in the field.

Hangouts Meet is a great tool to connect students with experts and each other though secure video and messaging.

Step 3:Go on a virtual reality tour of the ocean with Google Expeditions.

This tour is just one of more than 150 AR and 900 VR tours you and your students can experience. You can now view and guide tours you’ve created yourself using Tour Creator on both Android and iOS.

Step 4:Use a Jamboard to work together to discuss what you’ve learned so far.

Now that your students have dug into the problem, they can collaborate on the Jamboard or Jamboard app to answer key questions about the plastic problem and discuss what they have learned while researching.

Bonus:If you have a Vernier©️ sensor, use the Science Journal Android app to run an experiment testing how oxygen levels are affected by plastic in the ocean. Science Journal transforms devices, like you phone, into a pocket-sized tool for conduct fun science experiments—no fancy equipment required.

Google EDU demo at SXSW EDU

Assignment 3: Generate creative solutions

Finally, uplevel the lesson even more by generating creative solutions to the plastic problem based on everything we learned during instruction and research. Here’s a guide that suggests specific tools to use.

Step 1:Create a VR tour with Tour Creator.

Your students can help increase awareness of the plastic problem by creating their own immersive, 360° tours right from their computers. With this creative challenge, students can sharpen critical thinking and creativity skills, while building something they can add to a digital portfolio.

Step 2:Create a website using Google Sites to outline possible solutions.

Sites gives you an easy-to-use tool to build websites, host course curriculum and encourage students to build their development skills.

Step 3:Use Teachable Machine to create your own trash sorter.

Your students can make it easier to recycle by training their computers to recognize and sort different types of trash using Teachable Machine, an AI experiment that requires no coding.

Step 4: Make an automatic stop-motion animation with Google Photos.

With Google Photos, you can store and edit an unlimited amount of photos to use in your lessons.

Step 5: If you have a Jamboard, you can use it to collaboratively review and workshop creative solutions to removing plastic from the ocean. No physical Jamboard? No problem, check out the free web-based version.

Whether your students prefer to learn through video, reading, collaboration, hands-on experimentation or testing, Google tools allow you provide an engaging educational experience for every type of learner.  


Source: Google Chrome


Helping developers create more choice for educators

Editor’s note: This week our Google for Education team will be meeting up with educators, developers and EdTech enthusiasts at SXSW EDU in Austin, Texas. If you’re attending, join us at the Hilton in Room 406 to talk about the Google for Education Technology Partner Program and learn how to integrate with G Suite for Education and Classroom. Or follow along on Twitter and Facebook for news and updates.

As those working in education know, learning is a team sport. Teachers, school staff, administrators, students, parents, guardians and developers all play a part in ensuring that pupils leave class with more knowledge and skills than when they started. That’s why Google is working with developers to expand what’s possible in the classroom.

From virtual lab simulationsto literacy support for those with diverse learning needs, we’re inspired by the apps that developers have built for Google Classroom and G Suite for Education. We’re committed to supporting developers through our product APIs and open developer ecosystem that enables all kinds of apps to integrate with Google tools.

How Google for Education empowers developers

The Google for Education Technology Partner Program gives developers access to:

Have a product that integrates with Google for Education? Learn more about our Technology Track for partners.

Classroom API gif

What’s new at SXSW EDU?

Today at SXSW EDU, we are announcing the Chromebook App Hub by Google for Education. App Hub is a resource for educators to share and discover Chromebook apps and classroom ideas. The App Hub helps developers expand their apps’ reach and provides a platform for our developer partners to give, for while giving school stakeholders more transparency into their policies as they make decisions. Sign up to get notified when App Hub is available later this year.

Creative apps help redefine what’s possible in education. That’s why we support EdTech developers through Google Cloud for Startups. Through mentorship, training and free credits, Google Cloud for Startups enables early-stage EdTech startups to get up and running quickly and easily.

We’re also supporting startups at SXSW through sponsorship of the EDU pitch competition. Finalists will be eligible for the Spark Program ($20,000 in Cloud credits) and the winner will receive the Surge Package ($100,000 in credits). We’re also hosting a number of sessions for developers at the conference.

When we support developers, students and teachers benefit

Developers can reach more educators and students by integrating their apps with G Suite and Classroom. Administrators get more transparency around developer data policies using App Hub. And educators are empowered through one resource to find app choices and idea sparks, to save time and engage students in learning. By supporting a healthy app ecosystem, we can provide school stakeholders with more effective choices to personalize learning and differentiate lessons.

If you’re interested in integrating your app with G Suite and Classroom, we invite you to help us build engaging, flexible and accessible tools to inspire the next generation and provide educators with more choice in their classrooms.


Find ideas and activities on the new Chromebook App Hub

Editor’s note:This week our Google for Education team will be meeting up with educators, developers, and EdTech enthusiasts at SXSW EDU in Austin, Texas. If you’re attending, join us to learn more about building apps for Chromebooks at the Hilton in Room 406. Follow along on Twitter and Facebook for news and updates.

Teachers:How much time do you spend searching the web to find the perfect app or activity to bring a classroom lesson to life?

Curriculum specialists and IT administrators: How much time do you spend looking through app requests from teachers to make sure they’re effective tools for the classroom while also meeting the needs of your district policies?

EdTech developers:How much time do you spend trying to reach educators and help them understand the benefit of using your apps in their classrooms?

As you might imagine, we spend a lot of time talking to educators, school administrators and educational software developers about Chromebooks in the classroom. We’ve listened to your feedback, and today we’re announcing the Chromebook App Hub from Google for Education—an online resource to help educators, administrators and developers work together to learn about Chromebook apps and activity ideas for schools.

Chromebook App Hub Idea Sparks

A new hub that brings transparency to EdTech developers

We’ve gotten early feedback on the App Hub from developers and educators who helped consult on it. Dan Amos, the CEO of Book Creator, says that, “By being part of the App Hub we can showcase how Book Creator brings creativity to Chromebook classrooms, and demonstrate transparency around our data policies and product accessibility. We’re thrilled to be a part of this fantastic new resource that empowers educators to discover apps for their classroom.”

James Francis, the CEO of Screencastify, told us that, “Edtech is one of the few industries where each stakeholder wants the same result - improved outcomes for all students. With the App Hub, it’s clear that Google for Education is making strides to facilitate greater collaboration around this shared goal, and we’re thrilled to be a part of it. Chromebooks have totally revolutionized the accessibility, flexibility and safety of digital learning, and building our products on their platform was the best decision we’ve ever made.”

We also worked closely with policy partners, including the non-profit Student Data Privacy Consortium (SPDC), that sees the App Hub as a great way to assist developers in considering the student privacy implications of their products in use with learners.  Larry Fruth, the CEO of Access 4 Learning (A4L), the non-profit group behind the SPDC, says, “The App Hub will also be a great tool for schools and states as they look for resources like the SDPC to address changing privacy policies. Districts can align the information in the App Hub to their local resource approval processes, which will greatly improve the on-boarding of new apps and the transparency in their usage for districts.”

Chromebook App Hub Apps page

A new resource for educators to share and find idea sparks

Although apps are great, ideas from fellow educators for how to use them in the classroom are even better inspiration. We’re working with EdTechTeam and educators in the community to author idea sparks for how to use apps in the classroom, with tips for success, differentiated instruction strategies and links to additional resources such as videos, activities, and websites. Kate Petty, the Director of Educational Learning at EdTechTeam, says, “One of the best things about App Hub is the idea sparks that go with them. In my experience, teachers learn about applications in two ways: learning about a new lesson idea that has the app integrated into it, or hearing about an app that sounds awesome and want to get ideas about how to use it. Idea Sparks give teachers an opportunity to learn about new idea sparks and, even better, will provide an opportunity for teachers to share what they have created. As an idea contributor, it is an amazing experience to share what I am successfully doing in my classroom with educators around the world.”

And Dr. Roland Rios, President of TCEA in Texas and Director of Technology for Ft. Sam Houston ISD in San Antonio, who helped give early feedback on App Hub from a practitioner perspective, says, “The new Chromebook App Hub gives us just what we need—a network of passionate and dedicated developers building for education creating for educators who are eager to mindfully integrate technology into the classroom. With the App Hub, we will find new tools to engage students and we will connect to other teachers who are using these tools and providing lesson ideas. And as an administrator, the transparency around data policies and accessibility is helpful for decision-making.”

Stay tuned for the availability of the Chromebook App Hub later this year. In the meantime, educators can express interest in submitting idea sparks, and we encourage developers to tell us if they are interested in being part of the App Hub community. Don’t forget to sign up to get notified when it becomes available.

Using Google for Education tools to create community at Lundavra Primary

Editor’s note: Today’s post is by Harriet Ogilvie, a teacher at Lundavra Primary School in Fort William, Scotland. Harriet was one of the many teachers who recently joined us at BETT 2019 to share stories about using technology that engages students and transforms learning. Below, Harriet explains how she and other Lundavra teachers help students build communication skills and create online portfolios using G Suite for Education.

At Lundavra Primary School, students and teachers encourage parents and other local residents to visit our schools and learn about what’s happening in our classrooms. It’s important to us that we connect the Fort William community to the life of the school. To make this happen, we invite everyone in the area to “Community Cafes,” once-a-month social events featuring student singing, homemade baked goods and a book exchange.

After the Community Cafes, students with Chromebooks in hand ask people if they enjoyed attending, and what they’d like to see at future Cafes. The students enter responses into Google Forms, which is helpful for us teachers as we plan our future community events—plus, it’s much easier to keep track of than paper forms that wouldn’t be returned. When students are getting this feedback using Google Forms, they can connect and communicate with fellow students, teachers and people in the community. Students learn language and communication skills as they formulate questions to ask attendees and start conversations with adults.

Community Cafe at Lundavra Primary

Check out the Community Cafe at Lundavra Primary School!

I like talking with my granny and her friends and helping her use the Chromebook. Neo
Primary 6 student about the Community Cafe

For students, gaining digital skills and building confidence often starts in the Community Cafes, but continues through students’ development of learning portfolios, which are records of their classroom projects and their accomplishments. The portfolios help pupils take ownership of their learning and show what they've accomplished to peers and parents.

These portfolios used to be on paper. When we switched to online portfolios, students could be more creative in telling stories about their academic careers—for instance, by creating video book reports and adding photos of themselves and their classmates. They build portfolios using Google Sites—a much more flexible and engaging tool than paper portfolios that weren't easy to share and frequently misplaced. Students use the Padlet app with their Chromebooks to write regular reflections about their work, and embed the Padlet pages into their Google Sites. Using YouTube, students work with their peers to create vlogs about stories they write themselves. By the time students reach Year 7, they can teach their younger classmates how to build online portfolios—a confidence-building exercise for those about to move on to secondary school.

I am better at talking to people I don’t know. I enjoyed looking at the data we collected from our Google Forms survey. I made it into bar graphs and pie charts to make it easier to understand. Kirsty
Primary 6 student

Teachers and students need tools that encourage students to leave their comfort zones. In our case, the tools in the background are from Google: Videos, portfolios, surveys, documents and online research that inspire students to choose how they want to learn and create. Every time students use Google tools, they learn skills that go beyond the lesson at hand. When they build their online portfolios, students learn how to organize content; when they teach younger students how to use Google Sites, they learn about leadership. And when teachers create assignments in Google Classroom and provide comments while students are working, students learn to give and receive feedback and collaborate with others. We’re excited to find new ways to use Google to help our students become confident, engaged learners.

Source: Google Chrome


Accessing the web on Chromebooks without a Wi-Fi access point

Chromebooks are built to deliver a consistently fast, easy-to-use and secure experience. And when you’re using a Chromebook, you should be able to access the internet quickly and effortlessly, no matter where you are. But the availability of an internet-enabled Wi-Fi access point isn’t always a guarantee. Starting today, Instant Tethering is available on more Chromebooks—this means that you can connect to the internet via a paired Android phone’s cellular network connection, as long as tethering is enabled on your mobile data plan.

Normally, connecting to your phone’s hotspot is a multistep process—one that involves switching on the hotspot on your phone, specifying a network SSID and password, opening the other device's settings to connect to the hotspot, then disabling the hotspot manually when you no longer need it. Phew! But with Instant Tethering, you can pair your Android phone with your Chromebook during an initial set-up process, then accessing the internet only takes a single click.

When your Chromebook detects that it has no Wi-Fi access point, it provides a notification that a data connection is available through your mobile device. Instant Tethering is activated once you click the “Connect” button on that notification. Additionally, Instant Tethering will automatically disconnect if it detects 10 minutes of no activity to save you power and data.

chromebookIT

Before today, Instant Tethering was available on only a few devices, including Pixelbooks and Pixel Slates paired with either Pixel or Nexus phones. But now, Instant Tethering is available on 15 additional Chromebook models and over 30 cell phone models. And we’ll be bringing Instant Tethering to even more Chromebook and phones in the coming months.

This is our latest feature that allows Chromebooks to work better together with Android devices. You can read more about Instant Tethering, how to enable it, and find out if it works with your devices here.

Source: Google Chrome


Accessing the web on Chromebooks without a Wi-Fi access point

Chromebooks are built to deliver a consistently fast, easy-to-use and secure experience. And when you’re using a Chromebook, you should be able to access the internet quickly and effortlessly, no matter where you are. But the availability of an internet-enabled Wi-Fi access point isn’t always a guarantee. Starting today, Instant Tethering is available on more Chromebooks—this means that you can connect to the internet via a paired Android phone’s cellular network connection, as long as tethering is enabled on your mobile data plan.

Normally, connecting to your phone’s hotspot is a multistep process—one that involves switching on the hotspot on your phone, specifying a network SSID and password, opening the other device's settings to connect to the hotspot, then disabling the hotspot manually when you no longer need it. Phew! But with Instant Tethering, you can pair your Android phone with your Chromebook during an initial set-up process, then accessing the internet only takes a single click.

When your Chromebook detects that it has no Wi-Fi access point, it provides a notification that a data connection is available through your mobile device. Instant Tethering is activated once you click the “Connect” button on that notification. Additionally, Instant Tethering will automatically disconnect if it detects 10 minutes of no activity to save you power and data.

chromebookIT

Before today, Instant Tethering was available on only a few devices, including Pixelbooks and Pixel Slates paired with either Pixel or Nexus phones. But now, Instant Tethering is available on 15 additional Chromebook models and over 30 cell phone models. And we’ll be bringing Instant Tethering to even more Chromebook and phones in the coming months.

This is our latest feature that allows Chromebooks to work better together with Android devices. You can read more about Instant Tethering, how to enable it, and find out if it works with your devices here.

Adapting to the needs of learners, educators and schools with Chromebooks

Editor’s note: This week, we’re joining thousands of educators and students at BETT in London. Visit us at booth C230, where you can demo a range of Chromebooks designed for education, including the brand new Chrome OS tablet. Follow along on Twitter and Facebook for the latest news and updates.


We aim to build products that help educators, school staff and students thrive in and out of the classroom. Ever-evolving education standards and students’ diverse learning needs means teachers need adaptable devices that can keep up with these changes. For administrators, it’s about the ability to manage large groups of students and educators while protecting their data. For students, intuitive and easy-to-use devices help them learn in a way that’s conducive to their needs. For these reasons and more, our latest lineup of Chromebooks feature a wide range of devices from laptops to tablets, admin management, deployment options, accessibility features, input options, and a growing number of quality apps. Whether you’re a student mastering your times tables or a teacher deploying a 1:1 device program to thousands of users, there’s a Chromebook for everyone.

Adapting to the needs of learners

To adapt to different student learning needs, Chromebook’s tools have built-in accessibility features. Accessibility settings sync across any Chrome OS device, so as students switch between shared devices or log in at home with their G Suite for Education account, their settings automatically update. This means no additional instruction time wasted setting up assistive technology, and inclusion of students who might otherwise require an additional device or aide. With visual aids, stylus support, voice typing, audio support, input capabilities beyond typing and trackpad and an entire world of Chrome extensions and partners, we’re adapting to support the ever-changing needs of learners.

Chromebook accessibility features

Adapting to the needs of educators

Educators shape the minds of the next generation of leaders, thinkers, activists and creators. As the classroom changes, educators turn to digital tools, like Google Classroom, G Suite and Expeditions and third party apps to engage students and teach efficiently and effectively. In the hands of creative teachers, these tools help bring learning to life for millions of students. Plus, we support a wide ecosystem of developers, so there will never be a lack of quality educational apps for Chromebooks. A few partners building apps we love include:

  • Sphero incorporates STEAM and robotics into coding and every day classroom lessons. Look for their latest lesson plans on Workbench.

  • GeoGebra is an AR app on the Acer Chromebook Tab 10, letting students toggle between 2D and 3D shapes, graphs and more.

  • Scratch 3.0 is a popular coding app that has a new touch version (Scratch 3.0) optimized to work seamlessly on Chromebooks.

  • Soundtrap is an app that can nurture student voice through music, podcasts, language, literacy training Plus, teachers can assign lessons through Google Classroom.

  • Kamilets you annotate Docs and PDFs, making note taking using a stylus and the web much smoother.

  • Book Creatorhelps you create ebooks in a snap. Try the Classroom integration to share published books and showcase student learning.

  • Texthelp's Read&Write is a literacy toolbar that offers additional support for English as a new language learners and dyslexic students by reading out loud, researching assignments and proofing written work.

Chromebooks and Expeditions bringing learning to life

Adapting to the needs of schools

With the Chrome Education License, administrators can deploy technology at any pace, while having the flexibility to manage their fleet of devices in a number of environments. Schools can start with a 10:1 student to Chromebook ratio, zoom ahead to a 1:1 model, or add different types of devices over time, depending on the needs and budget. As schools add rugged Chromebooks and then tablets, or add more of the same trusted device type, administrators can do so with a single interface that supports all of them.

Chrome OS devices are shareable, meaning multiple students can log into their individual profiles on the same device. Without assigning a particular device to each and every student, transitions become smoother and slow startup time doesn’t eat into instruction time.. Since Chrome devices only take ten seconds to boot up and administrators can schedule system updates on their own timeframe (not during the middle of a lesson or a test), many schools and organizations have chosen to use Chromebooks in their classrooms.

We’d love to hear how you’re using tools to support all learners, so come visit us at BETT or reach out on Twitter.