Tag Archives: google pay

How online payments work with Steve Klebe

Posted by Jose Ugia and Steve Klebe

intro to online payments

Steve Klebe forms partnerships that drive adoption of Google Pay. He's spent the last 9 years working for the Google Payments Business Development team, and possesses more than 40 years of experience with products and services related to payment processing, data security, and authentication.

Recently, Steve sat down for an interview with Jose Ugia, a Developer Relations Engineer on the Google Pay team.

Read the interview transcript for a deep overview of online payments.

Jose Ugia: Let’s get started with the basics. What is the typical sequence of events in processing an online credit-card payment?

Steve Klebe: This can happen in a few different ways, but let’s talk about the typical series of events:

  1. A consumer visits the merchant's website or application, and they need to pay for the items that they want to purchase.
  2. The merchant then presents an order form to the consumer with a variety of payment options, including Google Pay. The consumer presses the Google Pay button, and the information that's associated with the card that the consumer chooses to pay with is securely sent to the merchant.
  3. The merchant calls the payment processor. The processor receives the request from the merchant and uses a shared key to decrypt the information in it in the payment service provider’s secure environment.
  4. The payment processor interacts with the network that’s associated with that particular card, such as Visa, Mastercard, American Express, or Discover. Although, there are variations of networks around the world.
  5. The network consults the issuing bank, and the issuing bank checks the account to verify that it’s active and valid. If there are funds available to cover the transaction, then the transaction is approved.

The approval triggers a response chain. The network responds to the payment processor, the payment processor responds to the merchant, and the merchant responds to the consumer with something like, “Your payment has been accepted!”

This sequence of events happens in approximately 2 seconds, during which the transaction passes through multiple different systems in order to deliver a response to the consumer.

Jose Ugia: Most developers and businesses don’t think about these steps. When you think about chargebacks and fraud, this information is especially useful.

The next question is related to a concept that goes by many names in the industry. It's what we call a PSP or payment service provider, but others refer to it as a payment processor, payment provider, or payment gateway. What is this concept and why are there so many different terms for it?

Steve Klebe: Things evolve and sometimes different entities in the ecosystem create their own terms to differentiate themselves. It’s a big challenge in the payments industry; there are many terms for the same concepts.

The term PSP has an official meaning in the ecosystem, and it can represent companies that take on different roles in the payment sequence, which I outlined in the first question. However, we kept things simple for our merchant and developer partners. PSP defines the initial link between the merchant and the network, regardless of their roles. The role of the PSP is to make sure the merchant is legitimate and categorize the merchant as a retail store, restaurant, or something else.

The PSP is the entity through which the money flows, from the card issuer through the networks to the PSP. They provide consolidated reporting to the merchant and—most people don’t realize this—they also often hold the financial responsibility. If the merchant is fraudulent or goes out of business and there are lingering transactions, the PSP assumes financial responsibility for the merchants.

Jose: So, if I’m planning to accept payments online, do I need a PSP?

Steve Klebe: Yes, you absolutely need to have a PSP, but it doesn't matter to you as a merchant if the PSP is an official processor or a licensed agent of a processor.

Jose: Are there specific considerations that I have to account for as a merchant or developer when I choose a PSP to process credit-card payments?

Steve Klebe: Sometimes it’s tied to the shopping cart of your e-commerce platform, most of which embed one or more PSPs into their systems. Sometimes, the decision has been made for you. Other times, you have flexibility to choose whatever you want. Different PSPs have different expertise in different types of payments. For example, if you’re a merchant who focuses on a subscription model, there are certain PSPs who handle these types of payments better than others. If you’re going to sell globally, you need to pick a PSP with the maximum ability to support alternative payment methods from other countries. If you’re a restaurant and you need to do in-store and online payment processing, not all PSPs are equal in their ability to support different types of channels.

So, do some research, talk to peers in your industry to find out who they use and whether they’re satisfied, and make an intelligent choice. It can have fairly significant consequences if you need to do online ordering, but you picked a PSP who is competent at in-store purchases and doesn’t take e-commerce seriously.

Jose: Are you suggesting that I might need to integrate multiple PSPs to cover different scenarios?

Steve: Yes. Using multiple PSPs is not unusual. If you need to cover different scenarios, such as subscription payments, in-person payments, or online payments then this can be very common. If you need to change your PSP, it can affect you later. Your PSP choice becomes intertwined with your back-office operations and fulfillment. It’s not just an API; it becomes integrated into all aspects of the business supply chain, including customer servicing, revenue recognition, etc. and switching isn't easy.

Jose: I’ve seen some PSPs offering something called “hosted checkout”. How does that differ from a regular integration in my website or application?

Steve Klebe: There are typically two approaches: you integrate your PSP's API and you as the merchant typically control the checkout process directly with the consumer. In the case of Google Pay, you can add the Google Pay button to your checkout pages. That's typically used by medium-to-large merchants, while smaller merchants tend to gravitate towards this concept called a hosted order page, which has some limitations because the checkout occurs on a page that the PSP hosts and different PSPs have different hosted-order-page capabilities.

If you’re an API merchant, for your non-Google Pay transactions you have a responsibility to protect the card information of your customers. With a hosted order page, all the sensitive information is being hosted on a page from the PSP. The penalties for having card information stolen from your servers are very severe, so hosted order pages are popular, flexible, and customizable.

In Europe, hosted checkouts are popular because commerce is complicated with more than 20 countries, different currencies, and payment methods. A US merchant could survive with a much simpler array of payment options if the merchant plans to only sell within US borders.

We work with most major PSPs globally and have them implement Google Pay as a default option for hosted checkouts. Usually, this is enabled by default but the PSP gives the merchant a choice to opt out.

Jose: What are e-wallets, digital wallets, and other payment facilitators, and how do they differ from a PSP.

Steve Klebe: There are a lot of acronyms, and they can start blending together and sounding the same to someone new to the space. The metaphor for a digital wallet was originally developed to represent that whatever is in your physical wallet would ultimately be in your digital wallet. While PSPs facilitate online transactions, digital wallets are a form of payment. There are many benefits to offering a digital wallet like Google Pay. One of the most obvious being the ability for customers to checkout quickly, without needing to re-enter credit card and billing information for every single transaction .

In the case of Google Pay, you can store loyalty cards, boarding passes, payment cards, and receipts in your digital wallet and use it to transact in physical stores, online websites and applications alike. The metaphor has played out, but there are a lot of differences within the broad category of alternative payment methods and digital wallets.

Those differences are evolving. Today, we have Google Pay, Apple Pay, PayPal, Samsung Pay, WeChatPay, Alipay and others. In some cases, the app or the account is only a container for credentials. In other cases, it's the account of record for your money. For example, in Asia, you see the popularity of Alipay and WeChat Pay, which are actually like bank accounts. In India, the Google Pay for India app connects directly to the consumer’s bank account, and initiates the movement of money to the merchant’s bank account.

Jose: What is a tokenized card and how does it affect online transactions?

Steve Klebe: The word tokenization is a loaded word in our industry and it creates a bunch of confusion. Tokenization and encryption (which are sometimes confused) came about because of the growing popularity of cards, and the growing use and misuse of cards by people with good and bad intentions.

The concept of exchanging a card number with a token is applied by various parties at different stages of an online transaction:

Tokenization, at the network level, came about after the industry established a standard for protecting card data that’s now referred to as PCI, which is an industry consortium funded by the major card brands that established a single standard for security.

Similarly, to assist merchants with complying with PCI, most PSPs came up with a proprietary scheme to take the card number from the merchant and give the merchant a token or reference number. The PSP, within its secure environment, would hold the card and the merchant wouldn’t need to handle it anymore. This became a dominant approach after PCI took effect.

In addition, there are two types of tokens that are used at the network level:

Device-based tokens or DPAN

When you want to use an existing card on your phone as a payment method, the call gets made to the associated network, which then calls the bank that issued the card. A call then comes back to authenticate the consumer and the most common step is the consumer is asked to enter a one time passcode they received through text. After the bank confirms your identity, it sends a signal to the network and approves your card for digital payments. The network then takes the account number, converts it to a token, and returns it to your wallet provider who securely stores it on the phone.

E-commerce tokens

This is a brand new concept where a product like Google Pay, which helps to securely store millions of cards in its cloud, delivers them to the network for conversion to a token. The network validates the status of the card with the issuing bank, turns them into e-commerce tokens, and returns the tokens to Google. Now, when you shop on any device, Google can use one of these e-commerce tokens because the network and issuer authenticated them. Even if the underlying card changes completely or the expiration date gets updated, this all happens behind the scenes. This is not only convenient for customers, but it also helps protect their card and transaction information by keeping the actual credit card number unexposed and including a dynamic element that is different for every transaction.

Jose: What is the future of payments going to bring? What are you most excited about?

Steve Klebe: I would say, due to the changes our world is going through, we are rethinking how payments are changing. It’s hard to know what the ultimate impact will be, but it's been about mobile optimization during the last couple years. Every merchant and PSP realizes that they have to enhance their digital offerings, but it’s not going to be any one individual thing. I think it’s the entire holistic experience, whether it’s web, mobile, or in-store. All of a sudden, every merchant realizes that they need to be prepared to do payments contactlessly. Even if the consumer is standing in front of you, you have to be prepared to handle the payment without contact.

There is a clear divide between card present and card not present, and those areas are now blending together. The card industry doesn’t care whether the person is in front of you. If a payment is made digitally, there are alternative rules that apply to the merchant. Merchants need to be extremely cognizant of these rules and they need to do everything they can to optimize how they accept payments.

An exception would be where you can start shopping with a merchant on your desktop and complete transactions elsewhere while your goods remain in your shopping cart. Their systems have to be capable of multiplatform payments and that requires a fresh look at who your PSPs are because not all PSPs provide such capabilities.

Device-bound tokens are very 1990ish. The whole world is moving to the cloud. A device bound token needs to be reprovisioned every time I get a new phone, which is typically every 1-2 years, and that has to change. We live in a cloud-based world and people expect to authenticate themselves and start doing business, and payments have to work this way, too.

Jose: Thank you for the chat, Steve. It sounds like payments are changing a lot, adapting to the evolution of technology and we’re excited to see where these changes take us.

--

Interested in learning more about Google Pay APIs or have questions? Follow us @GooglePayDevs and let us know in the comments or tweet using #AskGooglePayDev! For any other Google Pay-related requests and questions, or to start your Google Pay integration, visit Google Pay Business Console.

All aboard: More ways to pay for parking and transit

People all over the world turn to Google Maps to get things done — especially during the pandemic. From booking an online yoga class to ordering takeout from your favorite restaurant —Google Maps is a powerful sidekick that lets you accomplish tasks all throughout your day. Today, we have new tools in collaboration with Google Pay to help you get more done when you’re on the go: the ability to pay for street parking and transit fares right from Google Maps, without ever taking out your wallet. 


Keep it clean and easy  🧼 🖐️


These days, people are upping their hand sanitizing game and avoiding touching public surfaces as much as possible. Thanks to an integration with parking solutions providers Passport and ParkMobile, you can now easily pay your meter right from driving navigation in Maps, and avoid touching the meter altogether. Simply tap on the “Pay for Parking” button that appears as you near your destination. Then enter your meter number, the amount of time you want to park for, and tap “Pay.” Need to add more time to your meter? Easily extend your parking session with just a few taps.


pay for parking

Pay for parking right from Google Maps

Save time and grab a ride 🚌🏃


We’re expanding the ability to pay for transit fares from Maps for over 80 transit agencies around the world. Now you'll be able to plan your trip, buy your fare, and start riding without needing to toggle between multiple apps. You can understand how to pay in advance and even get your fare ready to go before you arrive at the station - which is helpful when you’re not sure what payment options a transit agency supports. When you get transit directions, you’ll see the option to pay with your phone with the credit or debit cards already linked to your Google Pay account. And in places like the San Francisco Bay Area, you’ll also be able to buy a digital Clipper card directly from Google Maps. Once you’ve purchased your fare, all you need to do is tap your phone on the reader or show your digital ticket to breeze on board.






pay for transit

Plan a trip, purchase a fare, and start riding - all from Google Maps.

No matter how you’re getting around these days, Google Maps can help you get there effortlessly. Pay for parking starts rolling out today on Android in 400+ cities in the U.S, (including Boston, Cincinnati, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, Washington D.C, and more) with iOS coming soon. The ability to pay for transit from Google Maps expands to 80 agencies globally on Android in the coming weeks.





A more inclusive global digital economy

Editor’s Note: The following is adapted from remarks delivered by Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google and Alphabet, at the Singapore FinTech Festival today on the need and opportunity to build a more inclusive global digital economy.


Thank you to the Monetary Authority of Singapore for the invitation to speak today—and for hosting this important event. While I hope we can have these big conversations in person again soon, I am grateful for all the ways that technology has kept us connected during the pandemic.


We’ve seen this year how online has been a lifeline. In Southeast Asia, 8 out of 10 people said that technology helped them navigate the pandemic, whether it was families searching for the latest COVID-19 information, small businesses using digital tools to reach new customers or students continuing to learn remotely.


Being helpful in these moments is at the core of Google’s mission to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. We’re proud that users turned to products like Search, YouTube, and Maps to help people get through uncertainty, and that tools like Meet and Google Classroom helped keep people connected and businesses productive in these times. 


Southeast Asia’s digital transformation


COVID-19 has accelerated the adoption of digital tools and trends by years. As a result, the Southeast Asian internet economy is on the verge of a massive transformation. A recent report we did with Temasek and Bain & Company shows that more than 40 million people in the region connected to the internet for the first time in 2020—that’s four times as many as the year before. In addition, one in three digital service consumers were new to a service, like virtual learning or buying groceries online. And 90 percent intend to continue using that service post-pandemic.


These digital trends aren’t just happening in cities. In places like Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines, more than half of first-time users were from outside metropolitan areas, which shows huge promise for closing the urban-rural digital divide.


While COVID has accelerated the use of digital tools, it’s also exposed how many people  are still left behind: from the 1.7 billion people around the world who are still unbanked, to the huge portion of African households without access to broadband, to millions of women entrepreneurs who lack the same access to opportunity as their male counterparts.


A more inclusive global digital economy


So the question is: how can we use this moment to reimagine a more inclusive digital economy? One that brings the benefits of the internet to everyone?


The answer is two-fold: First, by accelerating progress in closing the digital divide, which means expanding connectivity, financial inclusion, and digital skills. Second, by deepening partnerships between governments and business, which means  building on the new collaborations we’ve seen during COVID.  


Connectivity as the foundation


The question of inclusion and opportunity is deeply personal to me. Growing up in India, I didn’t have much access to a computer, or a phone. To make a call, I had to wait in long lines to use a shared phone with everyone else. So when our family finally got our first rotary phone, it changed our lives for the better, and it set me on a course to help bring technology to more people around the world. 


Today, an internet connection is the single best way to make technology available to more people. At Google, we are focused on the infrastructure—like the subsea cables we’re building between Western Europe and the West Coast of Africa, as well as the affordable, low-cost devices that can transform digital access—something our Android teams are working on with Jio Platforms in India.


Increasing financial inclusion with Google Pay


Of course, it’s not just about connecting to the internet that’s important, it’s about what people can do with that connectivity. One of the most exciting advancements is financial connectivity, which ensures that everyone can participate in the economic system.


That idea is what inspired us to launch Google Tez, now Google Pay, our first digital payment platform, in India in 2017. At the time, my home country was still largely a cash-based society. Since then, digital payments services have helped reshape how transactions are made. They’ve increased financial inclusion by making payments simple and seamless for over a hundred million Indians.


This historic shift has changed what’s possible for business owners like Vijay Babu, who runs a laundry shop in Bangalore. Two years ago, Vijay would have had to pay $100 for a credit card terminal, worry about printed receipts, and wait days to get paid. 


Today, with Google Pay, and a little help from his daughter, Vijay is able to keep better track of his transactions, accept payments remotely, and build relationships with his customers.


There are many others like Vijay. People are using Google Pay to do everything from send money home to their families and split the check for dinner. Kirana store owners are using it to pay their business expenses, as well as receive payments from their loyal customers.


All told, people in India complete more than three billion digital transactions a month, two thirds of which are taking place outside India’s biggest cities. Digital payment transactions across Southeast Asia are set to almost double to $1.2 trillion by 2025.


Now, we’re using the same technology to improve Google Pay globally, starting in Singapore and the U.S., with more to come. And we’re partnering with organizations like the Gates Foundation, Omidyar Network, the Rockefeller Foundation and others to drive Mojaloop, a nonprofit creating open-source tools any country and organization can use to develop its own digital payments system.


Bringing digital skills and tools to more people


Connectivity is the foundation of a more inclusive digital economy. The next layer is ensuring that everyone, including small businesses, have access to digital skills and tools. One example is the work that the Asia Foundation is doing, with support from our philanthropic arm Google.org, to train 200,000 small business owners and workers across Southeast Asia. 


This program means local nonprofits can help people like Lakela, an avocado farmer from Thailand who used YouTube to learn how to grow other types of fruit, and create new revenue streams for her business.


We’re also investing in the innovation ecosystem, including entrepreneurs and start-ups, to ensure digital economies are sustainable.


Power of partnerships


We can’t do any of this alone. That’s why partnerships are the second part of our agenda.


We have good models to build from. One of the bright spots in this year has been the strong partnerships forged between companies, governments, and NGOs, working together toward shared goals. Building a more inclusive digital economy will require this same spirit of collaboration.


A place to start is digital trade. In Southeast Asia alone, it’s estimated that expanding business and trade through technology could add $1 trillion to overall regional GDP by 2025. And it will help entrepreneurs grow across borders, leading to more jobs, better services and new opportunities.


Unlocking those benefits requires the right frameworks. Singapore and the Asia Pacific region are pioneering new approaches. New digital economy agreements could provide a template for other parts of the world, alongside broader trade deals like the new Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership.  By maximizing these digital agreements—and creating new ones—we can pave the way for a stronger, more inclusive digital economy. 


From closing digital divides to forging new partnerships, our goal for the post-COVID world is to ensure the benefits of technology can be shared as widely and equitably as possible.  


If we can do that, 2020 will be remembered not as the end of the world we knew, but the beginning of a world that works better, for everyone. We look forward to building that world alongside all of you.

Google Pay reimagined: pay, save, manage expenses and more

“Credit cards... rent… Wait. Did we pay the babysitter? We need to buy Max a new collar and order the turkey. I wish I knew how much we spent on groceries last month. Where’s the receipt for those shoes I need to return?”

Staying on top of payments and finances isn’t easy for the best of us. For the past five years, Google Pay has simplified payments online, in store and between friends. Now, more than 150 million people in 30 countries use Google Pay every month. 

Today we're taking an important step forward in our quest to make money simple, secure and helpful. Starting in the U.S., we're launching a redesigned Google Pay app on Android and iOS. The new app is designed around your relationships with people and businesses. It helps you save money and gives you insights into your spending. It’s built with multiple layers of security to keep your money and information private and safe. And in 2021, it will give you the chance to apply for a new kind of digital bank account with trusted financial institutions.

New Google Pay interface

Pay friends and businesses, explore offers and get insights on your spending.

A payment experience designed around relationships

Instead of showing a stack of cards or a long list of transactions, the new Google Pay app focuses on the friends and businesses you transact with most frequently. You can pay, see past transactions and find offers and loyalty info—all organized around conversations.

How you can see past transactions in Google Pay

If you need to split dinner, rent or other expenses with more than one person, you can create a group, split the bill, and keep track of who’s paid in a single place. Google Pay will even help you do the math on who owes what. 

You can also use Google Pay to order food at over 100,000 restaurants, buy gas at over 30,000 gas stations and pay for parking in over 400 cities, all from within the app—and more easy ways to pay are coming soon.

Save and organize your money

Google Pay can also help you save money and redeem offers without the hassle of clipping coupons or copying and pasting promo codes. Look out for offers from brands like Burger King, Etsy, REI Co-op, Sweetgreen, Target, Warby Parker and more in the app. You can activate them with a tap, and they’ll be automatically applied when you pay in store or online.

An example of $5 cash back from Target

If you choose to connect your bank account or cards to Google Pay, the app will provide periodic spending summaries and show your trends and insights over time—giving you a clearer view of your finances. 

Google Pay can also understand and automatically organize your spending. This lets you search across your transactions in new ways. For example, you can search for “food,” “last month,” or “Mexican restaurants” and Google Pay will instantly find the relevant transactions.

How you can search your transactions within Google Pay

A safer way to pay

It’s important that your money and private information are safe and in your control. Google Pay alerts you when you might be paying a stranger, protects you with advanced security, and gives you transparency and control to choose the privacy settings that are right for you. You can change these settings at any time.

And when you sign up for Google Pay, you choose whether you’d like to use your transaction history to personalize your experience within the app. That setting is off by default, but you can turn it on or try it for three months to see if you like it. At the end of three months, you can decide if you want to keep it on or off.

Most importantly, Google Pay will never sell your data to third parties or share your transaction history with the rest of Google for targeting ads.

Privacy and security settings within Google Pay

Coming soon—a new way to bank

People do almost everything on their phones today, but for many, the way they save, pay and engage with their bank has remained unchanged.

That’s why we’re working with trusted financial institutions to create Plex, a new mobile-first bank account integrated into Google Pay. Plex Accounts are offered by banks and credit unions, include checking and savings accounts with no monthly fees, overdraft charges or minimum balance requirements and help you save toward your goals more easily.

Plex account within Google Pay

Starting in 2021, 11 banks and credit unions, including minority-owned depository banks, in the U.S. will start offering Plex Accounts in Google Pay. In the meantime, you can join the waitlist on the app and be one of the first to apply for a Plex Account from Citi or SFCU.

So that’s the new Google Pay—a safe, simple and helpful way for you to pay and manage your finances. Get started by downloading it on Google Play or the App Store today.

The digital wallet is here to stay. It’s time for your business to cash in.

Posted by Cole Stuart, Google Pay Product Marketing

Digital wallets are rapidly growing in popularity, as adoption from users and acceptance from businesses has expanded significantly over recent years. As we have seen in recent months, this trend towards digital payments over traditional card or cash transactions has only accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic. Over 40% of global ecommerce spending in 2019 came from a digital wallet like Google Pay, Apple Pay, or Alipay according to the FIS Global Payments Report1. This year, over one billion shoppers are expected to make a digital wallet transaction.

We believe this is just the beginning. In the next five years, digital wallet adoption is expected to increase dramatically. Worldpay’s white paper explores how adopting digital wallets can benefit businesses like yours. Some of the key takeaways are highlighted below.

What digital wallets have to offer

Digital wallets, such as Google Pay, have the ability to not only improve your business outcomes, but also provide unique value to everyday consumers. Benefits include:

  • Higher conversion rates
  • Seamless checkout experience
  • Reduced cart abandonment
  • Advanced security and protection
Google Pay checkout screen

Digital wallets vs. ordinary card transactions

Real tangible benefits are found when businesses adopt a digital wallet. Findings include:

  • Digital wallet transactions showed significantly higher acceptance rates and significantly lower chargeback rates for businesses compared with ordinary card transactions2.

  • Even though transaction volumes for digital wallets were lower than cards in most markets, the value of US digital wallet transactions were on average 25% greater than ordinary card transactions in 20192.

How to bring Google Pay into your business

Ready to adopt a digital wallet and give your customers a seamless transaction experience in just 4 easy steps? Sign up with the Business Console here and visit our developer's site for more information. You can also find the full whitepaper here, alongside previous case studies that prove how Google Pay has helped drive lasting impact for other businesses.

Chart of Business Console process

Liked our whitepaper? Reach out directly to the contacts below.

Google:

Steve Klebe

Head of PSP Partnerships, Google Pay

[email protected]

Worldpay:

Rami Josef

Senior Product Manager, Worldpay

[email protected]


[1] - Worldpay by FIS Global Payments Report
[2] - Sourced from Worldpay’s Worldwide Payments Gateway (WPG) using data from Q4 2018 through Q1 2020

What do you think?

Do you have any questions? Let us know in the comments below or tweet using #AskGooglePayDev.

Google Pay, built for Singapore

When people in Singapore open the Google Pay app on their Android or iOS device, they’re met by some familiar sights—from the distinctive outlines of the Merlion and the Marina Bay Sands building to the island’s much-loved otters. The goal isn’t just to make Singaporeans feel at home. It’s part of a bigger effort to design Google Pay with local needs in mind.


Our mission with Google Pay is to make money simple, secure and helpful for everyone. Singaporeans were already using Google Pay to tap onto public transport and pay for purchases at more than 80,000 checkout counters. Now, together with our partners, we’re improving and expanding the Google Pay app in Singapore to better reflect the growing role of digital payments in peoples’ lives. 


Money made simple with more banks


To make Google Pay more helpful, we’re building on Singapore’s national real-time payment service—known as PayNow. 


With the PayNow integration, you can send money to anybody in Singapore, even if they’re not on Google Pay. All you need is their phone number. It’s a feature that we introduced for OCBC customers earlier in the year—we’re now extending it to customers of DBS Paylah!and Standard Chartered Bank.  


OCBC, DBS Paylah! and Standard Chartered Bank customers can also use their linked accounts to pay any business that has a PayNow QR code displayed, allowing merchants to receive payments in their corporate bank accounts.


Built around you, your friends and the places you pay 


Payments don’t take place in isolation—they’re part of the daily interactions you have with friends, family and local businesses. 


We built Google Pay around these everyday relationships, to make it quick and easy to transact with the people and businesses you know. In just a few taps, you'll be able to see a past payment with a business, or find a friend to pay. Plus, sending money to someone new is as easy as sending a chat message—just start entering their phone number.


And now we’re taking it a step further—Singapore is the first country where Google Pay users can form groups to organize and manage payments, as well as divide bills and other joint expenses within the app.

GPay SG screenshots

Just for Singapore: food and movies

With Google Pay you can already browse cuisines and order takeout or delivery with the Order Food feature. Now that restaurants have resumed dine-in services, we suspect the new Split a Bill feature will be particularly useful for requesting and receiving payments after a meal with friends. 

Singaporeans also love catching a movie, so it’s no surprise there was a collective cheer when cinemas re-opened recently. With the new Google Pay, you can skip the box office queue by booking a movie ticket and reserving your seats instantly within the app. We've just added Golden Village locations, in addition to Shaw Theatres—giving moviegoers a total of 174 screens to choose from across Singapore.

A more rewarding Google Pay

To make it fun to use Google Pay, the app gives out rewards for transactions in the form of virtual scratchcards (you ‘scratch’ them to find out how much you’ve won). You can earn scratchcards with instant cashback rewards on qualifying transactions—and we’re extending the bonuses when you introduce a friend to Google Pay

GPay SG screenshots 3

The ways Singaporeans manage their money and pay for the things they need are changing—and so are their expectations of payment apps. We’re looking forward to continuing to improve Google Pay for everyone in Singapore, building on everything we’ve announced today.  


Google Pay picks Flutter to drive its global product development

Posted by David Ko, Engineering Director; Jeff Lim, Software Engineer; Pankaj Gupta, Director of Engineering; Will Horn, Software Engineer

Three years ago, when we launched Google Pay India (then called Tez), our vision was to create a simple and secure payment app for everyone in India. We started with the premise of making payments simple and built a user interface that made making payments as easy as starting a conversation. The simplicity of the design resonated with users instantly and over time, we have added functionality to help users do more than just make payments. Today users can pay their bills, recharge their phones, get loans instantly through banks, buy train tickets and much more all within the app. Last year, we also launched the Spot Platform in India, which allows merchants to create branded experiences within the Google Pay app so they can connect with their customers in a more engaging way.

As we looked at scaling our learnings from India to other parts of the world, we wanted to focus on a fast and efficient development environment, which was modern and engaging with the flexibility needed to keep the UI clean. And more importantly one that enabled us to write once and be able to deploy to both iOS and Android reaching the wide variety of users.

It was clear that we would need to build it, and ensure that it worked across a wide variety of payment rails, infrastructure, and operating systems. But with the momentum we had for Google Pay in India, and the fast evolving product features - we had limited engineering resources to put behind this effort.

After evaluating various options, it was easy to pick Flutter as the obvious choice. The three things that made it click for us were:

  • We could write once in Dart and deploy on both iOS and Android, which led to a uniform best-in-class experience on both Android and iOS;
  • Just-in-Time compiler with hot reload during development enabled rapid iteration on UI which tremendously increased developer efficiency; and
  • Ahead-of-time compilation ensured high performance deployment.

Now the task was to get it done. We started with a small team of three software engineers from both Android and iOS. Those days were focused and intense. To start with we created a vertical slice of the app — home page, chat, and payments (with the critical native plugins for payments in India). The team first tried a hybrid approach, and then decided to do a clean rewrite as it was not scalable.

We ran a few small sprints for other engineers on the team to give them an opportunity to rewrite something in Flutter and provide feedback. Everyone loved Flutter — you could see the thrill on people’s faces as they talked about how fast it was to build a user interface. One of the most exciting things was that the team could get instant feedback while developing. We could also leverage the high quality widgets that Flutter provided to make development easier.

After carefully weighing the risks and our case for migration, we decided to go all in with Flutter. It was a monumental rewrite of a moving target, and the existing app continues to evolve while we were rewriting features. After many months of hard work, Google Pay Flutter implementation is now available in open beta in India and Singapore. Our users in India and Singapore can visit the Google Play Store page for Google Pay to opt into the beta program and experience the latest app built on Flutter. Next, we are looking forward to launching Google Pay on Flutter to everyone across the world on iOS and Android.

 Google Pay image Google Pay image Google pay image Google Pay image

We hope this gives you a fair idea of how to approach and launch a complete rewrite of an active app that is used by millions of users and businesses of all sizes. It would not have been possible for us to deliver this without Flutter’s continued advances on the platform. Huge thanks to the Flutter team, as today, we are standing on their shoulders!

When fully migrated, Google Pay will be one of the largest production deployments on the Flutter platform. We look forward to sharing more learnings from our transition to Flutter in the future.

Google Pay picks Flutter to drive its global product development

Posted by David Ko, Engineering Director; Jeff Lim, Software Engineer; Pankaj Gupta, Director of Engineering; Will Horn, Software Engineer

Three years ago, when we launched Google Pay India (then called Tez), our vision was to create a simple and secure payment app for everyone in India. We started with the premise of making payments simple and built a user interface that made making payments as easy as starting a conversation. The simplicity of the design resonated with users instantly and over time, we have added functionality to help users do more than just make payments. Today users can pay their bills, recharge their phones, get loans instantly through banks, buy train tickets and much more all within the app. Last year, we also launched the Spot Platform in India, which allows merchants to create branded experiences within the Google Pay app so they can connect with their customers in a more engaging way.

As we looked at scaling our learnings from India to other parts of the world, we wanted to focus on a fast and efficient development environment, which was modern and engaging with the flexibility needed to keep the UI clean. And more importantly one that enabled us to write once and be able to deploy to both iOS and Android reaching the wide variety of users.

It was clear that we would need to build it, and ensure that it worked across a wide variety of payment rails, infrastructure, and operating systems. But with the momentum we had for Google Pay in India, and the fast evolving product features - we had limited engineering resources to put behind this effort.

After evaluating various options, it was easy to pick Flutter as the obvious choice. The three things that made it click for us were:

  • We could write once in Dart and deploy on both iOS and Android, which led to a uniform best-in-class experience on both Android and iOS;
  • Just-in-Time compiler with hot reload during development enabled rapid iteration on UI which tremendously increased developer efficiency; and
  • Ahead-of-time compilation ensured high performance deployment.

Now the task was to get it done. We started with a small team of three software engineers from both Android and iOS. Those days were focused and intense. To start with we created a vertical slice of the app — home page, chat, and payments (with the critical native plugins for payments in India). The team first tried a hybrid approach, and then decided to do a clean rewrite as it was not scalable.

We ran a few small sprints for other engineers on the team to give them an opportunity to rewrite something in Flutter and provide feedback. Everyone loved Flutter — you could see the thrill on people’s faces as they talked about how fast it was to build a user interface. One of the most exciting things was that the team could get instant feedback while developing. We could also leverage the high quality widgets that Flutter provided to make development easier.

After carefully weighing the risks and our case for migration, we decided to go all in with Flutter. It was a monumental rewrite of a moving target, and the existing app continues to evolve while we were rewriting features. After many months of hard work, Google Pay Flutter implementation is now available in open beta in India and Singapore. Our users in India and Singapore can visit the Google Play Store page for Google Pay to opt into the beta program and experience the latest app built on Flutter. Next, we are looking forward to launching Google Pay on Flutter to everyone across the world on iOS and Android.

 Google Pay image Google Pay image Google pay image Google Pay image

We hope this gives you a fair idea of how to approach and launch a complete rewrite of an active app that is used by millions of users and businesses of all sizes. It would not have been possible for us to deliver this without Flutter’s continued advances on the platform. Huge thanks to the Flutter team, as today, we are standing on their shoulders!

When fully migrated, Google Pay will be one of the largest production deployments on the Flutter platform. We look forward to sharing more learnings from our transition to Flutter in the future.

Google Pay plugin for Magento 2

Posted by Soc Sieng, Developer Advocate

Google Pay plugin for Magento 2

We are pleased to announce the launch of the official Google Pay plugin for Magento 2. The Google Pay plugin can help increase conversions by enabling a simpler and more secure checkout experience in your Magento website. When you integrate with Google Pay, your customers can complete their purchases quickly using the payment methods they’ve securely saved to their Google Accounts.

Google Pay in action.

The Google Pay plugin is built in collaboration with Unbound Commerce, is free to use, and integrates with popular payment service providers including Adyen, BlueSnap, Braintree, FirstData - Payeezy & Ucom, Moneris, Stripe, and Vantiv.

Installation

The Google Pay plugin can be installed from the Magento Marketplace using this link or by searching the Magento Marketplace for “Google Pay”.

Refer to the Magento Marketplace User Guide for more installation instructions.

Getting started

To get started with the Google Pay plugin, you will need your Google Pay merchant identifier which can be found in the Google Pay Business Console.

Your Merchant ID can be found in the Google Pay Business Console.

Configuring the Google Pay plugin

Once installed, you can configure the plugin in your site’s Magento administration console by navigating to Stores > Configuration > Sales > Payment Methods and selecting the Configure button next to Google Pay.

Click on the Configure button to start the setup process.

Testing out Google Pay can be achieved in three easy steps:

  1. Google Pay credentials: enter your Google Pay merchant ID (available from the Google Pay Business Console) and merchant name.
  2. Payment gateway credentials: select your payment gateway from the list of payment gateways supported by the Google Pay plugin.
    1. Choose the Sandbox environment for testing purposes.
    2. Enter your payment gateway’s credentials into their respective form fields.
  3. Google Pay settings: enable Google Pay and choose the card networks that you would like to accept.

You can optionally try out some of the advanced settings that provide the ability to customize the color and type of Google Pay button as well as enabling Minicart integration, which is recommended.

Checkout the Advanced Settings to further customize how and where the Google Pay button is presented in your store.

If your payment provider isn’t listed as an option in the payment gateway list, check to see if your payment provider’s plugin has built-in support for Google Pay.

Launching Google Pay for your website

When you’ve completed your testing, submit your website integration in the Google Pay Business Console. You will need to provide your website’s URL and screenshots to complete the submission.

Summing it up

Integrating Google Pay into your website is a great way to increase conversions and to improve the purchasing experience for your customers.

Find out more about Google Pay and the Google Pay plugin for Magento.

What do you think?

Do you have any questions? Let us know in the comments below or tweet using #AskGooglePayDev.

Future-Proofing Payments in an Uncertain World | Virtual Fireside Chat with Checkout.com CTO Riaz Bordie

Posted by Jose Ugia and Checkout.com

We sat down with Riaz Bordie, the CTO of Checkout.com, a leading international provider of online payment solutions, to get his advice to merchants and the developer community on how to think about future-proofing payments in the uncertain world we live in today.

Jose Ugia: What advice do you have for merchants and developers as it relates to payments in these difficult times?

Riaz: Merchants are seeing a polarizing impact of COVID-19 on their businesses. For those who have an online presence, you’re either seeing a lull in traffic or a spike.

If you’re a merchant who’s seeing traffic dwindle, it’s more important than ever to make sure every transaction counts. If you used to see 50 transactions a day and now you see 10, you want to make sure all 10 deliver. Work with your Payment Service Provider (PSP) to make sure your approval ratios are as optimal as possible -- a legitimate customer who gets declined incorrectly may not return to purchase as they have in the past. If your PSP supports alternative payment methods like Google Pay that decrease friction at checkout and local payment methods if you’re selling internationally, that’s ideal. Keep an eye on your PSP’s stacks and uptimes to make sure you’re not missing out on sales due to outages or technical issues.

If you’re a merchant seeing a spike in traffic, that’s great news! But it’s important to note that a sudden traffic increase without proper operational and infrastructure planning can lead to fraud spikes, decreases in approval ratios, and downtime. With higher sales velocity, risk related issues will multiply. You’ll see more attempted fraud as fraudsters take advantage of unsuspecting consumers, higher payment declines resulting from outdated issuer risk modeling and excessive chargeback levels, subscription cancellations, buyer’s remorse, among others. How are your payments infrastructure and operations equipped to handle all of this?

Make sure your infrastructure is capable of scaling up. If you don’t have autoscaling, you’ll need a team and processes in place to scale infrastructure for traffic spikes, and keep in mind this may get harder with people working remotely. Work your PSP and other providers to optimize your payments, risk models and chargeback handling during this challenging time.

For both types of merchants, it’s important to pay closer attention to performance of your payments system. This includes both ensuring that processes are working in an optimal way - especially given remote working situations and also ensuring that you are seeing efficiencies at scale.

Jose Ugia: How did you think about building a payments infrastructure that was scalable and future-proof at Checkout.com?

We knew in the beginning we wanted a unified API, which through a single integration gives a merchant access to any market via a range of payment methods and other facilities. We’ve worked hard to get acquiring licenses in as many markets as possible so we can bring acquiring in-house, which in turn gives us greater visibility on the entire payment flow. We have also invested in a gateway that can be consistently deployed in local geographies so that whether the merchant is in Dubai or Singapore, they are getting the most optimal traffic flow.

Any engineer knows that tech breaks. Those who win have a better plan for dealing with breakage efficiently, to consistently maintain high levels of service. We spend a lot of time and resources on making sure our stack is resilient and we have the right operational processes in place to both proactively monitor for potential issues and respond correctly when they come up.

Jose Ugia: Speaking of where things are headed, where do you see the future of payments going from a payment service provider perspective?

A few key trends I see:

Risk & Fraud Detection. AI/ML is improving every aspect of tech. Fraudsters will get smarter but so will fraud prevention - it’s a cat and mouse game. In payments, sophisticated risk engines offering ML-based transaction scoring and highly customizable rules builders, among other features, will get better at detecting fraud without compromising sales.

Global acceptance will continue to be complex but paramount. Offering a variety of payment methods is table stakes these days. More and more, we’ll see that local payment methods aren’t the alternative but instead the primary way consumers pay. For example, you need to have Giropay if you’re selling in Germany and Alipay if you’re selling in China if you want a high conversion rate. Ensure that you and your local entities have an optimized setup with your acquirer (ideally domestic where possible) focused on achieving the lowest costs and highest approval rates.

Embedded infrastructure. Merchants - especially enterprise players - will want increased visibility and more control on optimizing their payment systems. We offer this level of insight and flexibility to our merchants today via our APIs around risk, reconciliation, disputes, etc. But we’re headed toward a world where dedicated infrastructure will become part of the package and allow for complete data separation and zero contention.

Jose Ugia: How do you think these changes of payments infrastructure will impact consumers downstream?

Convenience is king among consumers. I believe that COVID-19 will accelerate the move toward a contactless payments society, with consumers relying more on digital wallets and opportunities to pay through their devices. I personally no longer take my wallet out with me when I leave the house. A couple of years ago that felt like a conscious decision - now it’s just part of everyday life to rely solely on my smartphone to pay.

In some regions like MENA, which has typically been a cash-on-delivery society, we’re seeing more merchants close off cash and impose digital payments, opening up more adoption of upfront e-commerce payments. As mandated payment methods begin to change consumer behavior (studies say it takes 2 months to change a habit), new ways of paying will be here to stay, even beyond COVID-19.



- - - - - - - - - - -


Interested in learning more about Checkout.com’s services or speaking to a payments expert on how to optimize your payments stack? Contact us here. For Google Pay related requests and questions or to start your Google Pay integration, visit the Google Pay Business Console.