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Our 10th Doodle 4 Google winner is dino-mite

Ten years ago, for the very first Doodle 4 Google contest, we asked students “what if?” A decade later, we’ve been privileged to receive hundreds of thousands of submissions for our annual contest—submissions that reflect the dreams, hopes and talents of students across the country. These young artists help us to see the world through their eyes and find inspiration in unexpected places.

This year was no exception. We asked students to respond to the theme “What Inspires Me…” and received doodles depicting everything from a love of family and food to a passion for intergalactic roller coasters (!).

Now we’re thrilled to announce the winner of the 2018 Doodle 4 Google contest: first grader Sarah Gomez-Lane, who drew delightful dinosaurs to highlight her dream of becoming a paleontologist. Sarah was our K-3 finalist, and the Virginia state winner. We fell in love with Sarah’s rendering of her dinos, and were blown away by her big (you might even say “dino-sized”!) ambitions for her future, especially at her young age.

When asked how she felt upon hearing she was a finalist, Sarah exclaimed that she was “surprised!” Her advice to students interested in submitting to future Doodle 4 Google contests? “Try your best and have fun!”

doodle 4 google winner on stage

Sarah, first on the left in front, at the Doodle 4 Google award ceremony at Google’s headquarters June 18.

For the first time in Doodle 4 Google’s 10-year history, the National Winner will have the opportunity to turn their submission into an animated, interactive Doodle featured on the Google homepage. Over the summer, Sarah will collaborate with the Doodle team to bring her artwork to life. She’ll also receive $30,000 toward a college scholarship, and her elementary school in Falls Church, VA, will receive $50,000 to spend on technology to help students like Sarah continue to pursue what inspires them.


Thank you to everyone who participated not only this year, but throughout the past decade. And, of course, a huge congratulations to all of the talented 2018 winners. From all of us at Google: keep dreaming—and keep doodling!


Source: Search


Google Search trends all about Dad

Everything “dad” is suddenly cool: dad shoes, dad hats, and even the beloved dad joke. As a tribute to dear old dad ahead of Father’s Day, we’re highlighting some of the most interesting “dad” Google Search trends over the past year.

Dad-spo fashion trends

Who says dads don’t have style? Dad-chic is having a moment in a big way, according to these searches, which have gone up over the past year. Just don’t make us wear socks with our sandals 🧦🧦.

Dad shoes(U.S. data, past 12 months)

  • “Gucci dad shoes,” up 5000 percent

  • “Umbro dad shoes,” up 5000 percent

  • “Balenciaga dad shoes,” up 2800 percent

  • “Dad shoes trend,” up 850 percent

  • “Fila dad shoes,” up 550 percent

Dad hats(U.S. data, past 12 months)

  • “Rick and Morty dad hat,” up 5000 percent

  • “Black Panther dad hat,” up 5000 percent

  • “Off white dad hat,” up 500 percent

  • “Champion dad hat,” up 300 percent

  • “Make your own dad hat,” up 100 percent

Celeb dads on Search, ranked

2018 has been a big year for celebrity babies—and celebrity dads. We took a look at a handful of high-profile dads who welcomed new babies this year, and here are the rankings (by worldwide search interest in 2018):

  1. Kanye West
  2. Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson
  3. Prince William
  4. Tristan Thompson
  5. John Legend
  6. Adam Levine
  7. Hugh Grant
  8. Seth Meyers
  9. Jeffrey Dean Morgan
  10. John Stamos

Dad jokes, according to GIFs

Google Image searches for “dad jokes” have spiked 130 percent in the past 12 months. Below are some of the top “dad joke” related GIFs shared on our GIF search engine, Tenor:

While dad-cool may not always be a trend, appreciating our pops will never go out of style. Whomever you celebrate on June 18th, whether it’s dad, grandpa, coach, or another fatherly figure, we wish you the happiest of Father’s Days.

Source: Search


Google Search trends all about Dad

Everything “dad” is suddenly cool: dad shoes, dad hats, and even the beloved dad joke. As a tribute to dear old dad ahead of Father’s Day, we’re highlighting some of the most interesting “dad” Google Search trends over the past year.

Dad-spo fashion trends

Who says dads don’t have style? Dad-chic is having a moment in a big way, according to these searches, which have gone up over the past year. Just don’t make us wear socks with our sandals 🧦🧦.

Dad shoes(U.S. data, past 12 months)

  • “Gucci dad shoes,” up 5000 percent

  • “Umbro dad shoes,” up 5000 percent

  • “Balenciaga dad shoes,” up 2800 percent

  • “Dad shoes trend,” up 850 percent

  • “Fila dad shoes,” up 550 percent

Dad hats(U.S. data, past 12 months)

  • “Rick and Morty dad hat,” up 5000 percent

  • “Black Panther dad hat,” up 5000 percent

  • “Off white dad hat,” up 500 percent

  • “Champion dad hat,” up 300 percent

  • “Make your own dad hat,” up 100 percent

Celeb dads on Search, ranked

2018 has been a big year for celebrity babies—and celebrity dads. We took a look at a handful of high-profile dads who welcomed new babies this year, and here are the rankings (by worldwide search interest in 2018):

  1. Kanye West
  2. Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson
  3. Prince William
  4. Tristan Thompson
  5. John Legend
  6. Adam Levine
  7. Hugh Grant
  8. Seth Meyers
  9. Jeffrey Dean Morgan
  10. John Stamos

Dad jokes, according to GIFs

Google Image searches for “dad jokes” have spiked 130 percent in the past 12 months. Below are some of the top “dad joke” related GIFs shared on our GIF search engine, Tenor:

While dad-cool may not always be a trend, appreciating our pops will never go out of style. Whomever you celebrate on June 18th, whether it’s dad, grandpa, coach, or another fatherly figure, we wish you the happiest of Father’s Days.

Source: Search


Meet the national finalists of our 10th annual Doodle 4 Google contest

In January, we kicked off our 10th year of Doodle 4 Google, and students across all 53 states and territories submitted their representations of this year’s theme, “What Inspires Me...”

We couldn’t help but be inspired ourselves by all of the submissions. This year’s 180,000+ Doodles covered everything imaginable, from cooking to family to dragons.

Now, after millions of public votes, we’re excited to introduce our five national finalists, one from each age group. Here’s what these young artists had to say about their masterpieces:

Grades K-3: Sarah Gomez-Lane (Grade 1, Falls Church, VA)
"The things on my Doodle are my favorite dinosaurs. Dinosaurs inspire me to study more to be a paleontologist. The shovel is for my future job!"

SaraGomezLane_D4G.jpg

Grades 4-5:Sia Srivastava (Grade 4, Prosper, TX)
"I am very inspired about space travel. I want to explore the galaxy and visit different planets and create a rollercoaster through our universe!”

TX Sia-Srivastava_D4G.jpg

Grades 6-7:Ignacio Burgos (Grade 7, Portsmouth, RI)
"Fashion inspires me because of how you can reflect your own personal style into just a single garment. Inspiration can be drawn from anywhere and can show any sort of idea. Whatever you can imagine!"

Ignacio Burgos_D4G.jpg

Grades 8-9:Madelyn Kieh (Grade 9, Yeadon, PA)
"The thing that inspires me the most is the work of others. When I see an amazing art piece made by someone else, it motivates me to improve my own art. In my Doodle, I drew my big sister, whose artwork has inspired me to draw since I was young."

PA Madelyn-Kieh_D4G.jpg

Grades 10-12:Mark Thivierge (Grade 10, Lutz, FL)
"Nature has existed long before we have and therefore is where we draw our inspiration from. The word ‘inspire’ means to ‘breathe in’ and the wonders of nature are where I breathe in and find meaning in my mathematics, science, music and writing."

FL Mark-Thivierge_D4G.jpg

The national finalists will all receive a Pixelbook computer, a $5,000 college scholarship, and a trip to Google’s headquarters in California to celebrate with the other finalists and meet the Doodle Team.

Come back on June 18 to find out who will be the national winner. Thanks to all who voted and all the young artists who submitted their Doodles. We can’t wait to see what you dream up next year!

Source: Search


See what the world is searching for with the updated Google Trends

Google Trends has become a key part of journalistic storytelling, giving reporters everywhere an insight into search trends across the world. Today, we’re updating Google Trends with new features, simpler navigation and more ways to explore data and stories around one of the world’s biggest journalistic datasets. Many of the changes are based on feedback from Trends users.

The new design puts more editorial data-based stories up front, and gives you the ability to create your own stories using Year in Search data, or by exploring the revamped Trending searches and Explore pages. Go to trends.google.com to get started with new features, including:

  • A revamped Trending searches section, showing what is trending in search right now, both daily and minute-by-minute.

  • A newly-designed section where you can see Google Trends data stories curated by the News Lab team on everything from the Trump Administration through Mother’s Day. It’s also a great place to find amazing examples of Google data visualizations by newsroom designers from all over the world.

  • Easy access to Year in Search data going back to 2001, so you can see how search interest has changed over time.

  • New infographic types such as an intensity map to compare different topics in more meaningful ways.

Taylor Swift Kim Kardashian Trends

Map showing Taylor Swift vs Kim Kardashian across the U.S., with the split in search alongside.

All your favorite features are still there, including real time (minute-by-minute) feeds and daily Trends pages, and the Explore page, where you can search for anything you want.

We’re already working with journalists closely across emerging technologies as part of the Google News Initiative, partnering on innovative projects and building new tools for data journalism. We think these changes to Google Trends will be really valuable, but journalist feedback is important in ensuring that we continue to create features that work for the industry. We'd love to hear what you think—please send us your reactions through the feedback button on the site.

Source: Search


Ramadan Kareem! Get in the Ramadan spirit with Google

Ramadan starts today, and we’re helping you access the information you need to make the most of it. More than 1.7 billion Muslims around the world will observe this time of fasting, gratitude, giving back and connecting with family and friends. We’ve put together a few special experiences across Google to help, from relevant information right in Search to a new way to share Ramadan greetings, made using virtual reality technology.


Searching for... prayer times, recipes and entertainment

During Ramadan, information needs change, from people wanting to know when to start and end their fast, how to prepare Ramadan dishes, and when restaurants and places open during Ramadan . To make it easier to find everything you need, we’ve created a special tool in the Middle East and North Africa and Indonesia that appears when you search for “Ramadan” on Google. You’ll find customized, locally relevant information—everything from tips and prayer timings to the most popular recipes —all right in your Search results.

Given people are fasting all day, and large families gather during Iftar, preparing delicious food for the people that matter in our lives takes on a new importance. During Ramadan, searches for recipes spike 50 percent higher and watch times on YouTube for cooking videos peak at almost 30 percent higher. You can now explore top recipes and YouTube cooking videos directly through the Ramadan search experience.


Cooking videos aren’t the only content people look for on YouTube. Ramadan is the key entertainment season in the Middle East and North Africa and users go to YouTube to catch up on their favorite TV drama or comedy shows. YouTube watch time for “TV series” rises a staggering 151 percent in Ramadan compared to any other period in the year. This Ramadan, you can keep up with the latest Ramadan dramas and comedies directly through Search.


Searching for the Qibla anywhere in the world

Millions of Muslims around the world turn to Mecca every day for prayer. To help you answer another top question, “What’s the direction of the Qibla?”, last year we launched Qibla Finder, a web app that uses augmented reality to show you the direction of the Qibla wherever you are in the world. We’ve now enabled offline usage and a shortcut to add Qibla Finder to your Android homescreen, so you can locate Mecca when you’re on the move.
06_Qibla_Homescreen_Gif_NoLogo_EN_AE002.gif

Searching for greetings

Ramadan and Eid greeting cards are the top trending searches before, during and after Ramadan, with queries like “How to wish someone a happy Ramadan” and “How to make an Eid greeting card.“ So to help you create beautiful personalized messages to share during Ramadan, we’re launching Qalam from Google.
Introducing Qalam from Google: Unique Ramadan cards to share with friends and family

For centuries, writers and artists have created calligraphic art—ranging from ceiling art and intricate passages to everyday items like cups. Now Qalam brings this timeless heritage of calligraphy online. We collaborated with nine artists from around the world to create more than 35 unique digital Ramadan and Eid greetings (with hundreds of customizable artwork possibilities) using Tilt Brush, a virtual reality app. You can customize and share your own 3D Ramadan card now at g.co/Qalam.

Featured artists include the internationally renowned eL Seed, whose designs incorporate calligraphy with graffiti (“calligraffiti”), Tolga Girgin from Turkey who mixes calligraphy and typography to challenge the sense of perspective with clever shading and Soraya Syed, one of the first female calligraphers in Pakistan. She’s created a classic Arabic calligraphy piece which places the traditional art form in a contemporary context. We’ve been inspired by what we’ve seen so far, and we’ll continue working with more artists to add more creations to Google Qalam over time.


Be sure to come back to Google Search every day to find new ways to celebrate Ramadan. And remember to customize and share your own unique greeting card at g.co/Qalam. From all of us at Google, Ramadan Kareem!

Source: Search


The High Five: two newborn babies and a “Cursed Child”

This week, babies were born and lettuce was thrown out. Here’s a look at some top Search trends from the week, with data from theGoogle News Lab.

What’s in a name?

A lot, if you’re a Royal. After Prince William and Kate Middleton welcomed a son into the world this week, searches for “name of new royal baby” went up more than 3,000 percent. The newly-named Prince Louis’s siblings were also of interest—searches for “Prince George full name” went up 1,000 percent, and “Who is Princess Charlotte named after?” was also a trending question.

Trying to conjure up some tickets

Muggles and wizards alike are wondering “How much are tickets to Harry Potter and the Cursed Child?” (we’re guessing it’ll be a lot of Galleons). They may be ditching Orlando for New York—the play was more popular in Search than the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, but not quite as popular as “Summer: The Donna Summer Musical,” which was the most searched Broadway play this week.

More baby news

An image of a shirtless Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson holding his newborn baby girl went viral this week, and people oooh-ed and aaah-ed all over Search (interest in “the rock new baby” went up 2,750 percent). This was after he got a heartfelt invitation to prom from a superfan in Minnesota, which caused searches for “the rock prom” to go up 1,850 percent. Quite the week!

Lettuce warn you

Search questions are a mixed bag, but here’s one that stood out this week: “Is it safe to eat romaine lettuce yet?” If you’d like some side trends with your salad, there’s been a 1,000 percent increase in searches for “ecoli virus,” and the most searches for “e. coli” are coming from Alaska, Montana and Idaho.

An ending to marvel at

“The Avengers: Infinity War” hit the big screen this week, and there’s one thing on everyone’s mind: “Who dies in Infinity War?” Searches for “infinity war spoilers who dies” went up nearly 1,000 percent this week. We won’t spoil anything, but according to one top Search question—”How many post-credit scenes are there in Infinity War?”—you should stick around until the very end.

Source: Search


The High Five: two newborn babies and a “Cursed Child”

This week, babies were born and lettuce was thrown out. Here’s a look at some top Search trends from the week, with data from theGoogle News Lab.

What’s in a name?

A lot, if you’re a Royal. After Prince William and Kate Middleton welcomed a son into the world this week, searches for “name of new royal baby” went up more than 3,000 percent. The newly-named Prince Louis’s siblings were also of interest—searches for “Prince George full name” went up 1,000 percent, and “Who is Princess Charlotte named after?” was also a trending question.

Trying to conjure up some tickets

Muggles and wizards alike are wondering “How much are tickets to Harry Potter and the Cursed Child?” (we’re guessing it’ll be a lot of Galleons). They may be ditching Orlando for New York—the play was more popular in Search than the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, but not quite as popular as “Summer: The Donna Summer Musical,” which was the most searched Broadway play this week.

More baby news

An image of a shirtless Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson holding his newborn baby girl went viral this week, and people oooh-ed and aaah-ed all over Search (interest in “the rock new baby” went up 2,750 percent). This was after he got a heartfelt invitation to prom from a superfan in Minnesota, which caused searches for “the rock prom” to go up 1,850 percent. Quite the week!

Lettuce warn you

Search questions are a mixed bag, but here’s one that stood out this week: “Is it safe to eat romaine lettuce yet?” If you’d like some side trends with your salad, there’s been a 1,000 percent increase in searches for “ecoli virus,” and the most searches for “e. coli” are coming from Alaska, Montana and Idaho.

An ending to marvel at

“The Avengers: Infinity War” hit the big screen this week, and there’s one thing on everyone’s mind: “Who dies in Infinity War?” Searches for “infinity war spoilers who dies” went up nearly 1,000 percent this week. We won’t spoil anything, but according to one top Search question—”How many post-credit scenes are there in Infinity War?”—you should stick around until the very end.

Source: Search


The High Five: put your hands together for this week’s search trends

Every Friday, we look back at five trending topics in Search from that week, and then give ourselves a High Five for making it to the weekend. Today we’re putting our hands together for National High Five Day—so first, a few notable “high five” trends. Then on to our regularly scheduled programming.

High Fives all around
Turns out, searches for “high five” transcend all realms of culture: sports (“Why do NBA players high five after free throws?”) entertainment (“how to high five a Sim”), and pets (“How to teach a dog to high five”). As for virtual high fives, “Scrubs,” “Seinfeld” and Liz Lemon are high five famous—they’re the top trending “high five gifs.”

A First Lady, first a mother
When former First Lady Barbara Bush passed away on Tuesday at the age of 92, people remembered her role as matriarch, searching for “Barbara Bush children,” “Barbara Bush family,” and “Barbara Bush grandchildren.” She was the second woman to be the mother and wife of a president; and searches for the first woman to hold that title, Abigail Adams (wife of John and mother of John Quincy) went up by 1,150 percent this week.

What’s Swedish for robot?
Need an extra set of hands? A team of researchers built a robot to help with one of the most challenging tasks of the modern era—assembling Ikea furniture. In an ordinary week, people might search for Ikea lamp, but for now they’re more interested in “Ikea robot.” Though Swedish meatballs are always a favorite, this week’s trending Ikea furniture items were Ikea closets, plants and sofas.

Work it, Walmart
Walmart’s store aisles are turning into runways with the new employee dress code. They can now wear jeans and–brace yourselves–anysolid color top. As for bottoms, people want to know, “Are leggings included in Walmart’s new dress code?” We never (Arkan)saw this coming, but Arkansas topped the list of regions searching for “Walmart dress code” in the U.S. For people wondering about other dress code etiquette, a trending question was “what to wear to jury duty.”

Kendrick makes history
This week people asked “Why is Kendrick Lamar important?” Listen to this: he made music history by being the first non-classical or jazz musician to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music Composition (high five, Kendrick!). And people felt the pull to search for “Kendrick Lamar prize”—interest was 900 percent higher than “Kendrick Lamar song.”

Source: Search


The High Five: put your hands together for this week’s search trends

Every Friday, we look back at five trending topics in Search from that week, and then give ourselves a High Five for making it to the weekend. Today we’re putting our hands together for National High Five Day—so first, a few notable “high five” trends. Then on to our regularly scheduled programming.

High Fives all around
Turns out, searches for “high five” transcend all realms of culture: sports (“Why do NBA players high five after free throws?”) entertainment (“how to high five a Sim”), and pets (“How to teach a dog to high five”). As for virtual high fives, “Scrubs,” “Seinfeld” and Liz Lemon are high five famous—they’re the top trending “high five gifs.”

A First Lady, first a mother
When former First Lady Barbara Bush passed away on Tuesday at the age of 92, people remembered her role as matriarch, searching for “Barbara Bush children,” “Barbara Bush family,” and “Barbara Bush grandchildren.” She was the second woman to be the mother and wife of a president; and searches for the first woman to hold that title, Abigail Adams (wife of John and mother of John Quincy) went up by 1,150 percent this week.

What’s Swedish for robot?
Need an extra set of hands? A team of researchers built a robot to help with one of the most challenging tasks of the modern era—assembling Ikea furniture. In an ordinary week, people might search for Ikea lamp, but for now they’re more interested in “Ikea robot.” Though Swedish meatballs are always a favorite, this week’s trending Ikea furniture items were Ikea closets, plants and sofas.

Work it, Walmart
Walmart’s store aisles are turning into runways with the new employee dress code. They can now wear jeans and–brace yourselves–anysolid color top. As for bottoms, people want to know, “Are leggings included in Walmart’s new dress code?” We never (Arkan)saw this coming, but Arkansas topped the list of regions searching for “Walmart dress code” in the U.S. For people wondering about other dress code etiquette, a trending question was “what to wear to jury duty.”

Kendrick makes history
This week people asked “Why is Kendrick Lamar important?” Listen to this: he made music history by being the first non-classical or jazz musician to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music Composition (high five, Kendrick!). And people felt the pull to search for “Kendrick Lamar prize”—interest was 900 percent higher than “Kendrick Lamar song.”

Source: Search