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Congratulations to our US Grow with Google Developer Scholars!

Posted by Peter Lubbers, Head of Google Developer Training

Grow with Google in partnership with Udacity, is awarding 5,000 Nanodegree program scholarships to help aspiring developers in the US continue their digital skills training and prepare for jobs as Android or Mobile Web developers.

As part of the Grow with Google Developer Scholarship program, scholars completed an initial challenge course at Udacity - completing on average over 100 hours of coursework, building coding project portfolios and engaging with their local developer community. Today, Google and Udacity are excited to recognize the 5,000 top performers in the challenge course, and offer them a chance to continue their training through a Nanodegree program with a full scholarship.

By successfully completing a Nanodegree program, scholars earn an industry-recognized credential helping to create a path for increased job opportunities as well as prepare for one of Google's Developer Certifications: Associate Android Developer or Mobile Web Specialist. These developer training programs offer scholars the opportunity to build their skills and become job-ready, helping to close the gap in the more than 500,000 open computing jobs in the US.

We are incredibly inspired by the hard work and passion shown by all our Grow with Google developer scholars -- including these stellar scholars:

Bela from Tennessee, a mother of two working toward her goal of becoming a web developer. Bela recently shared her personal story of determination to complete her developer training.

Desmend from Illinois, who is taking what he learns in his Android developer course and sharing it with local high school students that he mentors -- teaching them about technology and the type of career opportunities offered to developers.

Sean from Alabama, a veteran using his course training to transition into the civilian workforce as an Android developer.

And Demetra from New York, who utilized the online training and forums to achieve her goal of advancing her skills in web development.

This scholarship effort is part of the Grow with Google initiative, which is aimed at helping create economic opportunities for Americans by offering free tools, training, and events. Udacity is excited to partner with Google on this powerful effort and together we look forward to seeing what these scholars will achieve in the coming year.

Rolling Study Halls: turning bus time into learning time

I grew up as an “Army Brat,” a name for kids with a parent in the military who are often on the move. As my mom sums it up, my family spent 18 years on the road in over a dozen cities, 20 different houses, three elementary schools, two middle schools, two high schools—with one tropical fish and one surprise visit from a python in Monterey, CA. Throughout all these travels—meeting people from all different backgrounds, faiths and ethnicities—the highlight was always the excitement of going to a new school. School remains a fixture in my life all these years later.


I’m still a road warrior, traveling across America’s highways and byways for work. On these trips, I see firsthand the growing gap between children living in poverty and those who come from more comfortable circumstances. I meet students who live in remote or rural areas and endure long bus rides to and from school—in some places up to 90 minutes each way. In these areas, like so many others across the country, a lot of students don’t have access to connectivity or devices at home, but they often have schoolwork that requires it. All of this I observe through the lens of technology and its potential to improve lives. Not only does tech enable me to stay connected while I’m on the go, but we live during a time where even astronauts can have Wi-Fi on their space stations. Why couldn’t our students have access to it on their bus rides home?


So in 2016, in partnership with local education leaders in Caldwell County, NC (near our Lenoir Data Center), and some Googler volunteers, we helped install Wi-Fi on 11 school buses in the district. We also worked with the Education Foundation of Caldwell County to make sure there were educators who could accompany students on these Wi-Fi-equipped buses to provide support and help out with assignments. Because bridging the “digital divide” isn’t just about providing access and devices—it’s also about using that technology effectively.

Lilyn Hester speaks at Rolling Study Hall pilot launch in 2016
Lilyn Hester speaking at the Rolling Study Hall pilot launch in 2016

The effects were immediate—almost too immediate for some bus drivers who were shocked (and a little confused) when their commutes became so quiet. Students were engaged. They were learning. And after a few months, there were more real results: School officials saw students do better in school. It was working.


After the success of the pilot, we brought it to another school district—Berkeley County, SC—targeting Lowcountry communities near St. Stephen and Alvin, areas where many students don’t have access at home. We worked with the College of Charleston to do research on the impact of this program and say that after one year, students were significantly more likely to be digitally literate and 80 percent of teacher participants said they were more likely to bring digital lessons into their classroom activities. They also saw homework completion go up, discipline rates go down, and a dramatic increase in overall student engagement.


Because of promising data like this, we’re expanding Rolling Study Halls across the country, starting today in Deer Trail School District in Colorado. As a part of our Grow with Google initiative, Rolling Study Halls will help students across the country access the tools and digital skills they’ll need to be prepared for tomorrow’s workforce.

We’re working with community leaders to outfit buses in 16 additional school districts in partnership with school networking nonprofit CoSN and broadband expert Kajeet. Together we hope to maximize access to learning time outside of school hours, with a goal of reclaiming more than 1.5 million hours for thousands of students by the end of this school year. School districts will be able determine policies to limit access to schoolwork only. Students will also have the chance to work collaboratively—alongside an onboard educator—to complete their assignments.

Introducing Rolling Study Halls

When we first started this program, I wanted to open up opportunities for students in need, and knock down barriers—like lack of access to internet at home—that stood in their way. To see an idea that I started in my own backyard go nationwide is humbling, but we never do it alone. Our program builds on the hard work and dedication of so many teachers, parents, school officials and nonprofit organizations who are making it all possible. And together, we can give these kids access to the learning opportunities they deserve.

Local entrepreneurs create new opportunities in Kentucky

Editor’s Note: Grow with Google offers free tools, trainings and events to help people grow their skills, careers, and businesses. The Grow with Google tour brings workshops, one-on-one coaching, and hands-on demos to cities and towns across the United States. Through a series of Keyword posts, we’ll highlight where we’ve been, but you can find out where we’re headed next on our site.

Three years ago, when a coal mine shut down in their hometown of Pikeville, Kentucky, Lynn Parish and Rusty Justice got together to search for a new way forward. They knew that technology could create jobs and enable miners and industry workers to continue living in Pikeville. With courage, determination and ingenuity, Lynn and Rusty created Bit Source, a software development company that would teach miners how to code and then hire them to work as developers. Today, former miners at Bit Source build websites, apps and digital tools for clients across the country.

Bit Source and several other Kentucky-based organizations joined us at the Grow with Google event yesterday in Louisville, where over 700 students, small businesses, educators, budding developers and job seekers participated in workshops, one-on-one coaching, and hands-on demos. These local organizations spoke about the opportunities in tech available to Kentuckians today.

Every 90 days there are about one hundred junior software development opportunities open in the greater Louisville area. Code Louisville is a program created by KentuckianaWorks that offers free software development training to equip people with the skills needed to fill those open jobs. As part of Grow with Google’s ongoing commitment in Louisville, we’re supporting KentuckianaWorks with a $100,000 sponsorship to help the organization expand their efforts, introduce new lessons including the Applied Digital Skills curriculum, and train over 500 new learners.

GwG_Brian Luerman, Anjali Chadha and Justin Hall.jpg
Brian Luerman, Anjali Chadha and Justin Hall share their stories on the Digital Heroes Panel

We’re proud to work alongside Kentuckians like Justin Hall, President of Bit Source, Brian Luerman of KentuckianaWorks, and Anjali Chadha, who at just 15 years old founded Empowered, which teaches young women of color technical skills and pairs them with local businesses who want to expand their online presence.

The Grow with Google tour will come to more cities and towns throughout 2018. Our next two stops are in Savannah, GA on April 25 and Columbia, SC on May 2. Learn more at g.co/grow/events.    

Helping 1 million Europeans find a job or grow their business by 2020

The world is undergoing a digital transformation, offering enormous opportunities for growth, innovation and jobs. However, digital skills and tools can still seem out of reach to many.

That’s why we’re renewing our commitment to the EU Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition, with a new pledge to help 1 million Europeans find a job or grow their business by 2020. This commitment goes beyond our previous pledge to help people develop digital skills to ensure that we support trainees as they put those skills to use in building careers and businesses.

We’ve now trained 3 million Europeans, and more than 2 million people in Africa, in digital skills. This is our “Grow with Google” project, launched in 2015 and localized with expert partners in each country to maximize relevance and results. Our digital skills work, a reflection of the talents of people we have trained, was recognised by the European Commission in 2016 and2017.

But does digital skills training really translate into economic impact and improved prospects for those people who invest their time?  To answer that question, we launched an independent research starting in 2016, and asked Grow with Google trainees about the impact they saw on their career or business 14 weeks after their training.

The research shows that following Grow with Google training, so far over 190,000 Europeans have found a job or started a business—like Idiko in Hungary, a mother of two who learnt how to code and now manages her own business from home. More than half a million European businesses have grown their business through new customers or revenue, like Ntina from Greece, who during the recession opened up a hotel business which now welcomes people from all over the word. And 32,000 small and medium sized businesses have taken on more staff, such as Mark & Andersfrom Denmark who have grown from two to 30 people in the last year.

Grow with Google

Our new Grow with Google Impact Report gathers together stories of people such as Idiko, Ntina, Mark and Anders who have found a job or grown their business. Going forward, we will work with our research Partner Ipsos to measure impact and we’ll publish quarterly updates showing how new skills can translate into opportunities for business owners and job seekers alike.

Grow with Google aims to help everyone in Europe get access to training and products to grow their skills, career, or business, and we’ll continue to partner with governments, city councils, universities, private-sector businesses and nonprofits through the support of Google.org to achieve this. In Italy, Crescere in Digitale, a partnership with the Ministry of Labour and Chamber of Commerce, will activate 5,000 more internships for young unemployed people at SMBs by 2020, which can lead to full-time employment for people like Cristina at Lux Made-In, a traditional jewellery store. In Spain, we just launched a digital skills employment program with the Government and in Germany, we continue to work with Fraunhofer IAIS on their Open Roberta program, teaching young women how to code.

Today anyone with a smartphone and an idea can be an entrepreneur, reach customers around the globe, can hire, grow and export. Technology is the toolkit for a world of opportunities—and Grow with Google is about helping everyone put those tools to work.

Helping 1 million Europeans find a job or grow their business by 2020

The world is undergoing a digital transformation, offering enormous opportunities for growth, innovation and jobs. However, digital skills and tools can still seem out of reach to many.


That’s why we’re renewing our commitment to the EU Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition, with a new pledge to help 1 million Europeans find a job or grow their business by 2020. This commitment goes beyond our previous pledge to help people develop digital skills to ensure that we support trainees as they put those skills to use in building careers and businesses.


We’ve now trained 3 million Europeans, and more than 2 million people in Africa, in digital skills. This is our “Grow with Google” project, launched in 2015 and localized with expert partners in each country to maximize relevance and results. Our digital skills work, a reflection of the talents of people we have trained, was recognised by the European Commission in 2016 and2017.


But does digital skills training really translate into economic impact and improved prospects for those people who invest their time?  To answer that question, we launched an independent research starting in 2016, and asked Grow with Google trainees about the impact they saw on their career or business 14 weeks after their training.


The research shows that following Grow with Google training, so far over 190,000 Europeans have found a job or started a business—like Idiko in Hungary, a mother of two who learnt how to code and now manages her own business from home. More than half a million European businesses have grown their business through new customers or revenue, like Ntina from Greece, who during the recession opened up a hotel business which now welcomes people from all over the word. And 32,000 small and medium sized businesses have taken on more staff, such as Mark & Andersfrom Denmark who have grown from two to 30 people in the last year.
grow with google europe pledge

Our new Grow with Google Impact Report gathers together stories of people such as Idiko, Ntina, Mark and Anders who have found a job or grown their business. Going forward, we will work with our research Partner Ipsos to measure impact and we’ll publish quarterly updates showing how new skills can translate into opportunities for business owners and job seekers alike.


Grow with Google aims to help everyone in Europe get access to training and products to grow their skills, career, or business, and we’ll continue to partner with governments, city councils, universities, private-sector businesses and nonprofits through the support of Google.org to achieve this. In Italy, Crescere in Digitale, a partnership with the Ministry of Labour and Chamber of Commerce, will activate 5,000 more internships for young unemployed people at SMBs by 2020, which can lead to full-time employment for people like Cristina at Lux Made-In, a traditional jewellery store. In Spain, we just launched a digital skills employment program with the Government and in Germany, we continue to work with Fraunhofer IAIS on their Open Roberta program, teaching young women how to code.

Today anyone with a smartphone and an idea can be an entrepreneur, reach customers around the globe, can hire, grow and export. Technology is the toolkit for a world of opportunities—and Grow with Google is about helping everyone put those tools to work.

The She Word: how Emily Hanley shares her passion for computer science

Editor’s Note: The She Word is a Keyword series all about dynamic and creative women at Google. Last week, the Grow with Google tour—which brings workshops, one-on-one coaching, and hands-on demos to cities across the U.S.—stopped in Lansing, Michigan. Emily Hanley, one of our very own software engineers and a Michigan native, taught introductory coding classes at the event. We spoke to her about returning to her hometown to teach, exposing more kids to computer science, and how her Google Home helps her have more dance parties with her kids.

Emily Hanley.jpg

What was your biggest takeaway from Grow with Google in Lansing?
It was inspiring to see so many people excited about the opportunity to not only interact with Google products, but to try out programming.

What was one memorable moment of the day?
Seeing the “ah ha” moments when people realized they had actually written code and produced something on their own. The classrooms were packed all day long, and it was so neat to interact with people who realized the potential of what they had just learned to do. People shared their stories of how they were already using technology in their fields, and this class helped them think about how they could do even more.

Lansing Grow with Google event was close to where you grew up.What was it like to go back to your hometown?
It’s amazing to see the investment in towns like Lansing, and to witness the revitalization that’s happening. People are bringing new ideas and technology to industries that have existed in Michigan for decades.

GoogleGrow_EmilyHanley.jpg

How did you get your start at Google?
I started as an intern in 2007 and have been here ever since—you could say I’ve grown up with Google.

How do you explain your job at a dinner party?
I’m a software engineer—I speak the language of computers. I work on the Chrome browser and make sure that other engineers who write code for Chrome don’t make it slower.

What advice do you have for girls who want to be engineers?
Don’t be afraid to dig in. Sometimes that means failing, but failure is a natural discovery that helps you figure out what you’re good at. Always ask the question that’s on your mind—chances are half the room is thinking the same thing, and more importantly, it’s how you grow.

Tell us about your path to computer science.
I didn’t learn about computers until college. I was more into physics and chemistry, and computers seemed like a black box. That’s part of why I’m so passionate about computer science education—if I can pass on what I’ve learned to the next generation, they can make something even bigger. They’ll do it tenfold.

When kids are exposed to CS at a young age, it becomes a crucial tool for them. It’s not just a platform for playing games. And you can use CS no matter what your passion is. If it’s fashion or journalism or something else, CS can be a part of it.

Who has helped you along your journey?
My mom always told me there’s never a dream too big. She was always an advocate and a dreamer. Whenever I’ve felt intimidated, or had less technical experience that others in the room, I thought, “Dang it, I’ll work harder and find the next door to bang down.” My mom taught me that.

How do you pass that advice onto your own (five!) kids?
The biggest thing I want to give all my children is confidence in themselves and their abilities to pursue their passion (I always say “pursue your passion, not a paycheck”). So often people internalize criticisms and roadblocks as indications they aren't good enough to keep going on that path, instead of seeing those roadblocks as opportunities to grow.

What role does technology play in your family life?
I have five kids under the age of 7. I try to make technology part of our everyday life, but not the main focus of it. We utilize our Google Home for things like dance parties and measurements when cooking. We use Google for school projects, printing coloring sheets and buying birthday presents. We take tons of photos and make Google Photobooks from our phones so we can have them on our coffee table. I want them to use technology as a tool to aid in their lives, but I don't want it to replace human connections.

Grow with Google comes to Lansing

Editor’s Note: Grow with Google offers free tools, trainings and events to help people grow their skills, careers, and businesses. The Grow with Google tour brings workshops, one-on-one coaching, and hands-on demos to cities and towns across the United States. Through a series of Keyword posts, we’ll highlight where we’ve been, but you can find out where we’re headed next on our site.

Grow with Google can be a homecoming for Googlers like Emily Hanley, who was born and raised near Lansing. As an Ann Arbor-based engineer, Emily had the chance to return to her hometown to lead an introductory coding classes at the event. She explained the importance of introducing computer science to young people, saying, “When kids are exposed to computer science at a young age, it becomes a crucial tool for them. And you can use computer science no matter what your passion is.”

The fifty Michiganders who attended Emily’s class were among the 1,100 job-seekers, small business owners, developers, educators and students who joined Grow with Google on tour at Lansing Community College in Michigan. With two offices (Ann Arbor and Birmingham-Detroit) and over 600 Googlers in Michigan, we are proud to have been able to bring some home to Lansing to help out with the two-day event.

In addition to hometown Googlers, we were fortunate to work with the local community, including many Lansing-based organizations focused on education and economic development. One of our partners, the Information Technology Empowerment Center (ITEC), provides after-school and summer programs to build excitement for coursework and careers in STEM fields. As part of our continued efforts in the city, Google announced a $100,000 sponsorship to ITEC to expand their digital skills offerings to even more K-12 students across the region.

The Grow with Google tour will continue in many more cities and towns throughout 2018. Our next stop is Louisville, Kentucky on March 29th. Learn more at g.co/grow/events.

Beginnings, Reinventions, and Leaps

Grow with Google Developer Scholars Advancing their Lives and Careers

This is a cross-post with our partner Udacity

The Grow with Google Developer Scholarship—a US-focused program offering learning opportunities to tens of thousands of aspiring developers—has given rise to a wealth of powerful stories from amazing individuals who are using their scholarships to pursue their goals and achieve their dreams. Some are creating new beginnings in new places. Others are reinventing their paths and transforming their futures. Still others are advancing their careers and growing their businesses.

Rei Blanco, Paul Koutroulakis, and Mary Weidner exemplify what the scholarship program is all about.

A New Beginning in Lansing, Michigan

Rei Blanco immigrated to Lansing, Michigan from Cuba seven years ago. He began learning English, and found opportunities to practice his skills in jobs ranging from housekeeping to customer support. Today, as a Grow with Google Developer Sscholarship recipient, he is learning a whole new language—Javascript—as well as HTML and CSS. Rei earned himself a spot as a student in the Front-End Web Developer challenge course, and is now fully-immersed, and loving every part of his journey to becoming a developer.

"When I get home, I immediately go to the basement and start coding!"

Rei studies several hours every night. He credits his partner for the non-stop encouragement she gives him. He embraces a daily workout routine that keeps him focused and energized. He also praises the student community for helping him to advance successfully through the program.

"The live help channel in our Slack workspace is great. Once you get stuck, you get immediate help or you can help out others."

As his skills grow, so does his confidence. A year ago, when he first began taking online coding courses, he felt out of place attending a local developer meetup. These days, he's a busy member of a student group working on outside projects, and has plans to attend many more in-person events. Rei is taking his developer career step-by-step—he's bolstering his chances of earning freelance work by steadily adding new projects to his portfolio, and has his sights set on a full-time job in front-end web development.

A Reinvention in Columbia, South Carolina

Paul Koutroulakis was a 20-year restaurant industry success story. For 10 of those years, he even owned his own establishment. But like it was for so many others, 2008 was a terrible year. Sales dropped, and the burden became too great. Paul lost his restaurant, and ultimately, his home.

Despite the hardships, Paul retained the spirit that had made him a success in the first place, and he was determined to persevere. But he also saw the writing on the wall, and knew he needed to make a change.

"This was a wakeup call with my resume. I didn't want to be an old man managing a restaurant."

From his research, he learned that demand for web developers was growing rapidly, and he recognized the opportunity he was looking for. From that moment forward, Paul focused his energy on becoming a developer.

He worked daytime hours at a logistics company, and started taking computer programming classes at night at a local technical college. Paul earned his associates degree, but he wasn't done. He felt the pressure to go the extra mile, and made the commitment to do so by competing for, and ultimately earning, a Grow with Google Developer Sscholarship.

"I need to make myself more marketable. I would like to show that age doesn't matter and that anyone can make a great contribution to a company or field if they are passionate about learning."

Today, Paul is focused on building a project portfolio, and wants to land a job as an entry-level web developer. His long-term goal is to enter the field of cybersecurity. Despite the hard work and long hours, he's excited by the skills he's learning, and by the transformation he's undergone. Best of all, he knows it's all worth it.

"Even if it's a late night of studying, it's better than coming home at one or two in the morning after a long shift at the restaurant."

A Leap Forward in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Mary Weidner's degree was in finance, and after graduating, she went right into the field, spending several years in a series of finance-related roles. Simultaneously, she was nurturing an interest in coding, even going so far as to take a few free online courses. Everything changed for her when a friend asked her to join him as co-founder for a fitness app he was developing. She was intrigued, and agreed to take the leap. As one-half of a two-person team, she found herself immediately supporting all aspects of the fledgling operation, from launching the database, to filming videos.

Mary's hobbyist-level interest in coding transformed into a primary focus, as she realized early on that building her tech skills would significantly enhance her ability to grow the business. But there was more than just operational necessity at work—Mary recognized she was facing an additional set of challenges.

"Not only do I want to learn how to code in order to help my company, I also want to be more respected in the industry. Being a woman and a non-technical co-founder is not the easiest place to be in tech."

As a Grow with Google Developer Sscholarship recipient, Mary is now engaged in an intensive learning program, and her skills are accelerating accordingly.

Strongr Fastr officially launched in January 2018, and has already been downloaded by thousands of users, boasting a user rating of 4.7 stars. It's an impressive start, but neither Mary nor her partner are resting on their laurels. They're motivated to grow and improve, and are focused on "finding traction channels that work, and trying to find that scalable groove."

Despite her head-down determination and focus, Mary's approach to learning is a spirited one, and she's enjoying every minute of her big leap forward.

"I'm loving it. It's really cool to have apps on my phone that I've made, even if they're the most simple thing. It's very empowering and just ... cool!"

Growing Careers and Skills Across the US

Grow with Google is a new initiative to help people get the skills they need to find a job. Udacity is excited to partner with Google on this powerful effort, and to offer the Ddeveloper Sscholarship program.

Grow with Google Developer scholars come from different backgrounds, live in different cities, and are pursuing different goals in the midst of different circumstances, but they are united by their efforts to advance their lives and careers through hard work, and a commitment to self-empowerment through learning. We're honored to support their efforts, and to share the stories of scholars like Rei, Paul, and Mary.

Making an Impact in Pittsburgh

When we announced the Grow with Google initiative last October at our Pittsburgh office, we gave the city’s nonprofit organizations a challenge: come up with a bold idea to create lasting economic impact in your community, and Google.org will provide a grant to make that idea a reality.

Since then, more than 90 nonprofit organizations submitted proposals to spur economic opportunity right here in the Pittsburgh area. Ideas ranged from community-driven technology repair to mobile clothing deliveries for families in need, and we were impressed by the dedication to making a real difference  in the Pittsburgh area.

This week, our panel of advisors selected four nonprofits whose ideas were exceptionally impactful, innovative, scalable and feasible. Here are the winners of the Google.org Impact Challenge—Pittsburgh:

  • Idea Foundry: A nonprofit economic development organization and accelerator that aims to diversify entrepreneurship by offering hands-on, individualized business development support for young entrepreneurs and small business. With their grant, Idea Foundry will help establish up to 10 businesses led by underrepresented communities in Pittsburgh, each with the goal of creating five new jobs within five years.

  • Pittsburgh Conservation Corps: With their grant, PCC will scale Project Landforce to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to earn livable wages by training people for jobs in environmental restoration. Their project will help 150+ people previously on public assistance to earn over $10 million in income, and to facilitate almost 110,000 hours of restoration work.

  • Pittsburgh Community Kitchen: The Pittsburgh Community Kitchen works with neighborhoods that have average an unemployment rate of 18 percent, where residents do not have easy access to employment and training support. Through their grant, the Pittsburgh Community Kitchen will provide culinary training and sustainable employment opportunities for 100 people transitioning into the workforce from incarceration, homelessness, addiction or mental illness. 

  • Prototype PGH: Prototype PGH is a makerspace focused on women that seeks to build careers in technology and beyond by improving confidence and expertise. It equips its members with   access to a fully-stocked makerspace to experiment, an engaged community, and a growing series of workshops on a wide variety of skills.  With their grant, the organization aims to engage 1,000 women in 100 workshops with the goals of increasing each of the members’ salaries by at least $1,000, and incubate at least five women-owned start-ups. 

Each of the winners will receive $50,000 from Google.org and training from Google to make their proposal a reality.

Starting on February 28 and running through March 14, the the public is encouraged to vote for the idea they think holds the most promise, and the winner will get an extra $50,000 in grant funding.

In total, Pittsburgh nonprofits will receive $250,000 from Google.org, as part of Grow with Google’s continued commitment to create economic opportunity for individuals across the United States.

New and expanding locations across America

Our goal is to ensure that information serves everyone, not just a few. To do this, we want to hire people to develop our products in the widest possible range of locations, around the world and throughout the United States. 

We opened our first office outside California in 2000. Now Google has offices and data centers in 21 states in the U.S, and last year we grew faster outside the Bay Area than in it. This year we plan on hiring thousands more people. To support that growth, today we’re announcing new or expanded offices and data centers in 14 states across the country. 

Google offices and data centers 2018

This afternoon, I was at the groundbreaking for our new data center in Clarksville/Montgomery County in Tennessee. The Tennessee data center is part of a $2.5 billion dollar investment we’re making to open or expand data centers in Alabama, Oregon, Tennessee, Virginia and Oklahoma. These data centers are what make Google services run for you or your business (in Tennessee alone, we answer millions of searches a day, and about 18,000 businesses and nonprofits use our search and advertising tools).

And our data centers also have a strong impact on the economies around them. People often discuss “the cloud” as if it’s built out of air. But it’s actually made up of buildings, machinery, and people who construct and manage it all. Today we employ an estimated 1,900 people directly on our data center campuses. We’ve created thousands of construction jobs—both for our data centers themselves, and for renewable energy generation. And our renewable energy purchasing commitments to date will result in energy infrastructure investments of more than $3.5 billion globally, about two-thirds of that in the United States.

In addition to these five data centers, we’re investing in new or expanded offices in nine states: California, Colorado, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas and Washington. Having talented people from different places, bringing diverse perspectives and backgrounds to work, is essential to the development of our products. In these locations, there will be jobs for thousands of people in a variety of roles—engineering, operations, sales and more.

The launch of Google’s data center in Clarksville is great news for Montgomery County. These high-quality jobs will benefit families in a real way, and I applaud Google's mission to improve education and advance workforce development for Americans. Senator Bob Corker
Tennessee

In addition to job opportunities at Google, our recently announced Grow with Google initiative continues to create opportunities for more people across the country. As part of our $1 billion commitment over the next five years, I was thrilled today to announce a $300,000 Google.org grant to Goodwill of Middle Tennessee, to incorporate new digital skills trainings into their workforce-development program—including new local scholarships for our IT Support Professional Certificate.  

We’re proud to be a growing part of the Clarksville/Montgomery County community and others like it across the country. And we’re committed to helping more people participate in the opportunities that technology provides.