Author Archives: Emily Wood

How girls see the world: Girlgaze and Pixel 2

Girlgaze is a multimedia company that highlights the work of female-identifying creatives and is dedicated to closing the gender gap by providing paid job opportunities for its global community.

Girlgaze’s inaugural zine, out today, was created primarily using Pixel 2, and today we’re also releasing a collection of Live Cases featuring Girlgaze photographers. We spoke with the creator of Girlgaze, Amanda de Cadenet, about the origins of the initiative and their work with Google.


The Keyword: Tell us about why you started Girlgaze. Why is it important to you to have more women represented behind the lens, not just in front of it? 


Amanda: When we began the #girlgaze initiative we realized quickly how many girls were eager to have a platform to share their perspective on the world. Within a matter of a few months we had close to 1 million submissions. When there is a need for something—in this case, a community for girls to connect on activism, creativity, and the challenges young women face—it will grow quickly. We’ve now had over 2.8 million submissions of images.


We felt it was our responsibility to not only draw attention to how the female perspective is so underrepresented in media, but also try and create a solution. It’s not enough to say, “Yes, the female perspective is hugely marginalized in these creative industries.” We also wanted to create a platform where we could showcase the incredible talent that is out there and create tangible jobs for our global community.


How did you get involved with the Pixel team? 


Girlgaze’s audience is made up of digital natives—they’re mostly Gen Z. With the launch of our inaugural zine—which is 100 percent digital—it was a natural fit to partner with Google.


Tell us about how you used Pixel for the new Girlgaze zine. What was different about this project?

Well, this being our inaugural issue of the zine makes it unique from any other! But also, shooting it almost entirely on the new Google Pixel 2 was pretty extraordinary for us. Although our community is very in-tune with using smartphones day-to-day, shooting industry-standard work on a smartphone was a first for us. We’re thrilled with the outcome!


Has the internet opened up new opportunities for women 
photographers/creators to gain more visibility? If so, in what way? 


The fact that we all have our phones on us at almost every moment, giving us access to technology to take and edit images at a whim, gives everyone a platform, without necessarily having studied or trained to become a photographer.


And social media has created a global platform for photographers around the world, some in very remote areas, to create and exhibit their work. In an industry that is heavily dominated by men, the internet has given the opportunity for female-identifying photographers to create their own community to share their point of view.


Tell us a little a bit about the Live Cases. How did you select which photos to turn into 
cases? Was there a particular aesthetic or theme you wanted to express?

We selected images from girls in our community whose work translated well to the wallpaper format, but not necessarily in a traditional sense. We wanted the imagery to be uniquely Girlgaze, images that strongly conveyed how our girls see the world.

What advice would you give to women who are interested in pursuing a creative career? 


Surround yourself with a good support system and community and utilize those you connect with to help you in your pursuit. I’ve always had an incredible female support network to see me through not only the struggles but also to celebrate the achievements. And the more you help those around you, the more you will realize how willing people are to help you. So don’t be afraid to reach out.

Turn around, bright eyes… and experience the total solar eclipse with Google

Move over, blue moon—there’s a more rare astronomical event in town. For the first time since 1979, a total eclipse of the sun is coming to the continental United States this Monday, August 21. Starting on the west coast around 9 a.m., the moon will begin to block the face of the sun. Not long later, the moon will completely cover the sun, leaving only the bright corona visible for as long as two minutes and 40 seconds.

Whether you’re traveling to see the “totality,” catching a glimpse of the partial eclipse from another location, or simply curious, Google can help you learn more about this unique moment. Grab your solar glasses and peep what we’ve got in store:

Live from the solar eclipse

Even if you’re not in the path of the solar eclipse you can tune to YouTube to watch the magic unfold live as it crosses over the U.S. Catch livestreams from NASA, The Weather Channel, Exploratorium, Discovery's Science Channel, and Univision.

Sun, moon and Google Earth

With a new Voyager story in Google Earth, you can learn more about the science behind the eclipse. You can also see what it will look like where you live.

Futures made of virtual totality

If you’re not in 70 mile wide path of totality, fret not. Travel to Mt. Jefferson, OR in Google Earth VR (on Rift and Vive) and view it in virtual reality. From the menu, select Total Solar Eclipse to get a view from the center of the action.

Lights, camera, astronomical action

We’re working with UC Berkeley, other partners and volunteer photographers to capture images of the sun’s corona at the moment of totality for use in scientific research. We’re also using our technology to algorithmically align these images into the Eclipse Megamovie, a continuous view of the eclipse. Read about some of the people involved in this project, and stay tuned for the complete Megamovie soon after the eclipse on https://eclipsemega.movie.

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s Android O!

People worldwide have explained solar eclipses through the lens of myth and legend for centuries. This year, there’s a new supernatural being whose identity will be revealed as the sun and the moon do their celestial dance. Get ready to meet Android O at android.com/o.

While a solar eclipse is a pretty rare astronomical event, don’t worry it’s not too early to start planning for the next one passing over the United States on October 14, 2023. You can always set a Google Calendar reminder to make sure you don’t forget.

Source: Android


Turn around, bright eyes… and experience the total solar eclipse with Google

Move over, blue moon—there’s a more rare astronomical event in town. For the first time since 1979, a total eclipse of the sun is coming to the continental United States this Monday, August 21. Starting on the west coast around 9 a.m., the moon will begin to block the face of the sun. Not long later, the moon will completely cover the sun, leaving only the bright corona visible for as long as two minutes and 40 seconds.

Whether you’re traveling to see the “totality,” catching a glimpse of the partial eclipse from another location, or simply curious, Google can help you learn more about this unique moment. Grab your solar glasses and peep what we’ve got in store:

Live from the solar eclipse

Even if you’re not in the path of the solar eclipse you can tune to YouTube to watch the magic unfold live as it crosses over the U.S. Catch livestreams from NASA, The Weather Channel, Exploratorium, Discovery's Science Channel, and Univision.

Sun, moon and Google Earth

With a new Voyager story in Google Earth, you can learn more about the science behind the eclipse. You can also see what it will look like where you live.

Futures made of virtual totality

If you’re not in 70 mile wide path of totality, fret not. Travel to Mt. Jefferson, OR in Google Earth VR (on Rift and Vive) and view it in virtual reality. From the menu, select Total Solar Eclipse to get a view from the center of the action.

Lights, camera, astronomical action

We’re working with UC Berkeley, other partners and volunteer photographers to capture images of the sun’s corona at the moment of totality for use in scientific research. We’re also using our technology to algorithmically align these images into the Eclipse Megamovie, a continuous view of the eclipse. Read about some of the people involved in this project, and stay tuned for the complete Megamovie soon after the eclipse on https://eclipsemega.movie.

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s Android O!

People worldwide have explained solar eclipses through the lens of myth and legend for centuries. This year, there’s a new supernatural being whose identity will be revealed as the sun and the moon do their celestial dance. Get ready to meet Android O at android.com/o.

While a solar eclipse is a pretty rare astronomical event, don’t worry it’s not too early to start planning for the next one passing over the United States on October 14, 2023. You can always set a Google Calendar reminder to make sure you don’t forget.

Source: Search


Turn around, bright eyes… and experience the total solar eclipse with Google

Move over, blue moon—there’s a more rare astronomical event in town. For the first time since 1979, a total eclipse of the sun is coming to the continental United States this Monday, August 21. Starting on the west coast around 9 a.m., the moon will begin to block the face of the sun. Not long later, the moon will completely cover the sun, leaving only the bright corona visible for as long as two minutes and 40 seconds.

Whether you’re traveling to see the “totality,” catching a glimpse of the partial eclipse from another location, or simply curious, Google can help you learn more about this unique moment. Grab your solar glasses and peep what we’ve got in store:

Live from the solar eclipse

Even if you’re not in the path of the solar eclipse you can tune to YouTube to watch the magic unfold live as it crosses over the U.S. Catch livestreams from NASA, The Weather Channel, Exploratorium, Discovery's Science Channel, and Univision.

Sun, moon and Google Earth

With a new Voyager story in Google Earth, you can learn more about the science behind the eclipse. You can also see what it will look like where you live.

Futures made of virtual totality

If you’re not in 70 mile wide path of totality, fret not. Travel to Mt. Jefferson, OR in Google Earth VR (on Rift and Vive) and view it in virtual reality. From the menu, select Total Solar Eclipse to get a view from the center of the action.

Lights, camera, astronomical action

We’re working with UC Berkeley, other partners and volunteer photographers to capture images of the sun’s corona at the moment of totality for use in scientific research. We’re also using our technology to algorithmically align these images into the Eclipse Megamovie, a continuous view of the eclipse. Read about some of the people involved in this project, and stay tuned for the complete Megamovie soon after the eclipse on https://eclipsemega.movie.

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s Android O!

People worldwide have explained solar eclipses through the lens of myth and legend for centuries. This year, there’s a new supernatural being whose identity will be revealed as the sun and the moon do their celestial dance. Get ready to meet Android O at android.com/o.

While a solar eclipse is a pretty rare astrological event, don’t worry it’s not too early to start planning for the next one passing over the United States on October 14, 2023. You can always set a Google Calendar reminder to make sure you don’t forget.

Source: Android


#teampixel always gets the shot

Pixel photographers know that the best image isn’t always the most obvious one. Sometimes you get it by looking up—sometimes by looking down. It might be close up, or framed by something unexpected. But if you keep your eyes open, it’s there. Take a look at what #teampixel saw this week:

Visit #teampixel on Instagram for more great shots and don’t forget to tag your own—we’d love a peek at the world the way you see it. 

How Android and Pixel are changing the way musicians create

If you happened to go to Google I/O this year—or tune in to the live stream—the hour leading up to the keynote featured a fun surprise: the band Parisi, filling Shoreline Amphitheatre with a wall of sound, using just four Pixel phones and modular musical instruments called ROLI BLOCKS.

Part of Parisi's performance at Google I/O 2017

Parisi’s performance was powered by ROLI’s NOISE app, which launched in preview mode at I/O for Pixel and other high-end Android phones. NOISE and BLOCKS are intended for people with a range of musical expertise to play, but they depend on phones with powerful technology—including low audio latency, powerful and fast processing capabilities, and glitch-free audio. We’ve made a series of updates to Android recently to better support creative audio, with more coming in Android O. By introducing NOISE in beta on Android, ROLI became one of the first to take advantage of Android’s improved music-making possibilities—and Parisi became the first band to show them off.

_N5I4308.jpg
From left: Jack and Marco Parisi. Photo courtesy of Parisi.

We spoke to Marco Parisi about their performance at I/O, and how mobile technology like Android O, Pixel and NOISE is changing the way musicians create.

Keyword: How did you get involved with I/O?

Marco: Google was excited about the capabilities of its Pixel phone and Android for audio, and came to us with an ask... to open I/O 2017 with a live set. We’ve been working with ROLI, a company that makes digital musical instruments, for two years. ROLI has an app, NOISE, which lets you compose, mix and play music from a mobile device. Google wanted to know if we could use NOISE on Pixel to do a set live at I/O. We love to experiment and explore, so we said “yes.” They sent us the phones two weeks before the show!

Sounds like us. ;) Was it intimidating to plan a whole set that way?

I wasn’t worried. Even though it can be uncomfortable to change the way you do something when you always do it in a certain way, we were excited to try something new.

IMG_1963.JPG
Parisi’s setup at Google I/O included four Pixel phones along with ROLI’s modular instruments: BLOCKS and Seaboard. Photo courtesy of Parisi.

How was the I/O set-up different from your normal sets? Did anything surprise you?

It was the first set we’ve done with just four phones. We’re used to using lots of laptops for our sets, so it was a challenge. But now that we’ve done it, we know we can actually make a proper set with phones—it’s realistic.

Ninety percent of the show was played live. You’re not just pressing play, either—you’re using the phone as a real music instrument, along with BLOCKS and Seaboard (a piano-like keyboard also made by ROLI). The magic is in the integration between the phone and the other technology we used to play. The phone is like an engine, and the other devices are so close to an acoustic instrument. It really changed our vision.

Has the I/O set changed anything about how you’re approaching future work?

The tracks we played at I/O haven’t been released—it’s stuff we’re working on for our upcoming album. While playing live on stage, I realized that I could have added a few different things. On the second or third try, we were adding things to the original track that were working—basically improvising. Now we’re gonna try those things in the same way but on the track—so what we did live at I/O is going to make it into the recorded version.

IMG_20170517_093949.jpg
Parisi performing at I/O. On the right-hand screen, you can see a ROLI BLOCK being played.

Digital technology is having a big effect on music. Tell us more about how you use tech in your art.

We’re in a new phase for music tech and creativity. Tech gives artists amazing flexibility to approach creating in new ways. We’re able to make different art that wouldn’t have been doable in a traditional studio setup—and changing your workflow has an impact on what you make.

You also spent some time exploring I/O itself. What did you think?

Working with everybody was cool. We were always connected with everybody over earpieces—from the sound guy to stage manager, really amazing people. One person started talking in Italian to us!

ROLI has a strong culture of collaboration and being passionate about what you do, and I felt the same thing at I/O. Joy is at the essence of what we do, and to see that in a company—like Google—is unique. You can really see that the world is changing and for us as musicians that’s amazing.

Source: Android


How Android and Pixel are changing the way musicians create

If you happened to go to Google I/O this year—or tune in to the live stream—the hour leading up to the keynote featured a fun surprise: the band Parisi, filling Shoreline Amphitheatre with a wall of sound, using just four Pixel phones and modular musical instruments called ROLI BLOCKS.

Part of Parisi's performance at Google I/O 2017

Parisi’s performance was powered by ROLI’s NOISE app, which launched in preview mode at I/O for Pixel and other high-end Android phones. NOISE and BLOCKS are intended for people with a range of musical expertise to play, but they depend on phones with powerful technology—including low audio latency, powerful and fast processing capabilities, and glitch-free audio. We’ve made a series of updates to Android recently to better support creative audio, with more coming in Android O. By introducing NOISE in beta on Android, ROLI became one of the first to take advantage of Android’s improved music-making possibilities—and Parisi became the first band to show them off.

_N5I4308.jpg
From left: Jack and Marco Parisi. Photo courtesy of Parisi.

We spoke to Marco Parisi about their performance at I/O, and how mobile technology like Android O, Pixel and NOISE is changing the way musicians create.

Keyword: How did you get involved with I/O?

Marco: Google was excited about the capabilities of its Pixel phone and Android for audio, and came to us with an ask... to open I/O 2017 with a live set. We’ve been working with ROLI, a company that makes digital musical instruments, for two years. ROLI has an app, NOISE, which lets you compose, mix and play music from a mobile device. Google wanted to know if we could use NOISE on Pixel to do a set live at I/O. We love to experiment and explore, so we said “yes.” They sent us the phones two weeks before the show!

Sounds like us. ;) Was it intimidating to plan a whole set that way?

I wasn’t worried. Even though it can be uncomfortable to change the way you do something when you always do it in a certain way, we were excited to try something new.

IMG_1963.JPG
Parisi’s setup at Google I/O included four Pixel phones along with ROLI’s modular instruments: BLOCKS and Seaboard. Photo courtesy of Parisi.

How was the I/O set-up different from your normal sets? Did anything surprise you?

It was the first set we’ve done with just four phones. We’re used to using lots of laptops for our sets, so it was a challenge. But now that we’ve done it, we know we can actually make a proper set with phones—it’s realistic.

Ninety percent of the show was played live. You’re not just pressing play, either—you’re using the phone as a real music instrument, along with BLOCKS and Seaboard (a piano-like keyboard also made by ROLI). The magic is in the integration between the phone and the other technology we used to play. The phone is like an engine, and the other devices are so close to an acoustic instrument. It really changed our vision.

Has the I/O set changed anything about how you’re approaching future work?

The tracks we played at I/O haven’t been released—it’s stuff we’re working on for our upcoming album. While playing live on stage, I realized that I could have added a few different things. On the second or third try, we were adding things to the original track that were working—basically improvising. Now we’re gonna try those things in the same way but on the track—so what we did live at I/O is going to make it into the recorded version.

IMG_20170517_093949.jpg
Parisi performing at I/O. On the right-hand screen, you can see a ROLI BLOCK being played.

Digital technology is having a big effect on music. Tell us more about how you use tech in your art.

We’re in a new phase for music tech and creativity. Tech gives artists amazing flexibility to approach creating in new ways. We’re able to make different art that wouldn’t have been doable in a traditional studio setup—and changing your workflow has an impact on what you make.

You also spent some time exploring I/O itself. What did you think?

Working with everybody was cool. We were always connected with everybody over earpieces—from the sound guy to stage manager, really amazing people. One person started talking in Italian to us!

ROLI has a strong culture of collaboration and being passionate about what you do, and I felt the same thing at I/O. Joy is at the essence of what we do, and to see that in a company—like Google—is unique. You can really see that the world is changing and for us as musicians that’s amazing.

Source: Android


Hit the road with these trending summer destinations

We’re officially into summer vacation here in the U.S., which means it’s time to hit the road. We’ve collected the top destinations people are searching on Google Maps this summer, so you can find travel inspiration whether you want a hike, a city view or a ballgame. Take a peek at the top trending spots, and find the full lists of the top 15 destinations in three categories at the end of this post.

America the Beautiful

Fourth of July may be over, but you can take a trip through our country’s history with these top searched landmarks. Start with the Liberty Bell (#10 on our list) or the Statue of Liberty (#4), both symbols of American independence, then swing into the nation’s capital to see the White House and the Lincoln Memorial. Your next stop (covered wagon optional) might be the Gateway Arch, a monument to the country’s western expansion in the 19th century and a jumping off point into the Great Plains—Mount Rushmore, in South Dakota, is a must-see at #1. Finally, you might visit the Hoover Dam, an icon of engineering constructed during the Great Depression, before making it to California to see the Hollywood Sign and the Golden Gate Bridge.

Landmarks

Find search your park

Go west. Though the list of top searched parks spans the country, only three are east of the Mississippi, with Yellowstone—America’s first national park—taking its fitting place at the top of the list. Geography aside, there seems to be a park for everyone’s taste. Many are searching for (literal) evergreen spots like Crater Lake National Park, Sequoia National Park and Muir Woods National Monument, where they can hit the trails under the cover of pines. Others are willing to brave the heat for a glimpse at stunning rock formations in Grand Canyon National Park or Arches National Park. There’s even an urban park—New York’s Central Park, obvi. And at #15 Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts in Fairfax, VA, you can even take in an opera or a performance by Blondie.

Parks

Play ball!

Baseball season is in full, um, swing—which has people searching for a spot to catch the action, and maybe a fly ball. Ten of our top 15 most searched stadiums are Major League Baseball stadiums, with NYC spots Yankee Stadium and the Mets’ Citi Field leading the pack ahead of West Coast rival parks Dodger Stadium and the Giants’ AT&T Park. But the #1 searched stadium in the country isn’t a baseball field at all: It’s MetLife Stadium, which is home to summer concerts and events—like the International Champions Cup match between Juventus F.C and FC Barcelona—until the New York Jets and the New York Football Giants return for the start of NFL season.

Stadiums

Check out the full list of all the trending spots:

Landmarks

  1. Mount Rushmore
  2. Golden Gate Bridge
  3. Empire State Building
  4. Statue of Liberty
  5. The White House
  6. Space Needle
  7. Lombard St
  8. Hollywood Sign
  9. The Gateway Arch
  10. Liberty Bell
  11. Four Corners
  12. 9/11 Memorial
  13. Hoover Dam
  14. Lincoln Memorial
  15. General Sherman (Tree)

Parks

  1. Yellowstone National Park
  2. Crater Lake National Park
  3. Central Park
  4. Grand Canyon National Park
  5. Yosemite National Park
  6. Acadia National Park
  7. Sequoia National Park
  8. Glacier National Park
  9. Bryce Canyon National Park
  10. Redwood National and State Parks
  11. Devils Tower National Monument
  12. Muir Woods National Monument
  13. Lassen Volcanic National Park
  14. Arches National Park
  15. Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts

Stadiums

  1. MetLife
  2. Yankee Stadium
  3. Dodger Stadium
  4. Citi Field
  5. AT&T Park
  6. SafeCo
  7. Arthur Ashe
  8. Coors Field
  9. Guaranteed Rate Field
  10. Soldier Field
  11. Angel Stadium
  12. Comerica Park
  13. Citizens Bank Park
  14. Kauffman Stadium
  15. Gillette Stadium

Source: Google LatLong


Hit the road with these trending summer destinations

We’re officially into summer vacation here in the U.S., which means it’s time to hit the road. We’ve collected the top destinations people are searching on Google Maps this summer, so you can find travel inspiration whether you want a hike, a city view or a ballgame. Take a peek at the top trending spots, and find the full lists of the top 15 destinations in three categories at the end of this post.

America the Beautiful

Fourth of July may be over, but you can take a trip through our country’s history with these top searched landmarks. Start with the Liberty Bell (#10 on our list) or the Statue of Liberty (#4), both symbols of American independence, then swing into the nation’s capital to see the White House and the Lincoln Memorial. Your next stop (covered wagon optional) might be the Gateway Arch, a monument to the country’s western expansion in the 19th century and a jumping off point into the Great Plains—Mount Rushmore, in South Dakota, is a must-see at #1. Finally, you might visit the Hoover Dam, an icon of engineering constructed during the Great Depression, before making it to California to see the Hollywood Sign and the Golden Gate Bridge.

Landmarks

Find search your park

Go west. Though the list of top searched parks spans the country, only three are east of the Mississippi, with Yellowstone—America’s first national park—taking its fitting place at the top of the list. Geography aside, there seems to be a park for everyone’s taste. Many are searching for (literal) evergreen spots like Crater Lake National Park, Sequoia National Park and Muir Woods National Monument, where they can hit the trails under the cover of pines. Others are willing to brave the heat for a glimpse at stunning rock formations in Grand Canyon National Park or Arches National Park. There’s even an urban park—New York’s Central Park, obvi. And at #15 Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts in Fairfax, VA, you can even take in an opera or a performance by Blondie.

Parks

Play ball!

Baseball season is in full, um, swing—which has people searching for a spot to catch the action, and maybe a fly ball. Ten of our top 15 most searched stadiums are Major League Baseball stadiums, with NYC spots Yankee Stadium and the Mets’ Citi Field leading the pack ahead of West Coast rival parks Dodger Stadium and the Giants’ AT&T Park. But the #1 searched stadium in the country isn’t a baseball field at all: It’s MetLife Stadium, which is home to summer concerts and events—like the International Champions Cup match between Juventus F.C and FC Barcelona—until the New York Jets and the New York Football Giants return for the start of NFL season.

Stadiums

Check out the full list of all the trending spots:

Landmarks

  1. Mount Rushmore
  2. Golden Gate Bridge
  3. Empire State Building
  4. Statue of Liberty
  5. The White House
  6. Space Needle
  7. Lombard St
  8. Hollywood Sign
  9. The Gateway Arch
  10. Liberty Bell
  11. Four Corners
  12. 9/11 Memorial
  13. Hoover Dam
  14. Lincoln Memorial
  15. General Sherman (Tree)

Parks

  1. Yellowstone National Park
  2. Crater Lake National Park
  3. Central Park
  4. Grand Canyon National Park
  5. Yosemite National Park
  6. Acadia National Park
  7. Sequoia National Park
  8. Glacier National Park
  9. Bryce Canyon National Park
  10. Redwood National and State Parks
  11. Devils Tower National Monument
  12. Muir Woods National Monument
  13. Lassen Volcanic National Park
  14. Arches National Park
  15. Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts

Stadiums

  1. MetLife
  2. Yankee Stadium
  3. Dodger Stadium
  4. Citi Field
  5. AT&T Park
  6. SafeCo
  7. Arthur Ashe
  8. Coors Field
  9. Guaranteed Rate Field
  10. Soldier Field
  11. Angel Stadium
  12. Comerica Park
  13. Citizens Bank Park
  14. Kauffman Stadium
  15. Gillette Stadium

Playing with light in this week’s #teampixel photos

Art can be found in unexpected places—a bubblegum pink building, the arc of a jellyfish’s swim, the reflection in the mirror of a river’s surface. In this week’s collection from Pixel photographers around the world, members of #teampixel have artfully captured photos that play with color, light and angles. Take a look:

If you have a Pixel, don’t forget to add the #teampixel hashtag to your photos on Instagram—you might be featured!