Author Archives: Emily Wood

How Android and Pixel are changing the way musicians create

If you happened to go to Google I/O this year—or tune in to the live stream—the hour leading up to the keynote featured a fun surprise: the band Parisi, filling Shoreline Amphitheatre with a wall of sound, using just four Pixel phones and modular musical instruments called ROLI BLOCKS.

Part of Parisi's performance at Google I/O 2017

Parisi’s performance was powered by ROLI’s NOISE app, which launched in preview mode at I/O for Pixel and other high-end Android phones. NOISE and BLOCKS are intended for people with a range of musical expertise to play, but they depend on phones with powerful technology—including low audio latency, powerful and fast processing capabilities, and glitch-free audio. We’ve made a series of updates to Android recently to better support creative audio, with more coming in Android O. By introducing NOISE in beta on Android, ROLI became one of the first to take advantage of Android’s improved music-making possibilities—and Parisi became the first band to show them off.

_N5I4308.jpg
From left: Jack and Marco Parisi. Photo courtesy of Parisi.

We spoke to Marco Parisi about their performance at I/O, and how mobile technology like Android O, Pixel and NOISE is changing the way musicians create.

Keyword: How did you get involved with I/O?

Marco: Google was excited about the capabilities of its Pixel phone and Android for audio, and came to us with an ask... to open I/O 2017 with a live set. We’ve been working with ROLI, a company that makes digital musical instruments, for two years. ROLI has an app, NOISE, which lets you compose, mix and play music from a mobile device. Google wanted to know if we could use NOISE on Pixel to do a set live at I/O. We love to experiment and explore, so we said “yes.” They sent us the phones two weeks before the show!

Sounds like us. ;) Was it intimidating to plan a whole set that way?

I wasn’t worried. Even though it can be uncomfortable to change the way you do something when you always do it in a certain way, we were excited to try something new.

IMG_1963.JPG
Parisi’s setup at Google I/O included four Pixel phones along with ROLI’s modular instruments: BLOCKS and Seaboard. Photo courtesy of Parisi.

How was the I/O set-up different from your normal sets? Did anything surprise you?

It was the first set we’ve done with just four phones. We’re used to using lots of laptops for our sets, so it was a challenge. But now that we’ve done it, we know we can actually make a proper set with phones—it’s realistic.

Ninety percent of the show was played live. You’re not just pressing play, either—you’re using the phone as a real music instrument, along with BLOCKS and Seaboard (a piano-like keyboard also made by ROLI). The magic is in the integration between the phone and the other technology we used to play. The phone is like an engine, and the other devices are so close to an acoustic instrument. It really changed our vision.

Has the I/O set changed anything about how you’re approaching future work?

The tracks we played at I/O haven’t been released—it’s stuff we’re working on for our upcoming album. While playing live on stage, I realized that I could have added a few different things. On the second or third try, we were adding things to the original track that were working—basically improvising. Now we’re gonna try those things in the same way but on the track—so what we did live at I/O is going to make it into the recorded version.

IMG_20170517_093949.jpg
Parisi performing at I/O. On the right-hand screen, you can see a ROLI BLOCK being played.

Digital technology is having a big effect on music. Tell us more about how you use tech in your art.

We’re in a new phase for music tech and creativity. Tech gives artists amazing flexibility to approach creating in new ways. We’re able to make different art that wouldn’t have been doable in a traditional studio setup—and changing your workflow has an impact on what you make.

You also spent some time exploring I/O itself. What did you think?

Working with everybody was cool. We were always connected with everybody over earpieces—from the sound guy to stage manager, really amazing people. One person started talking in Italian to us!

ROLI has a strong culture of collaboration and being passionate about what you do, and I felt the same thing at I/O. Joy is at the essence of what we do, and to see that in a company—like Google—is unique. You can really see that the world is changing and for us as musicians that’s amazing.

Source: Android


How Android and Pixel are changing the way musicians create

If you happened to go to Google I/O this year—or tune in to the live stream—the hour leading up to the keynote featured a fun surprise: the band Parisi, filling Shoreline Amphitheatre with a wall of sound, using just four Pixel phones and modular musical instruments called ROLI BLOCKS.

Part of Parisi's performance at Google I/O 2017

Parisi’s performance was powered by ROLI’s NOISE app, which launched in preview mode at I/O for Pixel and other high-end Android phones. NOISE and BLOCKS are intended for people with a range of musical expertise to play, but they depend on phones with powerful technology—including low audio latency, powerful and fast processing capabilities, and glitch-free audio. We’ve made a series of updates to Android recently to better support creative audio, with more coming in Android O. By introducing NOISE in beta on Android, ROLI became one of the first to take advantage of Android’s improved music-making possibilities—and Parisi became the first band to show them off.

_N5I4308.jpg
From left: Jack and Marco Parisi. Photo courtesy of Parisi.

We spoke to Marco Parisi about their performance at I/O, and how mobile technology like Android O, Pixel and NOISE is changing the way musicians create.

Keyword: How did you get involved with I/O?

Marco: Google was excited about the capabilities of its Pixel phone and Android for audio, and came to us with an ask... to open I/O 2017 with a live set. We’ve been working with ROLI, a company that makes digital musical instruments, for two years. ROLI has an app, NOISE, which lets you compose, mix and play music from a mobile device. Google wanted to know if we could use NOISE on Pixel to do a set live at I/O. We love to experiment and explore, so we said “yes.” They sent us the phones two weeks before the show!

Sounds like us. ;) Was it intimidating to plan a whole set that way?

I wasn’t worried. Even though it can be uncomfortable to change the way you do something when you always do it in a certain way, we were excited to try something new.

IMG_1963.JPG
Parisi’s setup at Google I/O included four Pixel phones along with ROLI’s modular instruments: BLOCKS and Seaboard. Photo courtesy of Parisi.

How was the I/O set-up different from your normal sets? Did anything surprise you?

It was the first set we’ve done with just four phones. We’re used to using lots of laptops for our sets, so it was a challenge. But now that we’ve done it, we know we can actually make a proper set with phones—it’s realistic.

Ninety percent of the show was played live. You’re not just pressing play, either—you’re using the phone as a real music instrument, along with BLOCKS and Seaboard (a piano-like keyboard also made by ROLI). The magic is in the integration between the phone and the other technology we used to play. The phone is like an engine, and the other devices are so close to an acoustic instrument. It really changed our vision.

Has the I/O set changed anything about how you’re approaching future work?

The tracks we played at I/O haven’t been released—it’s stuff we’re working on for our upcoming album. While playing live on stage, I realized that I could have added a few different things. On the second or third try, we were adding things to the original track that were working—basically improvising. Now we’re gonna try those things in the same way but on the track—so what we did live at I/O is going to make it into the recorded version.

IMG_20170517_093949.jpg
Parisi performing at I/O. On the right-hand screen, you can see a ROLI BLOCK being played.

Digital technology is having a big effect on music. Tell us more about how you use tech in your art.

We’re in a new phase for music tech and creativity. Tech gives artists amazing flexibility to approach creating in new ways. We’re able to make different art that wouldn’t have been doable in a traditional studio setup—and changing your workflow has an impact on what you make.

You also spent some time exploring I/O itself. What did you think?

Working with everybody was cool. We were always connected with everybody over earpieces—from the sound guy to stage manager, really amazing people. One person started talking in Italian to us!

ROLI has a strong culture of collaboration and being passionate about what you do, and I felt the same thing at I/O. Joy is at the essence of what we do, and to see that in a company—like Google—is unique. You can really see that the world is changing and for us as musicians that’s amazing.

Source: Android


How Android and Pixel are changing the way musicians create

If you happened to go to Google I/O this year—or tune in to the live stream—the hour leading up to the keynote featured a fun surprise: the band Parisi, filling Shoreline Amphitheatre with a wall of sound, using just four Pixel phones and modular musical instruments called ROLI BLOCKS.

Part of Parisi's performance at Google I/O 2017

Parisi’s performance was powered by ROLI’s NOISE app, which launched in preview mode at I/O for Pixel and other high-end Android phones. NOISE and BLOCKS are intended for people with a range of musical expertise to play, but they depend on phones with powerful technology—including low audio latency, powerful and fast processing capabilities, and glitch-free audio. We’ve made a series of updates to Android recently to better support creative audio, with more coming in Android O. By introducing NOISE in beta on Android, ROLI became one of the first to take advantage of Android’s improved music-making possibilities—and Parisi became the first band to show them off.

_N5I4308.jpg
From left: Jack and Marco Parisi. Photo courtesy of Parisi.

We spoke to Marco Parisi about their performance at I/O, and how mobile technology like Android O, Pixel and NOISE is changing the way musicians create.

Keyword: How did you get involved with I/O?

Marco: Google was excited about the capabilities of its Pixel phone and Android for audio, and came to us with an ask... to open I/O 2017 with a live set. We’ve been working with ROLI, a company that makes digital musical instruments, for two years. ROLI has an app, NOISE, which lets you compose, mix and play music from a mobile device. Google wanted to know if we could use NOISE on Pixel to do a set live at I/O. We love to experiment and explore, so we said “yes.” They sent us the phones two weeks before the show!

Sounds like us. ;) Was it intimidating to plan a whole set that way?

I wasn’t worried. Even though it can be uncomfortable to change the way you do something when you always do it in a certain way, we were excited to try something new.

IMG_1963.JPG
Parisi’s setup at Google I/O included four Pixel phones along with ROLI’s modular instruments: BLOCKS and Seaboard. Photo courtesy of Parisi.

How was the I/O set-up different from your normal sets? Did anything surprise you?

It was the first set we’ve done with just four phones. We’re used to using lots of laptops for our sets, so it was a challenge. But now that we’ve done it, we know we can actually make a proper set with phones—it’s realistic.

Ninety percent of the show was played live. You’re not just pressing play, either—you’re using the phone as a real music instrument, along with BLOCKS and Seaboard (a piano-like keyboard also made by ROLI). The magic is in the integration between the phone and the other technology we used to play. The phone is like an engine, and the other devices are so close to an acoustic instrument. It really changed our vision.

Has the I/O set changed anything about how you’re approaching future work?

The tracks we played at I/O haven’t been released—it’s stuff we’re working on for our upcoming album. While playing live on stage, I realized that I could have added a few different things. On the second or third try, we were adding things to the original track that were working—basically improvising. Now we’re gonna try those things in the same way but on the track—so what we did live at I/O is going to make it into the recorded version.

IMG_20170517_093949.jpg
Parisi performing at I/O. On the right-hand screen, you can see a ROLI BLOCK being played.

Digital technology is having a big effect on music. Tell us more about how you use tech in your art.

We’re in a new phase for music tech and creativity. Tech gives artists amazing flexibility to approach creating in new ways. We’re able to make different art that wouldn’t have been doable in a traditional studio setup—and changing your workflow has an impact on what you make.

You also spent some time exploring I/O itself. What did you think?

Working with everybody was cool. We were always connected with everybody over earpieces—from the sound guy to stage manager, really amazing people. One person started talking in Italian to us!

ROLI has a strong culture of collaboration and being passionate about what you do, and I felt the same thing at I/O. Joy is at the essence of what we do, and to see that in a company—like Google—is unique. You can really see that the world is changing and for us as musicians that’s amazing.

Source: Android


Hit the road with these trending summer destinations

We’re officially into summer vacation here in the U.S., which means it’s time to hit the road. We’ve collected the top destinations people are searching on Google Maps this summer, so you can find travel inspiration whether you want a hike, a city view or a ballgame. Take a peek at the top trending spots, and find the full lists of the top 15 destinations in three categories at the end of this post.

America the Beautiful

Fourth of July may be over, but you can take a trip through our country’s history with these top searched landmarks. Start with the Liberty Bell (#10 on our list) or the Statue of Liberty (#4), both symbols of American independence, then swing into the nation’s capital to see the White House and the Lincoln Memorial. Your next stop (covered wagon optional) might be the Gateway Arch, a monument to the country’s western expansion in the 19th century and a jumping off point into the Great Plains—Mount Rushmore, in South Dakota, is a must-see at #1. Finally, you might visit the Hoover Dam, an icon of engineering constructed during the Great Depression, before making it to California to see the Hollywood Sign and the Golden Gate Bridge.

Landmarks

Find search your park

Go west. Though the list of top searched parks spans the country, only three are east of the Mississippi, with Yellowstone—America’s first national park—taking its fitting place at the top of the list. Geography aside, there seems to be a park for everyone’s taste. Many are searching for (literal) evergreen spots like Crater Lake National Park, Sequoia National Park and Muir Woods National Monument, where they can hit the trails under the cover of pines. Others are willing to brave the heat for a glimpse at stunning rock formations in Grand Canyon National Park or Arches National Park. There’s even an urban park—New York’s Central Park, obvi. And at #15 Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts in Fairfax, VA, you can even take in an opera or a performance by Blondie.

Parks

Play ball!

Baseball season is in full, um, swing—which has people searching for a spot to catch the action, and maybe a fly ball. Ten of our top 15 most searched stadiums are Major League Baseball stadiums, with NYC spots Yankee Stadium and the Mets’ Citi Field leading the pack ahead of West Coast rival parks Dodger Stadium and the Giants’ AT&T Park. But the #1 searched stadium in the country isn’t a baseball field at all: It’s MetLife Stadium, which is home to summer concerts and events—like the International Champions Cup match between Juventus F.C and FC Barcelona—until the New York Jets and the New York Football Giants return for the start of NFL season.

Stadiums

Check out the full list of all the trending spots:

Landmarks

  1. Mount Rushmore
  2. Golden Gate Bridge
  3. Empire State Building
  4. Statue of Liberty
  5. The White House
  6. Space Needle
  7. Lombard St
  8. Hollywood Sign
  9. The Gateway Arch
  10. Liberty Bell
  11. Four Corners
  12. 9/11 Memorial
  13. Hoover Dam
  14. Lincoln Memorial
  15. General Sherman (Tree)

Parks

  1. Yellowstone National Park
  2. Crater Lake National Park
  3. Central Park
  4. Grand Canyon National Park
  5. Yosemite National Park
  6. Acadia National Park
  7. Sequoia National Park
  8. Glacier National Park
  9. Bryce Canyon National Park
  10. Redwood National and State Parks
  11. Devils Tower National Monument
  12. Muir Woods National Monument
  13. Lassen Volcanic National Park
  14. Arches National Park
  15. Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts

Stadiums

  1. MetLife
  2. Yankee Stadium
  3. Dodger Stadium
  4. Citi Field
  5. AT&T Park
  6. SafeCo
  7. Arthur Ashe
  8. Coors Field
  9. Guaranteed Rate Field
  10. Soldier Field
  11. Angel Stadium
  12. Comerica Park
  13. Citizens Bank Park
  14. Kauffman Stadium
  15. Gillette Stadium

Source: Google LatLong


Hit the road with these trending summer destinations

We’re officially into summer vacation here in the U.S., which means it’s time to hit the road. We’ve collected the top destinations people are searching on Google Maps this summer, so you can find travel inspiration whether you want a hike, a city view or a ballgame. Take a peek at the top trending spots, and find the full lists of the top 15 destinations in three categories at the end of this post.

America the Beautiful

Fourth of July may be over, but you can take a trip through our country’s history with these top searched landmarks. Start with the Liberty Bell (#10 on our list) or the Statue of Liberty (#4), both symbols of American independence, then swing into the nation’s capital to see the White House and the Lincoln Memorial. Your next stop (covered wagon optional) might be the Gateway Arch, a monument to the country’s western expansion in the 19th century and a jumping off point into the Great Plains—Mount Rushmore, in South Dakota, is a must-see at #1. Finally, you might visit the Hoover Dam, an icon of engineering constructed during the Great Depression, before making it to California to see the Hollywood Sign and the Golden Gate Bridge.

Landmarks

Find search your park

Go west. Though the list of top searched parks spans the country, only three are east of the Mississippi, with Yellowstone—America’s first national park—taking its fitting place at the top of the list. Geography aside, there seems to be a park for everyone’s taste. Many are searching for (literal) evergreen spots like Crater Lake National Park, Sequoia National Park and Muir Woods National Monument, where they can hit the trails under the cover of pines. Others are willing to brave the heat for a glimpse at stunning rock formations in Grand Canyon National Park or Arches National Park. There’s even an urban park—New York’s Central Park, obvi. And at #15 Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts in Fairfax, VA, you can even take in an opera or a performance by Blondie.

Parks

Play ball!

Baseball season is in full, um, swing—which has people searching for a spot to catch the action, and maybe a fly ball. Ten of our top 15 most searched stadiums are Major League Baseball stadiums, with NYC spots Yankee Stadium and the Mets’ Citi Field leading the pack ahead of West Coast rival parks Dodger Stadium and the Giants’ AT&T Park. But the #1 searched stadium in the country isn’t a baseball field at all: It’s MetLife Stadium, which is home to summer concerts and events—like the International Champions Cup match between Juventus F.C and FC Barcelona—until the New York Jets and the New York Football Giants return for the start of NFL season.

Stadiums

Check out the full list of all the trending spots:

Landmarks

  1. Mount Rushmore
  2. Golden Gate Bridge
  3. Empire State Building
  4. Statue of Liberty
  5. The White House
  6. Space Needle
  7. Lombard St
  8. Hollywood Sign
  9. The Gateway Arch
  10. Liberty Bell
  11. Four Corners
  12. 9/11 Memorial
  13. Hoover Dam
  14. Lincoln Memorial
  15. General Sherman (Tree)

Parks

  1. Yellowstone National Park
  2. Crater Lake National Park
  3. Central Park
  4. Grand Canyon National Park
  5. Yosemite National Park
  6. Acadia National Park
  7. Sequoia National Park
  8. Glacier National Park
  9. Bryce Canyon National Park
  10. Redwood National and State Parks
  11. Devils Tower National Monument
  12. Muir Woods National Monument
  13. Lassen Volcanic National Park
  14. Arches National Park
  15. Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts

Stadiums

  1. MetLife
  2. Yankee Stadium
  3. Dodger Stadium
  4. Citi Field
  5. AT&T Park
  6. SafeCo
  7. Arthur Ashe
  8. Coors Field
  9. Guaranteed Rate Field
  10. Soldier Field
  11. Angel Stadium
  12. Comerica Park
  13. Citizens Bank Park
  14. Kauffman Stadium
  15. Gillette Stadium

Playing with light in this week’s #teampixel photos

Art can be found in unexpected places—a bubblegum pink building, the arc of a jellyfish’s swim, the reflection in the mirror of a river’s surface. In this week’s collection from Pixel photographers around the world, members of #teampixel have artfully captured photos that play with color, light and angles. Take a look:

If you have a Pixel, don’t forget to add the #teampixel hashtag to your photos on Instagram—you might be featured!

Net Neutrality Day of Action: Help preserve the open internet

Editor's note: Today is the Net Neutrality Day of Action, and we’re sending this email to Take Action, our community focused on issues that are important to the future of the internet. We wanted to share it more broadly so everyone can see how to get involved.

The net neutrality rules that protect the open internet are in danger of being dismantled.

Internet companies, innovative startups, and millions of internet users depend on these common-sense protections that prevent blocking or throttling of internet traffic, segmenting the internet into paid fast lanes and slow lanes, and other discriminatory practices. Thanks in part to net neutrality, the open internet has grown to become an unrivaled source of choice, competition, innovation, free expression, and opportunity. And it should stay that way.

Today’s open internet ensures that both new and established services, whether offered by an established internet company like Google, a broadband provider, or a small startup, have the same ability to reach users on an equal playing field.

It’s an important chapter in this debate, and we hope you’ll make your voice heard.

Tell everyone that you want to keep the Internet free and open.

Google and many others are joining together to call on the FCC to preserve the open internet, and we encourage you to act too!

Together, we can make our voices heard and we can make a difference.

To find out more, including how to share your views with the FCC, visit https://netneutrality.internetassociation.org/action/.

Net Neutrality Day of Action: Help preserve the open internet

Editor's note: Today is the Net Neutrality Day of Action, and we’re sending this email to Take Action, our community focused on issues that are important to the future of the internet. We wanted to share it more broadly so everyone can see how to get involved.

The net neutrality rules that protect the open internet are in danger of being dismantled.

Internet companies, innovative startups, and millions of internet users depend on these common-sense protections that prevent blocking or throttling of internet traffic, segmenting the internet into paid fast lanes and slow lanes, and other discriminatory practices. Thanks in part to net neutrality, the open internet has grown to become an unrivaled source of choice, competition, innovation, free expression, and opportunity. And it should stay that way.

Today’s open internet ensures that both new and established services, whether offered by an established internet company like Google, a broadband provider, or a small startup, have the same ability to reach users on an equal playing field.

It’s an important chapter in this debate, and we hope you’ll make your voice heard.

Tell everyone that you want to keep the Internet free and open.

Google and many others are joining together to call on the FCC to preserve the open internet, and we encourage you to act too!

Together, we can make our voices heard and we can make a difference.

To find out more, including how to share your views with the FCC, visit https://netneutrality.internetassociation.org/action/.

Net Neutrality Day of Action: Help preserve the open internet

Editor's note:Today is the Net Neutrality Day of Action, and we’re sending this email to Take Action, our community focused on issues that are important to the future of the internet. We wanted to share it more broadly so everyone can see how to get involved.

The net neutrality rules that protect the open internet are in danger of being dismantled.

Internet companies, innovative startups, and millions of internet users depend on these common-sense protections that prevent blocking or throttling of internet traffic, segmenting the internet into paid fast lanes and slow lanes, and other discriminatory practices. Thanks in part to net neutrality, the open internet has grown to become an unrivaled source of choice, competition, innovation, free expression, and opportunity. And it should stay that way.

Today’s open internet ensures that both new and established services, whether offered by an established internet company like Google, a broadband provider, or a small startup, have the same ability to reach users on an equal playing field.

It’s an important chapter in this debate, and we hope you’ll make your voice heard.

Tell everyone that you want to keep the Internet free and open.

Google and many others are joining together to call on the FCC to preserve the open internet, and we encourage you to act too!

Together, we can make our voices heard and we can make a difference.

To find out more, including how to share your views with the FCC, visit https://netneutrality.internetassociation.org/action/.

#teampixel’s rainbow palette

Fittingly for the end of Pride Month, this week’s #pixelperfect shots are all shades of the rainbow—from azul on the coast of Spain to rosa in Stockholm, and from yellow in Australia to Orange in Munich. Take a look at these bold, bright images from #teampixel photographers around the world:

And share your photos with #teampixel—you might be featured on Keyword and Instagram.