Author Archives: Rajen Sheth

Chrome OS joins forces with VMware to accelerate the adoption of Chromebooks in the enterprise

From using Windows to web to mobile apps, our Chrome OS enterprise customers will now benefit from an extended partnership with VMware, which we announced today at Dell EMC World. The collaboration includes integration with VMware Workspace ONE, allowing customers to easily and securely deploy applications on Chrome OS devices.

Workspace ONE adds to the existing security of Chrome devices, which are designed with security in mind from boot up to shut down. Multiple layers of protection are built in to every Chromebook, ranging from encrypted data and platform storage, a Verified Boot process, sandboxing of all applications and security modules such as TPM chips. With the combined forces of Workspace ONE and Chrome OS, that security extends to virtualized applications to run your business.

Dell Chromebook VMware Workspace ONE

Workers gain access to more work applications through VMware Horizon desktop virtualization along with an added bonus: one click authentication and application management. Workspace ONE on Chromebooks and other Chrome OS devices simplifies the secure login process with SSO, or single sign on. Employees can then access the applications they need to get work done through a managed software catalog.

Sumit Dhawan, senior vice president and general manager, End-User Computing, VMware says “We believe the combination of VMware Workspace ONE and Chrome OS will provide increased security and accessibility to applications for customers using the platform. This is just the first step in our collaboration on this platform with more to come.”

IDC estimates that by 2018, 25% of Fortune 500 companies will have IT-supported Chromebooks deployed in their organization thanks to the speed, simplicity and shareability of secure Chromebooks. Find out why and learn more about how Chrome device security combined with simple to manage devices and the new Workspace ONE solution can empower your workforce today.

Chrome OS joins forces with VMware to accelerate the adoption of Chromebooks in the enterprise

From using Windows to web to mobile apps, our Chrome OS enterprise customers will now benefit from an extended partnership with VMware, which we announced today at Dell EMC World. The collaboration includes integration with VMware Workspace ONE, allowing customers to easily and securely deploy applications on Chrome OS devices.

Workspace ONE adds to the existing security of Chrome devices, which are designed with security in mind from boot up to shut down. Multiple layers of protection are built in to every Chromebook, ranging from encrypted data and platform storage, a Verified Boot process, sandboxing of all applications and security modules such as TPM chips. With the combined forces of Workspace ONE and Chrome OS, that security extends to virtualized applications to run your business.

Dell Chromebook VMware Workspace ONE

Workers gain access to more work applications through VMware Horizon desktop virtualization along with an added bonus: one click authentication and application management. Workspace ONE on Chromebooks and other Chrome OS devices simplifies the secure login process with SSO, or single sign on. Employees can then access the applications they need to get work done through a managed software catalog.

Sumit Dhawan, senior vice president and general manager, End-User Computing, VMware says “We believe the combination of VMware Workspace ONE and Chrome OS will provide increased security and accessibility to applications for customers using the platform. This is just the first step in our collaboration on this platform with more to come.”

IDC estimates that by 2018, 25% of Fortune 500 companies will have IT-supported Chromebooks deployed in their organization thanks to the speed, simplicity and shareability of secure Chromebooks. Find out why and learn more about how Chrome device security combined with simple to manage devices and the new Workspace ONE solution can empower your workforce today.

How businesses are smartly transforming with Google Cloud, Android, and Chrome

While businesses with a mobile strategy are commonplace today, that doesn’t mean the mobile transformation is over. Today, we’re highlighting how companies are using Google Cloud, Chrome, and Android to reimagine the way they engage customers in public spaces and also equip employees to work more productively in the office and in the field.

Smart signs cut costs and provide customer insights

We recently collaborated with Coca-Cola on Chrome-based digital signs for supermarkets that pull in localized ads from DoubleClick and are equipped with beacon technology for pushing personalized messages to mobile users. 

Coca-Cola digital signage

The company has worked closely with Google Cloud to build a new signage solution that includes affordable digital sign and menu boards for Coca-Cola sellers.

“Our mission at Coca-Cola is to elevate the consumer experience to a place of pure excellence and the ability to send the right message to the right person at the right time is key to driving that world class experience in the connected retail world,” said Greg Chambers, Global Group Director of Digital Innovation at Coca-Cola.

The displays are powered by inexpensive Chromebit devices connected to a content management system (CMS) on Google Cloud Platform. The Chromebits also provide simple, centralized management of the signs. Combined with sensors, they can offer the company detailed, actionable information through Google Analytics as well as highly contextual advertising to other screens like nearby customer smartphones.

Android plus cloud intelligence enables field workers

UK pest control company Rentokil Initial is piloting a fleet of Android devices that utilize Google Cloud machine learning, including our Vision API image classification technology, to help field workers better identify pests and get treatment suggestions. Employees use an Android app to capture images that are identified using a machine learning model that’s been trained on Rentokil’s pest imagery database. The app then provides solutions to eradicate the pests. The PestID app, jointly developed by Accenture Mobility, is among the first wave of solutions Google is helping build as part of an alliance announced last year with Accenture.

Connecting manufacturing to the back office

42Q, a product division of manufacturing services provider Sanmina, developed a Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) solution that runs on Google Cloud Platform. 

42Q Android use in manufacturing

It enables Sanmina employees and 42Q’s customers to bring real-time transparency to their factory operations using Android and Chrome devices. Using 42Q with Chrome, “deskless” back office workers can access work instructions, data requirements, and quality plans without deploying heavy client applications and expensive equipment.

Factory operators can also use the 42Q Android app for a “tailored” mobile interface, ensuring they only see critical information on demand. 

When combined with G Suite, everyone from front office planners to back office operators can collaborate on current production line states, critical orders and real time reporting on factory operations.

Tomorrow’s businesses: empowered with advanced devices, collaboration and context

With a Google Cloud devices and mobility strategy, businesses are able to gather contextual data through devices and apply machine learning analytics to quickly take smart, well-informed actions. And the more employees who use managed Chromebooks and Android devices to collaborate and securely access documents in G Suite, the more efficient your whole team becomes.

Several new devices support this secure data-driven strategy. The Asus Chromebook Flip and recently-announced Samsung Chromebook Pro and Plus function as both a Chromebook and an Android tablet with Google Play support. Last month, AOPEN launched the Chromebox mini and Chromebase mini, which also support Android apps and can use our new Kiosk APIs for improved app management and a robust customer experience.

To learn more about the Google Cloud devices and mobility solutions that enable a connected workspace, visit our booth at Next 2017 between March 8 and 10. There we’ll be demonstrating how a business becomes smarter when you pair Chrome and Android devices, cloud services and sensors with employees, customers and spaces. Or sign up here for additional information as we continue to evolve our range of data-driven tools to make every workspace connected no matter where it is.

Source: Google Cloud


How businesses are smartly transforming with Google Cloud, Android, and Chrome

While businesses with a mobile strategy are commonplace today, that doesn’t mean the mobile transformation is over. Today, we’re highlighting how companies are using Google Cloud, Chrome, and Android to reimagine the way they engage customers in public spaces and also equip employees to work more productively in the office and in the field.

Smart signs cut costs and provide customer insights

We recently collaborated with Coca-Cola on Chrome-based digital signs for supermarkets that pull in localized ads from DoubleClick and are equipped with beacon technology for pushing personalized messages to mobile users. 

Coca-Cola digital signage

The company has worked closely with Google Cloud to build a new signage solution that includes affordable digital sign and menu boards for Coca-Cola sellers.

“Our mission at Coca-Cola is to elevate the consumer experience to a place of pure excellence and the ability to send the right message to the right person at the right time is key to driving that world class experience in the connected retail world,” said Greg Chambers, Global Group Director of Digital Innovation at Coca-Cola.

The displays are powered by inexpensive Chromebit devices connected to a content management system (CMS) on Google Cloud Platform. The Chromebits also provide simple, centralized management of the signs. Combined with sensors, they can offer the company detailed, actionable information through Google Analytics as well as highly contextual advertising to other screens like nearby customer smartphones.

Android plus cloud intelligence enables field workers

UK pest control company Rentokil Initial is piloting a fleet of Android devices that utilize Google Cloud machine learning, including our Vision API image classification technology, to help field workers better identify pests and get treatment suggestions. Employees use an Android app to capture images that are identified using a machine learning model that’s been trained on Rentokil’s pest imagery database. The app then provides solutions to eradicate the pests. The PestID app, jointly developed by Accenture Mobility, is among the first wave of solutions Google is helping build as part of an alliance announced last year with Accenture.

Connecting manufacturing to the back office

42Q, a product division of manufacturing services provider Sanmina, developed a Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) solution that runs on Google Cloud Platform. 

42Q Android use in manufacturing

It enables Sanmina employees and 42Q’s customers to bring real-time transparency to their factory operations using Android and Chrome devices. Using 42Q with Chrome, “deskless” back office workers can access work instructions, data requirements, and quality plans without deploying heavy client applications and expensive equipment.

Factory operators can also use the 42Q Android app for a “tailored” mobile interface, ensuring they only see critical information on demand. 

When combined with G Suite, everyone from front office planners to back office operators can collaborate on current production line states, critical orders and real time reporting on factory operations.

Tomorrow’s businesses: empowered with advanced devices, collaboration and context

With a Google Cloud devices and mobility strategy, businesses are able to gather contextual data through devices and apply machine learning analytics to quickly take smart, well-informed actions. And the more employees who use managed Chromebooks and Android devices to collaborate and securely access documents in G Suite, the more efficient your whole team becomes.

Several new devices support this secure data-driven strategy. The Asus Chromebook Flip and recently-announced Samsung Chromebook Pro and Plus function as both a Chromebook and an Android tablet with Google Play support. Last month, AOPEN launched the Chromebox mini and Chromebase mini, which also support Android apps and can use our new Kiosk APIs for improved app management and a robust customer experience.

To learn more about the Google Cloud devices and mobility solutions that enable a connected workspace, visit our booth at Next 2017 between March 8 and 10. There we’ll be demonstrating how a business becomes smarter when you pair Chrome and Android devices, cloud services and sensors with employees, customers and spaces. Or sign up here for additional information as we continue to evolve our range of data-driven tools to make every workspace connected no matter where it is.

How businesses are smartly transforming with Google Cloud, Android, and Chrome

While businesses with a mobile strategy are commonplace today, that doesn’t mean the mobile transformation is over. Today, we’re highlighting how companies are using Google Cloud, Chrome, and Android to reimagine the way they engage customers in public spaces and also equip employees to work more productively in the office and in the field.

Smart signs cut costs and provide customer insights

We recently collaborated with Coca-Cola on Chrome-based digital signs for supermarkets that pull in localized ads from DoubleClick and are equipped with beacon technology for pushing personalized messages to mobile users. 

Coca-Cola digital signage

The company has worked closely with Google Cloud to build a new signage solution that includes affordable digital sign and menu boards for Coca-Cola sellers.

“Our mission at Coca-Cola is to elevate the consumer experience to a place of pure excellence and the ability to send the right message to the right person at the right time is key to driving that world class experience in the connected retail world,” said Greg Chambers, Global Group Director of Digital Innovation at Coca-Cola.

The displays are powered by inexpensive Chromebit devices connected to a content management system (CMS) on Google Cloud Platform. The Chromebits also provide simple, centralized management of the signs. Combined with sensors, they can offer the company detailed, actionable information through Google Analytics as well as highly contextual advertising to other screens like nearby customer smartphones.

Android plus cloud intelligence enables field workers

UK pest control company Rentokil Initial is piloting a fleet of Android devices that utilize Google Cloud machine learning, including our Vision API image classification technology, to help field workers better identify pests and get treatment suggestions. Employees use an Android app to capture images that are identified using a machine learning model that’s been trained on Rentokil’s pest imagery database. The app then provides solutions to eradicate the pests. The PestID app, jointly developed by Accenture Mobility, is among the first wave of solutions Google is helping build as part of an alliance announced last year with Accenture.

Connecting manufacturing to the back office

42Q, a product division of manufacturing services provider Sanmina, developed a Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) solution that runs on Google Cloud Platform. 

42Q Android use in manufacturing

It enables Sanmina employees and 42Q’s customers to bring real-time transparency to their factory operations using Android and Chrome devices. Using 42Q with Chrome, “deskless” back office workers can access work instructions, data requirements, and quality plans without deploying heavy client applications and expensive equipment.

Factory operators can also use the 42Q Android app for a “tailored” mobile interface, ensuring they only see critical information on demand. 

When combined with G Suite, everyone from front office planners to back office operators can collaborate on current production line states, critical orders and real time reporting on factory operations.

Tomorrow’s businesses: empowered with advanced devices, collaboration and context

With a Google Cloud devices and mobility strategy, businesses are able to gather contextual data through devices and apply machine learning analytics to quickly take smart, well-informed actions. And the more employees who use managed Chromebooks and Android devices to collaborate and securely access documents in G Suite, the more efficient your whole team becomes.

Several new devices support this secure data-driven strategy. The Asus Chromebook Flip and recently-announced Samsung Chromebook Pro and Plus function as both a Chromebook and an Android tablet with Google Play support. Last month, AOPEN launched the Chromebox mini and Chromebase mini, which also support Android apps and can use our new Kiosk APIs for improved app management and a robust customer experience.

To learn more about the Google Cloud devices and mobility solutions that enable a connected workspace, visit our booth at Next 2017 between March 8 and 10. There we’ll be demonstrating how a business becomes smarter when you pair Chrome and Android devices, cloud services and sensors with employees, customers and spaces. Or sign up here for additional information as we continue to evolve our range of data-driven tools to make every workspace connected no matter where it is.

Five ways retailers can provide personal, convenient customer service using Chrome

Successful retail outlets are always striving to improve customer service. Brick-and-mortar stores are borrowing a page from their online counterparts and turning to new technologies like Chrome to help make shopping easier and more fun for customers. Here are five ways retailers are using Chrome to personalize shopping, manage ad campaigns, offer local information and speed up the ordering process:

Personalized shopping

The best retail experience is personalized and relevant. Putting umbrellas and raincoats in front of a store during a rainstorm, for example, boosts inbound traffic and makes satisfied — and dry —  customers. But other than displaying umbrellas in the windows, how can a store advertise a spur of the moment promotion like that?  

Chico’s, a women’s apparel and accessories chain, uses Chromeboxes to tailor promotions across its U.S. stores. While bikinis are featured in digital displays in Florida, coats might be featured in Chicago and cocktail dresses in Las Vegas. Chico’s is working on bringing personalized content to 5,000 screens in its stores.

Express ordering

Australia’s Famous Fish by Steve Costi restaurant chain is mixing the best of self-service technology with old-world aesthetics. They introduced kiosk-based interactive menu boards based on Chrome which let people place their orders. This means customers have shorter lines and they get their food faster too.

Customer order kiosk at Famous Fish

Customers are pleased, and there’s been a noticeable boost to the bottom line. At the company’s Fountain Gate location, for example, average orders are 28.7% higher when customers use the kiosks. “Combining self-service touch screens with dynamic menu boards, the commercial Chrome technology is already providing a huge return on investment,” says Jon Sully, director of Famous Fish. “We’re seeing a noticeable increase in brand awareness and a large boost in customer spend.”

Going local

Where are the fish biting today? If you’re a sporting goods store and answer that for your customers, they’ll stay loyal for life. Scheels, a sporting-goods chain with 26 stores in 11 states, uses Chrome digital signs to display information about nearby river conditions and advice on the latest equipment and local fishing techniques. “They’re incredibly popular features that have helped build customer loyalty,” says Josh Diemert, lead systems administrator for Scheels.

Scheels also lets customers place orders using in-store kiosks. That frees up staff to provide more specialized service to individual customers. “We’ve taken the in-store experience to a new level by leveraging technology to make shopping fun, while at the same time empowering our sales team to deliver a better quality of service,” says Diemert.

Managing hundreds of campaigns

Store managers have a lot on their plates, and managing in-store digital signage campaigns can distract them from their most important work of helping customers and supporting their staff. Compass Group Canada turned to Chrome digital signage for promoting in-store offers in its restaurants and coffee shops. One marketer can now manage dozens of campaigns using Chrome Device Management, saving hundreds of hours of work a week. And campaigns are carefully tracked to make sure they perform well, leading to a 2% to 4% sales boost, which adds up for a company with $2 billion in annual revenue.

Bring more employees and processes online

If more retail employees have better access to computing, stores can move many of their processes online and make them more efficient. This includes everything from inventory checks, HR tasks, employee training on new store offerings, shift coordination, and marketing activities. The challenge has always been that it’s expensive to get a device for each employee, and it’s insecure to share a typical PC amongst multiple employees.

Chromebooks can be shared seamlessly between many employees, and any employee can pick up any device, log in, and get a secure workspace with access to all of their applications  By deploying a few Chromebooks in the back office of a store, retailers can give all of their employees secure access to computing, operate their stores more efficiently, and make sure that their employees are well trained on the latest products.

Find out more about how Google is ready to support and grow your retail business at our NRF BIG Show booth (#4333) in New York City, January 15th - 17th. Those who can’t attend the show can learn more here about how retailers can use Chrome digital signage and devices to engage customers.

Five ways retailers can provide personal, convenient customer service using Chrome

Successful retail outlets are always striving to improve customer service. Brick-and-mortar stores are borrowing a page from their online counterparts and turning to new technologies like Chrome to help make shopping easier and more fun for customers. Here are five ways retailers are using Chrome to personalize shopping, manage ad campaigns, offer local information and speed up the ordering process:

Personalized shopping

The best retail experience is personalized and relevant. Putting umbrellas and raincoats in front of a store during a rainstorm, for example, boosts inbound traffic and makes satisfied — and dry —  customers. But other than displaying umbrellas in the windows, how can a store advertise a spur of the moment promotion like that?  

Chico’s, a women’s apparel and accessories chain, uses Chromeboxes to tailor promotions across its U.S. stores. While bikinis are featured in digital displays in Florida, coats might be featured in Chicago and cocktail dresses in Las Vegas. Chico’s is working on bringing personalized content to 5,000 screens in its stores.

Express ordering

Australia’s Famous Fish by Steve Costi restaurant chain is mixing the best of self-service technology with old-world aesthetics. They introduced kiosk-based interactive menu boards based on Chrome which let people place their orders. This means customers have shorter lines and they get their food faster too.

Customer order kiosk at Famous Fish

Customers are pleased, and there’s been a noticeable boost to the bottom line. At the company’s Fountain Gate location, for example, average orders are 28.7% higher when customers use the kiosks. “Combining self-service touch screens with dynamic menu boards, the commercial Chrome technology is already providing a huge return on investment,” says Jon Sully, director of Famous Fish. “We’re seeing a noticeable increase in brand awareness and a large boost in customer spend.”

Going local

Where are the fish biting today? If you’re a sporting goods store and answer that for your customers, they’ll stay loyal for life. Scheels, a sporting-goods chain with 26 stores in 11 states, uses Chrome digital signs to display information about nearby river conditions and advice on the latest equipment and local fishing techniques. “They’re incredibly popular features that have helped build customer loyalty,” says Josh Diemert, lead systems administrator for Scheels.

Scheels also lets customers place orders using in-store kiosks. That frees up staff to provide more specialized service to individual customers. “We’ve taken the in-store experience to a new level by leveraging technology to make shopping fun, while at the same time empowering our sales team to deliver a better quality of service,” says Diemert.

Managing hundreds of campaigns

Store managers have a lot on their plates, and managing in-store digital signage campaigns can distract them from their most important work of helping customers and supporting their staff. Compass Group Canada turned to Chrome digital signage for promoting in-store offers in its restaurants and coffee shops. One marketer can now manage dozens of campaigns using Chrome Device Management, saving hundreds of hours of work a week. And campaigns are carefully tracked to make sure they perform well, leading to a 2% to 4% sales boost, which adds up for a company with $2 billion in annual revenue.

Bring more employees and processes online

If more retail employees have better access to computing, stores can move many of their processes online and make them more efficient. This includes everything from inventory checks, HR tasks, employee training on new store offerings, shift coordination, and marketing activities. The challenge has always been that it’s expensive to get a device for each employee, and it’s insecure to share a typical PC amongst multiple employees.

Chromebooks can be shared seamlessly between many employees, and any employee can pick up any device, log in, and get a secure workspace with access to all of their applications  By deploying a few Chromebooks in the back office of a store, retailers can give all of their employees secure access to computing, operate their stores more efficiently, and make sure that their employees are well trained on the latest products.

Find out more about how Google is ready to support and grow your retail business at our NRF BIG Show booth (#4333) in New York City, January 15th - 17th. Those who can’t attend the show can learn more here about how retailers can use Chrome digital signage and devices to engage customers.

3 secrets to Chromebook success from teachers of the 2016 graduating class

Editor’s note: In 2012, Google CEO Sundar Pichai shared his excitement that the Council Bluffs, Leyden, Fond Du Lac and Richland Two school districts were about to go “all in” on technology by providing Chromebooks for their students. Pichai said, “I can’t wait to see the impact it has on the education dynamics in the classroom.” Now, four years later, the first wave of students who used Chromebooks throughout high school have graduated, so we reached out to the schools to find out what they learned along the way. To learn more tips on using Chromebooks in the classroom, join us for Education on Air on December 3rd.

Four years ago the Council Bluffs, Leyden, Fond Du Lac and Richland Two school districts gave each incoming ninth-grader a Chromebook to use in class and at home as part of a 1:1 program. Here are tips that teachers and administrators from each of these schools on how to be successful introducing Chromebooks:

Allow for a transition period

It takes time for people to adapt to any new device or technology, so be patient when integrating it in schools. “Our faculty loves using Chromebooks in the classroom, almost as much as our students do, but first they needed an initial transition period to adapt to the new technology,” says Dr. Tatiana Bonuma, a principal for Leyden School District in Illinois. To make the transition easier, Leyden has student technical support interns who are available to answer teachers’ questions and troubleshoot any issues that arise.

Students also may go through a short transition period while they learn different ways to use the devices, not just as word processors, but for research and deep learning. “At first, our students used Chromebooks as a replacement for paper and pens,” says Samantha Adams, a high school language arts teacher for Council Bluffs School District in Iowa. However, this changed fast as students dived into the internet to do research for science projects, history papers and other assignments.

image02.jpg
A high school student shares his latest class project on a Chromebook with Dr. Tatiana Bonuma, principal for Leyden School District in Illinois

Level the playing field

In many schools students with computers and internet access at home have a significant advantage over those that don’t. But with a Chromebook in every student’s backpack, every student in the class has the same opportunity to spend time learning, working on projects and expanding their knowledge. “There has been a significant shift at our school in student technological and research capabilities because we use Chromebooks and Google Apps. This program has been a great equalizer, giving every student the ability to learn and understand technology,” says Susanne Liggett, a high school teacher at Richland County School District Two in South Carolina.

Using Chromebooks on a daily basis means students are more prepared for college and that they are learning skills that will help them throughout their lives, no matter what field they choose. “All of our graduating students are now able to use technology to work on digital projects, such as creating websites, YouTube channels and interactive Google Drawings, at the level a university will expect,” says Renee Nolan, an educational technology coach at Fond du Lac School District in Wisconsin.

image01.jpg
2016 graduates from Fond Du Lac School District in Wisconsin using Chromebooks in the classroom

Balance online and offline interactions

Chromebooks can be powerful communications tools for young people who are developing social, interpersonal and other life skills. “Some of our students who were shy or reluctant to work with their classmates on a project became more willing to do so electronically,” says Michaela Gray, a high school teacher at Council Bluffs School District. For example, students who might normally avoid engaging in the classroom are eager to use Hangouts and Docs to communicate about assignments and collaborate. At Council Bluffs, Gray saw an increase in student participation as a result of Chromebooks.

The devices are so easy and fun to use that students take to them very fast. This is a good thing, but the enthusiasm must be balanced with face-to-face interactions. “Sometimes I have to remind students of the importance of discussion and collaborating in person to build communication skills,” explains Liggett.

It’s been exciting to observe these freshman classes learn to use Chromebooks for the first time and learn that they feel better prepared for the next chapters in their lives because of their experience with the technology. “Students that visit after graduating say their experience with Chromebooks makes them feel ready to take on college and the professional world,” says Dr. Tatiana Bonuma, Principal at West Leyden High School. Imagine what we will be able to learn from graduating classes in the future as the role of technology continues to expand in the classroom.

To learn more tips on using Chromebooks in the classroom, join us for Education on Air on December 3rd.

Source: Education


3 secrets to Chromebook success from teachers of the 2016 graduating class

Editor’s note: In 2012, Google CEO Sundar Pichai shared his excitement that the Council Bluffs, Leyden, Fond Du Lac and Richland Two school districts were about to go “all in” on technology by providing Chromebooks for their students. Pichai said, “I can’t wait to see the impact it has on the education dynamics in the classroom.” Now, four years later, the first wave of students who used Chromebooks throughout high school have graduated, so we reached out to the schools to find out what they learned along the way. To learn more tips on using Chromebooks in the classroom, join us for Education on Air on December 3rd.

Four years ago the Council Bluffs, Leyden, Fond Du Lac and Richland Two school districts gave each incoming ninth-grader a Chromebook to use in class and at home as part of a 1:1 program. Here are tips that teachers and administrators from each of these schools on how to be successful introducing Chromebooks:

Allow for a transition period

It takes time for people to adapt to any new device or technology, so be patient when integrating it in schools. “Our faculty loves using Chromebooks in the classroom, almost as much as our students do, but first they needed an initial transition period to adapt to the new technology,” says Dr. Tatiana Bonuma, a principal for Leyden School District in Illinois. To make the transition easier, Leyden has student technical support interns who are available to answer teachers’ questions and troubleshoot any issues that arise.

Students also may go through a short transition period while they learn different ways to use the devices, not just as word processors, but for research and deep learning. “At first, our students used Chromebooks as a replacement for paper and pens,” says Samantha Adams, a high school language arts teacher for Council Bluffs School District in Iowa. However, this changed fast as students dived into the internet to do research for science projects, history papers and other assignments.

image02.jpg
A high school student shares his latest class project on a Chromebook with Dr. Tatiana Bonuma, principal for Leyden School District in Illinois

Level the playing field

In many schools students with computers and internet access at home have a significant advantage over those that don’t. But with a Chromebook in every student’s backpack, every student in the class has the same opportunity to spend time learning, working on projects and expanding their knowledge. “There has been a significant shift at our school in student technological and research capabilities because we use Chromebooks and Google Apps. This program has been a great equalizer, giving every student the ability to learn and understand technology,” says Susanne Liggett, a high school teacher at Richland County School District Two in South Carolina.

Using Chromebooks on a daily basis means students are more prepared for college and that they are learning skills that will help them throughout their lives, no matter what field they choose. “All of our graduating students are now able to use technology to work on digital projects, such as creating websites, YouTube channels and interactive Google Drawings, at the level a university will expect,” says Renee Nolan, an educational technology coach at Fond du Lac School District in Wisconsin.

image01.jpg
2016 graduates from Fond Du Lac School District in Wisconsin using Chromebooks in the classroom

Balance online and offline interactions

Chromebooks can be powerful communications tools for young people who are developing social, interpersonal and other life skills. “Some of our students who were shy or reluctant to work with their classmates on a project became more willing to do so electronically,” says Michaela Gray, a high school teacher at Council Bluffs School District. For example, students who might normally avoid engaging in the classroom are eager to use Hangouts and Docs to communicate about assignments and collaborate. At Council Bluffs, Gray saw an increase in student participation as a result of Chromebooks.

The devices are so easy and fun to use that students take to them very fast. This is a good thing, but the enthusiasm must be balanced with face-to-face interactions. “Sometimes I have to remind students of the importance of discussion and collaborating in person to build communication skills,” explains Liggett.

It’s been exciting to observe these freshman classes learn to use Chromebooks for the first time and learn that they feel better prepared for the next chapters in their lives because of their experience with the technology. “Students that visit after graduating say their experience with Chromebooks makes them feel ready to take on college and the professional world,” says Dr. Tatiana Bonuma, Principal at West Leyden High School. Imagine what we will be able to learn from graduating classes in the future as the role of technology continues to expand in the classroom.

To learn more tips on using Chromebooks in the classroom, join us for Education on Air on December 3rd.

Source: Education