Tag Archives: Google Nest

Hey Google, talk like Issa

Here's a trivia question for you. Which actress is also a writer and producer, started a web series on YouTube, translated common insecurities into a hit show, gives a great pep talk and makes a cameo as a voice on the Google Assistant? It's Issa Rae! 


Starting today, Issa Rae’s voice is available as a cameo on the Google Assistant, in English for a limited time in the U.S. To switch to Issa’s voice, simply say “Hey Google, talk like Issa," or go to your “Assistant voice” in Assistant Settings. You’ll then hear Issa’s voice when you ask the Assistant for things like the weather forecast or for answers to questions like, “When is the first day of winter?” You’ll also hear Issa’s voice when you’re in the mood for a joke or when you’re seeking motivation. Try asking your Assistant, “Hey Google…” 

  • “Do I need an umbrella today?”

  • “Tell me a secret.”

  • “What do you think of me?”

  • “Give me a quote from Issa Rae.”

  • “Sing a song.”

  • “Tell me a joke.”

  • Or ask, “Mirror talk” or “How do I look?” for confidence-boosting affirmations.

#TalkLikeIssa

You can even hear a few surprises—like Issa’s take when you ask, “Hey Google, do you love Daniel or Lawrence more?” or “Hey Google, tell me something awkward.” Responses to all other questions will continue to be in one of the original Assistant voices. And if you want yet another surprise, keep an eye out on the @Google Instagram channel today for a few exclusive sneak peeks into Issa’s life on set!


This is the Google Assistant’s second celebrity voice, following the melodic vocals of John Legend, made possible by the state-of-the-art speech synthesis model, WaveNet. You can get Issa’s cameo voice on any device that has the Google Assistant, including Google Home smart speakers and all Smart Displays—including the new Nest Hub Max—and on mobile for Android and iOS

Move your music between rooms with stream transfer

Since 2013, we’ve been working to make it easier for people to play music and watch their favorite shows and videos at home.  It started when we first launched Chromecast, which lets people get content from their phones to their TVs through a simple dongle. It continued with Google Home in 2016, which let people stream music effortlessly with a simple command — “OK Google, play music.” And with the newest member of our family, Nest Hub Max, users now have the ultimate smart display for streaming their favorite shows and videos.

Now that millions of users have multiple TVs, smart speakers and smart displays (some in every room!) we wanted to make it easy for people to control their media as they moved from room to room.

Stream transfer is a new feature that lets you easily move music, videos, podcasts and more between compatible devices in your home using your voice, the Google Home app or the touchscreen on your Nest smart display.

Here’s how you can give it a try: 

  • Move your music with the Google Assistant: Start playing music on the Google Home Mini in your kitchen, and keep the vibe going in the living room. Just say, “Hey Google, move the music to the living room speaker.”
  • Control your entertainment with the Google Home app: Tap the cast button to see all the devices in your home, then choose which device or group you’d like to move your podcast or music to. 
  • Move YouTube videos between your Nest smart display and Chromecast-enabled TV: Browse for your favorite YouTube videos on Nest Hub Max, and tap the cast control on the screen to move it to your Chromecast-connected TV. Or, say “Hey Google, play it on living room TV.”
  • Fill your home with music: If you have more than one Google Home and Nest smart speaker or display, you can set up a speaker group in the Home App. Transfer music from a single speaker to the speaker group to fill your whole home with music. 

Stream transfer is compatible with your favorite audio apps, including YouTube Music, Spotify, Pandora, and more. For video, you can enjoy the millions of videos available on YouTube. Stream transfer starts rolling out across all Chromecasts and Google Home and Nest smart speakers and displays today. 


5 tips to make your home Wi-Fi even better

These days, access to a reliable Wi-Fi signal can feel as crucial as having basic electricity or plumbing. In fact, a recent study conducted by Kelton Research and commissioned by Google found that 28 percent of people don’t think they could last a single day without Wi-Fi. But in that same study, a whopping 81 percent of people said they have experienced issues with their Wi-Fi at home. So why is something so essential considered such a hassle?

Luckily, there are some simple strategies to maximize your home Wi-Fi network to avoid slow loading times or grumbling when you’re trying to get online. Here are a few tips for making the most out of your Wi-Fi.

Place your router as centrally as possible. 

Wi-Fi signals get weaker the farther away you go from your router, so if you keep your router by the front door, your videos might load more slowly if you’re trying to watch them by the back door. So if you can, place your router as centrally as possible within your home, though this may not always be possible depending on where your internet provider brings in the connection. And if you don’t mind your router sitting on the counter top, keep it out in the open. If you can avoid hiding it by a bookcase or filing cabinet, you can really help boost your Wi-Fi signal.

Consider a mesh network. 

A mesh network is a group of routers that wirelessly communicate with each other to create a single, connected Wi-Fi network over a large area. It allows you to have multiple sources of powerful Wi-Fi throughout your home, not just one from the main router. Having a mesh network solves the problem of having the router just relegated to a corner in the house. We created Google Wifi as a mesh system because having multiple points work together to create a seamless single network provides consistently strong coverage for all connected devices in every room of the house. 

Make sure your router is up to date. 

If your existing router is more than three or four years old, check to make sure it supports 5GHz Wi-Fi signals. Some older routers only support 2.4GHz signals, which can make your devices much slower. Think of it as having a car that isn’t fast enough to drive on the freeway. Upgrade your router to at least an 802.11ac system so you can also use 5GHz frequencies, which are like the autobahn of Wi-Fi. (There are more lanes, and higher speed limits.) 

Always, always make your network password-protected. 

Having an “open network” without a password might seem convenient, since there’s no need to remember a complicated password. But if you do that, anyone even driving by your home could join your Wi-Fi network and compromise your network, devices and data by accessing your drives or slowing down your network. Choose a strong password that’s tough for anyone to guess, but easy for you to remember. 

Create a separate Wi-Fi network for guests. 

If you have kids at home, or just get a lot of guests, chances are you’ve handed out your Wi-Fi password a lot. Setting up a guest network creates a second Wi-Fi network in your home so your guests can have a great experience while your own devices stay secure and private. 

101 ways you can use the new Nest Hub Max at home

Today, we’re launching Nest Hub Max. Hub Max is a Google Assistant smart display that’s the perfect addition to your helpful home—it’s a TV for your kitchen, an indoor camera, a smart home controller, a digital photo frame and a great way to make video calls. It comes in chalk and charcoal for $229 in the U.S. on the Google Store, as well as retailers such as Best Buy, Home Depot, Target and more; it’s also available in the U.K. for £219 and Australia for AUS$349. To give you a glimpse of how Hub Max can be helpful in your household, we gathered the top 101 ways we’ve been using Nest Hub Max in our own homes:

Get entertained

1. Launch your favorite channels through your YouTube TV subscription by saying, “Hey Google, watch [channel]” to enjoy live TV while you finish the dishes.
2. Catch up on the news, sports and your favorite TV shows with a YouTube TV subscription that provides access to 70+ channels—no cable box required. Not sure what to watch? Ask your Assistant, “What’s on TV?”
3. You can also enjoy other entertainment services you’re subscribed to using just your voice, including CBS All Access and Starz. 
4. Stream thousands of apps from your phone to your Hub Max with built-in Cast functionality. Just open the Chromecast-enabled app on your phone and tap the Cast button.
5. Enjoy millions of YouTube videos, from original content to cooking clips to how-to videos. 

6. Jam to your favorite tunes on Hub Max’s stereo speakers from services like YouTube Music, Spotify, Pandora and more.
7. Set your favorite music service as your default listening app, so the Google Assistant will search there first when you ask it to play a song.
8. Get personalized recommendations on the home screen with Face Match. Just tap the screen to see suggested videos, music, news and podcasts, just for you.
9. Can’t decide which playlist or station is right to set the mood? Just say, “Hey Google, open Spotify” or “Hey Google, open YouTube Music.”
10. Need a groove to get you ready for a night out? Say, “Hey Google, play smooth jazz" or pick another genre you like. 
11. Don’t want to yell over the music? Use Quick Gestures to pause or resume music, videos and other content—just look at Hub Max and raise your hand.
12. Group Nest Hub Max with other smart displays, speakers and Chromecast devices to fill your entire home with music.
13. Catch up on the news of the day from a variety of top sources. Just say, “Hey Google, play the news” to get started. 
14. For live updates from specific news outlets, just say, “Hey Google, play CBS News” or another outlet.
15. Want to learn more about what’s happening within a specific topic? Ask “Hey Google, show me the sports news,” for example. 
16. Customize your news by selecting from some of your favorite sources, including hundreds of national and local broadcasters. 
17. Control thousands of entertainment devices from all major brands in your home from your Hub Max.
18. Lost the remote? Turn your Chromecast built-in TV on or off with a simple, “Hey Google, turn off the TV.”

Nest Hub Max

Stay connected

19. Make video calls to family and friends with Nest Hub Max using Google Duo—and not just to other Hub Max devices, but also to any Android or iOS device.

20. Stay in view during a video call with auto-framing, so you can prep dinner around the kitchen while you catch up with loved ones.
21. Don’t have time for a call? Leave a video message. Say “Hey Google, leave a video message for John” or send a video message from the Duo app on your phone.
22. With Face Match, just walk up to Hub Max and your Assistant will let you know about any video messages or missed calls you've received.
23. Create reminders for other members of your household, like reminding your partner to walk the dog. Face Match will also surface any missed reminders automatically when they approach Hub Max.
24. You can also use reminders to send someone a note of encouragement when they need it the most (“Hey Google, remind Kathy that she’ll do great in tomorrow’s interview”).
25. Use Hub Max’s built-in Nest Cam to check in on your pet when you’re not at home. 
26. Use Talk and Listen through the Nest Cam to say a quick hello.
27. Get continuous video recording, familiar face alerts and more with a Nest Aware subscription.

Keep the memories alive

28. Enjoy photos of your favorite memories from Google Photos on Nest Hub Max’s 10-inch HD screen.
29. Find those special memories in a flash with a simple, “Hey Google, show my photos from Hawaii,” and relive the family vacation. 
30. Search for photos of your dog, birthdays, weddings and more.
31. Create a Live Album so your best and latest shots show up on your Hub Max automatically. Just choose the people (or pets) you want to see.
32. Share a Live Album with friends and family, so they can see your latest photos on their smart display, too.
33. See a photo pop up that brings a smile to your face? Share it with one of your contacts: “Hey Google, share this photo with Mom.”
34. See an old memory and can’t remember the location? Just ask “Hey Google, where was this photo taken?”
35. Or say, “Hey Google, favorite this photo” to keep track of the shots you love in the Google Photos app.
36. Let Nest Hub Max better blend into your home with Ambient EQ so the screen automatically adjusts to match the lighting in the room. Just say, “Hey Google, turn on Ambient EQ.”

Get help in the kitchen

37. Discover recipes and see visual step-by-step directions—all hands-free—making Nest Hub Max your digital sous chef to help unleash your culinary creativity. 
38. Set multiple timers—for example, one for baking and one for your yoga workout.
39. Or name your timer: “Hey Google, set a 10 minute chicken timer.”
40. Ask your Google Assistant for quick conversions like, “Hey Google, how many milliliters in an ounce?”
41. Stay on track with your nutrition goals: “Hey Google, how many calories are in an apple?” 
42. Get access to millions of recipes from top names like Food Network and Tasty. 
43. If you need help in the middle of a recipe, “Hey Google, show me how to dice an onion” will pause the recipe and play a how-to video to help you get it right.
44. Search for recipes and save them to “My Cookbook” for later. 
45. Run out of buttermilk? Ask your Google Assistant to add it to your shopping list. 
46. Or ask for a substitute: “Hey Google, what’s a substitute for buttermilk?”
47. Next time your timer is going off, silence it by simply saying, “Stop”—no "Hey Google" required.
48. Or use Quick Gestures to stop the timer with just a raise of your hand. 

Have fun with family

49. Have a laugh with your Assistant! Just say, “Hey Google, tell me a joke.”
50. Or get the whole family in on the fun by saying, “Hey Google, let’s play Mad Libs.”
51. Don’t have the best voice for singing? Hub Max can help you with a rendition of “Happy Birthday.” Say, “Hey Google, sing ‘Happy Birthday.’” 
52. Keep little ones entertained with the sounds and images of their favorite animals: “Hey Google, what sound does a hippo make?”
53. You can also ask the Assistant to help the kids learn their ABCs; just say, “Hey Google, sing the ABCs.” 
54. Control your family’s experience with Filters to allow only family-friendly Actions or restrict access to music with explicit lyrics.
55. Enjoy story time together with Disney and Little Golden Books, powered by Family Link. Just say “Hey Google, let’s Read Along.” 
56. Sit back and relax with “Hey Google, tell me a story.”
57. Set alarms with your favorite characters, from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to Hatchimals. Just say “Hey Google, set a Character Alarm” and the Assistant takes it from there.
58. Want to play a song but not sure of the title? Just ask Google to identify the song by saying a few lyrics instead.
59. Playing a game and trying to decide who gets to go first? Ask, “Hey Google, roll dice."
60. Planning ahead for Halloween? Make it spooky with “Hey Google, haunt my house!”
61. Ask the Google Assistant to drop you a beat: “Hey Google, beatbox for me.”
62. Say “please” or “thank you” when using the Assistant and you’ll often be rewarded with delightful responses. Try “Hey Google, please set a timer for 5 minutes.”

Get things done

63. Start your day with personalized info meant just for you using Face Match. The Hub Max will welcome you with  a “Good morning” greeting and share your reminders, commute or an upcoming reservation when you walk up to the device.
64. Unsure about bringing the umbrella? Just say, “Hey Google, show me the weather.” 
65. Set aside quiet time before bed with Downtime, and the Hub Max will hold off on sharing notifications or responding to commands.  
66. Use Routines to streamline multiple tasks. Say “Hey Google, good morning” and Hub Max can control the lights, temperature, music or more all at once. 
67. Set up your personalized commute times and routes in the Assistant app. Then ask “Hey Google, how do I get to work?” and get real-time commute info. 
68. Got dinner ready, but no one’s in sight? Swipe down from the top of Nest Hub Max’s screen and tap “Broadcast” to call your family to the table through other Google Nest devices. 
69. You can also reply to a broadcast with a “Hey Google, reply,” followed by your message.
70. Getting ready for bed and want to dim the lights? Set up a routine and trigger it with something like "Hey Google, it’s nighttime."
71. Never lose your phone again. Say "Hey Google, find my phone" and your Assistant will call your phone. 
72. Waiting anxiously for the spoils of your latest bargain hunting victory? With Face Match, see proactive notifications from your Assistant for upcoming package deliveries, right on Hub Max.
73. Use interpreter mode to have a conversation in real time, even when you don’t speak the language. Simply ask your Assistant, “Hey Google, be my Italian interpreter.”
74. Making weekend plans? Ask the Assistant to find restaurants nearby.
75. Head to the movie theater on a rainy day to catch the latest flick. “Hey Google, what movies are playing right now?"
76. Get help remembering things. Simply say “Hey Google, remember my passport is in my sock drawer.” Then next time you’re looking for your passport, just ask the Assistant and you’ll be reminded.
77. Stay on top of your portfolio with the latest information on individual stocks and the global market: “Hey Google, what is [stock] trading at?”

Control your smart home

78. Manage all your compatible devices in one dashboard with home view. View devices by room, turn the lights on or off with a tap or pause what’s playing on your Chromecast. 
79. Use home view to adjust the colors or brightness of your compatible lights so you can get the mood just right.
80. Set up your Hub Max with a Nest Hello doorbell and you can see who’s at the front door.
81. Turn on the compatible lights in the room you’re in with a simple, “Hey Google, turn on the lights.”
82. If you want to turn on all the compatible lights across your home, just ask, “Hey Google, turn on all the lights.”
83. Get peace of mind and see your security camera video stream right on your Nest Hub Max.
84. Stay under the covers until it’s just right. Say, “Hey Google, make it warmer” to have your Nest thermostat make the room nice and toasty. 
85. Start your morning off right. Use a smart plug with your coffee maker and ask your Google Assistant to get things brewing.
86. Change your compatible smart bulb colors to set the party mood. "OK, Google, turn my lights pink."

Do even more

87. Too far down the rabbit hole of apps? Get back to the home screen anytime with “Hey Google, go home.”
88. Get a daily dose of good news. Just say “Hey Google, tell me something good.”
89. Preparing for your upcoming trivia night? Just ask, “Hey Google, who won the NBA Finals in 1990?”
90. Ask for help with your next vacation: “What are the best places to vacation in February?”
91. Enjoy the silky smooth voice of John Legend answering everyday questions. Just say, “Hey Google, talk like a Legend.” 
92. Need to relax? Just ask your Hub Max to play ocean sounds or soothing white noise.
93. Get ready for your road trip with help. Just say, “Hey Google, what are fun things to do in Austin?”
94. If you’re bored and just want to get out of the house, turn to the Assistant for ideas. “Hey Google, what events are happening today near Chicago?”
95. Or stay home and learn some interesting tidbits. Just say, “Ok Google, tell me a fun fact.”
96. Learn a new language. Simply say “Hey Google, how do you say ‘how much does this cost’ in French?”
97. Brush up on your vocabulary skills. “Ok Google, what does ‘gregarious’ mean?”
98. Stay up to date on your favorite sports and teams by asking for recent sports scores and stats. 
99. Never reach for a calculator again. "Ok Google, what's 254 times 13?" 
100. Do (almost) anything yourself. Need to learn how to French braid? There’s a YouTube video for that.
101. There’s even more to do with Nest Hub Max. Just ask “Hey Google, what can you do?”

Ask a Techspert: What is machine learning?

Editor’s Note: Do you ever feel like a fish out of water? Try being a tech novice and talking to an engineer at a place like Google. Ask a Techspert is a series on the Keyword asking Googler experts to explain complicated technology for the rest of us. This isn’t meant to be comprehensive, but just enough to make you sound smart at a dinner party. 

Imagine you’re going to the grocery store to buy ice cream. If you’re an ice cream lover like me, this probably happens regularly. Normally, I go to the store closest to my home, but every so often I opt to go to a different one, in search of my ice-cream white whale: raspberry chocolate chip. 

When you’re in a new store searching for your favorite-but-hard-to-find flavor of ice cream, you might not know exactly where it is, but you’ll probably know that you should head toward the refrigerators, it’s in the aisle labeled frozen foods and that it’s probably not in the same section as the frozen pizza.

My ability to find ice cream in a new store is not instinctive, even though it feels like it. It is the result of years of memories navigating the many sections and aisles of different grocery stores, using visual cues like refrigerators or aisle signs to figure out if I am on the right track. 

Today, when we hear about “machine learning,” we’re actually talking about how Google teaches computers to use existing information to answer questions like: Where is the ice cream? Or, can you tell me if my package has arrived on my doorstep? For this edition of Ask a Techspert, I spoke with Rosie Buchanan, who is a senior software engineer working on Machine Perception within Google Nest. 

She not only helped explain how machine learning works, she also told me that starting today, Nest Aware subscribers can receive a notification when their Nest Hello, using machine learning, detects that a package has been delivered. 

What is machine learning? 

I’ll admit: Rosie came up with the food metaphor. She told me that when you’re looking for something to eat, you have a model in your head. “You learn what to eat by seeing, smelling, touching and by using your prior experience with similar things,” she says. “With machine learning, we’re teaching the computer how to do something, often with better accuracy than a person, based on past understanding.” 

How do you get a machine to learn? 

Rosie and her team teach machines through supervised learning. To help Nest cameras identify packages, they use data that they know contains the “right answers,” which in this case are photos of packages. They then input these data sets to the computer so that it can create an algorithmic model based on the images they provided. This is called a training job, and it requires hundreds of thousands of images. “Over time, the computer is able to independently identify a delivered package without assistance,” Rosie says. 

How do you figure out what to make a machine learn? 

Rosie told me that package detection was one of the most requested features from Nest Hello users. “In particular, we’re trying to solve problems based on what users want,” she says. “Home safety and security is a huge area for our users.” By bringing package delivery notifications to Nest Aware, Rosie and her team have found a use for machine learning that eliminates the tedious task of waiting around for your delivery. 

Do you need a massive supercomputer to do machine learning? 

That depends on whether you’re creating a machine learning model or using it. If you’re a developer like Rosie, you’ll need some powerful computers. But if you want to see whether there’s a package on your doorstep, you don’t need more than a video doorbell. "When engineers develop a machine learning model, it can take a ton of computing power to teach it what it needs to know,” Rosie says. “But once it's trained, a machine learning model doesn't necessarily take up a lot of space, so it can run basically anywhere, like in your smart doorbell."

Can machines understand some things that we humans can’t? 

According to Rosie, yes. “We can often describe the things we’re learning,” she says, “but there are things we can’t describe, and machines are good at understanding these observations.” It’s called black box learning: We can tell the model is learning something but we can’t quite tell what it is. 

A great example of this is when a package arrives at your doorstep. Rosie’s team shows the network lots of pictures of packages, and lots of pictures of other things (trees, dogs, bananas, you name it). They tell the network which images are packages and which ones are not. The network is made up of different nodes, each trying to learn how to identify a package on its own. One node might learn that many packages are brown, and another might notice that many are rectangular. 

“These nodes work together to start putting together a concept of what a package is, eventually coming up with a concept of ‘packageness’ that we as humans might not even understand,” Rosie says. “At the end, we don't actually know exactly what the network learned as its definition of ‘packageness,’ whether it's looking for a brown box, a white bag or something else.” With machine learning, teams can show a network a new picture and it may tell us there’s a package in it, but we can’t fully know exactly how it made that decision. 

What’s the best part about working on machine learning? 

Rosie, who’s been at Google for over five years, says it’s all about working on the unknown. “We get to work on problems that we don’t know are actually solvable,” she says. “It’s exciting to get started on something while knowing that it might not be feasible.” 

So will machine learning be able to identify that raspberry chocolate chip is the best flavor of ice cream ever created? Probably not. We’ll still need human knowledge to confirm that. But machine learning will help us in other ways, like waiting around for a package to be delivered so you can take that precious time to peruse the frozen foods section. 

Our top Nest Cam tips for pup parents

I don’t know where I’d be without my rescue mutt, Ted, who my husband and I adopted when Ted was eight weeks old. Since then we’ve watched his personality unfold, we’ve (kind of) trained him, and he’s taught me all about patience, unconditional love and friendship. With his wagging tail and watchful little eyes, Ted never fails to cheer me up and make me feel safe. And science backs this up: studies have shown that dogs lower our stress levels and improve our health. But despite all we know about dogs, one thing remains a mystery: what do they do all day while we’re away from home? 

It’s easy to check in on your pup with an indoor camera like the Nest Cam Indoor or Nest Cam IQ Indoor, which show you a video feed of your dog in action. The cameras even let you talk and listen to them—plus, with a Nest Aware subscription you can record and replay cute clips, then save and share them. 

It’s National Dog Day, so we’ve compiled our top six Nest Cam tips (some require a Nest Aware subscription). Barking at you, pup parents.

  1. Keep up with training.Thanks to the two-way talk feature on Nest Cam Indoor and IQ Indoor, you can position your camera to keep an eye on a forbidden piece of furniture and will receive a notification if Fluffy is up to no good. Simply speak into the Nest app to tell them to get off the couch, or to give positive reinforcement.

  2. Soothe your dog’s anxiety. Nest Cams monitor for conspicuous sounds like a boom, crash, or barking and howling, so if your dog is stressed and making noises, your camera can let you know (and next time you can leave a soothing toy before heading out to work).

  3. Avoid dumpster diving. With Nest Aware, set an Activity Zone in the Nest App around an area your pup tends to get into (like the garbage bin) and receive a notification if they linger near it.

  4. Capture candid clips.Glance through your video history and watch highlights in Sightline (your camera’s timeline in the Nest app). You might catch Bella doing downward dog, or Buster having a case of the zoomies.

  5. Know when your dog walker arrives. With Nest Aware, you’ll get a familiar faces notification when your walker enters the view of your Nest Cam IQ or Nest Hello—but make sure you have your walker’s permission first (familiar face alerts are not available on Nest Cams used in Illinois).

  6. Share highlights with your friends and family. With Nest Aware, create a mini timelapse of your favorite clips to melt the hearts of your loved ones, and even post videos and photos to your social channels.

Have a paw-some day!

It’s time: Nest users can now switch to Google Accounts

Back in May, Nest and Google Home joined together as Google Nest to create a more helpful home. And now, the next step involves you: starting today, you can migrate your Nest account to a Google Account. It's easy to do and only takes a few minutes—here's what you need to know.

Migrating to a Google Account gives you new benefits, like:

  • Automatic security protections such as Suspicious activity detection, 2-Step Verification and Security Checkup. 
  • Your Google Nest devices and services will work together. For example, if you have a Nest Cam and a Chromecast, just say, "Hey Google, show me the backyard camera” to cast your camera stream to your TV without any additional setup. 
  • One account to sign into both the Nest and Google Home apps. 
  • Your homes and home members will be aligned across the Nest and Google Home apps.

You’ll receive an email invitation from Nest to migrate, but if you’d like to migrate now, you can select the “Sign in with Google” option in the most recent version of the Nest app. If you already have a Google Account that you use to sign into Google Home, just select that account when migrating your Nest Account. If you don't, it’s easy to create one. If you’re a first-time Nest user, you can use your existing Google Account to sign in. 

We’ve worked with Amazon on an updated Nest skill that will work with Google Accounts, so if you want to enable the Alexa integration with your Nest Thermostat or Nest Cam, you can click here to activate the updated skill. 

If you’re using Works with Nest with other partners, we suggest waiting to migrate your account until you receive an email invitation. If you decide to migrate before receiving your email, your Works with Nest integrations will no longer work and you won’t be able to get them back. We’re currently working with partners to provide similar integrations through Assistant Routines, and you'll receive your email invitation to migrate when these integrations are ready. If you don’t migrate your Nest Account, your existing Works with Nest integrations will continue to work.

You should make sure that you’ve downloaded the most recent Nest app on Android or iOS before you start your migration. If you have questions about migrating you can find help here or contact Nest Support.


Our hardware sustainability commitments

Most of us can’t get through the day without a phone, tablet, computer or smart speaker. My team at Google understands this well—we’ve been making consumer hardware (like Pixel phones and Google Home Minis) for just over three years now. But building these devices and getting them into the hands of our customers takes a lot of resources, and disposing of our old electronics can create significant waste. 


My job is to integrate sustainability into our products, operations and communities—making it not just an aspect of how we do business, but the centerpiece of it. It’s an ongoing endeavor that involves designing in sustainability from the start and embedding it into the entire product development process and across our operations, all while creating the products our customers want. This is how we will achieve our ambition to leave people, the planet, and our communities better than we found them. 


To help us get a step closer to reaching our goals, we’re sharing a set of hardware and services sustainability commitments

  • By 2020, 100 percent of all shipments going to or from customers will be carbon neutral 
  • Starting in 2022, 100 percent of Made by Google products will include recycled materials with a drive to maximize recycled content wherever possible.
  • And we will make technology that puts people first and expands access to the benefits of technology. 

These commitments will build on the foundation and progress we’ve already made. In 2018, we began publishing our product environmental reports, which help everyone understand exactly what our products are made of, how they’re built and how they get shipped to you. And from 2017 to 2018, our carbon emissions for product shipments decreased by 40 percent. we’ve also launched our Power Project, which will bring one million energy- and money-saving Nest thermostats to families in need by 2023, and built much of our Nest product portfolio with post-consumer recycled plastic.  


We’re always working to do more, faster. But today we’re laying the foundation for what we believe will be a way of doing business that commits to building better products better. 

For individuals with paralysis, Google Nest gives help at home

Editor’s note: Today's post comes from Garrison Redd, who shares how his Google Home Mini helped him regain independence, and how it can improve the lives of people living with paralysis.

It’s been nearly 20 years since my life changed—that’s two decades of learning to navigate life in a wheelchair. There are many obstacles for people living with paralysis, so I have to find creative ways to get things done. While I’m more independent than most, there have been times when I couldn’t join my friends for a drink because the bar had steep steps. Or I’ve been on a date where there wasn’t space between tables so everyone had to get up and cause a commotion. 

But some of the greatest challenges and hurdles I face are at home. When you’re paralyzed, your home goes from being a place of comfort and security to a reminder of what you’ve lost. Light switches and thermostats are usually too high up on the wall and, if my phone falls on the floor, I may not be able to call a friend or family member if I need help. These may seem like simple annoyances but, to members of the paralysis community, they reinforce the lack of control and limitations we often face.

This changed when the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation and Google Nest started a project to understand how technology can benefit people living with paralysis. Google Nest is providing up to 100,000 Google Home Minis to help them. I’ve been using mine for a few months, and it’s helped me control my environment, gain more independence, and have a little fun—all with my voice. 

If you’re not familiar with Mini, it’s a small and mighty smart speaker that gives you help when you need it. The first thing I did was connect Mini to my Nest Thermostat (the one that’s a tad too high). "Hey Google, turn down the thermostat" is especially useful these days in the summer heat. I’m training for the 2020 Paralympic Games as a powerlifter for Team USA, so I use my Mini to set alarms, manage my training schedule, and even make grocery lists. Music is a huge motivator for me, and with Mini, I listen to Spotify playlists and get pumped up before a workout. 

I can have fun with my Mini, too. I’ve tried my hand at trivia by saying, “Hey Google, let’s play lucky trivia.” I’ve dropped a beat with “Hey Google, beat box,” and I enjoy listening to my Google Play audiobooks. And, on a serious note, I know that if I need help but cannot reach my phone, I can use my Mini to call my mom or cousin using only my voice. 

29 years ago today, the Americans with Disabilities Act passed landmark legislation making public spaces more accessible for everyone. Unfortunately, the world isn’t flat and there are still many obstacles for people living with paralysis. I'm hopeful that Google Nest can help more people make their homes that much easier to navigate, just as it has for me. 

Individuals living with paralysis and their caregivers can sign up to get a little help around the home with a Google Home Mini—here’s how you can find out if you’re eligible. If you’d like to help through a donation, you can ask your Assistant, “Hey Google, donate to the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation.” Through your voice, you can offer a little bit of help that will go a long way. 


For individuals with paralysis, Google Nest gives help at home

Editor’s note: Today's post comes from Garrison Redd, who shares how his Google Home Mini helped him regain independence, and how it can improve the lives of people living with paralysis.

It’s been nearly 20 years since my life changed—that’s two decades of learning to navigate life in a wheelchair. There are many obstacles for people living with paralysis, so I have to find creative ways to get things done. While I’m more independent than most, there have been times when I couldn’t join my friends for a drink because the bar had steep steps. Or I’ve been on a date where there wasn’t space between tables so everyone had to get up and cause a commotion. 

But some of the greatest challenges and hurdles I face are at home. When you’re paralyzed, your home goes from being a place of comfort and security to a reminder of what you’ve lost. Light switches and thermostats are usually too high up on the wall and, if my phone falls on the floor, I may not be able to call a friend or family member if I need help. These may seem like simple annoyances but, to members of the paralysis community, they reinforce the lack of control and limitations we often face.

This changed when the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation and Google Nest started a project to understand how technology can benefit people living with paralysis. Google Nest is providing up to 100,000 Google Home Minis to help them. I’ve been using mine for a few months, and it’s helped me control my environment, gain more independence, and have a little fun—all with my voice. 

If you’re not familiar with Mini, it’s a small and mighty smart speaker that gives you help when you need it. The first thing I did was connect Mini to my Nest Thermostat (the one that’s a tad too high). "Hey Google, turn down the thermostat" is especially useful these days in the summer heat. I’m training for the 2020 Paralympic Games as a powerlifter for Team USA, so I use my Mini to set alarms, manage my training schedule, and even make grocery lists. Music is a huge motivator for me, and with Mini, I listen to Spotify playlists and get pumped up before a workout. 

I can have fun with my Mini, too. I’ve tried my hand at trivia by saying, “Hey Google, let’s play lucky trivia.” I’ve dropped a beat with “Hey Google, beat box,” and I enjoy listening to my Google Play audiobooks. And, on a serious note, I know that if I need help but cannot reach my phone, I can use my Mini to call my mom or cousin using only my voice. 

29 years ago today, the Americans with Disabilities Act passed landmark legislation making public spaces more accessible for everyone. Unfortunately, the world isn’t flat and there are still many obstacles for people living with paralysis. I'm hopeful that Google Nest can help more people make their homes that much easier to navigate, just as it has for me. 

Individuals living with paralysis and their caregivers can sign up to get a little help around the home with a Google Home Mini—here’s how you can find out if you’re eligible. If you’d like to help through a donation, you can ask your Assistant, “Hey Google, donate to the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation.” Through your voice, you can offer a little bit of help that will go a long way.