Tag Archives: peer bonus

Peer Bonus Experiences: The many ways in which you can contribute to open source

Recently, I was awarded a Google Open Source Peer Bonus, which I’m grateful for, as it proved to me that one can contribute value to open source projects, and build a career in it, without extensive experience coding. So how can someone with limited coding skills like me contribute to open source in a meaningful way?

Documentation

Documentation is important across open source and especially helpful to those who are new to a project! Developers and maintainers of projects are often focused on fixing bugs and improving the software. Therefore, documentation is harder to prioritize, so contributions to documentation are highly appreciated. Being experienced with applications won’t always help you in writing the documentation, since familiarity can cause you to miss a step when creating the doc. This is why, as a beginner, you are in an excellent position to ensure that instructions and step-by-step guides are easy to follow, don’t skip vital steps, and don’t use off-putting language.

If you have the opportunity to get involved in programs like Season of Docs as a mentor or a participant, as I did in 2019, the experience is hugely rewarding!

Events and Conferences

If you can help with mailing lists or organizing events, you can get involved in the community! In 2006, I became involved with the nascent Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo), where I was persuaded to set up a local chapter in the United Kingdom (going strong 14 years later!). It was one of the best things I could’ve done. This year we hosted a global conference (FOSS4G) and several UK events, including an online-only event. We’ve also managed to financially support a number of open source projects by providing an annual sponsorship, or by contributing to the funding of a specific improvement. I’ve met so many great people through my involvement in OSGeo, some of which have become colleagues and good friends.
The group meeting at FOSS4G 2013 in NottinghamAdd caption

If you’re interested in writing case studies, you can always speak about your experiences at conferences. Evidence that particular packages can be used successfully in real-world situations are incredibly valuable, and can help others put together business cases for considering an open source solution.

Assisting others

Sometimes the problems you face with technology can be experienced by money, and by open-sourcing your solution you could be impacting a lot of people. When I first started using open source software, the packages I needed were often hard to install and configure on Windows, having to be started using the command prompt, which can be intimidating for beginners. To scratch a problem-solving itch, I packaged them up onto a USB stick, added some batch files to make them load properly from an external drive, added a little menu for starting them, and Portable GIS was born. After 12 years, a few iterations, a website and a GitLab repository, it has been downloaded thousands of times, and is used in situations such as disaster relief, where installing lots of software rapidly on often old PCs is not really an option.

Mentoring Others

Once you are proficient in something, use your knowledge to help others. Some existing platforms for software use and development (online repositories like GitHub or GitLab) are extremely intimidating to new users, and create barriers to participation. If you can help people get over the fear-inducing first pull request, you will empower them to keep on contributing. My first pull request was a contribution to the Vaguely Rude Place-names map back in 2013 and since then I’ve run few training events along a similar line at conferences.

Open source is now fundamental to my career—16 years after learning about it—and something I am truly passionate about. It has shaped my life in many ways. I hope that my experiences might help someone who isn’t versed in code to get involved, realizing that their contributions are equally as valuable as bug fixes and patches.

By Jo Cook, Astun Technology—Guest Author

Peer Bonus Experiences: Building tiny models for the ML community with TensorFlow

Almost all the current state-of-the-art machine learning (ML) models take quite a lot of disk space. This makes them particularly inefficient in production situations. A bulky machine learning model can be exposed as a REST API and hosted on cloud services, but that same bulk may lead to hefty infrastructure costs. And some applications may need to operate in low-bandwidth environments, making cloud-hosted models less practical.

In a perfect world, your models would live alongside your application, saving data transfer costs and complying with any regulatory requirements restricting what data can be sent to the cloud. But storing multi-gigabyte models on today’s devices just isn’t practical. The field of on-device ML is dedicated to the development of tools and techniques to produce tiny—yet high performing!—ML models. Progress has been slow, but steady!

There has never been a better time to learn about on-device ML and successfully apply it in your own projects. With frameworks like TensorFlow Lite, you have an exceptional toolset to optimize your bulky models while retaining as much performance as possible. TensorFlow Lite also makes it very easy for mobile application developers to integrate ML models with tools like metadata and ML Model Binding, Android codegen, and others.

What is TensorFlow Lite?

“TensorFlow Lite is a production ready, cross-platform framework for deploying ML on mobile devices and embedded systems.” - TensorFlow Youtube

TensorFlow Lite provides first-class support for Native Android and iOS-based integrations (with many additional features, such as delegates). TensorFlow Lite also supports other tiny computing platforms, such as microcontrollers. TensorFlow Lite’s optimization APIs produce world-class, fast, and well-performing machine learning models.

Venturing into TensorFlow Lite

Last year, I started playing around with TensorFlow Lite while developing projects for Raspberry Pi for Computer Vision, using the official documentation and this course to fuel my initial learning. Following this interest, I decided to join a voluntary working group focused on creating sample applications, writing out tutorials, and creating tiny models. This working group consists of individuals from different backgrounds passionate about teaching on-device machine learning to others. The group is coordinated by Khanh LeViet (TensorFlow Lite team) and Hoi Lam (Android ML team). This is by far one of the most active working groups I have ever seen. And, back in our starting days, Khanh proposed a few different state-of-art machine learning models that were great fits for on-device machine learning:

These ideas were enough for us to start spinning up Jupyter notebooks and VSCode. After months of work, we now have strong collaborations between machine learning GDEs and a bunch of different TensorFlow Lite models, sample applications, and tutorials for the community to learn from. Our collaborations have been fueled by the power of open source and all the tiny models that we have built together are available on TensorFlow Hub. There are numerous open source applications that we have built that demonstrate how to use these models.
The Cartoonizer model cartoonizes uploaded images

Margaret and I co-authored an end-to-end tutorial that was published from the official TensorFlow blog and published the TensorFlow Lite models on TensorFlow Hub. So far, the response we have received for this work has been truly mesmerizing. I’ve also shared my experiences with TensorFlow Lite in these blog posts and conference talks:

A Tale of Model Quantization in TF Lite
Plunging into Model Pruning in Deep Learning
A few good stuff in TF Lite
Doing more with TF Lite
Model Optimization 101

The power of collaboration

The working group is a tremendous opportunity for machine learning GDEs, Googlers, and passionate community individuals to collaborate and learn. We get to learn together, create together, and celebrate the joy of teaching others. I am immensely thankful, grateful, and humbled to be a part of this group. Lastly, I would like to wholeheartedly thank Khanh for being a pillar of support to us and for nominating me for the Google Open Source Peer Bonus Award.

By Sayak Paul, PyImageSearch—Guest Author

Announcing the latest Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners!

We are very pleased to announce the latest Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners!

The Google Open Source Peer Bonus program rewards external open source contributors nominated by Googlers for their exceptional contributions to open source. Historically, the program was primarily focused on rewarding developers. Over the years the program has evolved—rewarding not just software engineers contributors from every part of open source—including technical writers, user experience and graphic designers, community managers and marketers, mentors and educators, ops and security experts. 


This time around we have 90 winners from an impressive number of countries—24—spread across five continents: Australia, Austria, Canada, China, Costa Rica, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, India, Italy, Japan, Mozambique, New Zealand, Nigeria, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Uganda, United Kingdom, and the United States.

Although the majority of recipients in this round were recognized for their code contributions, more than 40% of the successful nominations included tooling work, community work, and documentation. (Some contributors were recognized for their work in more than one area.)

Below is the list of current winners who gave us permission to thank them publicly:
WinnerProject
Xihan LiA Concise Handbook of TensorFlow 2
Alain SchlesserAMP Plugin for WordPress
Pierre GordonAMP Plugin for WordPress
Catherine HouleAMP Project
Quyen Le HoangANGLE
Kamil BregulaApache Airflow
László Kiss Kollárauditwheel/manylinux
Jack NeusChrome OS Release Branching tool
Fabian Hennekechromium
Matt GodboltCompiler Explorer
Sumeet Pawnikarcoreboot
Hal Sekicovid19
Derek ParkerDelve
Alessandro ArzilliDelve
Matthias SohnEclipse Foundation
Luca MilanesioEclipse Foundation
João Távoraeglot
Brad Cowiefaucetsdn
Harri HohteriFirebase
Rosário Pereira FernandesFirebase
Peter SteinbergerFirebase iOS, CocoaPods
Eduardo SilvaFluent Bit
Matthias SohnGerrit Code Review
Marco MillerGerrit Code Review
Camilla LöwyGLFW
Akim DemailleGNU Bison
Josh Bleecher SnyderGo
Alex BrainmanGo
Richard MusiolGo
Roger PeppeGo, CUE, gohack
Daniel MartíGo, CUE, many individual repo.
Juan LinietskyGodot Engine
Maddy MyersGoogle Research Open-COVID-19-Data
Pontus Leitzlergovim, gopls
Paul Jollygovim, gopls
Parul RahejaGround
Pau FreixesgRPC
Marius BrehlerIREE
George Nachmaniterm2
Kenji Urushimajsrsasign
Jacques ChesterKNative
Markus ThömmesKnative Serving
Savitha RaghunathanKubernetes
David Andersonlibdwarf
Florian WestphalLinux kernel
Jonas Bernoullimagit
Hugo van KemenadeMany open-source Python projects
Jeff LockhartMaps SDK for Android Utility Library
Claude VervoortMoodle
Jared McNeillNetBSD
Nao Yonashironginx-sxg-module
Geoffrey BoothNode.js
Gus CaplanNode.js
Guy BedfordNode.js
Samson GoddyOpen Source Community Africa
Daniel DylaOpenTelemetry
Leighton ChenOpenTelemetry
Shivkanya AndhareOpenTelemetry
Bartlomiej ObecnyOpenTelemetry
Philipp WagnerOpenTitan, Ibex, CocoTB
Srijan ReddyOppia
Chris SOppia
Bastien GuerryOrg mode
Gary KramlichPidgin Lead Developer
Hassan Kibirigeplotnine
Abigail DogbePyLadies Ghana
David HewittPyO3
Yuji KanagawaPyO3
Mannie YoungPython Ghana
Alex BradburyRISC-V LLVM, Ibex, OpenTitan
Lukas Taegert-AtkinsonRollup.js
Sanil RautShaka Packager
Richard Hallowsstylelint
Luke EdwardsSvelte and Node Libraries
Zoe CarverSwift Programming Language
Nick LockwoodSwiftFormat
Priti DesaiTekton
Sayak PaulTensorFlow
Lukas GeigerTensorFlow
Margaret Maynard-ReidTensorFlow
Gabriel de MarmiesseTensorFlow Addons
Jared MorganThe Good Docs Project
Jo CookThe Good Docs Project, GeoNetwork, Portable GIS, Various Open Source Geospatial Foundation communities
Ricky Mulyawan SuryadiTink JNI Examples
Nicholas MarriottTmux
Michael Tüxenusrsctp
Seth BrenithV8
Ramya RaoVS Code Go
Philipp HanckeWebRTC
Jason DonenfeldWireGuard
Congratulations to our winners! We look forward to your continued support and contributions to open source!

By Maria Tabak and Erin McKean, Program Managers – Google Open Source Programs Office

Announcing the 2020 first quarter Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners

We are very pleased to announce the latest Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners and their projects.

The Google Open Source Peer Bonus rewards external open source contributors nominated by Googlers for their exceptional contributions to open source. Historically, the program was primarily focused on rewarding developers. Over the years the program has evolved—rewarding not just software engineers but all types of contributors—including technical writers, user experience and graphic designers, community managers and marketers, mentors and educators, ops and security experts. 

In support of diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives worldwide, we had decided to devote this cycle to amazing women in open source, especially since it coincided with celebrating International Women’s Day on March 8. We are very excited and pleased to share the following statistics with you.

We have 56 winners this cycle representing 17 countries all over the world: Australia, Belgium, Canada, Estonia, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Netherlands, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States.

Even though the cycle was open to ALL contributors, the number of female nominees went up from 8% to 25% in comparison to the previous cycle. That’s an amazing number celebrating amazing women!

Also, we are very pleased to see the number of docs contributors increase from 7% to 15%. Documentation is the #1 factor for project adoption, so this shift is very important and encouraging. To strengthen this trend and emphasize the importance of documentation in open source, the next cycle will be devoted (but not limited!) to docs contributors.

Below is the list of current winners who gave us permission to thank them publicly:
WinnerProject
Matt Mower
AMP HTML
Sergey Zakharov
Android Open Source Project
Pawel Kozlowski
Angular
Jakob Homan
Apache Airflow, Apache Kafka, Apache Hadoop
Chad Dombrova
Apache Beam
Myrle Krantz
Apache Software Foundation - Diversity and Inclusion committee + board
Katia Rojas
Apache Software Foundation Outreachy Program
Greg Hesp
assistant-relay
Beka Westberg
Blockly
Siebrand Mazeland
Blockly Games
Dave Mielke
BRLTTY
Vijay Hiremath
Chromium; platform/ec
Daniel Stenberg
curl / libcurl
Simon Binder
Dart build system
Aloďs Deniel
device_preview
Fatima Sarah Khalid
Drupal
Gregory Popovitch
Filament
Amr Yousef
Flutter
Remi Rousselet
Flutter
Pooja Bhaumik
Flutter
Elijah Newren
Git
Roger Peppe
Go
Oleksandr Porunov
JanusGraph
Tim Bannister
Kubernetes
June Yi
Kubernetes
Karen Bradshaw
Kubernetes
James Le Cuirot
leptonica
Stefan Weil
leptonica
Egor Pugin
leptonica
Bert Frees
LibLouis
Christian Egli
LibLouis
Richard Hughes
Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS)
James (purpleidea)
mgmt
Mike Ryan
NgRx
Stefano Bonicatti
osquery
Alyssa Rosenzweig
panfrost
Carol Willing
Project Jupyter
Mariatta Wijaya
Python programming language
Alexander Neumann
restic
Nicholas Jamieson
rxjs (core member), rxjs-tslint-rules, rxjs-etc, ts-action
Kate Temkin
Several, mostly educational (see in Reasons)
Alyssa Ross
SpectrumOS / Nix
Rosalind Benoit
Spinnaker
Brian Le
Spinnaker
Vincent Demeester
Tekton
Chmouel Boudjnah
Tekton
Andrea Frittoli
Tekton
Simon Kaegi
Tekton
Cameron Shorter
The Good Docs Project
Ando Saabas
TreeInterpreter
Daz Wilkin
Trillian, Prometheus Exporter for GCP, KeyTransparency , OpenCensus
Gerrit Birkeland
typedoc
Wilson Snyder
Verilator
Thomas Oster
VisiCut
Koen Kanters
zigbee2mqtt
Jia Li
Zone.js
Congratulations to our winners! We look forward to your continued support and contributions to open source!

By Maria Tabak, Google Open Source

Announcing the 2020 first quarter Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners

We are very pleased to announce the latest Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners and their projects.

The Google Open Source Peer Bonus rewards external open source contributors nominated by Googlers for their exceptional contributions to open source. Historically, the program was primarily focused on rewarding developers. Over the years the program has evolved—rewarding not just software engineers but all types of contributors—including technical writers, user experience and graphic designers, community managers and marketers, mentors and educators, ops and security experts. 

In support of diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives worldwide, we had decided to devote this cycle to amazing women in open source, especially since it coincided with celebrating International Women’s Day on March 8. We are very excited and pleased to share the following statistics with you.

We have 56 winners this cycle representing 17 countries all over the world: Australia, Belgium, Canada, Estonia, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Netherlands, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States.

Even though the cycle was open to ALL contributors, the number of female nominees went up from 8% to 25% in comparison to the previous cycle. That’s an amazing number celebrating amazing women!

Also, we are very pleased to see the number of docs contributors increase from 7% to 15%. Documentation is the #1 factor for project adoption, so this shift is very important and encouraging. To strengthen this trend and emphasize the importance of documentation in open source, the next cycle will be devoted (but not limited!) to docs contributors.

Below is the list of current winners who gave us permission to thank them publicly:
WinnerProject
Matt Mower
AMP HTML
Sergey Zakharov
Android Open Source Project
Pawel Kozlowski
Angular
Jakob Homan
Apache Airflow, Apache Kafka, Apache Hadoop
Chad Dombrova
Apache Beam
Myrle Krantz
Apache Software Foundation - Diversity and Inclusion committee + board
Katia Rojas
Apache Software Foundation Outreachy Program
Greg Hesp
assistant-relay
Beka Westberg
Blockly
Siebrand Mazeland
Blockly Games
Dave Mielke
BRLTTY
Vijay Hiremath
Chromium; platform/ec
Daniel Stenberg
curl / libcurl
Simon Binder
Dart build system
Aloďs Deniel
device_preview
Fatima Sarah Khalid
Drupal
Gregory Popovitch
Filament
Amr Yousef
Flutter
Remi Rousselet
Flutter
Pooja Bhaumik
Flutter
Elijah Newren
Git
Roger Peppe
Go
Oleksandr Porunov
JanusGraph
Tim Bannister
Kubernetes
June Yi
Kubernetes
Karen Bradshaw
Kubernetes
James Le Cuirot
leptonica
Stefan Weil
leptonica
Egor Pugin
leptonica
Bert Frees
LibLouis
Christian Egli
LibLouis
Richard Hughes
Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS)
James (purpleidea)
mgmt
Mike Ryan
NgRx
Stefano Bonicatti
osquery
Alyssa Rosenzweig
panfrost
Carol Willing
Project Jupyter
Mariatta Wijaya
Python programming language
Alexander Neumann
restic
Nicholas Jamieson
rxjs (core member), rxjs-tslint-rules, rxjs-etc, ts-action
Kate Temkin
Several, mostly educational (see in Reasons)
Alyssa Ross
SpectrumOS / Nix
Rosalind Benoit
Spinnaker
Brian Le
Spinnaker
Vincent Demeester
Tekton
Chmouel Boudjnah
Tekton
Andrea Frittoli
Tekton
Simon Kaegi
Tekton
Cameron Shorter
The Good Docs Project
Ando Saabas
TreeInterpreter
Daz Wilkin
Trillian, Prometheus Exporter for GCP, KeyTransparency , OpenCensus
Gerrit Birkeland
typedoc
Wilson Snyder
Verilator
Thomas Oster
VisiCut
Koen Kanters
zigbee2mqtt
Jia Li
Zone.js
Congratulations to our winners! We look forward to your continued support and contributions to open source!

By Maria Tabak, Google Open Source

Announcing the 2019 second cycle Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners


We are happy to announce the 2019 second cycle winners of the Google Open Source Peer Bonus! This cohort represents the largest number of winners to date, with 115 awardees from 26 countries, including: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, Colombia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Mexico, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States.

The Google Open Source Peer Bonus is an award for open source contributors that are not employed by Google, but nominated by Googlers for their exceptional contributions to open source. Initially, the program began as a way to reward developers; however, has evolved into one that supports all contributors of open source from technical writers and designers to operations.

Below is the list of winners who gave us permission to thank them publicly:
WinnerOpen Source Project
Miina SikkAMP Plugin for WordPress, AMP Stories
Ryan KienstraAMP Plugin for WordPress, AMP Stories
Joost KoehoornAngular
Ash Berlin-TaylorApache Airflow
Jarek PotiukApache Airflow
Kamil BregulaApache Airflow
Ismael Mejia Apache Beam, Avro
Jose FonsecaAPITrace
Lars Zawallich Appleseed
Maximilian Michels Beam, Flink
Roman Lebedevbenchmark
Ben Manes Caffeine
Yang Luocasbin; npcap; nmap
Sedat DilekClangBuiltLinux
Nathan ChancellorClangBuiltLinux
Pablo Galindo Salgado CPython
Karthikeyan Singaravelan CPython
Tobe OsakweDart build system
Drew Banin DBT
Michael Johnson Discourse - Google+ Import Script
Philip Rebohledxvk
Mike Blandforder9x/ersky9x radio firmware
Simon EdwardsExtraterm
Ethan LeeFNA, FAudio, SDL2
Vasco Asturianoforce-graph
Alexandre AlapetiteFreshRSS
Jenny Bryan gargle: an R package for calling Google APIs from R, including auth.
Patrick Mulhall Gerrit Code Review
Gert van Dijk Gerrit Code Review
Rafael Ascensão Git
Arnold RobbinsGNU awk
Alberto DonizettiGo
Alessandro ArzilliGo
Tobias Klauser Go
Emmanuel Odeke Go
Brian KesslerGo
Giovanni Bajo Go compiler
Glenn Lewis go-github
Cedric Staub go-jose
Paul Jollygo-tools
Daniel Martígo-tools
Dominik Honnefgo-tools
Mulr Mandersgo-tools
Billie Cleek go-tools
Ramya Raogo-tools
John Paton Google Cloud Python client libraries and Pandas GBQ
Krystian Kuźniarekgoogletest
Gernot VormayrGoPacket
Johan Brandhorstgrpc-gateway
Mike JumperGuacamole
Willy TarreauHAProxy
Mike McQuaid HomeBrew
Joachim ViideHTM
Serguei Bezverkhinftables
Kalle PerssonInbox Theme for Gmail
Artem Gusevios-webkit-debug-proxy
Morven CaoIstio Operator
Karol LassakJenkins GCE plugin
Sebastien Goasguen Knative
Joan Edwards Knative
Markus ThömmesKnative
Ashleigh BrennanKnative
Cornelius WeigKrew
Josh BottumKubeflow
Kam Kasravikubeflow/kubeflow, kubeflow/manifests
Rune Mehlsenlit-analyzer
Roman LebedevLLVM
Jonas BernoulliMagit
Jaeyoung TaeMaterial Components Web/Material Components Web React
Maximilian Hilsmitmproxy
Brijesh Bittumonaco-vim
Rich Felker musl
Tim NeutkensNext.js
Gordon Lyonnmap
Ryan Gordon Numerous open source games and engines
Carlos Alberto CortezOpenTelemetry
Roch Devost OpenTelemetry
Ted Young OpenTelemetry
Joshua MacDonald OpenTelemetry/opentelemetry-go
Daniel KhanOpenTelemetry
Brandon Gonzalez OpenTelemetry
Valentin Marchaud OpenTelemetry and OpenCensus
Olivier Albertini OpenTelemetry and OpenCensus
Armin Ruech OpenTelemetry-Java
Tyler Benson OpenTelemetry-Java
Paulo Janotti OpenTelemetry-Service
Akshay Anand Oppia
James MarcaOR-Tools
Max DymondOSS-Fuzz
Ignazio Palmisano OWL API
Marcos Caceres Payment Request API
Jovi De Croock Preact
Leah UllmannPreact
Hervé Bredinpyannote
Tomohiko KinebuchiPython official document Japanese translation project
Gabriela de Queiroz R
Baldur KarlssonRenderDoc
Fabian HennekeSecure Shell
Sam AaronSonic Pi
Greg Roth Spiregg (SPIR-V Backend in DirectXShaderCompiler)
Erica SadunSwift Evolution
Sean Morgantensorflow/addons
Yong Tangtensorflow/io
Shree KumarTesseract
Seth Larson urllib3
Michael Tüxenusrsctp
Felix Weinrankusrsctp
Qiuyi ZhangV8
Sébastien HelleuWeechat
Wesley Shields YARA
Congratulations to the winners! Open source is a shared effort that is only possible with everyone’s commitment to build better solutions for the world. Thank you for partnering with us in this mission. We look forward to more collaborations in the months to come!

By María Cruz, Google Open Source

Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners are here!

At Google we’ve always used open source to innovate, build amazing products, and bring better technology to the world. We also enjoy being part of the community and are always looking for ways to give back.

In 2011 we launched the Google Open Source Peer Bonus program with the goal of supporting the ecosystem and sustainability of open source by rewarding external developers for their contributions to open source projects. Over the years the program has grown and expanded. Now we reward not just software developers but all types of contributors, including technical writers, user experience and graphic designers, community managers and marketers, mentors and educators, ops and security experts.

We are very pleased to announce the latest Google Open Source Peer Bonus Winners and their projects. We have a record number of 90 recipients this cycle representing 20 countries all over the world: Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, Ukraine and USA.

Below is the list of projects and awardees who gave us permission to thank them publicly:
Name Project Name Project
Cyril TovenaAgonesVincent DemeesterKnative Build Pipeline
Rebecca CloseAMPHTMLNader Ziadaknative/build
Leon TanAMPHTMLJim AngelKubernetes
Wassim CheghamAngularZach ArnoldKubernetes
Paul GschwendtnerAngular MaterialSerguei BezverkhiKubernetes
Maxim KoretskyiAngular-in-depth blogDamini Satya KammakomatiKubernetes
Kaxil NaikApache AirflowJennifer RondeauKubernetes
Kohei SutouApache ArrowMichael FrombergerKythe
Matthias BaetensApache BeamMark BrownLinux kernel
Lukazs GajowyApache BeamLuis ChamberlainLinux Kernel
Suneel MarthiApache BeamTetsuo HandaLinux kernel
Maximilian MichelsApache BeamTakashi IwaiLinux kernel
Alex Van BoxelApache BeamHeiko StuebnerLinux Kernel
Thomas WeiseApache BeamCong WangLinux kernel
Julian HydeApache CalciteRichard HughesLinux Vendor Firmware Service
Lan SunApache GroovyAaron PuchertLLVM/ Clang
Campion FellinApps Script CLI – ClaspOrne BrocaarLoRa Server
Nicolò RibaudoBabelGraeme RocherMicronaut
Rong Jie LooBazelAnders F Björklundminikube
Dave MielkeBRLTTYIskren ChernevMoment JS
Raphael Kubo da CostaChromiumTim DeschryverNgRx
Mike BanoncorebootBrandon RobertsNgRx
Elyes HaouascorebootEelco DolstraNixOS
Angel PonscorebootGuy BedfordNode.js
Ansgar BurchardtDebianYaw AnokwaOpen Data Kit
Chris LambDebian's Reproducible BuildsAndreas BartelsOpen Location Code
Zach LeathermaneleventyWes McKinneypandas
Vladimir GlavnyyFlatBuffersPradyun Gedampip
Alexandre ArdhuinFlutterMarvin Hagemeisterpreact
Kyle WongFlutterAndre Wigginspreact
Duncan LyallForseti SecurityChris Rocheprotoc-gen-validate (PGV)
Ross ScroggsGAM (Google Apps Manager)Ernest DurbinPython Package Index (PyPI)
Gert van DijkGerritRamon Santamariaraylib
Luca MilanesioGerrit Code ReviewAleksa SarairunC
David OstrovskyGerrit Code ReviewCornelius Weigskaffold
David PursehouseGerrit Code ReviewAnton Lindqvistsyzkaller
Matthias SohnGerrit Code ReviewZdenko PodobnýTesseract
Derrick StoleeGitKeqiu HuTonY
Roman LebedevGoogle BenchmarkBasarat Ali SyedTypeScript Deep Dive (book)
Florent Revestgooglecartographer/cartographer_rosPeter WongV8
Kirill KatsnelsongRPCKevin MurrayVerilog to Routing
Eddie KohlerhotcrpDarrell CommanderVirtualGL
Daniel-Constantin MierlaKamailioLin ClarkWasi + Wasmtime
Philipp CrocollKeepass2Android Password SafeSébastien HelleuWeechat
Shashwathi ReddyKnative buildWesley ShieldsYara
Congratulations to our recipients! We look forward to your continued support and contributions to open source!

By Maria Tabak, Google Open Source