Monthly Archives: June 2014

2014 Scholar Metrics released

Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2014 version of Scholar Metrics. This release is based on citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of mid-June 2014 and covers articles published in 2009–2013.

Scholar Metrics include journal articles from websites that follow our inclusion guidelines, selected conference articles in Computer Science & Electrical Engineering and preprints from arXiv, SSRN, NBER, and RePEc. As in previous releases, publications with fewer than 100 articles in the covered period, or publications that received no citations are not included.

You can browse publications in 8 broad areas like Physics & Mathematics or Life Sciences & Earth Sciences as well as 253 specific categories such as Physical Education & Sports Medicine or Plasma & Fusion. You will see the top 20 publications ordered by their five-year h-index and h-median metrics. To see which articles in a publication were cited the most and who cited them, click on its h-index number. To see the list of categories in an area, click on the area and then click on “Subcategories”.

Scholar Metrics also includes a large number of journals beyond those listed on the per-category pages. You can find these by typing words from the title in the search box, e.g., [Otorrinolaringologia].

In this release, we have discontinued seven categories that either had too few publications or that fully overlapped with other categories: Microscopy, European Studies, Circadian Rhythms & Sleep, Real-time & Embedded Systems, Back & Spine Health, Lipids, and Cryogenics & Refrigeration. Publications in these categories can now be found in other categories or by searching for words in their titles, e.g., [sleep], [microscopy].

For more details, see the Scholar Metrics help page.

Posted by: Helder Suzuki, Software Engineer

Android L Developer Preview and Android Studio Beta

By Jamal Eason, Product Manager, Android

At the Google I/O keynote yesterday we announced the L Developer Preview — a development version of an upcoming Android release. The Developer Preview lets you explore features and capabilities of the L release and get started developing and testing on the new platform. You can take a look at the developer features and APIs in the API Overview page.

Starting today, the L Developer Preview is available for download from the L Developer Preview site. We're also announcing that Android Studio is now in beta, and making great progress toward a full release.

Let’s take a deeper dive into what’s included in the preview and what it means for you as a developer as you prepare your apps for the next Android release.

What’s in the L Developer Preview

The L Developer Preview includes updated SDK tools, system images for testing on an emulator, and system images for testing on a Nexus 5 or Nexus 7 device.

You can download these components through the Android SDK Manager:

  • L Developer Preview SDK Tools
  • L Developer Preview Emulator System Image - 32-bit (64-bit experimental emulator image coming soon)
  • L Developer Preview Emulator System Image for Android TV (32-bit)

(Note: the full release of Android Wear is a part of Android KitKat, API Level 20. Read more about Android Wear development here.)

Today, we are also providing system image downloads for these Nexus devices to help with your testing as well:

  • Nexus 5 (GSM/LTE) “hammerhead” Device System Image
  • Nexus 7 [2013] - (Wifi) “razor” Device System Image

You can download both of these system images from the L Developer Preview site.

With the SDK Tools, and Nexus device images, you can get a head start on testing out your app on the latest Android platform months before the official launch. You can use the extra lead time to take advantage of all the new app features and APIs in your apps. The Nexus device images can help you with testing, but keep in mind that they are meant for development purposes only and should not be used on a production device.

Notes on APIs and publishing

The L Developer Preview is a development release and does not have a standard API level. The APIs are not final, and you can expect minor API changes over time.

To ensure a great user experience and broad compatibility, you can not publish versions of your app to Google Play that are compiled against L Developer Preview. Apps built for L Developer Preview will have to wait until the full official launch to publish on Google Play.

Android Studio Beta

To help you develop your apps for the upcoming Android version and for new Android device types, we’re also happy to announce Android Studio Beta. Android Studio Beta helps you develop apps by enabling you to:

  • Incorporate the new material design and interaction elements of the L Developer Preview SDK
  • Quickly create and build apps with a new app wizard and layout editor support for Android Wear and Android TV

Building on top of the build variants and flavors features we introduced last year, the Android Studio build system now supports creating multiple apks, such as for devices like Android Wear. You can try out all the new features with the L Developer Preview by downloading the Android Studio Beta today.

How to get started

To get started with the L Developer Preview and prepare your apps for the full release, just follow these steps:

  1. Try out Android Studio Beta
  2. Visit the L Developer Preview site
  3. Explore the new APIs
  4. Enable the material theme and try out material design on your apps
  5. Get the emulator system images through the SDK Manager or download the Nexus device system images.
  6. Test your app on the new Android Runtime (ART) with your device or emulator
  7. Give us feedback

As you use the new developer features and APIs in the L Developer Preview, we encourage you to give us your feedback using the L Developer Preview Issue Tracker. During the developer preview period, we aim to incorporate your feedback into our new APIs and adjust features as best as we can.

You can get all the latest downloads, documentation, and tools information from the L Developer Preview site on developer.android.com. You can also check our Android Developer Preview Google+ page for updates and information.

We hope you try the L Developer Preview as you start building the next generation of amazing Android user experiences.

Get it on Google Play

Segmenting Brand and Generic Paid Search Traffic in Google Analytics

Many advertisers with paid search campaigns advertise on queries mentioning their brand (e.g., “Motorola smartphone” for Motorola) and also on generic searches (e.g., “smartphone reviews”). Because the performance metrics for ads shown against brand and generic queries can be vastly different, many advertisers prefer to analyze these two groups separately.  For example, all else being equal, searches containing the advertiser’s brand name often have higher clickthrough-rates than those that don’t.

Automatic classification


To make analysis of brand and generic performance as easy as possible, we’re introducing a new feature which automatically identifies brand-aware paid search clicks tracked in Google Analytics. We use a combination of signals (including the clickthrough-rate, text string, domain name and others) to identify query terms which show awareness of your brand.  You can review our suggested brand terms and then accept or decline each of them. It’s also easy to add additional brand terms that we’ve missed. 

With the resulting list of brand terms, we classify your paid search traffic in GA so that you can split your “paid search” channel into two separate channels: “brand paid search” and “generic paid search”. This can be done both for Multi-Channel Funnels (for attribution purposes) and for the main Google Analytics channel grouping. See this straightforward step-by-step guide to get started.

Industry feedback

Back in 2012, George Michie from the Rimm-Kaufmann Group, a leading online marketing agency, called analyzing brand and generic paid search together “the cardinal sin of paid search”. We showed him a preview of our new solution and here’s his reaction:

"I've been arguing for many years that advertisers should look at their brand and generic paid search separately. There are massive differences in overall performance - but also in more specific areas, like attribution and new customer acquisition. 

Google Analytics now makes it a lot easier for advertisers to segment brand and generic paid search into separate channels. I'm sure this feature will help many more advertisers measure these important differences - and more importantly, take action on these new insights."

Getting started

Finally: note that this feature works for all paid search advertising, not just Google AdWords. It will roll out to all users in the coming weeks.

To get started, use the step-by-step guide to set up separate brand paid search and generic paid search channels. We’ve already suggested brand terms for every GA view with sufficient paid search traffic.

Posted by: Frank Uyeda, Software Engineer, Google Analytics

Introducing Video Advertising advanced certification on Google Partners

We’re excited to announce that the new Video Advertising advanced certification is now available to all members of Google Partners globally.  

In October 2013 we launched Google Partners – a program that provides agencies with the resources, training and support to help businesses succeed online. Over the last few months, we’ve been looking for more ways to recognize agencies’ specialized knowledge in certain areas of digital advertising.

This new certification is designed to recognize users with expertise in video advertising on YouTube and the Google Display Network and help them share that knowledge with their clients.

Starting today, AdWords certified members of Google Partners can take the Video Advertising exam to earn advanced certification.

To learn more about this advanced certification, please visit the Partners Help Center.

Posted by the Google Partners team


Unlimit your business with Google Drive for Work

Cross-posted from the Google Enterprise Blog.

The workplace is full of files that capture your best ideas or your team’s most productive collaborations. But those files aren’t useful if you’re unable to access or share them effectively. That’s why, just two years ago, we introduced Google Drive. Today more than 190 million people actively use it at home, school and work. Drive keeps all your work safe, and makes it available everywhere and easy to share. Companies around the world like Crate & Barrel, Seagate, Tory Burch, HP and Jaguar Land Rover rely on Drive to work faster and collaborate better with their coworkers and customers.

But we’ve also heard from businesses that they want more control and security, visibility into how files are shared, and a product that will grow with them. So we’ve been working to make Drive even better for business, and today at Google I/O we announced Google Drive for Work — a new premium offering for businesses that includes unlimited storage, advanced audit reporting and new security controls for $10/user/month.



More control, more visibilityGoogle Drive for Work combines the familiar storage, sync and share experience of Google Drive with new admin controls, advanced file audit reporting and eDiscovery services. New fine-grained controls let admins customize the Drive experience, such as which employees can install the desktop sync client. With the new audit view you can see activity like moving, deleting or sharing a file within or outside the company, and an audit API will also be available for developers. Google Apps Vault, our solution for search and discovery for compliance needs, is also included with Drive for Work, expanding to cover all content stored in Drive, including Docs, Sheets and Slides, as well as any other file type.



More than enough space for all your workEvery year companies create more data than the last, adding megabytes, gigabytes and terabytes. Well, today, we’re taking bytes out of the conversation. For $10/user/month, businesses get unlimited storage for all their employees and can store files up to 5 TB in size (To put that in perspective, no desktop or laptop on the market today even has a hard drive big enough to capture and store a file that size).

More securityAs of today, all files uploaded to Google Drive will be encrypted, not only from your device to Google and in transit between Google data centers, but also at rest on Google servers.

More productivitySome of the most common file types stored in Drive are Microsoft Word, Excel® and PowerPoint® files. We’ve now built the power of Quickoffice into Docs, Sheets and Slides, so you can open and edit those documents in their native format using Office Compatibility Mode directly on Android and Chrome browser today, and coming soon to iOS. No need to buy additional software or decide how to open your file. Editing Office files is just a click or tap away from Drive on your computer, tablet or phone.




Ready for your business, available todayGoogle Drive for Work includes the benefits and guarantees of Google Apps for Business, like 24x7 phone support and a 99.9% uptime guarantee. You also get access to all of Google’s productivity apps like Docs, Sheets, Slides, Sites and Hangouts, so you collaborate in even more ways. Drive for Work also offers enterprise-grade security and compliance, including a SSAE 16 / ISAE 3402 Type II, SOC 2-audit, ISO 27001 certification, adherence to the Safe Harbor Privacy Principles, and can support industry-specific requirements like HIPAA.

Drive for Work is available globally, today. If you’re a current Apps customer you can upgrade from the Admin Console to get new features like unlimited storage. If you’re new to using Google at work you can learn more about Google Drive for Work on the web, or contact us for more information. 

Posted by: Scott Johnston, Director of Product Management, Google Drive

Google I/O: Design, Develop, Distribute

By Monica Tran, Head of Developer Marketing

Today at Moscone, we kicked off our 7th annual Google I/O. This year, we’re focusing on three key themes: design, develop, distribute, helping you build your app from start to finish.

It’s been amazing to see how far you’ve come: in fact, since the last Google I/O, we’ve paid developers more than $5 billion, a testament to the experiences you’re creating. In the keynote, we had a number of announcements geared towards meeting the user wherever they go: on the TV, in the car and on your wrist. Below is a taste of some of the goodies we unveiled to help you along the way.

DESIGN

  • Material design — we introduced material design, which uses tactile surfaces, bold graphic design, and fluid motion to create beautiful, intuitive experiences.
  • L-Release of Android, with material design — Bringing material design to Android is a big part of the L-Release of Android: we’ve added the new Material theme (which you can apply to your apps for a new style) and the ability to specify a view’s elevation, allowing you to cast dynamic, real-time shadows in your apps.
  • Bringing material design to Polymer — As a developer, you’ll now have access to all the capabilities of material design via Polymer, bringing tangibility, bold graphics, and animations to your applications on the web, all at 60fps.

DEVELOP

  • Android L Developer Preview — Get extra lead time to make great apps for the next version of Android, with lots of new APIs to make Android simpler and more consistent on screens everywhere
  • Google Play services 5.0 is rolling out worldwide with great new features for developers.
  • Android TV SDK — Explore, learn and build apps and games for the biggest screen in the home. Your hard work will pay off in the fall when Asus, Razer and other partners launch their first Android TV devices.
  • Google Cast SDK — Help users find your content more easily with the improved Google Cast SDK developer console, which lets your app get discovered on chromecast.com/apps and on Google Play.
  • Android Auto SDK coming — Bring your app experience to the car by extending your existing app with Android Auto APIs. Be in millions of cars — with just one app.
  • Google Fit — An open fitness platform giving users control of their fitness data so that developers can focus on building smarter apps and manufacturers can focus on creating amazing devices.
  • Gaming — Learn what's new about Google Play Games and the Android platform to take games to the next level.
  • Google Cloud Platform — Get help with debugging, tracing, and monitoring applications in with new developer productivity tooling. Also, try Cloud Dataflow, a new fully managed service that simplifies the process of creating data pipelines.
  • The new Gmail API — Add Gmail features to your app with RESTful access to threads, messages, labels, drafts and history.
  • Android features for Enterprise — Secure apps and data without complicating the user experience. Build for the enterprise with no changes to the apps you're already developing. Learn more here.

DISTRIBUTE

Get it on Google Play

Restore a user’s Google Drive files

Admins can now restore a given user’s deleted Google Drive files for a specified date range. This helps ensure that, if a user accidentally deletes important files, those files are not permanently lost. The feature pertains to files that have been emptied from the Trash only. Files still in the Trash can be easily recovered by the user.

Release track:
Rapid release and Scheduled release

For more information:
https://support.google.com/a/answer/6052340

whatsnew.googleapps.com
Get these product update alerts by email
Subscribe to the RSS feed of these updates

Better document and image viewing experience in Gmail and Google Drive

We've launched a new version of the UI for viewing documents and images in Gmail and Google Drive to give more focus to the content itself. The tool bar has moved to the top (and disappears when not in use) and the document/image frame is now wider, giving users a more streamlined experience.

Release track:
Rapid release, with Scheduled release coming in two weeks (for Gmail only, changes in Drive will launch to all tracks today)

whatsnew.googleapps.com
Get these product update alerts by email
Subscribe to the RSS feed of these updates

Dedicated desktop home pages for Google Docs, Sheets & Slides

We know that often times you’d like an easier way to return to your most relevant and recently edited documents, spreadsheets, and presentations, no matter what device you’re using. So we created new home screens to help you do that with direct access points for Docs, Sheets & Slides.

To access these home screens, use the following urls:


Release track:
Rapid release (Note: this launch will be rolling out gradually over the coming weeks), with Scheduled release coming soon

For more information:
https://plus.sandbox.google.com/+GoogleDrive/posts/PPEQLd8huvn

whatsnew.googleapps.com
Get these product update alerts by email
Subscribe to the RSS feed of these updates

Edit Microsoft Office files in Chrome and ChromeOS

Google Apps users can now edit Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files directly from Google Drive, Gmail and the new Docs, Sheets and Slides home screens, without needing Microsoft Office. For ChromeOS users, there's nothing to install, it just works. Chrome users for Mac and Windows can install the “Office Editing for Docs, Sheets & Slides” extension and you’re good to go.

Release track:
Rapid release and Scheduled release

For more information:
Help Center Article

whatsnew.googleapps.com
Get these product update alerts by email
Subscribe to the RSS feed of these updates