Tag Archives: student programs

Wrapping up Google Code-in 2017

Today marks the conclusion of the 8th annual Google Code-in (GCI), our contest that teaches teenage students through contributions to open source projects. As with most years, the contest evolved a bit and grew. And it grew. And it doubled. And then it grew some more...
These numbers may increase as mentors finish reviewing the final work submitted by students.
Mentors from each of the 25 open source organizations are now busy reviewing the last of the work submitted by student participants. We’re looking forward to sharing the stats.

Each organization will pick two Grand Prize Winners who will be flown to Northern California to visit Google’s headquarters, enjoy a day of adventure in San Francisco, and meet their mentors and Google engineers.

We’d like to congratulate all of the student participants for challenging themselves and making a contribution to open source in the process! We’d also like to congratulate the mentors for surviving the unusually busy contest.

Further, we’d like to thank the mentors and the organization administrators. They are the heart of this program, volunteering countless hours creating tasks, reviewing student work, and helping students into the world of open source. Mentors teach young students about the many facets of open source development, from community standards and communicating across time zones to version control and testing. We couldn’t run this program without you!

Stay tuned, we’ll be announcing the Grand Prize Winners and Finalists on January 31st.

By Josh Simmons, Google Open Source

Seeking open source projects for Google Summer of Code 2018

Do you lead or represent a free or open source software organization? Are you seeking new contributors? (Who isn’t?) Do you enjoy the challenge and reward of mentoring new developers? Apply to be a mentor organization for Google Summer of Code 2018!

We are seeking open source projects and organizations to participate in the 14th annual Google Summer of Code (GSoC). GSoC is a global program that gets student developers contributing to open source. Each student spends three months working on a project, with the support of volunteer mentors, for participating open source organizations.

Last year 1,318 students worked with 198 open source organizations. Organizations include individual projects and umbrella organizations that serve as fiscal sponsors, such as Apache Software Foundation or the Python Software Foundation.

You can apply starting today. The deadline to apply is January 23 at 16:00 UTC. Organizations chosen for GSoC 2018 will be posted on February 12.

Please visit the program site for more information on how to apply, a detailed timeline of important deadlines and general program information. We also encourage you to check out the Mentor Guide and join the discussion group.

Best of luck to all of the applicants!

By Josh Simmons, Google Open Source

Google Code-in is breaking records

It’s been an incredible (and incredibly busy!) three weeks for the 25 mentor organizations participating in Google Code-in (GCI) 2017, our seven week global contest designed to introduce teens to open source software development. Participants complete bite sized “tasks” in topics that include coding, documentation, UI/UX, quality assurance and more. Volunteer mentors from each open source project help participants along the way.

Total registered students has already surpassed 2016 numbers and we are less than halfway to the finish! We’re thrilled that high school students are embracing GCI like never before.

Check out some of the statistics below (current as of Thursday, December 14):
  • Total registered students: 6,146
  • Number of students who have completed at least one task: 1,573 (51% of those students have completed more than 3 tasks, earning them a GCI t-shirt)
  • Total number of tasks completed: 5,499
  • Most tasks completed by one student: 39

Top 5 Countries by Tasks Completed

Countries Represented by Mentors and Students



Of course, GCI wouldn’t be possible without the effort of the more than 725 mentors and organization administrators. Based in 65 countries, mentors answer questions, review submissions, and approve tasks for students at all hours of the day -- and sometimes night! They work tirelessly to help encourage and guide the next generation of open source contributors.

Every year we express our gratitude to the mentors and organization administrators. We are particularly grateful for them given how many more students are participating in GCI this year. Thank you all, and hang in there!

By Mary Radomile, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2017 Mentor Summit

This year Google brought over 320 mentors from all over the world (33 countries!) to Google's offices in Sunnyvale, California for the 2017 Google Summer of Code Mentor Summit. This year 149 organizations were represented, which provided the perfect opportunity to meet like-minded open source enthusiasts and discuss ways to make open source better and more sustainable.
Group photo by Dmitry Levin used under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license.
The Mentor Summit is run as an unconference in which attendees create and join sessions based on their interests. “I liked the unconference sessions, that they were casual and discussion based and I got a lot out of them. It was the place I connected with the most people,” said Cassie Tarakajian, attending on behalf of the Processing Foundation.

Attendees quickly filled the schedule boards with interesting sessions. One theme in this year’s session schedule was the challenging topic of failing students. Derk Ruitenbeek, part of the phpBB contingent, had this to say:
“This year our organisation had a high failure rate of 3 out of 5 accepted students. During the Mentor Summit I attended multiple sessions about failing students and rating proposals and got a lot [of] useful tips. Talking with other mentors about this really helped me find ways to improve student selection for our organisation next time.”
This year was the largest Mentor Summit ever – with the exception of our 10 Year Reunion in 2014 – and had the best gender diversity yet. Katarina Behrens, a mentor who worked with LibreOffice, observed:
“I was pleased to see many more women at the summit than last time I participated. I'm also beyond happy that now not only women themselves, but also men engage in increasing (not only gender) diversity of their projects and teams.”
We've held the Mentor Summit for the past 10+ years as a way to meet some of the thousands of mentors whose generous work for the students makes the program successful, and to give some of them and the projects they represent a chance to meet. This year was their first Mentor Summit for 52% of the attendees, giving us a lot of fresh perspectives to learn from!

We love hosting the Mentor Summit and attendees enjoy it, as well, especially the opportunity to meet each other. In fact, some attendees met in person for the first time at the Mentor Summit after years of collaborating remotely! According to Aveek Basu, who mentored for The Linux Foundation, the event was an excellent opportunity for “networking with like minded people from different communities. Also it was nice to know about people working in different fields from bioinformatics to robotics, and not only hard core computer science.” 

You can browse the event website and read through some of the session notes that attendees took to learn a bit more about this year’s Mentor Summit.

Now that Google Summer of Code 2017 and the Mentor Summit have come to a close, our team is busy gearing up for the 2018 program. We hope to see you then!

By Maria Webb, Google Open Source 

Google Code-in contest for teenagers starts today!

Today marks the start of the 8th consecutive year of Google Code-in (GCI). It’s the biggest contest ever and we hope you’ll come along for the ride!

The Basics

What is Google Code-in?

Our global, online contest introducing students to open source development. The contest runs for 7 weeks until January 17, 2018.

Who can register?

Pre-university students ages 13-17 that have their parent or guardian’s permission to register for the contest.

How do students register?

Students can register for the contest beginning today at g.co/gci. Once students have registered and the parental consent form has been submitted, students can choose which task they want to work on first. Students choose the task they find interesting from a list of hundreds of available tasks created by 25 participating open source organizations. Tasks take an average of 3-5 hours to complete. The task categories are:
  • Coding
  • Documentation/Training
  • Outreach/Research
  • Quality Assurance
  • User Interface

Why should students participate?

Students not only have the opportunity to work on a real open source software project, thus gaining invaluable experience, but they also have the opportunity to be a part of the open source community. Mentors are readily available to help answer their questions while they work through the tasks.

Google Code-in is a contest so there are prizes! Complete one task and receive a digital certificate. Three completed tasks and you’ll also get a fun Google t-shirt. Finalists get a hoodie. Grand Prize winners receive an all expense paid trip to Google headquarters in California!

Details

Over the last 7 years, more than 4,500 students from 99 countries have successfully completed over 23,000 tasks in GCI. Intrigued? Learn more about GCI by checking out our rules and FAQs. And please visit our contest site and read the Getting Started Guide.

Teachers, if you are interested in getting your students involved in Google Code-in we have resources available to help you get started.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Welcoming 25 mentor organizations for Google Code-in 2017

We’re thrilled to introduce 25 open source organizations that are participating in Google Code-in 2017. The contest, now in its eighth year, offers 13-17 year old pre-university students an opportunity to learn and practice their skills while contributing to open source projects.

Google Code-in officially starts for students on November 28. Students are encouraged to learn about the participating organizations ahead of time and can get started by clicking on the links below:

  • Apertium: rule-based machine translation platform
  • BRL-CAD: computer graphics, 2D and 3D geometry modeling and computer-aided design (CAD)
  • Catrobat: visual programming for creating mobile games and animations
  • CCExtractor: open source tools for subtitle generation
  • CloudCV: building platforms for reproducible AI research
  • coala: a unified interface for linting and fixing code, regardless of the programming languages used
  • Drupal: content management platform
  • FOSSASIA: developing communities across all ages and borders to form a better future with Open Technologies and ICT
  • Haiku: operating system specifically targeting personal computing
  • JBoss Community: a community of projects around JBoss Middleware
  • LibreHealth: aiming to bring open source healthcare IT to all of humanity
  • Liquid Galaxy: an interactive, panoramic and immersive visualization tool
  • MetaBrainz: builds community maintained databases
  • Mifos Initiative: transforming the delivery of financial services to the poor and the unbanked
  • MovingBlocks: a Minecraft-inspired open source game
  • OpenMRS: open source medical records system for the world
  • OpenWISP: build and manage low cost networks such as public wifi
  • OSGeo: building open source geospatial tools
  • Sugar Labs: learning platform and activities for elementary education
  • SCoRe: research lab seeking sustainable solutions for problems faced by developing countries
  • Systers: community for women involved in technical aspects of computing
  • Ubuntu: an open source operating system
  • Wikimedia: non-profit foundation dedicated to bringing free content to the world, operating Wikipedia
  • XWiki: a web platform for developing collaborative applications using the wiki paradigm
  • Zulip: powerful, threaded open source group chat with apps for every major platform

These mentor organizations are hard at work creating thousands of tasks for students to work on, including code, documentation, user interface, quality assurance, outreach, research and training tasks. The contest officially starts for students on Tuesday, November 28th at 9:00am PST.

You can learn more about Google Code-in on the contest site where you’ll find Contest Rules, Frequently Asked Questions and Important Dates. There you’ll also find flyers and other helpful information including the Getting Started Guide. Our discussion mailing list is a great way to talk with other students, mentors and organization administrators about the contest.

By Josh Simmons, Google Open Source

Google Code-in 2017 is seeking organization applications


We are now accepting applications for open source organizations who want to participate in Google Code-in 2017. Google Code-in, a global online contest for pre-university students ages 13-17, invites students to learn by contributing to open source software.

Working with young students is a special responsibility and each year we hear inspiring stories from mentors who participate. To ensure these new, young contributors have a great support system, we select organizations that have gained experience in mentoring students by previously taking part in Google Summer of Code.

Organizations must apply before Tuesday, October 24 at 16:00 UTC.

17 organizations were accepted last year, and over the last 7 years, 4,553 students from 99 different countries have completed more than 23,651 tasks for participating open source projects. Tasks fall into 5 categories:

  • Code: writing or refactoring 
  • Documentation/Training: creating/editing documents and helping others learn more
  • Outreach/Research: community management, outreach/marketing, or studying problems and recommending solutions
  • Quality Assurance: testing and ensuring code is of high quality
  • User Interface: user experience research or user interface design and interaction

Once an organization is selected for Google Code-in 2017 they will define these tasks and recruit mentors who are interested in providing online support for students.

You can find a timeline, FAQ and other information about Google Code-in on our website. If you’re an educator interested in sharing Google Code-in with your students, you can find resources here.

By Josh Simmons, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code turns 14

Google Open Source is proud to announce the 14th year of Google Summer of Code (GSoC)! Yes, GSoC is officially well into its teenage years - hopefully without that painful awkward stage - and we are excited to introduce more new student developers to the world of open source software development.

Over the last 13 years GSoC has provided over 13,000 university students from around the world with an opportunity to hone their skills by contributing to open source projects during their summer break. Participants gain invaluable experience working directly with mentors on open source projects, and earn a stipend upon successful completion of their project.

We’re excited to keep the tradition going! Applications for interested open source organizations open on January 4, 2018 and student applications open in March*.

Are you an open source project interesting in learning more? Visit the program site to learn about what it means to be a mentor organization and how to submit a good application. We welcome all types of organizations - both large and small - and each year about 20% of the organizations we accept are completely new to GSoC.

Students, it’s never too early to start thinking about your proposal. You can check out the organizations that participated in Google Summer of Code 2017 as well as the projects students worked on. We also encourage you to explore other resources like the student and mentor guides and frequently asked questions.

You can always learn more on the program website. Please stay tuned for more details!

By Mary Radomile, Google Open Source

* Exact dates will be announced later this year.

Announcing Google Code-in 2017: The Latest and Greatest for Year Eight

We are excited to announce the 8th consecutive year of the Google Code-in (GCI) contest! Students ages 13 through 17 from around the world can learn about open source development working on real open source projects, with mentorship from active developers. GCI begins on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 and runs for seven weeks through to Wednesday, January 17, 2018.


Google Code-in is unique because not only do the students choose what they want to work on from the 2,000+ tasks created by open source organizations, but they have mentors available to help answer their questions as they work on each of their tasks.

Starting to work on open source software can be a daunting task in and of itself. How do I get started? Does the organization want my help? Am I too inexperienced? These are all questions that developers (of all ages) might consider before contributing to an open source organization.

The beauty of GCI is that participating open source organizations realize teens are often first time contributors, and the volunteer mentors are equipped with the patience and the experience to help these young minds become part of the open source community.

Open source communities thrive when there is a steady flow of new contributors who bring new perspectives, ideas, and enthusiasm. Over the last 7 years, GCI open source organizations have helped over 4,500 students from 99 countries become contributors. Many of these students are still contributing to open source years later. Dozens have gone on to become Google Summer of Code (GSoC) students and even mentors for other students.

The tasks open source organizations create vary in skill set and level, including beginner tasks any student can take on, such as “setup your development environment.” With tasks in five different categories, there’s something to fit almost any student’s skills:

  • Code: writing or refactoring 
  • Documentation/Training: creating/editing documents and helping others learn more
  • Outreach/Research: community management, marketing, or studying problems and recommending solutions
  • Quality Assurance: testing and ensuring code is of high quality
  • User Interface: user experience research, user interface design, or graphic design

Open source organizations can apply to participate in Google Code-in starting on Monday, October 9, 2017. Google Code-in starts for students November 28th!

Visit the contest site g.co/gci to learn more about the contest and find flyers, slide decks, timelines and more.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2017 Student Curtain Call

Back in early May we announced the students accepted into the 13th edition of the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) program, our largest program ever! Today we are pleased to announce the 1,128 (86.2%*) students from 68 countries that successfully completed the 2017 GSoC. Great job, students!





Students worked diligently with 201 open source organizations and over 1,600 mentors to learn to work with internationally distributed online teams, write great code and help their mentoring org enhance, extend and refine their codebases. Students have also become an important part of these communities. We feel strongly that to keep open source organizations thriving and evolving, they need new ideas - GSoC students help to bring fresh perspectives to these important projects.

We look forward to seeing even more from the 2017 students. Many will go on to become GSoC mentors in future programs and many more will become committers to these and other open source organizations. Some may even create their own open source projects! These students have a bright future ahead of them in technology and open source.

Interested in what the students worked on this summer? Check out their work as well as statistics on past programs.

A big thank you to our mentors and organization administrators who make this program possible. Their dedication to welcoming new student contributors into their communities and teaching them the fundamentals of open source is awesome and inspiring. Thank you all!

Congratulations to all of the GSoC 2017 students and the mentors who made this our biggest and best Google Summer of Code yet.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

* 1,309 students started the coding period on May 30th, stats are based upon that number.