Tag Archives: student programs

Google Code-in 2017 is seeking organization applications


We are now accepting applications for open source organizations who want to participate in Google Code-in 2017. Google Code-in, a global online contest for pre-university students ages 13-17, invites students to learn by contributing to open source software.

Working with young students is a special responsibility and each year we hear inspiring stories from mentors who participate. To ensure these new, young contributors have a great support system, we select organizations that have gained experience in mentoring students by previously taking part in Google Summer of Code.

Organizations must apply before Tuesday, October 24 at 16:00 UTC.

17 organizations were accepted last year, and over the last 7 years, 4,553 students from 99 different countries have completed more than 23,651 tasks for participating open source projects. Tasks fall into 5 categories:

  • Code: writing or refactoring 
  • Documentation/Training: creating/editing documents and helping others learn more
  • Outreach/Research: community management, outreach/marketing, or studying problems and recommending solutions
  • Quality Assurance: testing and ensuring code is of high quality
  • User Interface: user experience research or user interface design and interaction

Once an organization is selected for Google Code-in 2017 they will define these tasks and recruit mentors who are interested in providing online support for students.

You can find a timeline, FAQ and other information about Google Code-in on our website. If you’re an educator interested in sharing Google Code-in with your students, you can find resources here.

By Josh Simmons, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code turns 14

Google Open Source is proud to announce the 14th year of Google Summer of Code (GSoC)! Yes, GSoC is officially well into its teenage years - hopefully without that painful awkward stage - and we are excited to introduce more new student developers to the world of open source software development.

Over the last 13 years GSoC has provided over 13,000 university students from around the world with an opportunity to hone their skills by contributing to open source projects during their summer break. Participants gain invaluable experience working directly with mentors on open source projects, and earn a stipend upon successful completion of their project.

We’re excited to keep the tradition going! Applications for interested open source organizations open on January 4, 2018 and student applications open in March*.

Are you an open source project interesting in learning more? Visit the program site to learn about what it means to be a mentor organization and how to submit a good application. We welcome all types of organizations - both large and small - and each year about 20% of the organizations we accept are completely new to GSoC.

Students, it’s never too early to start thinking about your proposal. You can check out the organizations that participated in Google Summer of Code 2017 as well as the projects students worked on. We also encourage you to explore other resources like the student and mentor guides and frequently asked questions.

You can always learn more on the program website. Please stay tuned for more details!

By Mary Radomile, Google Open Source

* Exact dates will be announced later this year.

Announcing Google Code-in 2017: The Latest and Greatest for Year Eight

We are excited to announce the 8th consecutive year of the Google Code-in (GCI) contest! Students ages 13 through 17 from around the world can learn about open source development working on real open source projects, with mentorship from active developers. GCI begins on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 and runs for seven weeks through to Wednesday, January 17, 2018.


Google Code-in is unique because not only do the students choose what they want to work on from the 2,000+ tasks created by open source organizations, but they have mentors available to help answer their questions as they work on each of their tasks.

Starting to work on open source software can be a daunting task in and of itself. How do I get started? Does the organization want my help? Am I too inexperienced? These are all questions that developers (of all ages) might consider before contributing to an open source organization.

The beauty of GCI is that participating open source organizations realize teens are often first time contributors, and the volunteer mentors are equipped with the patience and the experience to help these young minds become part of the open source community.

Open source communities thrive when there is a steady flow of new contributors who bring new perspectives, ideas, and enthusiasm. Over the last 7 years, GCI open source organizations have helped over 4,500 students from 99 countries become contributors. Many of these students are still contributing to open source years later. Dozens have gone on to become Google Summer of Code (GSoC) students and even mentors for other students.

The tasks open source organizations create vary in skill set and level, including beginner tasks any student can take on, such as “setup your development environment.” With tasks in five different categories, there’s something to fit almost any student’s skills:

  • Code: writing or refactoring 
  • Documentation/Training: creating/editing documents and helping others learn more
  • Outreach/Research: community management, marketing, or studying problems and recommending solutions
  • Quality Assurance: testing and ensuring code is of high quality
  • User Interface: user experience research, user interface design, or graphic design

Open source organizations can apply to participate in Google Code-in starting on Monday, October 9, 2017. Google Code-in starts for students November 28th!

Visit the contest site g.co/gci to learn more about the contest and find flyers, slide decks, timelines and more.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2017 Student Curtain Call

Back in early May we announced the students accepted into the 13th edition of the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) program, our largest program ever! Today we are pleased to announce the 1,128 (86.2%*) students from 68 countries that successfully completed the 2017 GSoC. Great job, students!





Students worked diligently with 201 open source organizations and over 1,600 mentors to learn to work with internationally distributed online teams, write great code and help their mentoring org enhance, extend and refine their codebases. Students have also become an important part of these communities. We feel strongly that to keep open source organizations thriving and evolving, they need new ideas - GSoC students help to bring fresh perspectives to these important projects.

We look forward to seeing even more from the 2017 students. Many will go on to become GSoC mentors in future programs and many more will become committers to these and other open source organizations. Some may even create their own open source projects! These students have a bright future ahead of them in technology and open source.

Interested in what the students worked on this summer? Check out their work as well as statistics on past programs.

A big thank you to our mentors and organization administrators who make this program possible. Their dedication to welcoming new student contributors into their communities and teaching them the fundamentals of open source is awesome and inspiring. Thank you all!

Congratulations to all of the GSoC 2017 students and the mentors who made this our biggest and best Google Summer of Code yet.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

* 1,309 students started the coding period on May 30th, stats are based upon that number.

The Mentors of Google Summer of Code 2017

Every year, we pore over oodles of data to extract the most interesting and relevant statistics about the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) mentors. Mentors are the bread and butter of our program - without their hard work and dedication, there would be no GSoC. These volunteers spend 12 weeks (plus a month of community bonding) tirelessly guiding their students to create the best quality project possible and welcoming them into their communities - answering questions and providing help at all hours.

Here’s a quick snapshot of our 2017 group:
  • Total mentors: 3,439
  • Mentors assigned to an active project: 1,647
  • Mentors who have participated in GSoC over 10 years: 22
  • Percentage of new mentors: 49%
GSoC 2017 mentors are a worldly group, hailing from 69 countries on 6 continents - we’re still waiting on a mentor from Antarctica… Anyone?

Interested in the data? Check out the full list of countries.
Some interesting factoids about our mentors:
  • Average age: 39
  • Youngest: 15*
  • Oldest: 68
  • Most common first name: Michael (there are 40!)
GSoC mentors help to introduce the next generation to the world of open source software development — for that we are very grateful. To show our appreciation, we invite two mentors from each of the 201 participating organizations to attend the annual mentor summit at the Google campus in Sunnyvale, California. It’s three days of food, community building, lively debate and lots of fun.

Thank you to everyone involved in Google Summer of Code. Cheers to yet another great year!

By Mary Radomile, Google Open Source

* Say what? 15 years old!? Yep! We had 12 GSoC mentors under the age of 18. This group of enthusiastic teens started their journey in our sister program, Google Code-in, an open source coding competition for 13-17 year olds. You can read more about it at g.co/gci.

After a "close call," a coding champion

Cross-posted on The Keyword

Eighteen-year-old Cameroon resident Nji Collins had just put the finishing touches on his final submission for the Google Code-In competition when his entire town lost internet access. It stayed dark for two months.

“That was a really, really close call,” Nji, who prefers to be called Collins, tells the Keyword, adding that he traveled to a neighboring town every day to check his email and the status of the contest. “It was stressful.”

Google’s annual Code-In contest, an effort to introduce teenagers to the world of open source, invites high school students from around the world to compete. It’s part of our mission to encourage and inspire the next generation of computer scientists, and in turn, the contest allows these young people to play a role in building real technologies.

Over the course of the competition, participants complete open-source coding and design “tasks” administered by an array of tech companies like Wikimedia and OpenMRS. Tasks range from editing webpages to updating databases to making videos; one of Collins’ favorites, for example, was making the OpenMRS home page sensitive to keystrokes. This year, more than 1,300 entrants from 62 countries completed nearly 6,400 assignments.

While Google sponsors and runs the contest, the participating tech organizations, who work most closely with the students, choose the winners. Those who finish the most tasks are named finalists, and the companies each select two winners from that group. Those winners are then flown to San Francisco, CA for an action-packed week involving talks at the Googleplex in Mountain View, office tours, segway journeys through the city, and a sunset cruise on the SF Bay.
Collins with some of the other winners from Google Code-in 2016
“It’s really fun to watch these kids come together and thrive,” says Stephanie Taylor, Code-In’s program manager. “Bringing together students from, say, Thailand and Poland because they have something in common: a shared love of computer science. Lifelong friendships are formed on these trips.”

Indeed, many Code-In winners say the community is their main motivator for joining the competition. “The people are what brought me here and keep me here,” says Sushain Cherivirala, a Carnegie Mellon computer science major and former Code-In winner who now serves as a program mentor. Mentors work with Code-In participants throughout the course of the competition to help them complete tasks and interface with the tech companies.
Google Code-in winners on the Google campus
Code-In also acts as an accessible introduction to computer science and the open source world. Mira Yang, a 17-year-old from New Jersey, learned how to code for the first time this year. She says she never would have even considered studying computer science further before she dabbled in a few Code-In tasks. Now, she plans to major in it.
Google Code-in winners Nji Collins and Mira Yang

“Code-In changed my view on computer sciences,” she says. “I was able to learn that I can do this. There’s definitely a stigma for girls in CS. But I found out that people will support you, and there’s a huge network out there.”

That network extended to Cameroon, where Collins’ patience and persistence paid off as he waited out his town’s internet blackout. One afternoon, while checking his email a few towns away, he discovered he’d been named a Code-In winner. He had been a finalist the year prior, when he was the only student from his school to compete. This year, he’d convinced a handful of classmates to join in.

“It wasn’t fun doing it alone; I like competition,” Collins, who learned how to code by doing his older sister’s computer science homework assignments alongside her, says. “It pushes me to work harder.”

Learn more about the annual Code-In competition.

By Carly Schwartz, Editor-in-Chief, Google Internal News

Google Summer of Code 2017 statistics part 2

Now that Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2017 is under way with students in their first full week of the coding period we wanted to bring you some more statistics on the 2017 program. Lots and lots of numbers follow:

Organizations

Students are working with 201 organizations (the most we’ve ever had!) of which 39 are participating in GSoC for the first time.

Student Registrations

Over 20,651 students from 144 countries registered for the program, which is an 8.8% increase over the previous high for the program.

Project Proposals

4,764 students from 108 countries submitted a total of 7,089 project proposals.

Gender breakdown

11.4% of accepted students are women. We are always interested in making our programs and open source more inclusive. Please contact us if you know of organizations we should work with to spread the word about GSoC to underrepresented groups.

Universities

The 1,318 students accepted into the GSoC 2017 program hailed from 575 universities, of which 142 have students participating for the first time in GSoC.

Top 10 schools by students accepted for GSoC 2017 

University Name Country Accepted Students
International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad India 39
Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani (BITS Pilani) India 37
Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur India 31
University of Moratuwa Sri Lanka 24
Delhi Technological University India 23
Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, Goa Campus India 18
Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee India 18
Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay India 15
LNM Institute of Information Technology India 15
TU Munich/Technische Universität München Germany 14

Another post with stats on our GSoC mentors will be coming soon!

Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2017 statistics: Part one

Since 2005 Google Summer of Code (GSoC) has been bringing new developers into the open source community every year. GSoC 2017 is the largest to date with 1,318 students from 72 countries accepted into the program who are working with a record 201 open source organizations this summer.

Students are currently participating in the Community Bonding phase of the program where they become familiar with the open source communities they will be working with. They also spend time learning the codebase and the community’s best practices so they can start their 12 week coding projects on May 30th.

Each year we like to share program statistics as we see GSoC continue to expand all over the world. This year there are three students that are the first to be accepted into GSoC from their home countries: Qatar, Tajikistan and Zimbabwe. A complete list of accepted students and their countries is below:

Country Students Country Students Country Students
Argentina 3 Ghana 1 Qatar 1
Armenia 1 Greece 29 Romania 11
Australia 6 Hungary 6 Russian Federation 54
Austria 13 India 569 Saudi Arabia 1
Bangladesh 2 Indonesia 2 Serbia 3
Belarus 3 Ireland 5 Singapore 10
Belgium 6 Israel 2 Slovak Republic 6
Bosnia and Herzegovina 1 Italy 23 Slovenia 2
Brazil 21 Jamaica 1 South Africa 2
Bulgaria 4 Japan 13 South Korea 8
Cameroon 8 Kazakhstan 1 Spain 19
Canada 27 Kenya 1 Sri Lanka 54
China 49 Latvia 1 Sweden 8
Colombia 1 Lithuania 2 Switzerland 5
Costa Rica 1 Macedonia 1 Taiwan 1
Croatia 1 Mexico 1 Tajikistan 1
Czech Republic 6 Moldova 1 Turkey 11
Denmark 2 Netherlands 14 Ukraine 12
Ecuador 2 New Zealand 1 United Arab Emirates 1
Egypt 10 Nigeria 1 United Kingdom 16
Estonia 1 Pakistan 8 United States 126
Finland 4 Peru 1 Uruguay 1
France 20 Poland 19 Vietnam 4
Germany 55 Portugal 10 Zimbabwe 1

In our next GSoC statistics post we will delve deeper into the schools, gender breakdown, mentors and registration numbers for the 2017 program.

Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Students, Start Your Engineerings!


It’s that time again! Our 201 mentoring organizations have selected 1,318 the students they look forward to working with during the 13th Google Summer of Code (GSoC). Congratulations to our 2017 students and a big thank you to everyone who applied!

The next step for participating students is the Community Bonding period which runs from May 4th through May 30th. During this time, students will get up to speed on the culture and toolset of their new community. They’ll also get acquainted with their mentor and learn more about the languages or tools they will need to complete their projects. Coding commences May 30th.

To the more than 4,200 students who were not chosen this year - don’t be discouraged! Many students apply at least once to GSoC before being accepted. You can improve your odds for next time by contributing to the open source project of your choice directly; organizations are always eager for new contributors! Look around GitHub and elsewhere on the internet for a project that interests you and get started.

Happy coding, everyone!

By Cat Allman, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2017 student applications are open!

Are you a university student looking to learn more about open source software development? Consider applying to Google Summer of Code (GSoC) for a chance to spend your break coding on an open source project.

vertical GSoC logo.jpg


For the 13th straight year GSoC will give students from around the world the opportunity to learn the ins and outs of open source software development while working from their home. Students will receive a stipend for their successful contributions to allow them to focus on their coding during the program.

Mentors are paired with the students to help address technical questions and to monitor their progress throughout the program. Former GSoC participants have told us that the real-world experience they’ve gained during the program has not only sharpened their technical skills, but has also boosted their confidence, broadened their professional network and enhanced their resumes.

Interested students can submit proposals on the program site now through Monday, April 3 at 16:00 UTC. The first step is to search through the 201 open source organizations and review the “Project ideas” for the organizations that appeal to you. Next, reach out to the organizations to introduce yourself and determine if your skills and interests are a good match with their organization.




Since spots are limited, we recommend writing a strong project proposal and submitting a draft early to receive feedback from the organization which will help increase your chances of selection. Our Student Manual, written by former students and mentors, provides excellent helpful advice to get you started with choosing an organization and crafting a great proposal.

For information throughout the application period and beyond, visit the Google Open Source Blog, join our Google Summer of Code discussion lists or join us on Internet Relay Chat (IRC) at #gsoc on Freenode. Be sure to read the Program Rules, Timeline and FAQ, all available on the program site, for more information about Google Summer of Code.

Good luck to all the open source coders who apply, and remember to submit your proposals early — you only have until Monday, April 3 at 16:00 UTC!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Summer of Code Program Manager