Tag Archives: student programs

Students, Start Your Engineerings!


It’s that time again! Our 201 mentoring organizations have selected 1,318 the students they look forward to working with during the 13th Google Summer of Code (GSoC). Congratulations to our 2017 students and a big thank you to everyone who applied!

The next step for participating students is the Community Bonding period which runs from May 4th through May 30th. During this time, students will get up to speed on the culture and toolset of their new community. They’ll also get acquainted with their mentor and learn more about the languages or tools they will need to complete their projects. Coding commences May 30th.

To the more than 4,200 students who were not chosen this year - don’t be discouraged! Many students apply at least once to GSoC before being accepted. You can improve your odds for next time by contributing to the open source project of your choice directly; organizations are always eager for new contributors! Look around GitHub and elsewhere on the internet for a project that interests you and get started.

Happy coding, everyone!

By Cat Allman, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2017 student applications are open!

Are you a university student looking to learn more about open source software development? Consider applying to Google Summer of Code (GSoC) for a chance to spend your break coding on an open source project.

vertical GSoC logo.jpg


For the 13th straight year GSoC will give students from around the world the opportunity to learn the ins and outs of open source software development while working from their home. Students will receive a stipend for their successful contributions to allow them to focus on their coding during the program.

Mentors are paired with the students to help address technical questions and to monitor their progress throughout the program. Former GSoC participants have told us that the real-world experience they’ve gained during the program has not only sharpened their technical skills, but has also boosted their confidence, broadened their professional network and enhanced their resumes.

Interested students can submit proposals on the program site now through Monday, April 3 at 16:00 UTC. The first step is to search through the 201 open source organizations and review the “Project ideas” for the organizations that appeal to you. Next, reach out to the organizations to introduce yourself and determine if your skills and interests are a good match with their organization.




Since spots are limited, we recommend writing a strong project proposal and submitting a draft early to receive feedback from the organization which will help increase your chances of selection. Our Student Manual, written by former students and mentors, provides excellent helpful advice to get you started with choosing an organization and crafting a great proposal.

For information throughout the application period and beyond, visit the Google Open Source Blog, join our Google Summer of Code discussion lists or join us on Internet Relay Chat (IRC) at #gsoc on Freenode. Be sure to read the Program Rules, Timeline and FAQ, all available on the program site, for more information about Google Summer of Code.

Good luck to all the open source coders who apply, and remember to submit your proposals early — you only have until Monday, April 3 at 16:00 UTC!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Summer of Code Program Manager

Getting ready for Google Summer of Code 2017

Spring is just around the corner here in the Northern Hemisphere and Google Summer of Code is fast approaching. If you are a student interested in participating this year, now is the time to prepare -- read on for tips on how to get ready.

This year we’ve accepted 201 open source organizations into the program, nearly 40 of which are new to the program. The organizations cover a wide range of topics including (but certainly not limited to!):

  • Operating systems
  • Web application frameworks
  • Healthcare and bioinformatics
  • Music and graphic design
  • Machine learning
  • Robotics
  • Security




How should you prepare for Google Summer of Code?

While student applications don’t open until March 20th at 16:00 UTC, you need to decide which projects you’re interested in and what you’ll propose. You should also communicate with those projects to learn more before you apply.

Start by looking at the list of participating projects and organizations. You can explore by searching for specific names or technologies, or filtering by topics you are interested in. Follow the “Learn More” link through to each organization’s page for additional information.

Once you’ve identified the organizations that you’re interested in, take a look at their ideas list to get a sense of the specific projects you could work on. Typically, you will choose a project from that list and write a proposal based on that idea, but you could also propose something that’s not on that list.

You should reach out to the organizations after you’ve decided what you want to work on. Doing this can make the difference between a good application and a great application.

Whatever you do, don’t wait until March 20th to begin preparing for Google Summer of Code! History has shown that students who reach out to organizations before the start of the application period have a higher chance of being accepted into the program, as they have had more time to talk to the organizations and understand what they are looking for with the project.

If you have any questions along the way, take a look at the Student Manual, FAQ and Timeline. If you can’t find the answer to your question, try taking your question to the mailing list.

By Josh Simmons, Open Source Programs Office

Introducing the Google Summer of Code 2017 Mentor Organizations

Today’s the day! We are excited to announce the mentor organizations accepted for this year’s Google Summer of Code (GSoC). Every year we receive more applications than we can accept and 2017 was no exception. After carefully reviewing almost 400 applications, we have chosen 201 open source projects and organizations, 18% of which are new to the program. Please see the program website for a complete list of the accepted organizations.

Interested in participating as a student? We will begin accepting student applications on Monday, March 20, 2017 at 16:00 UTC and the deadline is Monday, April 3, 2017 at 16:00 UTC.

Over the next three weeks, students who’d like to participate in Google Summer of Code should research the organizations and their Ideas Lists to explore which organizations are a good fit for their interests and skills and learn how they might contribute. Some of the most successful proposals have been completely new ideas submitted by students, so if you don’t see a project that appeals to you, don’t hesitate to suggest a new idea to the organization! There are contacts listed for each organization on their Ideas List — students should contact the organization directly to discuss their ideas. We also strongly encourage all interested students to reach out to and become familiar with the organization before applying.

You can find more information on our website, including a full timeline of important dates and program milestones. We also highly recommend all interested students read the Student Manual, FAQ and the Program Rules.

Congratulations to all of our mentor organizations! We look forward to working with all of you during Google Summer of Code 2017.

By Josh Simmons, Open Source Programs Office

Google Code-in 2016: even more young developers

Google Code-in (GCI), our contest introducing 13-17 year olds to open source software development, wrapped up last month with our largest contest to date: 1,340 students from 62 countries completed an impressive 6,379 tasks! Working with 17 open source organizations, students wrote code, created and edited documentation, designed UI elements and logos, conducted research, developed screencasts and videos teaching others about open source software, and helped find (and fix!) hundreds of bugs.

General statistics

  • 56.4% of students completed three or more tasks (earning themselves a fun Google Code-in 2016 t-shirt)
  • 21% of students were female
  • 30% of the participants from the USA were female
  • This was the first Google Code-in for 1,143 students (85.3%)

Student age

2017-02-23_07-48-36.png

Participating schools

Students from 550 schools competed in this year’s contest. While Google Code-in is a program for individuals, every year some schools emerge as hot spots of participation. This year, these five schools had the most students taking part:

School NameCountryNumber of Participants
Dunman High SchoolSingapore185
Sacred Heart Convent Senior Secondary SchoolIndia29
Jayshree Periwal International SchoolIndia26
Colegiul National Aurel VlaicuRomania23
Ly Tu Trong Specialized High SchoolsVietnam14

Countries

We are pleased to have a new country participating in GCI this year: Mauritius! The chart below displays the ten countries with the most students completing at least 1 task.




In June we will welcome all 34 grand prize winners (along with a mentor from each participating organization) for a fun-filled trip to the Bay Area. The trip will include meeting with Google engineers to hear about new and exciting projects, tours of the Google campuses and a fun day exploring San Francisco.

Keep an eye on the Google Open Source Blog in coming weeks for more stats on Google Code-in 2016, plus posts from the mentoring organizations describing some of their experiences with the contests and the work done by “their” students.

We are thrilled that Google Code-in was so popular this year. We hope to continue to grow and expand this contest in the future to introduce even more teenagers to the world of open source software development.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Code-in Program Manager

Google Summer of Code 2016 wrap-up: LabLua

This is the final guest post from the students, mentors and organization administrators that participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2016. We’ve seen recaps of student work and lessons learned, which you can check out the rest of the series as we gear up for this year’s program.


LabLua is a lab at PUC-Rio dedicated to research on programming languages, with emphasis on the Lua language. Lua is a powerful, fast, lightweight, embeddable scripting language that is used in many industrial applications, and on many embedded systems and games.

We were very happy to participate in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) for the third time, and to mentor eight fine students that all completed their projects successfully. We thank them, and Google, for this extraordinary contribution to our research and development work.

Here is a brief summary of this year's projects:

Next Generation of the LuaRocks test suite - Robert Karasek
LuaRocks is the package manager for Lua modules. Its test suite was implemented as a big shell script that performed only black-box testing and ran only on Linux. The goal for this project was to port the test suite to Lua, improving its portability and allowing more types of tests so we could improve test coverage.

Robert ported the test suite to Lua using Busted. His new test suite, now merged into LuaRocks, runs on Linux and Mac OS X, accessible via Travis CI, as well as Windows, accessible via AppVeyor. 

This was a welcome addition, bringing greater confidence to developers. Robert improved the checks in existing tests and wrote many new ones, including a new mock-server for testing a client API for uploading packages to the repository.

Typed Lua Typechecker - Tomasz Dyczek 

Typed Lua provides static type checking for the Lua language. Typed Lua extends the syntax of Lua 5.3 to introduce type annotations, and performs local type inference for more precise detection of unannotated expressions.

Tomasz implemented the core of Typed Lua in Haskell. Tomasz's implementation parses code written in a syntax close to the abstract syntax of Typed Lua, then type checks the generated AST. Besides providing a support for testing and reasoning about new features, Tomasz's typechecker can be also used to validate tests to be included in Typed Lua's test suite.

Classes and Generics for Typed Lua - Kevin Clancy

Kevin worked on the implementation of a class system for Typed Lua. He also added parametric polymorphism (generics) for classes and existing Typed Lua types, such as functions and tables.

Kevin's work currently lives in its own branch, but will be merged into the main branch soon. Meanwhile, Kevin has written a detailed post explaining all the features he implemented

Improving Error Reporting in PEG Parsers - Matthew Allen Go 

LPegLabel is an extension of LPeg, a pattern matching tool for Lua, based on Parsing Expression Grammars (PEGs). LPegLabel supports labeled failures, a facility that improves error reporting and recovery for PEG-based parsers.

The goal of this project was to use LPegLabel to write parsers with good error reporting. These parsers could then be used by the Lua community and also serve as a guide for LPegLabel users. Because LPegLabel is a young tool, another important contribution was to improve the tool's usability.

Matthew achieved both goals. He developed a parser for Lua 5.3, which has been incorporated into the new release of lua-parser (1.0.0), and improved LPegLabel’s usability with work on its API and documentation.

Improving elasticsearch-lua tests and build - Dhaval Kapil

Elasticsearch is a distributed and scalable search engine written in Java that offers a REST API accessed through JSON. During GSoC 2015, Dhaval implemented elasticsearch-lua, a client for the Lua language following a model similar to clients written in Python and PHP.

During GSoC 2016, Dhaval worked on improving elasticsearch-lua. He added a test suite, documented the entire codebase, and updated the current client to work with the newest version of Elasticsearch.

Dhaval went above and beyond, creating a new library called luaver. This work was motivated by having to frequently switch between different versions of Lua while developing the test suite. A full blog post about his project can be found here.

Admin Center and Elasticsearch integration for Sailor - Nikhil Ramesh 

Sailor is a web framework with a model-view-controller (MVC) architecture. Like other web frameworks, such as Ruby on Rails and Django, it is designed to make development faster by making some assumptions and conventions and encouraging principles like Don’t Repeat Yourself (DRY).

Nikhil focused on extending Sailor. The first feature he worked on was an Admin Center, which is a web interface for configuring an application. He also integrated Sailor and elasticsearch-lua, allowing Elasticsearch indexes to be stored as Sailor Models. His work is currently pending as a pull request and will soon be merged.

Extending the online tutorial of Céu with Emscripten and SDL - Margarit Vicentiu

Céu is a language for developing reactive applications such as video games and embedded systems. Its compiler generates output in plain C to integrate easily with the underlying platform (e.g. Arduino, SDL). For this project, we wanted to integrate Céu with Emscripten in order to run applications in a web browser.

Vicentiu started with Céu’s online tutorial, which is a server-side application: the user types code in a text area and hits the send button; the server receives the code, executes it, and sends the output back to the user. During the summer, Vicentiu made most of the examples compile with Emscripten and run in real-time on the user’s screen.

Our next goal is to make the graphical examples with user interactions also work in the browser, and Vicentiu plans to continue contributing to the project to achieve this goal.

An automatic generator of WSDL documents for LuaSOAP - Victor Dias

LuaSOAP is a library for working with the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). WSDL is an XML format for describing network services; it is used to describe operations, messages and types offered by Web Services.

This summer Victor extended LuaSOAP's WSDL support by building a software layer for the automatic generation of WSDL documents. This new layer eases the description of most WSDL "bureaucracy" -- types, operations, ports, messages -- which have no counterparts in Lua. He also improved the test suite and the documentation. Victor's work will be integrated into the next version of LuaSOAP.

By Ana Lúcia de Moura, Organization Administrator for LabLua

Google Summer of Code 2016 wrap-up: CloudCV

This guest post is part of our ongoing series of posts from the students, mentors and organization administrators who participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC), a program which gets university students contributing to open source software.

Google Summer of Code 2016 was a memorable one for CloudCV. Despite being a relatively “young” organization (this is just our second year as a mentor organization), there were many excellent applicants who put a tremendous amount of effort into their proposals and ramp-up tasks. It was difficult to choose!

CloudCV began in the summer of 2014 as a research project within the Machine Learning and Perception Lab at Virginia Tech, with the ambitious goal of democratizing computer vision and machine learning. We’re run exclusively by students and are working to enable developers, researchers, and fellow students to leverage artificial intelligence technology as a service and to share state of the art algorithms with the research community.

In line with this goal, we decided to build two tools that cater to computer vision researchers and hobbyists alike: CloudCV-fy your code and CloudCV-IDE. Though building two new platforms from the ground up was going to be challenging, our students’ motivation was overwhelming and their performance surpassed all expectations. We even demonstrated their work at CVPR 2016, a top-tier computer vision conference!

CloudCV-fy

A recurring use case for computer vision researchers, and many others, is to build a web-based demo and REST API to demonstrate the capabilities of their creations to the world. But web development involves writing hundred of lines of additional code across multiple languages (HTML, CSS, JavaScript, etc), which takes time away from research.


Our first student, Ashish Chaudhary, took on this problem by building CloudCV-fy. Over many iterations of design and development, Ashish delivered a tool that allows a user to simply write lightweight wrappers around their machine learning model/library and be done. CloudCV-fy automatically builds web-based interactive demos for them -- no need to tinker with HTML, CSS or JavaScript. Code to demo. Done.

The demo can be hosted on our servers, the user’s own server or any third party cloud service. As a result of this, researchers can focus on what they do best: designing and training models. CloudCV handles the rest. You can learn more in the write-up Ashish did on his blog.

CloudCV-IDE

There has been an explosion in the number of deep learning frameworks and it is difficult for researchers to keep up with all the latest tools. CloudCV-IDE, built by student Gaurav Gupta, addresses this by allowing a user to build a deep learning network with a drag-and-drop interface, then export to the deep learning framework of their choice (Caffe, TensorFlow, etc).

Gaurav also added support to import model configuration files in order to visualize any architecture. This is one of the first attempts to do this.



By the end of the summer, Gaurav delivered a great UI to visualize models with robust support for Caffe and TensorFlow back-ends. This was a successful start that we plan to build on by supporting more frameworks and facilitating collaborative building of deep learning models.

Overall, this was a highly productive GSoC for CloudCV. Our tools are under active development and we welcome contributions and ideas for new features.

We will definitely apply for GSoC 2017. If you are a student interested in participating we encourage you to get involved early! Feel free to reach out to us on our Gitter channel or on our mailing list.

By Viraj Prabhu, Organization Administrator for CloudCV

Googlers on the road: FOSDEM 2017

The new year is off to an excellent start as we wrap up the 7th year of Google Code-in, ramp up for the 13th year of Google Summer of Code, and return from connecting with our compatriots in the open source community down under at Linux.conf.au. Next up? We’re headed to FOSDEM, Europe’s famed non-commercial and volunteer-organized open source conference.

FOSDEM_logo.png
FOSDEM logo licensed under CC BY.

FOSDEM is hosted in Brussels on the Université libre de Bruxelles campus and runs the weekend of February 4-5. It’s a unique event in the spirit of the free and open source software and is free to the public. This year they are expecting 8,000+ attendees.

We’re looking forward to talking face-to-face with some of the thousands of former students, mentors and organization administrators who have participated in our student programs. A few of them will even be giving talks about their recent Google Summer of Code experience.

If you’d like to say hello or chat about our programs, you’ll be sure to find a Googler or two at our table. You’ll also find a number of Googlers in the program schedule:

Saturday, February 4th

2:00pm    Bazel: How to build at Google scale by Klaus Aehlig
3:25pm    Copyleft in Commerce: How GPLv3 keeps Samba relevant in the marketplace by Jeremy Allison

Sunday, February 5th

10:40am  gRPC 101: Building fast and efficient microservices by Ray Tsang
10:50am  Is the GPL a copyright license or a contract under U.S. law? by Max Sills
12:45pm  The state of Go: What to expect in Go 1.8 by Francesc Campoy
1:00pm    Analyze terabytes of OS code with one query by Felipe Hoffa (more info)
2:50pm    Like the ants: Turn individuals into a large contributing community by Dan Franc

See you there!

By Josh Simmons, Open Source Programs Office

Announcing the Google Code-in 2016 Winners!

Drum roll please! We are very proud to announce the 2016 Google Code-in (GCI) Grand Prize Winners and Finalists. Each year we see the number of student participants increase, and 2016 was no exception: 1,340 students from 62 countries completed an impressive 6,418 tasks. Winners and Finalists were chosen by the 17 open source organizations and are listed alphabetically below.
First is a list of our Grand Prize winners. These 34 teens completed an astounding 842 total tasks. Each Grand Prize winner will be flown to the Google campus for four days this summer to meet with Google engineers and enjoy the Bay Area.

GRAND PRIZE WINNERS
Name Organization Country
Matthew Marting Apertium United States
Shardul Chiplunkar Apertium United States
Michal Hanus BRL-CAD Czech Republic
Sudhanshu Agarwal BRL-CAD India
Alexandru Bratosin CCExtractor Development Romania
Evgeny Shulgin CCExtractor Development Russian Federation
Joshua Pan Copyleft Games Group United States
Shriank Kanaparti Copyleft Games Group India
Dhanat Satta-awalo Drupal Thailand
Utkarsh Dixit Drupal India
Kaisar Arkhan FOSSASIA Indonesia
Oana Roşca FOSSASIA Romania
Raefaldhi Amartya Junior Haiku Indonesia
Vanisha Kesswani Haiku India
Ilya Bizyaev KDE Russian Federation
Sergey Popov KDE Russian Federation
Anshuman Agarwal MetaBrainz India
Daniel Hsing MetaBrainz Hong Kong
Dhruv Shrivastava Mifos India
Sawan Kumar Mifos India
Ong Jia Wei, Isaac Moving Blocks Singapore
Scott Moses Sunarto Moving Blocks Indonesia
Mira Yang OpenMRS United States
Nji Collins OpenMRS Cameroon
Cristian García Sugar Labs Uruguay
Tymon Radzik Sugar Labs Poland
August van de Ven SCoRe Netherlands
Deniz Karakay SCoRe Turkey
Jacqueline Bronger Systers Germany
Soham Sen Systers India
Filip Grzywok Wikimedia Poland
Justin Du Wikimedia United States
Sampriti Panda Zulip India
Tommy Ip Zulip United Kingdom

And below are the Finalists. Each of these 51 students will receive a digital certificate of completion, a GCI t-shirt and hooded sweatshirt.

FINALISTS
Name Organization
Bror Hultberg Apertium
Kamil Bujel Apertium
Ngadou Sylvestre Apertium
Apratim Ranjan Chakrabarty BRL-CAD
Tianyue Gao BRL-CAD
Trung Nguyen Hoang BRL-CAD
Danila Fedorin CCExtractor Development
Manveer Basra CCExtractor Development
Matej Plavevski CCExtractor Development
Daniel Wee Soong Lim Copyleft Games Group
Jonathan Pan Copyleft Games Group
Oscar Belletti Copyleft Games Group
Ashmith Kifah Sheik Meeran Drupal
Heervesh Lallbahadur Drupal
Neeraj Pandey Drupal
Adarsh Kumar FOSSASIA
Ridhwanul Haque FOSSASIA
Sanchit Mishra FOSSASIA
Dmytro Shynkevych Haiku
Stephanie Fu Haiku
Tudor Nazarie Haiku
Harpreet Singh KDE
Sangeetha S KDE
Spencer Brown KDE
Daniel Theis MetaBrainz
Divya Prakash Mittal MetaBrainz
Tigran Kostandyan MetaBrainz
Illia Andrieiev Mifos
Justin Du Mifos
Tan Gemicioglu Mifos
J Young Kim Moving Blocks
Maxim Borsch Moving Blocks
Quinn Roberts Moving Blocks
Shivani Thaker OpenMRS
Tenzin Zomkyi OpenMRS
Yusuf Karim OpenMRS
Emily Ong Hui Qi Sugar Labs
Euan Ong Sugar Labs
Pablo Salomón Ortega Quintana Sugar Labs
Basil Najjar SCoRe
Jupinder Parmar SCoRe
Thuận Nguyễn SCoRe
Muaaz Kasker Systers
Muhammed Shamil K Systers
Phoebe Fletcher Systers
David Siedtmann Wikimedia
Nikita Volobuev Wikimedia
Yurii Shnitkovskyi Wikimedia
Cynthia Lin Zulip
Rafid Aslam Zulip
Robert Hönig Zulip


The Google Open Source Programs Office is proud to run this contest each year. The quality of work from our participating students is incredible, and each year we look forward to meeting our Grand Prize winners in person. It’s exciting to see the next generation of coders emerge! We also owe a huge debt of gratitude to all of the mentors who helped guide each of the participants through their tasks. Without their tireless work over the past 7 weeks, GCI would not be possible.

Stay tuned to the open source blog - we’ll regularly post Google Code-in 2016 stories in the upcoming months including a full breakdown of contest statistics, wrap-up posts from the organizations, student highlights and more.

By Mary Radomile, Open Source Programs Office

Google Summer of Code 2016 wrap-up: Orange

This post is part of our ongoing series of guest posts from the students, mentors and organization administrators who participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC). GSoC is a program that pairs university students with mentors for a summer where they apply their computer science skills to building open source software.

Orange Data Mining is a data mining suite with visual programming and interactive data analysis at its core. Orange was developed at Bioinformatics Lab at University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, it is written mainly in Python, and you can find it hosted on GitHub.

This was our third Google Summer of Code and we were given five slots and decided to select students based on two criteria: their proposal joined with their coding skills and the importance of the project to our organization.

Great work was done over the summer and we are proud to present our students’ projects!

Recommender Systems add-on by Salva Carrion

Salva independently implemented a new Orange3 add-on for recommender systems. He developed a scripting library for collaborative filtering for the core of the add-on, which includes a number of published matrix factorization algorithms. The scripting library is then further extended to include GUI-based widgets for visual programming.

Educational add-on by Primož Godec

Primož took on a task of developing a series of educational widgets for Orange3. The end result was a full Orange3-Educational add-on with four widgets that can be used to demonstrate key data mining and machine learning procedures in the classroom. These widgets are useful for helping beginners understand the inner workings of key algorithms in data mining, and for teachers to be able to visually explain the various methods. They include interactive and step-by-step visualizations of k-means, polynomial classification, and gradient descent.

Text add-on by Aliaxey Sukharevich

Orange3-Text add-on was already an active project before GSoC, but Aliaxey took it to another level. Twitter and Wikipedia public RESTful services were introduced as widgets to allow acquisition of data from new sources. Many widgets were boosted with new functionalities and methods (e.g. HDP, LDA and LSP methods in Topic Modelling widget). Preprocessing was redesigned and reimplemented such that it now handles n-grams and POS Tagging.

CN2 Rule Induction by Matevž Kren

The goal of this project was to implement a CN2 rule induction algorithm, and Orange widgets for learning and exploration of inferred classification rules. At the heart of the project is an implementation of a scripting library, which can be easily extended with additional divide and conquer algorithms or its components.

Porting Orange codebase to Pandas by Sašo Stanovnik

This was a gargantuan task and Sašo handled it beautifully. The goal was to consolidate Orange data structures and management routines to support data from Pandas. Sašo redesigned Orange data management core, did a massive amount of refactoring and improvements and removed legacy and unused code. The biggest challenge was of course preserving as much compatibility with the existing Orange interaction as possible while providing full Pandas flexibility. The result is a functional Pandas-based core Orange.

All contributions were committed on GitHub (Orange3, Orange3-Text, Orange3-Recommendation and Orange3-Educational repositories) and most of them are already pip-installable. The only contribution that has not yet been merged is the migration to Pandas, which will require adaptation and careful compatibility checking of other components of the system.

We are extremely grateful to be given the chance to participate in Google Summer of Code and to have had such amazing students at our lab. We can’t wait to apply again next year!

By Ajda Pretnar, Organization Administrator for Orange