Tag Archives: Google in Europe

Our ongoing commitment to support computer science educators in Europe

The need for employees with computer science (CS) and coding skills is steadily increasing in Europe—by 4 percent every year between 2006 and 2016 according to DigitalEurope.  But educators are struggling to keep up with the demand, often because they lack the professional development, confidence and resources to successfully teach their students. 

Because of these challenges, we’re working to increase the availability of quality computer science education and access to CS skills by empowering CS teachers globally. We’ve recently launched new support in Europe, the Middle East and Africa through CS4HS, a program to fund universities and nonprofits designing and delivering rigorous computer science professional development for teachers.

We’re excited to be working with 79 organizations worldwide, and 28 in the EMEA region, who are committed to increasing the technical and teaching skills of educators, and building communities of ongoing learning. We believe that these organizations are committed to delivering high-quality teacher professional development programs with a deep impact in their local community and a strong potential to increase their reach.

Classroom image

Growing the community of computer science educators  

Over the past 10 years, CS4HS has contributed $10 million to professional development (PD) providers around the world to help develop and empower teachers—like Catrobat, a non-profit initiative based at Graz University of Technology in Austria who created a free online course for students and teachers, and the University of Wolverhampton, who created a free MOOC to empower teachers of computing to teach programming in the new computing syllabuses in England, among others.

We’re excited to support new and future CS educators around the world. Even though computer science is a relatively new discipline for most schools, the enthusiasm is growing and teachers have a critical role to play in fueling their students’ interest and participation. These grants will help universities and nonprofits reach educators with PD opportunities that enhance their CS and technical skills development, improve their confidence in the classroom, and provide leadership training so that they can be advocates for CS education in their communities.

2017 awardees in EMEA

Asociatia Techsoup Romania

Ideodromio, Cyprus

Università degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Informatica, Italy

Lithuanian Computer Society

Dublin City University, Ireland

Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland

EduACT, Greece

Graz University of Technology, Austria

University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Asociatia Tech Lounge, Romania

Association Rural Internet Access Points, Lithuania

University of Wolverhampton, UK

Universidad de Granada, Spain

University UMK Toruń, Poland

Hasselt University, Belgium

Jednota školských informatiků, Czech Republic

University of Lille - Science and Technology, France

University of Roehampton, UK

University of Urbino, Italy

ETH Zürich, Switzerland

Vattenhallen Science Center, Lund University, Sweden

University College of Applied Sciences, Palestine

Hapa Foundation, Ghana

Let’s Get Ready, Cameroon

Swaziland Foundation for STEM Education

Laikipia University, Kenya

Mobile4Senegal

Peo Ya Phetogo in partnership with University of the Western Cape & Mozilla Foundation, South Africa

To discover more about CS opportunities near you, explore our educator resourcesstudent programs and resources, and tools.


Our ongoing commitment to support computer science educators in Europe

The need for employees with computer science (CS) and coding skills is steadily increasing in Europe—by 4 percent every year between 2006 and 2016 according to DigitalEurope.  But educators are struggling to keep up with the demand, often because they lack the professional development, confidence and resources to successfully teach their students. 

Because of these challenges, we’re working to increase the availability of quality computer science education and access to CS skills by empowering CS teachers globally. We’ve recently launched new support in Europe, the Middle East and Africa through CS4HS, a program to fund universities and nonprofits designing and delivering rigorous computer science professional development for teachers.

We’re excited to be working with 79 organizations worldwide, and 28 in the EMEA region, who are committed to increasing the technical and teaching skills of educators, and building communities of ongoing learning. We believe that these organizations are committed to delivering high-quality teacher professional development programs with a deep impact in their local community and a strong potential to increase their reach.

Classroom image

Growing the community of computer science educators  

Over the past 10 years, CS4HS has contributed $10 million to professional development (PD) providers around the world to help develop and empower teachers—like Catrobat, a non-profit initiative based at Graz University of Technology in Austria who created a free online course for students and teachers, and the University of Wolverhampton, who created a free MOOC to empower teachers of computing to teach programming in the new computing syllabuses in England, among others.

We’re excited to support new and future CS educators around the world. Even though computer science is a relatively new discipline for most schools, the enthusiasm is growing and teachers have a critical role to play in fueling their students’ interest and participation. These grants will help universities and nonprofits reach educators with PD opportunities that enhance their CS and technical skills development, improve their confidence in the classroom, and provide leadership training so that they can be advocates for CS education in their communities.

2017 awardees in EMEA

Asociatia Techsoup Romania

Ideodromio, Cyprus

Università degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Informatica, Italy

Lithuanian Computer Society

Dublin City University, Ireland

Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland

EduACT, Greece

Graz University of Technology, Austria

University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Asociatia Tech Lounge, Romania

Association Rural Internet Access Points, Lithuania

University of Wolverhampton, UK

Universidad de Granada, Spain

University UMK Toruń, Poland

Hasselt University, Belgium

Jednota školských informatiků, Czech Republic

University of Lille - Science and Technology, France

University of Roehampton, UK

University of Urbino, Italy

ETH Zürich, Switzerland

Vattenhallen Science Center, Lund University, Sweden

University College of Applied Sciences, Palestine

Hapa Foundation, Ghana

Let’s Get Ready, Cameroon

Swaziland Foundation for STEM Education

Laikipia University, Kenya

Mobile4Senegal

Peo Ya Phetogo in partnership with University of the Western Cape & Mozilla Foundation, South Africa

To discover more about CS opportunities near you, explore our educator resourcesstudent programs and resources, and tools.


Android Pay says “Привет” to Russia

Stepping out for groceries or an afternoon coffee? You’ll no longer need to bring anything more than your phone. Starting today, Android Pay is available in Russia – which means you’ll be able to enjoy a simpler and more secure way to pay across all 11 time zones.

Android Pay lets you check out quickly and easily in some of your favorite stores and apps – gone are the days of fumbling for credit cards and counting cash. Get the Android Pay app from Google Play and add your eligible card to get started. When you’re ready to pay, just hold your phone near the payment terminal and wait for the checkmark to appear. You can also add all your loyalty cards to Android Pay so they’re easily accessible.

Where can I use Android Pay?

Whether you’re fueling your car, grabbing coffee with breakfast, buying groceries, or going to the cinema, you can use Android Pay anywhere that accepts contactless payments –just look for either of these logos when you’re ready to pay.

Android Pay NFC

Thousands of your favorite places already accept Android Pay, including Magnit, Perekrestok, Starbucks, KFC and Rosneft. And with your loyalty cards saved in the Android Pay app, there’s no need to carry them around anymore.

Select Merchants that accept Android Pay

Shopping in apps like Lamoda, OneTwoTrip, or Rambler-Kassa? Breeze through checkout with Android Pay. You’ll no longer have to enter your payment details every time –look for the Android Pay button and you can pay with a single tap. Here some of the apps that accept Android Pay now, with more coming soon!

RU_in app

And if you’re an online merchant, we've teamed up with several processors to make it even easier for you to accept Android Pay in your apps and sites. Visit the Android Pay API developer site to learn more.

Russian Processors

Getting started

To start using Android Pay, download the Android Pay app from Google Play. You’ll need to have Android KitKat 4.4 or higher on your phone. Then, add an eligible Visa or Mastercard credit or debit card from a supported bank, such as AK BARS, Alfa-Bank, B&N Bank, MTS Bank, Otkritie, Promsvyazbank, Raiffeisen Bank, Rocketbank, Russian Standard Bank, Russian Agricultural Bank, Sberbank, Tinkoff Bank, Tochka, VTB24 or Yandex.Money. Don’t see your bank on the list? Don’t worry. We’re always adding new partners, and we’ll let you know as soon as new banks come on board.

Android Pay Russian Featured Banks

If you already have the Raiffeisen Bank, Sberbank, or Tinkoff Bank mobile apps, you can enable Android Pay from those banking apps without having to download Android Pay. Just tap the “Add to Android Pay” button to enable your card in Android Pay without entering your card information.

Because Android Pay doesn’t share your actual credit or debit card number with stores, it’s safer than using a plastic card. If your phone is ever lost or stolen, you can use Find My Device to instantly lock your phone from anywhere, secure it with a new password, or wipe it clean of your personal information.

Ready to use Android Pay in stores? You’ll need to make sure your phone supports NFC. Thousands of phones do – and we’ve created a guide to answer your questions and point you in the right direction.
Russia OEMs

We’re thrilled to name Russia as our 11th country to adopt Android Pay, and we hope it’ll make your everyday purchases faster, easier, and a little more fun. Get the app now to enjoy the benefits of effortless checkout in apps, online, and at all your favorite places.

Android Pay says “Привет” to Russia

Stepping out for groceries or an afternoon coffee? You’ll no longer need to bring anything more than your phone. Starting today, Android Pay is available in Russia – which means you’ll be able to enjoy a simpler and more secure way to pay across all 11 time zones.

Android Pay lets you check out quickly and easily in some of your favorite stores and apps – gone are the days of fumbling for credit cards and counting cash. Get the Android Pay app from Google Play and add your eligible card to get started. When you’re ready to pay, just hold your phone near the payment terminal and wait for the checkmark to appear. You can also add all your loyalty cards to Android Pay so they’re easily accessible.

Where can I use Android Pay?

Whether you’re fueling your car, grabbing coffee with breakfast, buying groceries, or going to the cinema, you can use Android Pay anywhere that accepts contactless payments –just look for either of these logos when you’re ready to pay.

Android Pay NFC

Thousands of your favorite places already accept Android Pay, including Magnit, Perekrestok, Starbucks, KFC and Rosneft. And with your loyalty cards saved in the Android Pay app, there’s no need to carry them around anymore.

Select Merchants that accept Android Pay

Shopping in apps like Lamoda, OneTwoTrip, or Rambler-Kassa? Breeze through checkout with Android Pay. You’ll no longer have to enter your payment details every time –look for the Android Pay button and you can pay with a single tap. Here some of the apps that accept Android Pay now, with more coming soon!

RU_in app

And if you’re an online merchant, we've teamed up with several processors to make it even easier for you to accept Android Pay in your apps and sites. Visit the Android Pay API developer site to learn more.

Russian Processors

Getting started

To start using Android Pay, download the Android Pay app from Google Play. You’ll need to have Android KitKat 4.4 or higher on your phone. Then, add an eligible Visa or Mastercard credit or debit card from a supported bank, such as AK BARS, Alfa-Bank, B&N Bank, MTS Bank, Otkritie, Promsvyazbank, Raiffeisen Bank, Rocketbank, Russian Standard Bank, Russian Agricultural Bank, Sberbank, Tinkoff Bank, Tochka, VTB24 or Yandex.Money. Don’t see your bank on the list? Don’t worry. We’re always adding new partners, and we’ll let you know as soon as new banks come on board.

Android Pay Russian Featured Banks

If you already have the Raiffeisen Bank, Sberbank, or Tinkoff Bank mobile apps, you can enable Android Pay from those banking apps without having to download Android Pay. Just tap the “Add to Android Pay” button to enable your card in Android Pay without entering your card information.

Because Android Pay doesn’t share your actual credit or debit card number with stores, it’s safer than using a plastic card. If your phone is ever lost or stolen, you can use Find My Device to instantly lock your phone from anywhere, secure it with a new password, or wipe it clean of your personal information.

Ready to use Android Pay in stores? You’ll need to make sure your phone supports NFC. Thousands of phones do – and we’ve created a guide to answer your questions and point you in the right direction.
Russia OEMs

We’re thrilled to name Russia as our 11th country to adopt Android Pay, and we hope it’ll make your everyday purchases faster, easier, and a little more fun. Get the app now to enjoy the benefits of effortless checkout in apps, online, and at all your favorite places.

Introducing Searching for Syria, a project made in partnership with UNHCR

It was six years ago in March that the Syrian civil war began, and since then more than five million people have been forced to leave their homes, their possessions, their families, and their education to seek shelter throughout the Middle East, Europe, and around the world. The scale of the crisis is hard for most of us to fathom, and the experiences of the refugee population can often feel too remote for most of us to understand.

Since 2015, we’ve tried to do our part to help. Google.org has invested more than $20 million in grants supporting solutions to provide 800,000+ refugees with emergency support and access to vital information and education.

SFS_Blogpost_400x400.gif

Today we are launching a site called “Searching for Syria,” a new way for people learn about Syria and the Syrian refugee crisis by exploring five of the most common search queries that people around the world are asking. Each question allows you to explore some of the detail behind the answer, combining UNHCR data with Google Maps, satellite imagery, videos, photography, and stories from refugees.

Each June the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) releases a Global Trends report which contains the latest facts and figures on refugees, asylum-seekers, migrants and other people under the agency’s mandate. Late last year, Google and the UNHCR teamed up to combine this report with Search trends, drawing connections between the questions that people are searching for with the UNHCR’s detailed data sets. Our goal was to paint a new kind of picture of the Syrian refugee crisis, accessible to greater numbers of people—and in doing so, remind people not only of the scale of the crisis, but also of the human side of it.

We see through Google Search trends that people are certainly trying to understand the scale of the crisis. Among the top trending searches in Germany, France, and the UK last year was “What is happening in Syria?” and simply, “What is a refugee?” People in every corner of the world are turning to Google Search to  find out what’s going on and how they might help. In 2016 alone people searched for information about Syria and the Syrian people over tens of millions of times.

SFS_BlogPost_Family_Shot.png

Over the last six years we have seen Search trends from around the world shift from  immediate questions like, “Where are Syrian refugees going?” to the more contemplative, “What was Syria like before the war?” Throughout Searching for Syria, refugee families tell you about their homes six years ago and today—and what they’ve experienced in traveling to their new, temporary lives.

People search for many reasons—to learn and to research, or sometimes to connect, share, and overcome. Sharing these trends, based on UNHCR’s verified data, will ensure that people searching to better understand one of the most terrible events of the last six years will be able to do just that.

Searching for Syria

Introducing Searching for Syria, a project made in partnership with UNHCR

It was six years ago in March that the Syrian civil war began, and since then more than five million people have been forced to leave their homes, their possessions, their families, and their education to seek shelter throughout the Middle East, Europe, and around the world. The scale of the crisis is hard for most of us to fathom, and the experiences of the refugee population can often feel too remote for most of us to understand.

Since 2015, we’ve tried to do our part to help. Google.org has invested more than $20 million in grants supporting solutions to provide 800,000+ refugees with emergency support and access to vital information and education.

SFS_Blogpost_400x400.gif

Today we are launching a site called “Searching for Syria,” a new way for people learn about Syria and the Syrian refugee crisis by exploring five of the most common search queries that people around the world are asking. Each question allows you to explore some of the detail behind the answer, combining UNHCR data with Google Maps, satellite imagery, videos, photography, and stories from refugees.

Each June the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) releases a Global Trends report which contains the latest facts and figures on refugees, asylum-seekers, migrants and other people under the agency’s mandate. Late last year, Google and the UNHCR teamed up to combine this report with Search trends, drawing connections between the questions that people are searching for with the UNHCR’s detailed data sets. Our goal was to paint a new kind of picture of the Syrian refugee crisis, accessible to greater numbers of people—and in doing so, remind people not only of the scale of the crisis, but also of the human side of it.

We see through Google Search trends that people are certainly trying to understand the scale of the crisis. Among the top trending searches in Germany, France, and the UK last year was “What is happening in Syria?” and simply, “What is a refugee?” People in every corner of the world are turning to Google Search to  find out what’s going on and how they might help. In 2016 alone people searched for information about Syria and the Syrian people over tens of millions of times.

SFS_BlogPost_Family_Shot.png

Over the last six years we have seen Search trends from around the world shift from  immediate questions like, “Where are Syrian refugees going?” to the more contemplative, “What was Syria like before the war?” Throughout Searching for Syria, refugee families tell you about their homes six years ago and today—and what they’ve experienced in traveling to their new, temporary lives.

People search for many reasons—to learn and to research, or sometimes to connect, share, and overcome. Sharing these trends, based on UNHCR’s verified data, will ensure that people searching to better understand one of the most terrible events of the last six years will be able to do just that.

Searching for Syria

The grand tour of Italy: traveling through the past and present to define our future

Italian culture—art, architecture, music and food—have made Italy great in the eyes of the rest of the world. Have you ever wondered how these Italian masterpieces from the past have shaped today’s present, and how they can continue to be a source of inspiration in the future?

Three hundred years ago, Italy’s “Grand Tour” was a journey made mainly by wealthy young people from Venice to Sicily, going through Tuscany, Rome or Naples, to discover the legacy of classical art and Renaissance Masterpieces. Europe’s upper class families made a tradition of sending their sons and daughters to explore  the country’s artwork to inspire a love of culture and creativity. Today Google brings this journey back to life, but this time we’re making it available to everyone, everywhere.

We’ve  reinterpreted the The Grand Tour of Italy on Google Arts & Culture through vivid exhibits and storytelling from partners including the Comitato Giovani della Commissione Nazionale Italiana for UNESCO, Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia—Museo Correr and Cà RezzonicoAccademia dei Fisiocritici, Consorzio per la Tutela del Palio di Siena, Outdoor Project, and the Teatro Massimo in Palermo. Working together, and with a little help from Google’s technology, we’re proud to present The Grand Tour of Italy,  which explores four cities in five Cardboard tours, 25 videos, 21 Street View tours, 38 digital exhibitions and 1300+ images.

People everywhere can embark on a digital trip from Venice to Palermo, going through Siena and Rome to see some of the cultural treasures of Italy, experience timeless traditions, take a closer look at masterpieces in ultra-high resolution and discover Italian innovations that have changed the modern world.

Immerse yourself in the atmosphere of the Festa del Redentore, find out about its origins and history, or usingsimple Google Cardboard, you can experience the magic of the Redentore fireworks display with a 360° virtual tour. Enjoy the excitement of a tradition that shapes the life of an entire city, and experience the preparation for the Palio di Siena, as if you were right there. In one click, you can go to Pienza and discover how a small town with a population of around 3,000 created a new approach to town planning, later used in laying out larger modern cities. Take a virtual walk around Rome and stop to look at the statue of Pasquino, hear the story of the talking statues and the “Pasquinate”, the forerunner of today’s social media. Go into the Teatro Massimo Vittorio Emanuele of Palermo, the largest opera theatre in Italy and one of the largest in Europe. It used to be exclusively for the city’s upper class, but now everyone can enjoy it.

Our digital journey continues to Venice (and in the coming months in Siena, Rome and Palermo), where we’ll help residents of the city prepare cities for a digital future. Free seminars and workshops organized with our partners will help spread digital skills among citizens and make sure the younger generations are ready to take advantage of the opportunities offered by technology.

If you’re in Venice, come and see us from May 19-21 at the Arsenale Nord, Tesa 94 (from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.) to discover how these fascinating stories come to life. If not, don’t miss the chance to discover more about the project and download Google Art & Culture app on Android and iOS!

Three years of striking the right (to be forgotten) balance

It is now three years since Europe’s highest court decided that EU citizens should have a ‘right to be forgotten’. Implementing that right has neither been simple nor without controversy, but in that time we have evaluated 720,000 delisting requests, ultimately removing around 43% of the more than 2 million links submitted to us.  

Over the three years, the way search engines delist, and national law, has continued to develop. Now, two fundamental issues are being considered by two of Europe’s highest courts.

Sensitive personal data and the public interest

Put simply, the first issue—due to be heard by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) in the coming months—is whether people have an absolute right to request removal of lawfully published, but sensitive, personal data from search results.  Or whether, as is the case now, search engines should continue to balance the public interest in access to information with the individual’s right to privacy.   

The background to this CJEU case is that in 2016, four individuals were unhappy with our decision not to remove certain links to webpages about them. They appealed to the French data protection regulator, the CNIL, asking them to review our decisions, challenging the underlying principle that a public interest test should apply.

In its review, the CNIL agreed with our decisions. The individuals subsequently took their case to the French Supreme Administrative Court (the Conseil d’Etat). This court heard their arguments in February of this year, and referred the case to the European Court of Justice of the European Union (case number C-136/17).

The CJEU now has to decide whether ‘sensitive personal data’—such as the political allegiance of an individual, or a past criminal conviction reported in the press—should always outweigh the public interest.

The tricky thing with this kind of information is that it is often important for people to know and it is frequently reported in newspapers and elsewhere. Requiring automatic delisting from search engines, without any public interest balancing test, risks creating a dangerous loophole. Such a loophole would enable anyone to demand removal of links that should remain up in the public interest, simply by claiming they contain some element of sensitive personal data.

So when the CJEU confirms a date to hear this case, we will be advocating strongly for the public interest balancing test to apply to all types of delisting requests—including those containing sensitive personal data.

Where does the right to be forgotten apply?

There is another fundamental legal question due to be heard in coming months at the French Conseil d’Etat. At stake: whether Europe’s right to be forgotten should reach beyond the borders of Europe, whether delisting of links should also happen in other countries which have different ways of balancing privacy and access to information.

Enforcing the right to be forgotten beyond Europe would set a grave precedent. There would quickly be a race to the bottom as other countries, perhaps less open and democratic than France, ordered Google to remove search links for every citizen in every other country of the world.

We’ve written extensively on this topic in the past, as have a wide range of human rights and media organisations, and others. It’s possible that the Conseil d’Etat may also refer this geographical scope question to the CJEU.  But wherever this case is heard, our key assertion remains the same: no one country should be able to impose its rules on the citizens of other another country, especially when it comes to lawful content.

Fundamental questions

Google did not welcome the right to be forgotten, but we have worked hard to implement it in Europe over the last three years. Access to information in the public interest, and the right of of all countries to define the balance between privacy and free expression within their own borders, are important, fundamental issues. We look forward to presenting our arguments at both the CJEU and the Conseil d’Etat.


What is YouTube’s role in the music industry?

The music industry is navigating a period of significant change. But while physical sales have been on the decline, advertising- and subscription-funded streaming have been a source of growth. In 2016 YouTube paid out over 1 billion USD to the music industry from ad revenue alone; and our Content ID allows the music industry to control their content on the platform, including the ability to make money from fan-uploaded music content.   

Nonetheless, there is a lively debate about whether YouTube is good or bad for the music industry overall. To get to the bottom of this question, and to better understand the way the industry has changed in the digital age, we commissioned a study from RBB Economics. The study, which looks at exclusive YouTube data and a survey of 6,000 users across Germany, France, Italy and the U.K, will examine several aspects of the transformed industry in a series of papers being published over the coming weeks.

In the first paper, published today, RBB looks at the question of cannibalisation: does the fact that people listen to music on YouTube mean that they don’t use other—sometimes more lucrative—sources of music?   

The study finds that this is not the case. In fact, if YouTube didn’t exist, 85% of time spent on YouTube would move to lower value channels, and would result in a significant increase in piracy.

The researchers find that significant cannibalisation by YouTube of other legitimate music channels is unlikely, for a few reasons:

  • Based on survey data they find that, in the absence of YouTube, most time spent listening to music on YouTube would be lost or shifted to lower value music channels.

YouTube music consumption
  • In the absence of YouTube, time spent listening to pirated content would increase by 29%, suggesting that people are going to YouTube instead of pirating music.  

  • And further, blocking music from YouTube does not lead to an increase in streams on other platforms.

The cumulative effect of these findings is that YouTube has a market expansion effect, not a cannibalising one.

In coming weeks, RBB will release further papers on other aspects of the digital music world and YouTube’s role therein. We will update this post with their findings.


What is YouTube’s role in the music industry?

The music industry is navigating a period of significant change. But while physical sales have been on the decline, advertising- and subscription-funded streaming have been a source of growth. In 2016 YouTube paid out over 1 billion USD to the music industry from ad revenue alone; and our Content ID allows the music industry to control their content on the platform, including the ability to make money from fan-uploaded music content.   

Nonetheless, there is a lively debate about whether YouTube is good or bad for the music industry overall. To get to the bottom of this question, and to better understand the way the industry has changed in the digital age, we commissioned a study from RBB Economics. The study, which looks at exclusive YouTube data and a survey of 6,000 users across Germany, France, Italy and the U.K, will examine several aspects of the transformed industry in a series of papers being published over the coming weeks.

In the first paper, published today, RBB looks at the question of cannibalisation: does the fact that people listen to music on YouTube mean that they don’t use other—sometimes more lucrative—sources of music?   

The study finds that this is not the case. In fact, if YouTube didn’t exist, 85% of time spent on YouTube would move to lower value channels, and would result in a significant increase in piracy.

The researchers find that significant cannibalisation by YouTube of other legitimate music channels is unlikely, for a few reasons:

  • Based on survey data they find that, in the absence of YouTube, most time spent listening to music on YouTube would be lost or shifted to lower value music channels.

YouTube music consumption
  • In the absence of YouTube, time spent listening to pirated content would increase by 29%, suggesting that people are going to YouTube instead of pirating music.  

  • And further, blocking music from YouTube does not lead to an increase in streams on other platforms.

The cumulative effect of these findings is that YouTube has a market expansion effect, not a cannibalising one.

In coming weeks, RBB will release further papers on other aspects of the digital music world and YouTube’s role therein. We will update this post with their findings.