Tag Archives: Google in Europe

Supporting CS educators in Europe, the Middle East and Africa

To ensure all young people have the opportunity to learn computer science (CS), it’s critical that educators are prepared and supported to teach with confidence and competence. Today we’re announcing grants to 31 universities and nonprofit organizations across 16 countries in Europe, the Middle East and Africa to provide professional development for CS educators. These grants are part of Grow with Google’s commitment to train and equip teachers with the right skills to prepare the future workforce.


As digital technologies continue to evolve at an increasingly faster rate, it’s predicted that 21 million new jobs will be created in the next 10 to 15 years. CS has a crucial role in equipping students with the technical skills to embrace these new opportunities and career choices. CS education includes design, data, algorithms and the study of computer systems, while also promoting crucial skills such as collaboration, problem-solving and creativity. We believe every student should have the opportunity to learn CS; with that comes the responsibility of preparing teachers to deliver a CS curriculum with competence and confidence.


The grants announced today will enable research institutions, universities, and educational nonprofits to develop professional development (PD) programs specifically for CS teachers—those already teaching the subject and those completely new to the field. Through these PD programs, teachers will be able to grow their skills and knowledge to provide an exemplary educational experience for their students. Over the coming year, the 31 awardees in EMEA will provide a combined 500 hours of professional learning opportunities for 10,000 primary, secondary and pre-service teachers.


The funding announced today will support professional development for teachers in countries like Italy, where APS Programma il Futuro will provide professional development courses to approximately 150 primary and secondary school teachers. The grants will also allow awardees to respond to the increasing demand for CS PD in pre-service teacher education. In Ireland, for example, The University of Limerick will develop a new course to empower 50 pre-service teachers with CS skills and hands-on classroom resources.


We’re thrilled to congratulate these 2018 grant awardees across Europe, Middle East and Africa. Prepared teachers are key to helping students embrace the CS opportunities of tomorrow, and we look forward to seeing how these grantees will advance CS education for the new global economy.

Our preparations for Europe’s new data protection law

Last year, we outlined Google’s commitment to comply with Europe’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), across all of the services we provide in the European Union. We’ve been working on our compliance efforts for over eighteen months, and ahead of the new law coming into effect, here’s an update on some of the key steps we've taken.


Improved user transparency

We’re updating our current Privacy Policy to make it easier to understand what information we collect, and why we collect it. We’ve improved the navigation and organization of the policy to make it easier to find what you’re looking for; explained our practices in more detail and with clearer language; and added more detail about the options you have to manage, export, and delete data from our services. The policy now also includes explanatory videos and illustrations, because a visual description can be easier to understand than text alone. And we've made it easier to jump to your privacy settings directly from the policy, helping you make choices about your privacy.

Although we’re taking these steps to make our Privacy Policy easier to understand, it’s important to note that nothing is changing about your current settings or how your information is processed. You’ll continue to have granular control over the data you share with us when you use our services, but with clearer explanations. The updated policy is already available to read and we’ll be emailing all of our users about it individually.


Improved user controls

Every day, nearly 20 million people around the globe visit My Account, our central hub that brings together all the different ways you can review your Google security, privacy and ad settings. As part of our GDPR compliance efforts, we’ve improved both the controls and the clarity of information in My Account so that people are better informed about how and why their data is collected. Within My Account, you can: 


  • Use Activity Controls to choose what activity is saved to your Google Account. We provide simple on/off switches to control Location History, Web and App Activity, YouTube Search History and more, across all devices that are signed in to your account.
  • View or delete data—including search history, location history, browsing history—from our services using My Activity. To make it easier to browse your past online activity, we have given you tools to search by topic, date, and product. You can permanently delete specific activities, entire days or weeks of activity that you don’t want associated with your account.
  • Take a Security Checkup or Privacy Checkup to reassure yourself that your account is secure, and that your privacy settings work for you. We’ve recently added an option that allows you to subscribe to more frequent prompts to take the Privacy Checkup.
  • Manage or mute the ads you see on Google, on websites and in apps using the recently upgraded Ads Settings tool and Mute This Ad control. We have provided more information about how and why certain ads are personalized, and will also be further simplifying the look and feel of these tools in the coming months.
  • Get a clear overview of all the Google products that you use—and the data associated with them—via Google Dashboard. We’ve recently made the Dashboard more mobile-friendly so it's now easy to use across different devices.

Improved data portability

Since its launch in 2011, people around the world have used our Download Your Data tool to export data from products like Google Photos, Drive, Calendar, Google Play Music and Gmail, either to their own computer, or to storage services like OneDrive, Dropbox and Box. We are further improving and expanding this feature, adding more Google services, including more contextual data controls, and creating a new setting that helps people schedule regular downloads.
Download your Data

While we’ve enabled people to download data from our services for many years, the GDPR encourages companies to enable direct service-to-service data transfers where feasible, for example from Google Photos to another photo service. To support that aim, we've recently initiated the Data Transfer Project on GitHub, providing early-stage open source code that will, in time, be of use to any developer wanting to offer seamless transfer of data from one service directly into an alternative (or vice versa).


Parental consent and improved tools for children online

Under the new rules, companies must get consent from parents to process their children’s data in certain circumstances. To obtain that consent and to make sure that parents and children have the tools to manage their online experiences, we’re rolling out Family Link—already available in various countries around the world—throughout the EU.


Through Family Link, parents can create a Google Account for their child and are required to provide consent for certain processing of their child’s data. Family Link also allows parents to set certain digital ground rules on their child’s Android device—like approving or blocking apps, keeping an eye on screen time, or remotely locking their child’s device. We plan to evolve Family Link’s functionality over time, working closely with parents and advocacy groups.


Helping our business customers and partners

The GDPR places new obligations on Google, but also on any business providing services to people in the EU. That includes our partners around the globe: advertisers, publishers, developers and cloud customers. We’ve been working with them to prepare for May 25, consulting with regulators, civil society groups, academics, industry groups and others.


For our advertising partners, we’ve clarified how our advertising policies will change when the GDPR takes effect. We already ask publishers to get consent from their users for the use of our ad tech on their sites and apps under existing legislation, but we’ve now updated that requirement in line with GDPR guidance. We’re also working closely with our publisher partners to provide a range of tools to help them gather user consent, and have built a solution for publishers that want to show non-personalized ads, using only contextual information.


For our Google Cloud customers, we’ve updated our data processing terms for G Suite and Google Cloud Platform and provided detailed information to customers about our approach to data portability, data incident notifications, secure infrastructure and third party audits and certifications, among other features. For more information, see this post on Google Cloud.


Strengthening our privacy compliance program

Over the last decade, Google has built a strong global privacy compliance program, taking advice from regulators around the world. Across the company, we have dedicated teams of engineers and compliance experts who work in full-time privacy roles, ensuring that no Google product launches without a comprehensive privacy review. We’ve now further improved our privacy program, enhancing our product launch review processes, and more comprehensively documenting our processing of data, in line with the accountability requirements of the GDPR.


This is a snapshot of things we’ve done to date to be ready for May 25, 2018. But our commitment to compliance with the GDPR, and the rights it gives people, will continue long beyond this date. As we evolve our products over time, we’ll continue to improve our Privacy Program and the protections we offer to users. Our ambition is to have the highest possible standards of data security and privacy, and to put our users and partners in control.

How YouTube can help people develop their careers and grow their businesses

As new technologies change the way people do their jobs or run their businesses, YouTube can help them acquire new skills to take advantage of the opportunities ahead.

Video is much more than just a source of entertainment, it’s also a powerful medium for learning.  YouTube has a wealth of resources to help people advance their careers, prepare for new jobs or grow their businesses. More than 500 million learning-related videos are viewed on the platform every day. These videos are made and shared by a highly-motivated group of creators, such as Linda Raynier, whose videos teach job seekers how to nail aninterview or write a resume that gets noticed; or Vanessa Van Edwards, who helps people master soft skills like how to use body language in an interview or communicate a great elevator pitch. Thanks to creators like Linda and Vanessa, people can learn new skills for free and engage with a YouTube community of experts for valuable support.

Finding out the facts

Together with brand consultancy Flamingo, we recently surveyed internet users to discover what they think of YouTube and and how it helps them learn new skills.

In the ten European countries covered in the research, 64 percent of respondents felt that YouTube helps them learn new skills that enable personal or professional advancement, making it the highest-rated channel of those included in the survey. YouTube scores highly on this measure for both men (62 percent) and women (66 percent), and across all age groups, at least 50 percent of respondents agreed with the statement.

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As part of the research, we ran interviews with people who note that YouTube is a key resource for learning and building their career. One respondent in Saudi Arabia observed that: “YouTube makes me feel like I have a teacher—a teacher that’s available at any moment.” Likewise, a teenager  from France, said, “I decided I wanted to work in fashion thanks to YouTube. I learned how to apply makeup and spot fashion trends thanks to what I learned from YouTubers.”

No matter if you want to launch your business or find tips to get a new job, YouTube is a resource that’s always there to help you grow. What will you learn next?

Helping 1 million Europeans find a job or grow their business by 2020

The world is undergoing a digital transformation, offering enormous opportunities for growth, innovation and jobs. However, digital skills and tools can still seem out of reach to many.

That’s why we’re renewing our commitment to the EU Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition, with a new pledge to help 1 million Europeans find a job or grow their business by 2020. This commitment goes beyond our previous pledge to help people develop digital skills to ensure that we support trainees as they put those skills to use in building careers and businesses.

We’ve now trained 3 million Europeans, and more than 2 million people in Africa, in digital skills. This is our “Grow with Google” project, launched in 2015 and localized with expert partners in each country to maximize relevance and results. Our digital skills work, a reflection of the talents of people we have trained, was recognised by the European Commission in 2016 and2017.

But does digital skills training really translate into economic impact and improved prospects for those people who invest their time?  To answer that question, we launched an independent research starting in 2016, and asked Grow with Google trainees about the impact they saw on their career or business 14 weeks after their training.

The research shows that following Grow with Google training, so far over 190,000 Europeans have found a job or started a business—like Idiko in Hungary, a mother of two who learnt how to code and now manages her own business from home. More than half a million European businesses have grown their business through new customers or revenue, like Ntina from Greece, who during the recession opened up a hotel business which now welcomes people from all over the word. And 32,000 small and medium sized businesses have taken on more staff, such as Mark & Andersfrom Denmark who have grown from two to 30 people in the last year.

Grow with Google

Our new Grow with Google Impact Report gathers together stories of people such as Idiko, Ntina, Mark and Anders who have found a job or grown their business. Going forward, we will work with our research Partner Ipsos to measure impact and we’ll publish quarterly updates showing how new skills can translate into opportunities for business owners and job seekers alike.

Grow with Google aims to help everyone in Europe get access to training and products to grow their skills, career, or business, and we’ll continue to partner with governments, city councils, universities, private-sector businesses and nonprofits through the support of Google.org to achieve this. In Italy, Crescere in Digitale, a partnership with the Ministry of Labour and Chamber of Commerce, will activate 5,000 more internships for young unemployed people at SMBs by 2020, which can lead to full-time employment for people like Cristina at Lux Made-In, a traditional jewellery store. In Spain, we just launched a digital skills employment program with the Government and in Germany, we continue to work with Fraunhofer IAIS on their Open Roberta program, teaching young women how to code.

Today anyone with a smartphone and an idea can be an entrepreneur, reach customers around the globe, can hire, grow and export. Technology is the toolkit for a world of opportunities—and Grow with Google is about helping everyone put those tools to work.

Helping 1 million Europeans find a job or grow their business by 2020

The world is undergoing a digital transformation, offering enormous opportunities for growth, innovation and jobs. However, digital skills and tools can still seem out of reach to many.


That’s why we’re renewing our commitment to the EU Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition, with a new pledge to help 1 million Europeans find a job or grow their business by 2020. This commitment goes beyond our previous pledge to help people develop digital skills to ensure that we support trainees as they put those skills to use in building careers and businesses.


We’ve now trained 3 million Europeans, and more than 2 million people in Africa, in digital skills. This is our “Grow with Google” project, launched in 2015 and localized with expert partners in each country to maximize relevance and results. Our digital skills work, a reflection of the talents of people we have trained, was recognised by the European Commission in 2016 and2017.


But does digital skills training really translate into economic impact and improved prospects for those people who invest their time?  To answer that question, we launched an independent research starting in 2016, and asked Grow with Google trainees about the impact they saw on their career or business 14 weeks after their training.


The research shows that following Grow with Google training, so far over 190,000 Europeans have found a job or started a business—like Idiko in Hungary, a mother of two who learnt how to code and now manages her own business from home. More than half a million European businesses have grown their business through new customers or revenue, like Ntina from Greece, who during the recession opened up a hotel business which now welcomes people from all over the word. And 32,000 small and medium sized businesses have taken on more staff, such as Mark & Andersfrom Denmark who have grown from two to 30 people in the last year.
grow with google europe pledge

Our new Grow with Google Impact Report gathers together stories of people such as Idiko, Ntina, Mark and Anders who have found a job or grown their business. Going forward, we will work with our research Partner Ipsos to measure impact and we’ll publish quarterly updates showing how new skills can translate into opportunities for business owners and job seekers alike.


Grow with Google aims to help everyone in Europe get access to training and products to grow their skills, career, or business, and we’ll continue to partner with governments, city councils, universities, private-sector businesses and nonprofits through the support of Google.org to achieve this. In Italy, Crescere in Digitale, a partnership with the Ministry of Labour and Chamber of Commerce, will activate 5,000 more internships for young unemployed people at SMBs by 2020, which can lead to full-time employment for people like Cristina at Lux Made-In, a traditional jewellery store. In Spain, we just launched a digital skills employment program with the Government and in Germany, we continue to work with Fraunhofer IAIS on their Open Roberta program, teaching young women how to code.

Today anyone with a smartphone and an idea can be an entrepreneur, reach customers around the globe, can hire, grow and export. Technology is the toolkit for a world of opportunities—and Grow with Google is about helping everyone put those tools to work.

Newsroom placements for students across Europe

Calling journalism students across Europe. If you have a passion for news, want to make and break stories and love technology, we have a program that brings all those skills together—the 2018 Google News Lab Fellowship.

This year we’re offering placements across 10 countries. For the first time, news publishers in Belgium and the Netherlands will be taking part—the Fellowship will open here soon—and each of will offer new opportunities for students to gain valuable experience. 

Applications are open in the following european countries: Austria, Ireland, Finland, France, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK. Country-specific applications can be found on the News Lab website

In the coming weeks, the participating newsrooms will select their preferred candidates and identify a Fellow by the end of May. The Fellow will then join the newsroom for a two-month summer placement, and Google provides a €5,500 stipend for each publisher to allocate. Fellows who have completed their placement in previous years say it was a “golden opportunity to get full-time work experience” and an invaluable start to their career in journalism.

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Attending a workshop in London, here are the 2017 News Lab Fellows, and one Googler—me on the far right!

During their placement, the Fellows are invited to contribute their ideas to stories and new projects. From fact-checking to data journalism, video to audio, each newsroom offers a unique opportunity. In previous years, we’ve seen Fellows secure a frontpage story, bring new thinking to analytics and introduce emerging 360 technology to their newsroom.

In 2017, selected Fellows from parts of northern Europe traveled to Google in London to take part in a training and innovation workshop. While here, they heard product experts from the YouTube Space and the News Lab and received practical tips to help strengthen their digital newsgathering and visualization skills.

While the program isn’t available on an annual basis everywhere, there are currently Fellowships taking place in Australia, South Korea and the U.S., and we’re always thinking of how to expand and test the program in other countries.

Thank you to all of the news organizations that are taking part this year—for example, Agence France-Presse, Wirtschaftswoche, The Telegraph and LCI—and those who’ve taken part in previous years. Good luck to everyone who wishes to apply!

Applications for Round 5 of DNI Innovation Fund are now open

Since its introduction in 2015, the Digital News Initiative Innovation Fund has offered more than €90 million to more than 460 ambitious projects in digital journalism, across 29 countries. The fund, our €150 million commitment to supporting innovation in the European news industry, is designed to provide no-strings-attached funding to those in the news industry looking for some room—and budget—to experiment. Today the DNI Innovation Fund is open for a fifth round of applications—the deadline to apply is April 9, 2018.


How the Fund works

The Fund is open to established publishers, online-only players, news startups, collaborative partnerships and individuals based in the EU and EFTA countries. There are three categories of funding available: Prototype (up to €50k of funding), Medium (up to €300k of funding) and Large (between €300k and €1 million in funding). For more information on eligible projects, criteria and funding, see our website.


We’re looking for projects that demonstrate new thinking in the practice of digital journalism, support the development of new business models, or even change the way people consume digital news. Projects can be highly experimental, but must have well-defined goals and have a significant digital component. Successful projects will show innovation and have a positive impact on the production of original digital journalism and on the long-term sustainability of the news business.


New for Round 5: Diversifying revenue streams

As with Round 4, all Medium and Large track applications will need to demonstrate that they have a monetisation component within the idea to be eligible. This year, we’re also looking for ideas outside of the well-known approaches around paywalls. So in Round 5 we welcome a range of experimental and innovative approaches which diversify revenue streams.


Apply now

See the DNI Innovation Fund website for full details and and application forms. Applications must be made in English by April 9, 2018 at 23.59 CEST. We’ll announce recipients by mid July.


New approaches have never been more needed so it’s time to experiment, innovate and try something new. We’re ready and waiting to help you bring your ideas to reality—submit your applications now!

With just a flick of a wand, “Harry Potter: A History of Magic” is on Google Arts & Culture

For Harry Potter’s fellow students at Hogwarts, “A History of Magic” is historian Bathilda Bagshot’s legendary chronicle of Wizarding history. And last year, we mere Muggles got our own version. “Harry Potter: A History of Magic” is an exhibition from the British Library containing rare books, manuscripts and magical objects from the British Library’s collection, capturing the traditions of folklore and magic from across the world, which are at the heart of the Harry Potter stories.


Turns out, the exhibition was more popular than the Three Broomsticks on a cold day … it quickly sold out. To bring the Harry Potter magic to more fans around the world, hundreds of the exhibition’s treasures from London as well as 15 online exhibits are now available in six languages (English, Spanish, French, German, Hindi and Brazilian Portuguese, and more coming soon) on Google Arts & Culture.

These examples shed light on what you’ll see in the exhibit. Lumos!

The British Library exhibit has proven that “interest in magic is a real global phenomenon, and has fascinated people for thousands of years,” says Julian Harrison, Lead Curator for Medieval Historical Manuscripts and “Harry Potter: A History of Magic.”

“The British Library is thrilled that our blockbuster ‘Harry Potter: A History of Magic’ exhibition can now be viewed on Google Arts & Culture. We’ve used medieval manuscripts, precious printed books and Chinese oracle bones to explore magical traditions, from the making of potions to the harvesting of poisonous plants, and from the study of the night sky to the uses of unicorns.”

To explore these magical traditions for yourself, check out The British Library collections online with Google Arts & Culture and on our iOS and Android apps.

Bringing online safety education programs to UK schools

At Google, we believe in technology's ability to unlock creativity and create opportunity, but it’s our duty to equip our users with the tools and resources to make safe choices online. 

Last year, we surveyed more than 200 teachers in the UK to learn about their experience with online safety in the classroom. We found that teachers believe children should start learning about online safety at age seven, and 99% of the teachers we spoke to felt that online safety should be part of the curriculum. More than one in three teachers also reported that they’d witnessed an online safety incident (sharing personal information or cyberbullying, for example) in their classroom.

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However, the majority of the teachers we spoke to said they didn't feel they had the necessary resources to teach online safety to their students.

To help teachers empower their students to navigate the online world safely, today we’re launching our Be Internet Legends and Be Internet Citizens educational programs. We’ll visit primary and secondary schools across the UK where we’ll train 60,000 young people face-to-face through assemblies and workshops, and aim to reach one million young people through our free training resources created for teachers and youth workers. Both programs have been awarded the Quality Mark of accreditation by the PSHE Association, the national body for Personal, Social and Health Education in the UK.

Be Internet Legends

In partnership with family internet safety experts at Parent Zone, we created the Be Internet Legends program for Key Stage 2 primary school students to help them be safe, confident explorers of the online world. And UK primary school teachers can download or order their free Be Internet Legends teaching resources packs to bring the program to their classrooms. Vicki Shotbolt, CEO of Parent Zone says, “We’re delighted to be working with Google on Be Internet Legends because we know how important it is to provide children with the knowledge they need to stay safe online and we have to inspire them to want to act on that knowledge.”

Introducing Be Internet Legends

Be Internet Citizens

Be Internet Citizens, which is part of YouTube Creators For Change, teaches 13-15 year olds media literacy, critical thinking and digital citizenship with the aim of encouraging them to have a positive voice online. Created in partnership with the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD), the program empowers children to produce online content to express their identities, share their stories, make social impact, and bring communities together. “We’re incredibly excited to be working with Google to scale Be Internet Citizens in 2018,” says ISD CEO Sasha Havlicek. “As online spaces play an increasingly vital role in our social, cultural and political lives, it is vital young people feel confident to make their voices heard, stay safe and play a positive role as digital citizens.”

Starting next week, our teams are excited to hit the road visiting schools across the UK.

Updating our “right to be forgotten” Transparency Report

In May 2014, in a landmark ruling, the European Court of Justice established the “right to be forgotten,” or more accurately, the “right to delist,” allowing Europeans to ask search engines to delist information about themselves from search results. In deciding what to delist, search engines like Google must consider if the information in question is “inaccurate, inadequate, irrelevant or excessive”—and whether there is a public interest in the information remaining available in search results.


Understanding how we make these types of decisions—and how people are using new rights like those granted by the European Court—is important. Since 2014, we’ve provided information about “right to be forgotten” delisting requests in our Transparency Report, including the number of URLs submitted to us, the number of URLs delisted and not delisted, and anonymized examples of some of the requests we have received.

New data in the Transparency Report


Today, we’re expanding the scope of our transparency reporting about the “right to be forgotten” and adding new data going back to January 2016 when our reviewers started manually annotating each URL submitted to us with additional information, including:


  • Requesters:We show a breakdown of the requests made by private individuals vs. non-private individuals—e.g., government officials or corporate entities.

  • Content of the request:We classify the content that the individual has asked us to delist into a set of categories: personal information, professional information, crime, and name not found, meaning that we were not able to find the individual’s name on the page.

  • Content of the site: When we evaluate a URL for potential delisting, we classify the website that hosts the page as a directory site, news site, social media, or other.

  • Content delisting rate:This is the rate at which we delist content by category on a quarterly basis.


Looking back: analyzing three years of delisting requests


In addition to updating the Transparency Report, we’re also providing a snapshot of our efforts to process these requests over the last three years.

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We’re also releasing the draft of a new research paper called Three Years of the Right to be Forgotten, which has been submitted to the Privacy Enhancing Technologies Symposium for peer review. This paper uses our manual reviewers’ annotations to provide a comprehensive analysis of the ways Europeans are using the “right to be forgotten.”


We hope the new data we’ve added to the Transparency Report and our research paper will help inform the ongoing discussion about the interplay between the right to privacy and the right to access lawful information online.