Tag Archives: Google in Europe

Internet Citizens: Let’s make a better web

The internet is a place where anyone can have a voice, be part of a community and generate positive social change. But the internet isn’t always positive or welcoming for everyone.

Nearly all of us will have come across comments or content online that shocked or even offended us, sometimes leaving us feeling isolated or powerless to change the conversation. For young people in particular, this sense of vulnerability can be heightened especially when something is shared on social media by a trusted friend.

That’s why we’re launching Internet Citizens, a series of day-long workshops for 13-18 year olds in cities across the U.K., as part of our global YouTube Creators for Change program, which supports creators who are tackling social issues and promoting awareness, tolerance and empathy on their YouTube channels. The workshops will help young people find a positive sense of belonging online and teach skills on how to participate safely and responsibly, and use tools such as flagging and comment moderation to make the web better for all. Some of the specific topics include what could be done in response to offensive speech, fake news, echo chambers and how they could use video to bring diverse groups together.

Our curriculum was designed by experts from the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, in partnership with UK Youth and Livity, and was also informed by our work with an advisory council including Faith Associates, Active Change Foundation, the MET Police, Demos and the Diana Award. Hosting these workshops are Alain “Fusion” Clapham and Efe Ezekiel, along with YouTube creator Nadir Nahdi, Founder of BENI, all of whom have mastered the art of using their voice and creativity to drive social change.

We’ve spent the last few weeks testing the workshop before our launch today in Liverpool, and have seen some promising results. With the help of UK Youth, we’ll visit youth clubs across the country over the coming months, and we’ll also explore ways to work further with youth workers and other partners to scale the program.

This is just one part of our commitment to a better web. Alongside this, we’re exploring more innovative ways to use technology and to partner with experts to help us tackle hate speech online. We’ll share more updates on these areas in the coming weeks.

And Fusion said it best: The internet is what we want it to be. It can be an unpleasant place where people misunderstand and deliberately deceive each other. Or it can be this amazing place where we can share, collaborate, understand and help each other.

To find out more about Internet Citizens, please visit our website.

Internet Citizens: Let’s make a better web

The internet is a place where anyone can have a voice, be part of a community and generate positive social change. But the internet isn’t always positive or welcoming for everyone.

Nearly all of us will have come across comments or content online that shocked or even offended us, sometimes leaving us feeling isolated or powerless to change the conversation. For young people in particular, this sense of vulnerability can be heightened especially when something is shared on social media by a trusted friend.

That’s why we’re launching Internet Citizens, a series of day-long workshops for 13-18 year olds in cities across the U.K., as part of our global YouTube Creators for Change program, which supports creators who are tackling social issues and promoting awareness, tolerance and empathy on their YouTube channels. The workshops will help young people find a positive sense of belonging online and teach skills on how to participate safely and responsibly, and use tools such as flagging and comment moderation to make the web better for all. Some of the specific topics include what could be done in response to offensive speech, fake news, echo chambers and how they could use video to bring diverse groups together.

Our curriculum was designed by experts from the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, in partnership with UK Youth and Livity, and was also informed by our work with an advisory council including Faith Associates, Active Change Foundation, the MET Police, Demos and the Diana Award. Hosting these workshops are Alain “Fusion” Clapham and Efe Ezekiel, along with YouTube creator Nadir Nahdi, Founder of BENI, all of whom have mastered the art of using their voice and creativity to drive social change.

We’ve spent the last few weeks testing the workshop before our launch today in Liverpool, and have seen some promising results. With the help of UK Youth, we’ll visit youth clubs across the country over the coming months, and we’ll also explore ways to work further with youth workers and other partners to scale the program.

This is just one part of our commitment to a better web. Alongside this, we’re exploring more innovative ways to use technology and to partner with experts to help us tackle hate speech online. We’ll share more updates on these areas in the coming weeks.

And Fusion said it best: The internet is what we want it to be. It can be an unpleasant place where people misunderstand and deliberately deceive each other. Or it can be this amazing place where we can share, collaborate, understand and help each other.

To find out more about Internet Citizens, please visit our website.

The Ghent Altarpiece: how we digitized one of the most influential artworks of all time

Some 600 years ago, the Van Eyck brothers created one of the first large-scale oil paintings: “Adoration of the Mystic Lamb.” Due to its pioneering attention to detail and realistic portrayal of people, the “Ghent Altarpiece” is renowned as one of the most influential paintings ever made and a defining artwork that represents the start of the Northern Renaissance.

ghent altarpiece (inside).gif

As such an important symbol in art history, the altarpiece has long been highly sought after and widely coveted. Since 1432, when it was first installed at Saint Bavo Cathedral in what’s now Belgium, the Altarpiece has survived 13 crimes. Looted, burned and torn apart, it’s been through the hands of multiple armies, including those of Napoleon and the Nazis.

After World War II, the Monuments Men—a group set up by the Allied armies to protect cultural heritage from the Nazis—brought it back to its original home in Ghent, Belgium. One of the panels—“The Just Judges”—is still missing following its theft in 1934. Its absence remains one of the most intriguing riddles in art history.
output_sM4QuS (1).gif

Archives documenting the Altarpiece’s rescue at the end of WWII from the collection of Lukas - Art in Flanders.

Now, the freshly renovated exterior panels of the Altarpiece can be explored in ultra-high resolution on Google Arts & Culture. Thanks to a partnership with the online image library of Flemish art heritage Lukas - Art in Flanders and the Cathedral of Saint-Bavo, we’ve digitized this masterpiece for future generations to explore in unprecedented detail.

Mystic Lamb Altarpiece

Our robotic Art Camera took about 4,000 high-resolution close-ups of the artwork and used those to create the highest ever resolution image ever made of the panels. You can zoom as much as you’d like into more than 8 billion pixels.

20160926_google_078.JPG
Art Camera digitizing one of the 10 exterior panels of the Altarpiece

Discover amazing details, revealed by the panels’ recent renovation: for example, a charming view of medieval Ghent which used to be barely visible. Now you can even make out the lines of the book Mary is reading.

Altarpiece_detail.png

This is one of the latest efforts by Google Arts & Culture to provide institutions with the tools to digitally preserve their collections and make cultural heritage more accessible to everyone.

Explore the adventurous past and rescue of the Altarpiece today—and download Google Art & Culture app on iOS or Android for a daily dose of culture.

The Ghent Altarpiece: how we digitized one of the most influential artworks of all time

Some 600 years ago, the Van Eyck brothers created one of the first large-scale oil paintings: “Adoration of the Mystic Lamb.” Due to its pioneering attention to detail and realistic portrayal of people, the “Ghent Altarpiece” is renowned as one of the most influential paintings ever made and a defining artwork that represents the start of the Northern Renaissance.

ghent altarpiece (inside).gif

As such an important symbol in art history, the altarpiece has long been highly sought after and widely coveted. Since 1432, when it was first installed at Saint Bavo Cathedral in what’s now Belgium, the Altarpiece has survived 13 crimes. Looted, burned and torn apart, it’s been through the hands of multiple armies, including those of Napoleon and the Nazis.

After World War II, the Monuments Men—a group set up by the Allied armies to protect cultural heritage from the Nazis—brought it back to its original home in Ghent, Belgium. One of the panels—“The Just Judges”—is still missing following its theft in 1934. Its absence remains one of the most intriguing riddles in art history.
output_sM4QuS (1).gif

Archives documenting the Altarpiece’s rescue at the end of WWII from the collection of Lukas - Art in Flanders.

Now, the freshly renovated exterior panels of the Altarpiece can be explored in ultra-high resolution on Google Arts & Culture. Thanks to a partnership with the online image library of Flemish art heritage Lukas - Art in Flanders and the Cathedral of Saint-Bavo, we’ve digitized this masterpiece for future generations to explore in unprecedented detail.

Mystic Lamb Altarpiece

Our robotic Art Camera took about 4,000 high-resolution close-ups of the artwork and used those to create the highest ever resolution image ever made of the panels. You can zoom as much as you’d like into more than 8 billion pixels.

20160926_google_078.JPG
Art Camera digitizing one of the 10 exterior panels of the Altarpiece

Discover amazing details, revealed by the panels’ recent renovation: for example, a charming view of medieval Ghent which used to be barely visible. Now you can even make out the lines of the book Mary is reading.

Altarpiece_detail.png

This is one of the latest efforts by Google Arts & Culture to provide institutions with the tools to digitally preserve their collections and make cultural heritage more accessible to everyone.

Explore the adventurous past and rescue of the Altarpiece today—and download Google Art & Culture app on iOS or Android for a daily dose of culture.

Promoting a safer Internet with consumer groups in Belgium, Italy and Spain

The Internet offers lots of opportunities to explore, create and collaborate. But the internet is in many ways a mirror of our real world, which isn’t always pretty, and to make the most of the web it’s vital to keep yourself safe and secure. It’s natural to be anxious about cyber criminality and security breaches--in fact according to to Commission research, 50% of EU citizens say they don’t feel informed about the risks. Some of you have maybe even been victims of internet scams or phishing attacks yourselves.

So what’s the solution? Certainly there are behaviors we use to keep ourselves safe in public places or city streets – what we call ‘common sense.’ But what are does common sense look like online? What is the equivalent of locking your front door – and where can you learn more about them?

To help everybody to navigate safely and securely through new technologies, gadgets, and services in an ever-changing online world, Google has partnered with local consumer groups to dispel myths about internet safety and to give concrete and easy to follow tips to stay safe online.

Last month we announced our latest partnership with the Belgian consumer group, Test-Achats, focusing on internet safety. Online security is a particularly relevant topic in Belgium, because more than 60% of Belgians know little – or nothing at all – about the issues surrounding online safety (according to a survey conducted on September 2016 by GFK). Many people think the topic is too complex for them, but online security has become essential and ignoring the risks can be costly.

Building on local research, we developed an educational platform  – www.cybersimple.be – where Belgians can learn from a series of 90 web-safety tips ranging from account and device protection to child safety and online transactions. The web site, available in French, Dutch and English, also includes a quiz to test and improve your web-safety knowledge.

The partnership with Test-Achats follows similar collaborations with consumer groups in Italy (with Altroconsumo) and Spain (with la Organización de Consumidores y Usuarios). The goal of these campaigns is to provide consumers with the knowledge they need to optimise and ensure their security when they go online. Whether you are a novice or an expert, we hope you will find some of the advice and tools available helpful.

In Italy we developed the initiative even further by bringing in-person advice to Italian citizens with a bus tour throughout Italy, connecting with thousands of citizens and giving advice on online safety.

Safer Internet Tour Italy
The Safer Internet team in tour across Italy

For more information about our long term partnerships with national consumer associations in Italy, Spain and Belgium, please visit altroconsumo.it/vivinternet/, ocu.org/viveinternetseguro/ and cybersimple.be

Together, we can help consumers to develop safe online behaviours and enjoy the benefits of the internet.

Promoting a safer Internet with consumer groups in Belgium, Italy and Spain

The internet offers lots of opportunities to explore, create and collaborate. But the internet is in many ways a mirror of our real world, which isn’t always pretty, and to make the most of the web it’s vital to keep yourself safe and secure. It’s natural to be anxious about cyber criminality and security breaches—in fact, according to to Commission research, 50 percent of EU citizens say they don’t feel informed about the risks. Some of you have maybe even been victims of internet scams or phishing attacks yourselves.

So what’s the solution? Certainly there are behaviors we use to keep ourselves safe in public places or city streets—what we call "common sense." But what are does common sense look like online? What is the equivalent of locking your front door—and where can you learn more about them?

To help everybody to navigate safely and securely through new technologies, gadgets, and services in an ever-changing online world, Google has partnered with local consumer groups to dispel myths about internet safety and to give concrete and easy to follow tips to stay safe online.

Last month we announced our latest partnership with the Belgian consumer group, Test-Achats, focusing on internet safety. Online security is a particularly relevant topic in Belgium, because more than 60 percent of Belgians know little—or nothing at all—about the issues surrounding online safety (according to a survey conducted on September 2016 by GFK). Many people think the topic is too complex for them, but online security has become essential and ignoring the risks can be costly.

Building on local research, we developed an educational platform—www.cybersimple.be—where Belgians can learn from a series of 90 web-safety tips ranging from account and device protection to child safety and online transactions. The website, available in French, Dutch and English, also includes a quiz to test and improve your web-safety knowledge.

The partnership with Test-Achats follows similar collaborations with consumer groups in Italy (with Altroconsumo) and Spain (with la Organización de Consumidores y Usuarios). The goal of these campaigns is to provide consumers with the knowledge they need to optimize and ensure their security when they go online. Whether you're a novice or an expert, we hope you'll find some of the advice and tools available helpful.

In Italy we developed the initiative even further by bringing in-person advice to Italian citizens with a bus tour throughout Italy, connecting with thousands of citizens and giving advice on online safety.

Safer Internet Tour Italy
The Safer Internet team in tour across Italy

For more information about our long-term partnerships with national consumer associations in Italy, Spain and Belgium, please visit altroconsumo.it/vivinternet/, ocu.org/viveinternetseguro/ and cybersimple.be. Together, we can help people to develop safe online behaviors and enjoy the benefits of the internet.

Google Wifi now makes scheduling internet time easier

From binge-watching your favorite TV shows with Chromecast, to searching online for a cookie dough recipe for a night in, having great Wi-Fi at home helps with special everyday moments. But as we all know, sometimes these moments can turn into hours spent watching videos or browsing photos.

That’s why we built Scheduled Pause, a new feature in Google Wifi that lets you automatically pause the internet for everyday events like “Bedtime” to help wind down at the end of the day, or have a daily “Homework” schedule so your kids can focus before dinner.

google_wifiGif.gif

The idea behind Scheduled Pause started a year ago. While exploring how to best create tools for families, I noticed that I was having trouble falling asleep. I’d check emails and surf the web late into the night. Experimenting with options, I started using a timer on my computer to turn the internet off at 11 p.m. The first night was a shock, but after a few nights I was ready to shut down earlier. And I was more refreshed and rejuvenated in the morning.

As I started talking to more people, in and outside of Google, I found that screen time was a common challenge for parents—from getting kids to put down their favorite game to struggling to have dinner without eyes glued to devices.

We hope Scheduled Pause helps you and your family create time for everyone to be more present and enjoy everyday moments.

Google Wifi now makes scheduling internet time easier

From binge-watching your favorite TV shows with Chromecast, to searching online for a cookie dough recipe for a night in, having great Wi-Fi at home helps with special everyday moments. But as we all know, sometimes these moments can turn into hours spent watching videos or browsing photos.

That’s why we built Scheduled Pause, a new feature in Google Wifi that lets you automatically pause the internet for everyday events like “Bedtime” to help wind down at the end of the day, or have a daily “Homework” schedule so your kids can focus before dinner.

google_wifiGif.gif

The idea behind Scheduled Pause started a year ago. While exploring how to best create tools for families, I noticed that I was having trouble falling asleep. I’d check emails and surf the web late into the night. Experimenting with options, I started using a timer on my computer to turn the internet off at 11 p.m. The first night was a shock, but after a few nights I was ready to shut down earlier. And I was more refreshed and rejuvenated in the morning.

As I started talking to more people, in and outside of Google, I found that screen time was a common challenge for parents—from getting kids to put down their favorite game to struggling to have dinner without eyes glued to devices.

We hope Scheduled Pause helps you and your family create time for everyone to be more present and enjoy everyday moments.

Google Wifi now makes scheduling internet time easier

From binge-watching your favorite TV shows with Chromecast, to searching online for a cookie dough recipe for a night in, having great Wi-Fi at home helps with special everyday moments. But as we all know, sometimes these moments can turn into hours spent watching videos or browsing photos.

That’s why we built Scheduled Pause, a new feature in Google Wifi that lets you automatically pause the Internet for everyday events like “Bedtime” to help wind down at the end of the day, or have a daily “Homework” schedule so your kids can focus before dinner.

google_wifiGif.gif

The idea behind Scheduled Pause started a year ago. While exploring how to best create tools for families, I noticed that I was having trouble falling asleep. I’d check emails and surf the web late into the night. Experimenting with options, I started using a timer on my computer to turn the internet off at 11 p.m. The first night was a shock, but after a few nights I was ready to shut down earlier. And I was more refreshed and rejuvenated in the morning.

As I started talking to more people, in and outside of Google, I found that screen time was a common challenge for parents—from getting kids to put down their favorite game to struggling to have dinner without eyes glued to devices.

We hope Scheduled Pause helps you and your family create time for everyone to be more present and enjoy everyday moments.

Google Pixel and Boiler Room launch ‘VR dancefloors: Techno in Berlin’

Today in Berlin we’re launching a new virtual reality collaboration ‘VR dancefloors: Techno in Berlin’, with Boiler Room, an international heavyweight in underground music entertainment, to give music fans everywhere a unique and unprecedented opportunity to experience Berlin’s much-heralded club culture without leaving home. The experience is designed to be enjoyed on Pixel, phone by Google,--or any other Daydream-ready smartphone.

VR dancefloors: Techno in Berlin’ is an immersive music experiment which lets you ‘choose your own adventure’ in an industrial Berlin night club. You’ll be transported right into the middle of a cast of 150 of Berlin’s most dedicated ravers from a host of subcultures. Get ready to hang with artists, crash the dancefloor, uncover the dark room, wander between audio-visual installations, and explore hidden spaces of Berlin’s underground club culture--wherever your are in the world.

With Pixel currently available in Germany and the U.K., we set out to create a seamless experience combining the best of Google software together with premium hardware. Virtual Reality is a great showcase for this combination, and we believe the vast majority of people who’ll experience VR over the next few years will do so via a smartphone. So, we built Pixel to be the first device that offers simple, high quality VR experiences through the Daydream platform and the Daydream View headset, an experience which has since been expanded to Motorola (Moto Z), ZTE (Axon 7) and more to come.

VR can be a powerful tool to transform the way you enjoy culture and entertainment. It can connect you with the things, people, places and memories that matter most to you in a new immersive way. VR dancefloors: Techno in Berlin marks an entirely new cultural moment, a new entertainment synthesis with interactive elements of immersive theatre, computer game narrative, music TV broadcast and installation art. The 15 minutes long experience was filmed in the industrial environs of a typical Berlin nightclub featuring a live-electronics set by Berliners FJAAK, who played from a range of analogue hardware.

VR dancefloor hero

In the spirit of making unique cultural moments widely accessible, this project will allow Boiler Room’s audience and the growing number of Pixel and Daydream users to drop straight into the heart of the action.

The experience is available for free on Daydream, Google’s VR platform as part of the ‘Inception app’ around the world from today on.

Enjoy!