Tag Archives: Google in Asia

Google Business Group is helping entrepreneurs around the world—vote for your favorite

As a part of our effort to inspire entrepreneurs to take their businesses online, we invited members of our global Google Business Group (GBG) to participate in a competition and share how the internet and technology empower them to do extraordinary things. We received 469 submissions from GBG members and independent entrepreneurs in 26 countries. These entries presented the big ideas of intrepid entrepreneurs from all around the world, including Brazil, Egypt, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, and Uganda.

Google selected nine global finalists, including an app working to ease the supply shortage in Indonesia’s blood banks, an online pet food social enterprise, and a digital platform matching qualified entry-level job seekers with employers in India. These enterprises demonstrate how bringing businesses online can increase a business’s positive social contributions–locally, nationally, and even globally.

Now it’s your turn to get involved. Tell us which story inspires you most by casting a vote by next Tuesday, March 28th by 11:59 pm PST. The top winners will get an all-expenses paid trip to Mountain View, California and a much-coveted access pass to the annual Google I/O conference in April 2017. While there, the winners will have the opportunity to meet with other tech thinkers, innovators, and business leaders.

We hope you’ll feel as inspired as we are after seeing these stories. On March 30th, we’ll update this post with the winners!

Google Business Group is helping entrepreneurs around the world—vote for your favorite

As a part of our effort to inspire entrepreneurs to take their businesses online, we invited members of our global Google Business Group (GBG) to participate in a competition and share how the internet and technology empower them to do extraordinary things. We received 469 submissions from GBG members and independent entrepreneurs in 26 countries. These entries presented the big ideas of intrepid entrepreneurs from all around the world, including Brazil, Egypt, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, and Uganda.

Google selected nine global finalists, including an app working to ease the supply shortage in Indonesia’s blood banks, an online pet food social enterprise, and a digital platform matching qualified entry-level job seekers with employers in India. These enterprises demonstrate how bringing businesses online can increase a business’s positive social contributions–locally, nationally, and even globally.

Now it’s your turn to get involved. Tell us which story inspires you most by casting a vote by next Tuesday, March 28th by 11:59 pm PST. The top winners will get an all-expenses paid trip to Mountain View, California and a much-coveted access pass to the annual Google I/O conference in April 2017. While there, the winners will have the opportunity to meet with other tech thinkers, innovators, and business leaders.

We hope you’ll feel as inspired as we are after seeing these stories. On March 30th, we’ll update this post with the winners!

Code Jam returns: Do you have what it takes?

Today we invite anyone with a passion for coding—from students to professionals, and newbies to pros—to sign up for Code Jam, Google's largest, most challenging programming competition.

Last year, Code Jam welcomed 60,000 Code Jammers from more than 130 countries. The competition features multiple online rounds of intense, algorithmic problems, a track for coding in a distributed environment, an on-site World Finals and the opportunity to win a cash prize of up to $15,000. While we’ve changed and grown from our humble beginnings in 2007, much of the essential ingredients that make Code Jam beloved by so many remain the same.

Here’s what you need to know:

The languages are many. Code Jam allows competitors to use any coding language throughout the competition—everything from C++ to JavaScript to INTERCAL, LOLCODE, and Whitespace. We’ve even heard of a competitor who solved the 2015 Dijkstra problem using only a spreadsheet. Whatever language you speak, you’re part of a broader Code Jam community. This global community of current and former participants (and fans of the competition) has grown to more than 200,000 across our Twitter, YouTube, Google+ and Facebook channels. And on any given day, you can participate in discussions about competition puzzles or get tips and tricks from past competitors.

The problems are memorable. The quality of the problems keeps many of the world’s best programmers coming back each year. All Code Jam problems are written by Google engineers. Hundreds have dedicated their time over the years to make every problem rewarding and fun for Code Jammers, from the easiest Qualification Round problem to the most fiendish challenge in the World Finals. You can check out past problems here and try your hand at them for practice. A lesser known fact is that the engineers who authored the problems in last year’s World Finals were actually competitors before they were teammates: all four were finalists in Code Jam 2005.

The stakes are high. In addition to receiving the limited edition Code Jam t-shirt (given to the top 1,500  performers), the top 26 finalists will be invited to compete in the World Finals at Google’s office in Dublin, Ireland for the chance become the Code Jam Champion and a cash prize of up to $15,000. As always, we’ll livestream the World Finals on YouTube so that thousands of fans can experience the magic from home. Can’t wait until then? Check out this behind-the-scenes look at Code Jam in the meantime.

Register today. We hope to see you jamming with us in Code Jam’s Online Qualification Round on April 7 — you can register here. Join our community on social media, follow us at #CodeJam2017 and help us spread the word.

Visit our website g.co/codejam to learn more about Code Jam spin-offs and other opportunities to test your coding skills while having fun with Google.

Code Jam returns: Do you have what it takes?

Today we invite anyone with a passion for coding—from students to professionals, and newbies to pros—to sign up for Code Jam, Google's largest, most challenging programming competition.

Last year, Code Jam welcomed 60,000 Code Jammers from more than 130 countries. The competition features multiple online rounds of intense, algorithmic problems, a track for coding in a distributed environment, an on-site World Finals and the opportunity to win a cash prize of up to $15,000. While we’ve changed and grown from our humble beginnings in 2007, much of the essential ingredients that make Code Jam beloved by so many remain the same.

Here’s what you need to know:

The languages are many. Code Jam allows competitors to use any coding language throughout the competition—everything from C++ to JavaScript to INTERCAL, LOLCODE, and Whitespace. We’ve even heard of a competitor who solved the 2015 Dijkstra problem using only a spreadsheet. Whatever language you speak, you’re part of a broader Code Jam community. This global community of current and former participants (and fans of the competition) has grown to more than 200,000 across our Twitter, YouTube, Google+ and Facebook channels. And on any given day, you can participate in discussions about competition puzzles or get tips and tricks from past competitors.

The problems are memorable. The quality of the problems keeps many of the world’s best programmers coming back each year. All Code Jam problems are written by Google engineers. Hundreds have dedicated their time over the years to make every problem rewarding and fun for Code Jammers, from the easiest Qualification Round problem to the most fiendish challenge in the World Finals. You can check out past problems here and try your hand at them for practice. A lesser known fact is that the engineers who authored the problems in last year’s World Finals were actually competitors before they were teammates: all four were finalists in Code Jam 2005.

The stakes are high. In addition to receiving the limited edition Code Jam t-shirt (given to the top 1,500  performers), the top 26 finalists will be invited to compete in the World Finals at Google’s office in Dublin, Ireland for the chance become the Code Jam Champion and a cash prize of up to $15,000. As always, we’ll livestream the World Finals on YouTube so that thousands of fans can experience the magic from home. Can’t wait until then? Check out this behind-the-scenes look at Code Jam in the meantime.

Register today. We hope to see you jamming with us in Code Jam’s Online Qualification Round on April 7 — you can register here. Join our community on social media, follow us at #CodeJam2017 and help us spread the word.

Visit our website g.co/codejam to learn more about Code Jam spin-offs and other opportunities to test your coding skills while having fun with Google.

The Torwali language and its new Android keyboard

Editor’s note: We invited Zubair Torwali, ​Executive Director​ of ​Idara Baraye Taleem-o-Taraqi​, an organization that works to promote northern Pakistan’s languages, to tell us how the new Torwali language Android keyboard will help preserve the language.

Torwali, a Dardic language with around 80,000 speakers in the Swat Valley, is one of Pakistan’s 27 highly endangered languages. With mounting pressures to speak the dominant Pashto language, Torwali is neither used at the public schools nor part of the formal curriculum.

For a long time, Torwali had no written alphabet, and therefore, little in the way of a written tradition. Around a decade ago, however, a team of language activists associated with Idara Baraye Taleem-o-Taraqi designed a spelling system (orthography) for Torwali under the expert guidance of linguists and educationists from the Summer Institute of Linguistics. The orthography was adapted from Arabic, much like Urdu, Pakistan’s national language.

Torwali needs four special phonemes (distinct units of sound) which are not in Urdu:

/ɶ/; /ɕ/; /ʐ/; /ʂ/

represented in Torwali writing as

“ݜ", “ڙ” , “ڇ”, “ٲ”

In the Swat Valley, people primarily use Android smartphones to get access to the Internet and interact on social media.There are special keyboards for writing Torwali on computers, but only a few people in the Swat Valley have access to PCs. The question is then, how can people write in Torwali on their smartphones to communicate in their own language?

Wanting to make a specific Torwali script keyboard on Android smartphones, we contacted Google and worked with engineer Richard Sproat. Richard had experience building Tibetan and Khmer keyboards, and he helped us build  a Torwali keyboard into the Android Gboard keyboard. So now anyone with an Android phone running Jellybean or higher will be able to type in Torwali. To turn it on, just go to Settings in Android and then choose Languages & input > Virtual keyboard > Gboard > Languages > Torwali. (If you don’t have Gboard already, you can always download it from the Google Play Store here.)

Now people in the Swat Valley can use the keyboard to text their friends and family or update their status on social media. Endangered languages like Torwali can only be maintained by linking them with modern information technology, and a Gboard keyboard for Torwali is one step toward that goal​.

The Torwali language and its new Android keyboard

Editor’s note: We invited Zubair Torwali, ​Executive Director​ of ​Idara Baraye Taleem-o-Taraqi​, an organization that works to promote northern Pakistan’s languages, to tell us how the new Torwali language Android keyboard will help preserve the language.

Torwali, a Dardic language with around 80,000 speakers in the Swat Valley, is one of Pakistan’s 27 highly endangered languages. With mounting pressures to speak the dominant Pashto language, Torwali is neither used at the public schools nor part of the formal curriculum.

For a long time, Torwali had no written alphabet, and therefore, little in the way of a written tradition. Around a decade ago, however, a team of language activists associated with Idara Baraye Taleem-o-Taraqi designed a spelling system (orthography) for Torwali under the expert guidance of linguists and educationists from the Summer Institute of Linguistics. The orthography was adapted from Arabic, much like Urdu, Pakistan’s national language.

Torwali needs four special phonemes (distinct units of sound) which are not in Urdu:

/ɶ/; /ɕ/; /ʐ/; /ʂ/

represented in Torwali writing as

“ݜ", “ڙ” , “ڇ”, “ٲ”

In the Swat Valley, people primarily use Android smartphones to get access to the Internet and interact on social media.There are special keyboards for writing Torwali on computers, but only a few people in the Swat Valley have access to PCs. The question is then, how can people write in Torwali on their smartphones to communicate in their own language?

Wanting to make a specific Torwali script keyboard on Android smartphones, we contacted Google and worked with engineer Richard Sproat. Richard had experience building Tibetan and Khmer keyboards, and he helped us build  a Torwali keyboard into the Android Gboard keyboard. So now anyone with an Android phone running Jellybean or higher will be able to type in Torwali. To turn it on, just go to Settings in Android and then choose Languages & input > Virtual keyboard > Gboard > Languages > Torwali. (If you don’t have Gboard already, you can always download it from the Google Play Store here.)

Now people in the Swat Valley can use the keyboard to text their friends and family or update their status on social media. Endangered languages like Torwali can only be maintained by linking them with modern information technology, and a Gboard keyboard for Torwali is one step toward that goal​.

The Torwali language and its new Android keyboard

Editor’s note: We invited Zubair Torwali, ​Executive Director​ of ​Idara Baraye Taleem-o-Taraqi​, an organization that works to promote northern Pakistan’s languages, to tell us how the new Torwali language Android keyboard will help preserve the language.

Torwali, a Dardic language with around 80,000 speakers in the Swat Valley, is one of Pakistan’s 27 highly endangered languages. With mounting pressures to speak the dominant Pashto language, Torwali is neither used at the public schools nor part of the formal curriculum.

For a long time, Torwali had no written alphabet, and therefore, little in the way of a written tradition. Around a decade ago, however, a team of language activists associated with Idara Baraye Taleem-o-Taraqi designed a spelling system (orthography) for Torwali under the expert guidance of linguists and educationists from the Summer Institute of Linguistics. The orthography was adapted from Arabic, much like Urdu, Pakistan’s national language.

Torwali needs four special phonemes (distinct units of sound) which are not in Urdu:

/ɶ/; /ɕ/; /ʐ/; /ʂ/

represented in Torwali writing as

“ݜ", “ڙ” , “ڇ”, “ٲ”

In the Swat Valley, people primarily use Android smartphones to get access to the Internet and interact on social media.There are special keyboards for writing Torwali on computers, but only a few people in the Swat Valley have access to PCs. The question is then, how can people write in Torwali on their smartphones to communicate in their own language?

Wanting to make a specific Torwali script keyboard on Android smartphones, we contacted Google and worked with engineer Richard Sproat. Richard had experience building Tibetan and Khmer keyboards, and he helped us build  a Torwali keyboard into the Android Gboard keyboard. So now anyone with an Android phone running Jellybean or higher will be able to type in Torwali. To turn it on, just go to Settings in Android and then choose Languages & input > Virtual keyboard > Gboard > Languages > Torwali. (If you don’t have Gboard already, you can always download it from the Google Play Store here.)

Now people in the Swat Valley can use the keyboard to text their friends and family or update their status on social media. Endangered languages like Torwali can only be maintained by linking them with modern information technology, and a Gboard keyboard for Torwali is one step toward that goal​.

Indonesia’s YouTube creators Cameo Project: Laughter for Good

As part of our series of interviews with people using the Internet to do exciting things, we sat down with Cameo Project, Indonesia’s favorite comedic troupe on YouTube. They’ve been making relatable and funny videos about life in Indonesia since 2012, and have been using comedy to raise awareness about important social issues for young people. They were named YouTube’s Creators for Change Ambassadors last year.

As we announced at the YouTube Pop-up Space in Jakarta today, Cameo Project is teaming up with local NGOs—the Maarif Institute and Habibie Center—on a cross-country project to encourage students to create videos for positive change on topics that affect their community. They’ll also run workshops on YouTube to create content that can make a difference.

Here we speak to the members of Cameo Project about their plans to shine a light on the importance of diversity in Indonesia, and why they think video is the best medium to affect the change they want to see.  

The guys of Cameo Project
The Cameo Project

You’ve made videos confronting difficult and heavy topics such as racism, inclusion, and bullying. What prompted you to enter into these conversations, and why on YouTube?
We think video is the best medium for communication, and YouTube makes sense because it’s where you find the world’s biggest video audience. To make an impact, we have to deliver our message on the platform where we’re heard the most.

Through video, we can illustrate our points of view in a way that resonates with our audience—often in a humorous way, but in a way that is thought-provoking and honest, too. Indonesia is a diverse country with many different voices and perspectives—and we want to show that those differences are there to complement each other, and to make us stronger.

What feedback have you gotten from your viewers about these “social change” videos?
The responses are varied. The Internet is a platform for free expression, so even though some viewers may not personally agree with us, we hope they still appreciate our point of view.  We also understand that haters will be haters, and positive messages don’t always go viral. However, we are encouraged by the fact that there are always people in the audience who give us constructive feedback, which helps us evaluate how we can get better.

MAYORITAS VS MINORITAS #GUEMAYORITAS

MAYORITAS VS MINORITAS #GUEMAYORITAS

What do you think are the most important social messages that Indonesian youth need to hear today?
Create for good, make positive content, and embrace differences. The strength of Indonesia lies in its diversity. Because we’re different, we complement each other, and that’s unifying.

What’s the best part about being an Ambassador for YouTube’s Creators for Change program?
We get to meet young people from different cities all across Indonesia, and we get to remind them that you can change people’s lives through the positive content you create. And they can make money while doing it too! Doesn’t that sound like a dream? Work from home, make positive content, AND get paid.  

You’re also teaming up with two local NGOs—the Maarif Institute and Habibie Center. Can you tell us more about that?
The work we do will create a bigger impact if we have more hands joining us.  It’s humbling to be named a role model for young people, but we definitely can’t do it alone—it makes sense to work with organizations that have been working on social change initiatives for years. So as part of the Creators for Change program in Indonesia, we will join forces with local NGOs with similar objectives: to make the Internet a better place for  youth.

With Maarif Institute for instance, we will have a program to show how diversity can lead to many good things for the country. We will travel and meet high school and university students in ten cities and share what it’s like to be YouTube creators and how they can play a part in creating a positive online community. We will also give technical workshops for those interested in becoming YouTube creators, and provide them with a challenge where they have to make videos that they think will affect positive change in their home city.

Indonesia’s YouTube creators Cameo Project: Laughter for Good

As part of our series of interviews with people using the Internet to do exciting things, we sat down with Cameo Project, Indonesia’s favorite comedic troupe on YouTube. They’ve been making relatable and funny videos about life in Indonesia since 2012, and have been using comedy to raise awareness about important social issues for young people. They were named YouTube’s Creators for Change Ambassadors last year.

As we announced at the YouTube Pop-up Space in Jakarta today, Cameo Project is teaming up with local NGOs—the Maarif Institute and Habibie Center—on a cross-country project to encourage students to create videos for positive change on topics that affect their community. They’ll also run workshops on YouTube to create content that can make a difference.

Here we speak to the members of Cameo Project about their plans to shine a light on the importance of diversity in Indonesia, and why they think video is the best medium to affect the change they want to see.  

The guys of Cameo Project
The Cameo Project

You’ve made videos confronting difficult and heavy topics such as racism, inclusion, and bullying. What prompted you to enter into these conversations, and why on YouTube?
We think video is the best medium for communication, and YouTube makes sense because it’s where you find the world’s biggest video audience. To make an impact, we have to deliver our message on the platform where we’re heard the most.

Through video, we can illustrate our points of view in a way that resonates with our audience—often in a humorous way, but in a way that is thought-provoking and honest, too. Indonesia is a diverse country with many different voices and perspectives—and we want to show that those differences are there to complement each other, and to make us stronger.

What feedback have you gotten from your viewers about these “social change” videos?
The responses are varied. The Internet is a platform for free expression, so even though some viewers may not personally agree with us, we hope they still appreciate our point of view.  We also understand that haters will be haters, and positive messages don’t always go viral. However, we are encouraged by the fact that there are always people in the audience who give us constructive feedback, which helps us evaluate how we can get better.

MAYORITAS VS MINORITAS #GUEMAYORITAS

MAYORITAS VS MINORITAS #GUEMAYORITAS

What do you think are the most important social messages that Indonesian youth need to hear today?
Create for good, make positive content, and embrace differences. The strength of Indonesia lies in its diversity. Because we’re different, we complement each other, and that’s unifying.

What’s the best part about being an Ambassador for YouTube’s Creators for Change program?
We get to meet young people from different cities all across Indonesia, and we get to remind them that you can change people’s lives through the positive content you create. And they can make money while doing it too! Doesn’t that sound like a dream? Work from home, make positive content, AND get paid.  

You’re also teaming up with two local NGOs—the Maarif Institute and Habibie Center. Can you tell us more about that?
The work we do will create a bigger impact if we have more hands joining us.  It’s humbling to be named a role model for young people, but we definitely can’t do it alone—it makes sense to work with organizations that have been working on social change initiatives for years. So as part of the Creators for Change program in Indonesia, we will join forces with local NGOs with similar objectives: to make the Internet a better place for  youth.

With Maarif Institute for instance, we will have a program to show how diversity can lead to many good things for the country. We will travel and meet high school and university students in ten cities and share what it’s like to be YouTube creators and how they can play a part in creating a positive online community. We will also give technical workshops for those interested in becoming YouTube creators, and provide them with a challenge where they have to make videos that they think will affect positive change in their home city.

Indonesia’s YouTube creators Cameo Project: Laughter for Good

As part of our series of interviews with people using the Internet to do exciting things, we sat down with Cameo Project, Indonesia’s favorite comedic troupe on YouTube. They’ve been making relatable and funny videos about life in Indonesia since 2012, and have been using comedy to raise awareness about important social issues for young people. They were named YouTube’s Creators for Change Ambassadors last year.

As we announced at the YouTube Pop-up Space in Jakarta today, Cameo Project is teaming up with local NGOs—the Maarif Institute and Habibie Center—on a cross-country project to encourage students to create videos for positive change on topics that affect their community. They’ll also run workshops on YouTube to create content that can make a difference.

Here we speak to the members of Cameo Project about their plans to shine a light on the importance of diversity in Indonesia, and why they think video is the best medium to affect the change they want to see.  

The guys of Cameo Project
The Cameo Project

You’ve made videos confronting difficult and heavy topics such as racism, inclusion, and bullying. What prompted you to enter into these conversations, and why on YouTube?
We think video is the best medium for communication, and YouTube makes sense because it’s where you find the world’s biggest video audience. To make an impact, we have to deliver our message on the platform where we’re heard the most.

Through video, we can illustrate our points of view in a way that resonates with our audience—often in a humorous way, but in a way that is thought-provoking and honest, too. Indonesia is a diverse country with many different voices and perspectives—and we want to show that those differences are there to complement each other, and to make us stronger.

What feedback have you gotten from your viewers about these “social change” videos?
The responses are varied. The Internet is a platform for free expression, so even though some viewers may not personally agree with us, we hope they still appreciate our point of view.  We also understand that haters will be haters, and positive messages don’t always go viral. However, we are encouraged by the fact that there are always people in the audience who give us constructive feedback, which helps us evaluate how we can get better.

MAYORITAS VS MINORITAS #GUEMAYORITAS

MAYORITAS VS MINORITAS #GUEMAYORITAS

What do you think are the most important social messages that Indonesian youth need to hear today?
Create for good, make positive content, and embrace differences. The strength of Indonesia lies in its diversity. Because we’re different, we complement each other, and that’s unifying.

What’s the best part about being an Ambassador for YouTube’s Creators for Change program?
We get to meet young people from different cities all across Indonesia, and we get to remind them that you can change people’s lives through the positive content you create. And they can make money while doing it too! Doesn’t that sound like a dream? Work from home, make positive content, AND get paid.  

You’re also teaming up with two local NGOs—the Maarif Institute and Habibie Center. Can you tell us more about that?
The work we do will create a bigger impact if we have more hands joining us.  It’s humbling to be named a role model for young people, but we definitely can’t do it alone—it makes sense to work with organizations that have been working on social change initiatives for years. So as part of the Creators for Change program in Indonesia, we will join forces with local NGOs with similar objectives: to make the Internet a better place for  youth.

With Maarif Institute for instance, we will have a program to show how diversity can lead to many good things for the country. We will travel and meet high school and university students in ten cities and share what it’s like to be YouTube creators and how they can play a part in creating a positive online community. We will also give technical workshops for those interested in becoming YouTube creators, and provide them with a challenge where they have to make videos that they think will affect positive change in their home city.