Tag Archives: Google in Asia

Celebrating Penpan Sittitrai, Thailand’s master of fruit carving

Today's Doodle in Thailand celebrates national artist Penpan Sittitrai and the delicate art of fruit carving, which she mastered, skillfully turning every fruit and vegetable she touched into something truly exquisite.

Penpan Sittitrai doodle

The tradition of fruit carving has been around for centuries, initially carried out to decorate the tables of the Thai royal family. Over time, it has turned into a staple at most cultural events — something would be amiss at a Thai wedding without one of these as a centerpiece. But it’s at Songkran, the Thai New Year festival, when this custom is especially popular.

Penpan Sittitrai

Penpai carving a mango (Image source: the family's private photo collection)

Penpan Sittitrai is Thailand’s most famous fruit carving artist. Using nothing but a simple carving knife, she shaped watermelons into delicate leaves and mangoes into elegant swans. Nature was Sittitrai’s favorite theme, and from girlhood through her golden years, Sittitrai practiced her craft, elevating it to a form of fine art.

Penpan left behind many legacies, including her book “The Art of Thai Vegetable and Fruit Carving,” so anyone, anywhere can learn how to turn their apple-a-day into a work of art.

Celebrating Penpan Sittitrai, Thailand’s master of fruit carving

Today's Doodle in Thailand celebrates national artist Penpan Sittitrai and the delicate art of fruit carving, which she mastered, skillfully turning every fruit and vegetable she touched into something truly exquisite.

Penpan Sittitrai doodle

The tradition of fruit carving has been around for centuries, initially carried out to decorate the tables of the Thai royal family. Over time, it has turned into a staple at most cultural events — something would be amiss at a Thai wedding without one of these as a centerpiece. But it’s at Songkran, the Thai New Year festival, when this custom is especially popular.

Penpan Sittitrai

Penpai carving a mango (Image source: the family's private photo collection)

Penpan Sittitrai is Thailand’s most famous fruit carving artist. Using nothing but a simple carving knife, she shaped watermelons into delicate leaves and mangoes into elegant swans. Nature was Sittitrai’s favorite theme, and from girlhood through her golden years, Sittitrai practiced her craft, elevating it to a form of fine art.

Penpan left behind many legacies, including her book “The Art of Thai Vegetable and Fruit Carving,” so anyone, anywhere can learn how to turn their apple-a-day into a work of art.

Bringing digital skills training to more classrooms in Korea

Recently a group of Googlers visited Ogeum Middle School in Seoul, where they joined a junior high school class that had some fun trying out machine learning based experiments. The students got to see neural nets in action, with experiments that have trained computers to guess what someone’s drawing, or that turn a picture taken with a smartphone into a song.

Ogeum School - Giorgio Cam
Students at Ogeum Middle School trying out Giorgio Cam, an experiment built with machine learning that lets you make music with the computer just by taking a picture. It uses image recognition to label what it sees, then it turns those labels into lyrics of a song.

We’re always excited to see kids develop a passion for technology, because it seeds an interest in using technology to solve challenges later in life.

The students at Ogeum Middle School are among the first of over 3,000 kids across Korea we hope to reach through “Digital Media Campus” (or 디지털 미디어 캠퍼스 in Korean), a new digital literacy education program. Through a Google.org grant to the Korea Federation of Science Culture and Education Studies (KOSCE), we plan to reach junior high school students in 120 schools across the country this year. Students in their ‘free semester’—a time when middle schoolers can take up electives to explore future career paths—will be able to enroll in this 32-hour course spanning 16 weeks beginning next month.

KOSCE-trained tutors will show kids how to better evaluate information online and assess the validity of online sources, teach them to use a range of digital tools so they can do things like edit videos and create infographics, and help them experience exciting technologies like AR and VR. By giving them a glimpse of how these technologies work, we hope to excite them about the endless possibilities offered by technology. Perhaps this will even encourage them to consider the world of careers that technology opens up to them.  

Helping kids to recognize these opportunities often starts with dismantling false perceptions at home. This is why we’re also offering a two-hour training session to 2,000 parents, who’ll pick up tips to help their kids use digital media.

We ran a pilot of the program last year, and have been heartened by the positive feedback we’ve received so far. Teachers and parents have told us that they appreciate the skills it teaches kids to be competitive in a digital age. And the students are excited to discover new digital tools and resources that are useful to them in their students.

While we might not be able to reach every high school student with this program, we hope to play a small role in helping to inspire Korea’s next generation of tech innovators.

Bringing digital skills training to more classrooms in Korea

Recently a group of Googlers visited Ogeum Middle School in Seoul, where they joined a junior high school class that had some fun trying out machine learning based experiments. The students got to see neural nets in action, with experiments that have trained computers to guess what someone’s drawing, or that turn a picture taken with a smartphone into a song.

Ogeum School - Giorgio Cam
Students at Ogeum Middle School trying out Giorgio Cam, an experiment built with machine learning that lets you make music with the computer just by taking a picture. It uses image recognition to label what it sees, then it turns those labels into lyrics of a song.

We’re always excited to see kids develop a passion for technology, because it seeds an interest in using technology to solve challenges later in life.

The students at Ogeum Middle School are among the first of over 3,000 kids across Korea we hope to reach through “Digital Media Campus” (or 디지털 미디어 캠퍼스 in Korean), a new digital literacy education program. Through a Google.org grant to the Korea Federation of Science Culture and Education Studies (KOSCE), we plan to reach junior high school students in 120 schools across the country this year. Students in their ‘free semester’—a time when middle schoolers can take up electives to explore future career paths—will be able to enroll in this 32-hour course spanning 16 weeks beginning next month.

KOSCE-trained tutors will show kids how to better evaluate information online and assess the validity of online sources, teach them to use a range of digital tools so they can do things like edit videos and create infographics, and help them experience exciting technologies like AR and VR. By giving them a glimpse of how these technologies work, we hope to excite them about the endless possibilities offered by technology. Perhaps this will even encourage them to consider the world of careers that technology opens up to them.  

Helping kids to recognize these opportunities often starts with dismantling false perceptions at home. This is why we’re also offering a two-hour training session to 2,000 parents, who’ll pick up tips to help their kids use digital media.

We ran a pilot of the program last year, and have been heartened by the positive feedback we’ve received so far. Teachers and parents have told us that they appreciate the skills it teaches kids to be competitive in a digital age. And the students are excited to discover new digital tools and resources that are useful to them in their students.

While we might not be able to reach every high school student with this program, we hope to play a small role in helping to inspire Korea’s next generation of tech innovators.

Bringing digital skills training to more classrooms in Korea

Recently a group of Googlers visited Ogeum Middle School in Seoul, where they joined a junior high school class that had some fun trying out machine learning based experiments. The students got to see neural nets in action, with experiments that have trained computers to guess what someone’s drawing, or that turn a picture taken with a smartphone into a song.

Ogeum School - Giorgio Cam
Students at Ogeum Middle School trying out Giorgio Cam, an experiment built with machine learning that lets you make music with the computer just by taking a picture. It uses image recognition to label what it sees, then it turns those labels into lyrics of a song.

We’re always excited to see kids develop a passion for technology, because it seeds an interest in using technology to solve challenges later in life.

The students at Ogeum Middle School are among the first of over 3,000 kids across Korea we hope to reach through “Digital Media Campus” (or 디지털 미디어 캠퍼스 in Korean), a new digital literacy education program. Through a Google.org grant to the Korea Federation of Science Culture and Education Studies (KOSCE), we plan to reach junior high school students in 120 schools across the country this year. Students in their ‘free semester’—a time when middle schoolers can take up electives to explore future career paths—will be able to enroll in this 32-hour course spanning 16 weeks beginning next month.

KOSCE-trained tutors will show kids how to better evaluate information online and assess the validity of online sources, teach them to use a range of digital tools so they can do things like edit videos and create infographics, and help them experience exciting technologies like AR and VR. By giving them a glimpse of how these technologies work, we hope to excite them about the endless possibilities offered by technology. Perhaps this will even encourage them to consider the world of careers that technology opens up to them.  

Helping kids to recognize these opportunities often starts with dismantling false perceptions at home. This is why we’re also offering a two-hour training session to 2,000 parents, who’ll pick up tips to help their kids use digital media.

We ran a pilot of the program last year, and have been heartened by the positive feedback we’ve received so far. Teachers and parents have told us that they appreciate the skills it teaches kids to be competitive in a digital age. And the students are excited to discover new digital tools and resources that are useful to them in their students.

While we might not be able to reach every high school student with this program, we hope to play a small role in helping to inspire Korea’s next generation of tech innovators.

A new home for Google in the Philippines

A lot has changed in the four years since we opened the doors to our first office in the Philippines: another 20 million Filipinos have come online, and with the number of smartphone users expected to hit 70 million people next year, Filipinos are consuming more online content than ever before.

Our team of Pinoy-Googlers working here has grown too, and we recently moved into a new office that’s inspired by famous sites, sounds and a few stars from around the country.

From the fiesta feeling in our cafeteria to the natural beauty of the limestone Tabon Caves, these Pinoy touches inspire us as we work on products and services that we hope will make Filipinos’ lives online easier, and to showcase more of our country’s culture and beauty for people around the world to explore on the Internet.


Sabtang lighthouse
Take in a 360° view of Sabtang in the country’s far north on Street View.

We recently added to the beautiful places you can visit in the Philippines on Google Street View, with nearly 200 new sites across the country from Batanes in the north, to Guimaras in the south. Check out this breathtaking 360° view of Sabtang Lighthouse.

Plaza Roma Intramuros
Visit Plaza Roma in Intramuros in virtual reality on Google Arts & Culture. Just select the Cardboard icon to switch to VR mode and pop your phone into a VR viewer like Google Cardboard.

And you can now take a guided, virtual reality tour of the walled city of Intramuros on the Google Arts & Culture platform. You can also appreciate Intramuros’ collection of historic religious sculptures.

Bringing more meaningful content online is just one way we’re helping to unlock the Internet for Filipinos. We’re also helping businesses of all sizes digitize so they can capture the opportunities of the country’s Internet economy, which is expected to grow in value to US$19 billion by 2025.

In the last four years, we’ve also seen the growth of many more businesses that are built entirely off of the Internet, like Zipmatch, a start-up that is using 360° technology to differentiate itself in the real-estate marketplace. Zipmatch is the first Filipino participant in our Launchpad Accelerator program, which provides equity-free support to help start-ups scale into thriving companies. We hope to see many more Pinoy Internet entrepreneurs come through this program.

These are just some of the exciting ways in which Pinoys are using the Internet, and how we’re working with them to make the most of it. But we want more people around the country to be able to take advantage of the opportunities that the Internet offers. With nearly two in five Filipinos still offline, we think we can play a role here. This is why we’ve announced that Google.org is supporting DigiBayanihan’s efforts to bring basic ICT skills to 1 million Filipinos across Visayas and Mindanao. By training so-called “digibayanis” (or digital heroes), we hope to increase digital literacy in hard-to-reach places, and build a more inclusive online environment.
DTI Secretary Lopez tried out Google Cardboard
Department of Trade and Industry Secretary Lopez joined us at our housewarming salu-salo, where he gave the Cardboard tour of Intramuros a whirl. Here’s what he had to say: “With the population getting more connected and engaged every day, it is necessary for individuals, businesses, and communities to have the right skills to thrive in today’s modern economy. We join Google in its commitment to promote digital inclusion, empower every Filipino online, and in effect, drive the country’s economy forward.”

Mabuhay and we look forward to welcoming you to our new home. And as everyone already knows, it really is more fun at Google Philippines!

A new home for Google in the Philippines

A lot has changed in the four years since we opened the doors to our first office in the Philippines: another 20 million Filipinos have come online, and with the number of smartphone users expected to hit 70 million people next year, Filipinos are consuming more online content than ever before.

Our team of Pinoy-Googlers working here has grown too, and we recently moved into a new office that’s inspired by famous sites, sounds and a few stars from around the country.

From the fiesta feeling in our cafeteria to the natural beauty of the limestone Tabon Caves, these Pinoy touches inspire us as we work on products and services that we hope will make Filipinos’ lives online easier, and to showcase more of our country’s culture and beauty for people around the world to explore on the Internet.


Sabtang lighthouse
Take in a 360° view of Sabtang in the country’s far north on Street View.

We recently added to the beautiful places you can visit in the Philippines on Google Street View, with nearly 200 new sites across the country from Batanes in the north, to Guimaras in the south. Check out this breathtaking 360° view of Sabtang Lighthouse.

Plaza Roma Intramuros
Visit Plaza Roma in Intramuros in virtual reality on Google Arts & Culture. Just select the Cardboard icon to switch to VR mode and pop your phone into a VR viewer like Google Cardboard.

And you can now take a guided, virtual reality tour of the walled city of Intramuros on the Google Arts & Culture platform. You can also appreciate Intramuros’ collection of historic religious sculptures.

Bringing more meaningful content online is just one way we’re helping to unlock the Internet for Filipinos. We’re also helping businesses of all sizes digitize so they can capture the opportunities of the country’s Internet economy, which is expected to grow in value to US$19 billion by 2025.

In the last four years, we’ve also seen the growth of many more businesses that are built entirely off of the Internet, like Zipmatch, a start-up that is using 360° technology to differentiate itself in the real-estate marketplace. Zipmatch is the first Filipino participant in our Launchpad Accelerator program, which provides equity-free support to help start-ups scale into thriving companies. We hope to see many more Pinoy Internet entrepreneurs come through this program.

These are just some of the exciting ways in which Pinoys are using the Internet, and how we’re working with them to make the most of it. But we want more people around the country to be able to take advantage of the opportunities that the Internet offers. With nearly two in five Filipinos still offline, we think we can play a role here. This is why we’ve announced that Google.org is supporting DigiBayanihan’s efforts to bring basic ICT skills to 1 million Filipinos across Visayas and Mindanao. By training so-called “digibayanis” (or digital heroes), we hope to increase digital literacy in hard-to-reach places, and build a more inclusive online environment.
DTI Secretary Lopez tried out Google Cardboard
Department of Trade and Industry Secretary Lopez joined us at our housewarming salu-salo, where he gave the Cardboard tour of Intramuros a whirl. Here’s what he had to say: “With the population getting more connected and engaged every day, it is necessary for individuals, businesses, and communities to have the right skills to thrive in today’s modern economy. We join Google in its commitment to promote digital inclusion, empower every Filipino online, and in effect, drive the country’s economy forward.”

Mabuhay and we look forward to welcoming you to our new home. And as everyone already knows, it really is more fun at Google Philippines!

Step “Into the Wild” with Tango at Singapore ArtScience Museum

The Sumatran tiger is among the most critically endangered species in the world, with just 400 tigers surviving today. Its natural habitat is also one of the most threatened regions. With a new virtual reality experience, visitors to Into the Wild at Singapore’s ArtScience Museum can get really close to this threatened species, walk through and learn more about its rainforest habitat. All you need to guide you on this educational virtual adventure is a smartphone with Tango, a technology that enables augmented reality experiences.

With phones that use Tango technology, it’s possible to track motion, understand distances in the real-world, and recognize locations. This is what makes it possible to build a virtual world on top of the real one. Into the Wild is only the second virtual and augmented reality museum experience using Tango.

Into the Wild - Butterflies

Start your digital adventure by picking up a Lenovo Phab 2 Pro when you enter. Fire up the device, follow a kaleidoscope of butterflies and watch the real world transform into a virtual forest.

As you walk through the exhibit and point the tablet in different directions, you’ll experience what it’s like to walk through the rainforest and meet some of its inhabitants along the way, many of which are endangered by deforestation and other illegal activity.

Into the Wild - Mouse-deer
Help free a trapped mouse-deer

You’ll discover a mouse-deer — the smallest known hoofed animal — that’s been trapped. You can help it escape by tapping the cage it is caught in.

Into the Wild - Tapir
Follow Malayan tapirs as they find a drink

Continue on your journey, and you’ll come across a stream and see a Malayan tapir as it waddles toward the waterfall for a drink. Malayan tapirs are hard to spot as there are less than 2,000 of them in the wild.

Into the Wild - Fire
A fire starts in the forest, threatening the animals

You might then see an orangutan enjoying some fruit as it lounges in the trees. But all of sudden, a raging fire will shatter the tranquil scene and blanket the forest with thick smoke.

What happens next? You’ll have to find out when Into the Wild opens at Singapore ArtScience Museum on February 11. Best of all, your actions can have a direct impact in the real world. When you complete your adventure, you can plant a virtual tree and donate to the WWF to help their efforts to restore Southeast Asia’s rainforests.

We're thrilled by this collaboration with Singapore ArtScience Museum, Lenovo, WWF and many other great partners* to bring the Southeast Asian rainforest to life. We hope Into the Wild helps more people learn about some of the world’s most endangered species and their habitats, and that it sparks and inspires the imagination of current and aspiring developers to build many more exciting AR/VR experiences.

*Into the Wild was built in collaboration with Lenovo, WWF and Singapore artist Brian Gothong Tan, in association with Panasonic and Qualcomm, and developed by creative production company MediaMonks.

Step “Into the Wild” with Tango at Singapore ArtScience Museum

The Sumatran tiger is among the most critically endangered species in the world, with just 400 tigers surviving today. Its natural habitat is also one of the most threatened regions. With a new virtual reality experience, visitors to Into the Wild at Singapore’s ArtScience Museum can get really close to this threatened species, walk through and learn more about its rainforest habitat. All you need to guide you on this educational virtual adventure is a smartphone with Tango, a technology that enables augmented reality experiences.

With phones that use Tango technology, it’s possible to track motion, understand distances in the real-world, and recognize locations. This is what makes it possible to build a virtual world on top of the real one. Into the Wild is only the second virtual and augmented reality museum experience using Tango.

Into the Wild - Butterflies

Start your digital adventure by picking up a Lenovo Phab 2 Pro when you enter. Fire up the device, follow a kaleidoscope of butterflies and watch the real world transform into a virtual forest.

As you walk through the exhibit and point the tablet in different directions, you’ll experience what it’s like to walk through the rainforest and meet some of its inhabitants along the way, many of which are endangered by deforestation and other illegal activity.

Into the Wild - Mouse-deer
Help free a trapped mouse-deer

You’ll discover a mouse-deer — the smallest known hoofed animal — that’s been trapped. You can help it escape by tapping the cage it is caught in.

Into the Wild - Tapir
Follow Malayan tapirs as they find a drink

Continue on your journey, and you’ll come across a stream and see a Malayan tapir as it waddles toward the waterfall for a drink. Malayan tapirs are hard to spot as there are less than 2,000 of them in the wild.

Into the Wild -- Forest fire
A fire starts in the forest, threatening the animals

You might then see an orangutan enjoying some fruit as it lounges in the trees. But all of sudden, a raging fire will shatter the tranquil scene and blanket the forest with thick smoke.

What happens next? You’ll have to find out when Into the Wild opens at Singapore ArtScience Museum on February 11. Best of all, your actions can have a direct impact in the real world. When you complete your adventure, you can plant a virtual tree and donate to the WWF to help their efforts to restore Southeast Asia’s rainforests.

We're thrilled by this collaboration with Singapore ArtScience Museum, Lenovo, WWF and many other great partners* to bring the Southeast Asian rainforest to life. We hope Into the Wild helps more people learn about some of the world’s most endangered species and their habitats, and that it sparks and inspires the imagination of current and aspiring developers to build many more exciting AR/VR experiences.

*Into the Wild was built in collaboration with Lenovo, WWF and Singapore artist Brian Gothong Tan, in association with Panasonic and Qualcomm, and developed by creative production company MediaMonks.

Lost in Translation no more with Word Lens in Japanese

If you don’t speak Japanese, Tokyo can be a confusing and sometimes daunting place to visit. Even if you make it through the complex subway system, you’ll be faced by street signs, menus or products on supermarket shelves that are only in Japanese. 

With Word Lens now available in Japanese, you’ll never have to worry about taking a wrong turn on a busy Shibuya street or ordering something you wouldn't normally eat. 

The Google Translate app already lets you snap a photo of Japanese text and get a translation for it in English. But it’s a whole lot more convenient if you can just point your camera and instantly translate text on the go. With Word Lens, you just need to fire up the Translate app, point your camera at the Japanese text, and the English translations will appear overlaid on your screen—even if you don't have an Internet or data connection. It’s every savvy traveller’s dream! 

Google Translate: Cash only

To turn your smartphone into a powerful instant translation tool for English to Japanese (and vice versa), all you need to do is download the Google Translate app, either on Android or iOS