Tag Archives: Connected Workspaces

How Scheels uses Chrome to help its sales associates better serve customers

Editor’s Note: Today’s post is from Becky Torkelson, Computer Support Specialist Leader for Scheels, an employee-owned 27-store chain of sporting goods stores in the Midwest and West. Scheels uses Chrome browser and G Suite to help its 6,000 employees better serve customers and work together efficiently.

Whether customers come to Scheels stores to buy running shoes, fishing rods or camping stoves, they talk to associates who know the products inside and out. We hire people who are experts in what they’re selling and who have a passion for sports and outdoor life. They use Chrome browser and G Suite to check email and search for products from Chromebooks right on the sales floor, so they can spend more time serving customers.

That’s a big improvement over the days when we had a few PCs, equipped with IBM Notes and Microsoft Office, in the back rooms of each store. Associates and service technicians used the PCs to check email, enter their work hours or look up product specs or inventory for customers—but that meant they had to be away from customers and off the sales floor.

Starting in 2015, we bought 100 Chromebooks and 50 Chromeboxes, some of which were used to replace PCs in store departments like service shops. Using Chromebooks, employees in these departments could avoid manual processes that slowed down customer service in the past. With G Suite, Chrome devices and Chrome browser working together, our employees have access to Gmail and inventory records when they work in our back rooms. They can quickly log on and access the applications they need. This means they have more time on the sales floor for face-to-face interaction with customers.

Our corporate buyers, who analyze inventory and keep all of our stores stocked with the products we need, use Google Drive to share and update documents for orders instead of trading emails back and forth. We’re also using Google Sites to store employee forms and policy guides for easy downloading—another way people save time.  

We use Chrome to customize home pages for employee groups, such as service technicians. As soon as they log in to Chrome, the technicians see the bookmarks they need—they don’t have to jump through hoops to find technical manuals or service requests. Our corporate buyers also see their own bookmarks at login. Since buyers travel from store to store, finding their bookmarks on any computer with Chrome is a big time-saver.

Our IT help desk team tells me that they hardly get trouble tickets related to Chrome. There was a very short learning curve when we changed to Chrome, an amazing thing when you consider we had to choose tools for a workforce of 6,000 people. The IT team likes Chrome’s built-in security—they know that malware and antivirus programs are running and updating in the background, so Chrome is doing security monitoring for us.

Since Scheels is employee-owned, associates have a stake in our company’s success. They’re excited to talk to customers who want to learn about the best gear for their favorite sports. Chrome and G Suite help those conversations stay focused on customer needs and delivering smart and fast service.

How Scheels uses Chrome to help its sales associates better serve customers

Editor’s Note: Today’s post is from Becky Torkelson, Computer Support Specialist Leader for Scheels, an employee-owned 27-store chain of sporting goods stores in the Midwest and West. Scheels uses Chrome browser and G Suite to help its 6,000 employees better serve customers and work together efficiently.

Whether customers come to Scheels stores to buy running shoes, fishing rods or camping stoves, they talk to associates who know the products inside and out. We hire people who are experts in what they’re selling and who have a passion for sports and outdoor life. They use Chrome browser and G Suite to check email and search for products from Chromebooks right on the sales floor, so they can spend more time serving customers.

That’s a big improvement over the days when we had a few PCs, equipped with IBM Notes and Microsoft Office, in the back rooms of each store. Associates and service technicians used the PCs to check email, enter their work hours or look up product specs or inventory for customers—but that meant they had to be away from customers and off the sales floor.

Starting in 2015, we bought 100 Chromebooks and 50 Chromeboxes, some of which were used to replace PCs in store departments like service shops. Using Chromebooks, employees in these departments could avoid manual processes that slowed down customer service in the past. With G Suite, Chrome devices and Chrome browser working together, our employees have access to Gmail and inventory records when they work in our back rooms. They can quickly log on and access the applications they need. This means they have more time on the sales floor for face-to-face interaction with customers.

Our corporate buyers, who analyze inventory and keep all of our stores stocked with the products we need, use Google Drive to share and update documents for orders instead of trading emails back and forth. We’re also using Google Sites to store employee forms and policy guides for easy downloading—another way people save time.  

We use Chrome to customize home pages for employee groups, such as service technicians. As soon as they log in to Chrome, the technicians see the bookmarks they need—they don’t have to jump through hoops to find technical manuals or service requests. Our corporate buyers also see their own bookmarks at login. Since buyers travel from store to store, finding their bookmarks on any computer with Chrome is a big time-saver.

Our IT help desk team tells me that they hardly get trouble tickets related to Chrome. There was a very short learning curve when we changed to Chrome, an amazing thing when you consider we had to choose tools for a workforce of 6,000 people. The IT team likes Chrome’s built-in security—they know that malware and antivirus programs are running and updating in the background, so Chrome is doing security monitoring for us.

Since Scheels is employee-owned, associates have a stake in our company’s success. They’re excited to talk to customers who want to learn about the best gear for their favorite sports. Chrome and G Suite help those conversations stay focused on customer needs and delivering smart and fast service.

Source: Google Cloud


Security enhancements and more for enterprise Chrome browser customers

When it comes to Chrome, security is one of our most important considerations—and that’s especially true when it comes to our enterprise users. We’re always looking for ways to further protect enterprises from potential dangers like ransomware, malware, and other vulnerabilities. 

Chrome browser has been validated by third parties as a frontrunner in enterprise browser security, and we’re committed to constantly introducing more safeguards. That’s why the latest release of Chrome browser introduces a variety of new security enhancements for enterprises. From new ways to better isolate processes, to broader support for more advanced security standards, to the introduction of new policies, IT admins now have more options to protect their users and businesses from potential threats. Here’s a quick overview of the security updates this latest release of Chrome will offer, plus an update on a few upcoming changes in 2018.


Site Isolation: For enterprises with the highest security needs

Starting with today’s release, Site Isolation is now available. With Site Isolation enabled, Chrome renders content for each open website in a separate process, isolated from other websites. This can mean even stronger security boundaries between websites than Chrome’s existing sandboxing technology. Admins can read more to determine if this capability makes sense for their organization—and start implementing it immediately.


Making it easier to restrict extensions based on required permissions

Although admins have been able to whitelist and blacklist specific extensions in Chrome, we’ve heard feedback that it can be difficult to scale. Beginning today, IT admins can configure a new policy that restricts access to extensions based on the permissions required. For example, through policy, IT can now block all extensions that require the use of a webcam or microphone, or those that require access to reading or changing data on the websites visited. This policy is available now, and will help IT teams enforce necessary controls, without overly restricting users.  

Chrome updates for enterprises

Version 1.3 of Transport Layer Security (TLS) and policy

Secure communication on the Internet is made possible through a protocol called Transport Layer Security (TLS). To support the latest security standards, we're enabling TLS 1.3 for Gmail in today’s release of Chrome browser. The previous version, TLS 1.2, was standardized in 2008 and, although it can be secure when configured correctly, it’s in need of an overhaul. The improvements in TLS 1.3 make it faster and more secure, and we’ll be expanding TLS 1.3 support to the broader web in 2018.


Chrome browser users should not be impacted by this change. IT admins that are aware of any systems that are not interoperable with TLS 1.3 should post feedback in the admin forum. As admins prepare for the wider use of TLS 1.3, they can configure this policy for network software or hardware that will not transit TLS 1.3 connections. More details are available on this page.


Broader platform support for the NTLMv2 authentication protocol

Last week we shared on our admin forum that Chrome 64, coming in early 2018, will include support for the NTLMv2 authentication protocol, including Extended Protection for Authentication (EPA) on Mac, Android, Linux and Chrome OS. This allows all platforms to perform NTLM authentication with the same level of security that was previously available only in Chrome on Windows.


IT admins can enable this feature today by visiting chrome://flags/#enable-ntlm-v2. In Chrome 65, NTLMv2 will become the default NTLM protocol as it already is on Windows. More details are available on this page. With this update, Chrome will become the only browser to support NTLMv2 with EPA on non-Windows platforms.


Reducing Chrome crashes caused by third-party software

Last week we announced we’ll be implementing changes in Chrome to improve stability and reduce the number of browser crashes. Starting with the release of Chrome 68 in July 2018, we’ll begin blocking third-party software from injecting code into Chrome on Windows.


Code injection has historically been used by products such as anti-virus software. But it’s an outdated process, and we encourage vendors of such software to take advantage of the newer, more effective options available.


In the meantime, we understand sometimes businesses need to rely on such software, and we want to make sure they’re covered. We’ll be introducing a new policy in the coming months that will offer admins extended support for critical apps that require code injection to function.

Chrome updates for enterprises 02

Admins can visit chrome://conflicts to check if software currently installed on a computer is injecting into Chrome.


We’re excited to bring new capabilities to IT admins that enhance Chrome’s security and stability. For more information about Chrome browser for enterprise, visit Chrome.com/enterprise, or to share feedback, visit our Chrome browser Enterprise Admin Forum.

Please Welcome Diane Bryant to Google Cloud

I am happy and excited to announce that Diane Bryant, former Group President at Intel, will be joining Google Cloud as our Chief Operating Officer. I can’t think of a person with more relevant experience and talents. She is an engineer with tremendous business focus and an outstanding thirty-year career in technology.

Most recently, Diane was head of Intel’s Data Center Group, which generated $17 billion in revenue in 2016. Over her five years as Group President, Diane expanded the business to additionally focus on pervasive cloud computing, network virtualization and the adoption of artificial intelligence solutions. Previously, Bryant was Intel’s Corporate Vice President and Chief Information Officer, where she was responsible for corporate-wide information technology solutions and services.  

Diane serves on the board of United Technologies. Throughout her career, Diane has worked to mentor and sponsor women in technology.

Google Cloud is the most technologically advanced, most highly available, and most open cloud in the world. We are growing at an extraordinary rate as we enable businesses to become smarter with data, increase their agility, collaborate and secure their information. Diane’s strategic acumen, technical knowledge and client focus will prove invaluable as we accelerate the scale and reach of Google Cloud.

I am personally looking forward to working closely with Diane Bryant as we enter what promises to be a great 2018 for Google Cloud.

Please Welcome Diane Bryant to Google Cloud

I am happy and excited to announce that Diane Bryant, former Group President at Intel, will be joining Google Cloud as our Chief Operating Officer. I can’t think of a person with more relevant experience and talents. She is an engineer with tremendous business focus and an outstanding thirty-year career in technology.

Most recently, Diane was head of Intel’s Data Center Group, which generated $17 billion in revenue in 2016. Over her five years as Group President, Diane expanded the business to additionally focus on pervasive cloud computing, network virtualization and the adoption of artificial intelligence solutions. Previously, Bryant was Intel’s Corporate Vice President and Chief Information Officer, where she was responsible for corporate-wide information technology solutions and services.  

Diane serves on the board of United Technologies. Throughout her career, Diane has worked to mentor and sponsor women in technology.

Google Cloud is the most technologically advanced, most highly available, and most open cloud in the world. We are growing at an extraordinary rate as we enable businesses to become smarter with data, increase their agility, collaborate and secure their information. Diane’s strategic acumen, technical knowledge and client focus will prove invaluable as we accelerate the scale and reach of Google Cloud.

I am personally looking forward to working closely with Diane Bryant as we enter what promises to be a great 2018 for Google Cloud.

Source: Google Cloud


MedXM keeps patients healthy, with help from G Suite and Chrome

Editor’s note: Today’s post comes from Sy Zahedi, CEO of MedXM, which works with health plan providers to offer preventive care and health education to patients. MedXM is using G Suite and Chrome to operate more efficiently and help outreach agents and clinicians improve care for patients.

Every day, 5,000 MedXM healthcare workers visit patients in their homes or in nearby clinics. Our clinicians and health aides make sure patients are taking medications, following doctor instructions and making progress in managing chronic conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure. We believe that focusing on things like prevention, education and early detection will keep our patients healthy, and detect or deter illnesses before they become critical or require hospital stays.

Meeting with patients face to face is our strategy for keeping people healthy.  That’s why we rely on technology to remain connected with our patients.  Our outreach center agents need to be able to field calls from patients with questions or emergencies. Other employees communicate with health insurers about our wellness programs or to obtain documentation on patient progress. To meet our mission of delivering great person-to-person care, we chose G Suite, Chromebooks, and Chrome browser.

Switching to faster, more secure applications.


Before Google, we relied on laptops equipped with Microsoft Office. Healthcare workers and remote employees had to use VPNs to log in to our network. The process was slow and not user friendly. Plus, we plan to hire more remote workers in the future, so we needed easy and secure tools that allowed workers to share and update documents no matter where they were.

Once we determined that G Suite could allow employees to securely communicate with each other and with healthcare providers, we rolled out Gmail first, then moved on to Google Drive, Google Docs and Google Hangouts. We also deployed Chrome browser across all worker computers. Switching employees and outreach center agents to G Suite took very little time—many of our employees already used tools like Gmail and Google Docs at home. And once our IT team showed employees how multiple people could work on a Google Sheets spreadsheet at the same time, they never wanted to use anything but Google Sheets from then on.



Decreased costs. Increased productivity.


Since we began using G Suite and Chrome, productivity increased significantly, while software costs decreased by 40 percent. Since staff can share information with clinicians using Google Drive, employees no longer waste time with complicated VPNs when they need to upload work orders to healthcare providers. Plus, they can complete routine tasks faster, such as filling out vacation requests in Google Forms instead of passing around sheets of paper.

Switching to Google also reduced the workload for the MedXM IT team, which used to spend about 25 percent of its time supporting legacy desktop applications. Today, they need to provide very little support for G Suite so they can spend more time on creative projects, like using Google Apps Script to create custom dashboards for staff.

After adding up all of the benefits of using G Suite and Chrome, we’re taking the next step: replacing our outreach center and clinician computers with Chromebooks.

Because Google makes us more efficient, employees have more time to spend caring for patients. With more time tending to patients’ needs, we can fulfill our company mission: preventative healthcare, education and early detection. Now that’s good medicine.

MedXM keeps patients healthy, with help from G Suite and Chrome

Editor’s note: Today’s post comes from Sy Zahedi, CEO of MedXM, which works with health plan providers to offer preventive care and health education to patients. MedXM is using G Suite and Chrome to operate more efficiently and help outreach agents and clinicians improve care for patients.

Every day, 5,000 MedXM healthcare workers visit patients in their homes or in nearby clinics. Our clinicians and health aides make sure patients are taking medications, following doctor instructions and making progress in managing chronic conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure. We believe that focusing on things like prevention, education and early detection will keep our patients healthy, and detect or deter illnesses before they become critical or require hospital stays.

Meeting with patients face to face is our strategy for keeping people healthy.  That’s why we rely on technology to remain connected with our patients.  Our outreach center agents need to be able to field calls from patients with questions or emergencies. Other employees communicate with health insurers about our wellness programs or to obtain documentation on patient progress. To meet our mission of delivering great person-to-person care, we chose G Suite, Chromebooks, and Chrome browser.

Switching to faster, more secure applications.


Before Google, we relied on laptops equipped with Microsoft Office. Healthcare workers and remote employees had to use VPNs to log in to our network. The process was slow and not user friendly. Plus, we plan to hire more remote workers in the future, so we needed easy and secure tools that allowed workers to share and update documents no matter where they were.

Once we determined that G Suite could allow employees to securely communicate with each other and with healthcare providers, we rolled out Gmail first, then moved on to Google Drive, Google Docs and Google Hangouts. We also deployed Chrome browser across all worker computers. Switching employees and outreach center agents to G Suite took very little time—many of our employees already used tools like Gmail and Google Docs at home. And once our IT team showed employees how multiple people could work on a Google Sheets spreadsheet at the same time, they never wanted to use anything but Google Sheets from then on.



Decreased costs. Increased productivity.


Since we began using G Suite and Chrome, productivity increased significantly, while software costs decreased by 40 percent. Since staff can share information with clinicians using Google Drive, employees no longer waste time with complicated VPNs when they need to upload work orders to healthcare providers. Plus, they can complete routine tasks faster, such as filling out vacation requests in Google Forms instead of passing around sheets of paper.

Switching to Google also reduced the workload for the MedXM IT team, which used to spend about 25 percent of its time supporting legacy desktop applications. Today, they need to provide very little support for G Suite so they can spend more time on creative projects, like using Google Apps Script to create custom dashboards for staff.

After adding up all of the benefits of using G Suite and Chrome, we’re taking the next step: replacing our outreach center and clinician computers with Chromebooks.

Because Google makes us more efficient, employees have more time to spend caring for patients. With more time tending to patients’ needs, we can fulfill our company mission: preventative healthcare, education and early detection. Now that’s good medicine.

Source: Google Cloud


Chrome Enterprise now offers native print management

In August we announced the launch of Chrome Enterprise, a single, cost-effective solution giving you the security and control you need to keep your employees connected. On our road to releasing Chrome Enterprise, we listened to a lot of feedback from businesses. And one of the most common requests we received was greater printing capabilities.

Whether it’s firing off a last minute presentation, or grabbing those boarding passes on the way to the airport, fast and simple printing is business critical. That's why we're excited to expand Chrome Enterprise's native printing capabilities.

Chrome Enterprise’s native print functionality is enabled through the Common UNIX Printing System (CUPS). CUPS uses an Internet Printing Protocol (IPP) that allows printing directly to a printer over the local network. You can add, remove, enable and disable printers by organizational unit in the Google admin console. Enabled printers will automatically appear in a user’s list of Chrome printers.

For employees, setup will be a cinch. With native print functionality, they can add a local printer and begin printing—no connectors needed. They can also print directly to a printer via USB.

For more information on managing native printing in Chrome Enterprise, check out our Help Center article. Or warm up your friendly local printer and fire away from your Chrome browser. Just don’t forget to BYOP (bring your own paper)!

Defy Ventures: Using Chromebooks and G Suite to give people a second chance

Editor’s note: Today’s post comes from Charles Hoke, Chief Development Officer of Defy Ventures, a nonprofit that helps current and formerly incarcerated people in 25 U.S. correctional facilities launch new careers. Defy Ventures uses Chromebooks, G Suite and Pixel phones to help people with criminal histories learn about entrepreneurship and research business opportunities.

The prospects for work are bleak for incarcerated people, even when they're released from prison. Research from the American Civil Liberties Union shows that 65 percent of formerly incarcerated individuals are still unemployed one year after their release. But they have the talent to make their way in the outside world, legitimately—what we call “transforming the hustle.” At Defy Ventures, we help these Entrepreneurs-in-Training (EITs) make a new start for themselves by starting their own businesses. We work with them while they’re in prison, and continue to help after their release.

To help EITs develop their business skills, we connect them with technology so they can search online for business opportunities, watch training videos, and communicate with mentors. Chromebooks and G Suite have become key tools in helping EITs realize their dreams.

Most people leaving prison don’t have computers. We used to give donated and refurbished laptops to EITs, or invite them to our office to use our computers—but the laptops and software were often out of date. That’s when we turned to Chromebooks, which auto-updates and always has the latest software, product features and virus protection. Thanks to a collaboration with Google since December 2014, we’re now giving EITs Chromebooks, G Suite accounts and Pixel phones—all of which they get to keep after graduating from the program.

The speed and simplicity of Chromebooks, as well as their reasonable cost, made them perfect for us. Many EITs don’t have a lot of computer knowledge, but it doesn’t take them long to figure out how to use Chromebooks and G Suite. The fast learning curve saves time for our program staff, who would normally have to answer EITs’ hardware and software questions, since we don’t have an IT department. Equipped with Chromebooks, EITs can watch 250 hours of Defy Ventures video tutorials on entrepreneurship, employment readiness, and personal development. Chromebooks also connect EITs to other resources, like job boards, housing lists, and even where to find clothes to wear to interviews.

Defy2
Defy Ventures EIT Eugene Williams

Matching EITs to mentors is an important part of our service. We used to pair them using paper documents and spreadsheets. By placing mentor and EIT information into Google Forms, we streamlined the process so staff can make matches 50 percent faster than before. Our staff is also using G Suite tools like Gmail, Docs and Sheets to collaborate on work projects.

Google technology also helps us maximize our resources. Previously, with only a few borrowed or refurbished laptops, plus our office computers, we could only serve about 30 EITs at a time. Now that EITs have Chromebooks and G Suite, they can work independently, and we can serve as many as 250 EITs at once. The new device setup is quick and easy. We created a 30-minute training course called “Getting to Know your Google Chromebook,” which walks EITs through device setup and the basics of using G Suite. After EITs have completed the course, our program managers follow up with each one to answer any remaining questions they have.

We believe that with Chromebooks and G Suite, we’ll be able to replicate our program in more cities. And by offering EITs better technology, we believe we can improve retention rates and reduce their time to employment or to business launch. We’ve given away 200 Chromebooks to date, and we expect to give away about 1,500 more over the next two years.

While these are long-term impacts, EITs have told us how Chromebooks and G Suite are changing their lives right now. “With this new Chromebook and Pixel phone, I am now able to manage my company seamlessly and more efficiently,” says EIT Aaron Owens, who founded Florida marketing and branding company ArkBM.

Defy3
Defy Ventures EIT Aaron Owens

Formerly incarcerated people have paid their debt to society, but they can remain in invisible handcuffs because of a lack of opportunities. I love seeing the smiles on EITs’ faces and hearing the giddiness in their voices when they realize how much easier it is to pursue their personal goals with the use of technology. And I'm glad we've found the right fit with Chromebooks and G Suite.

Source: Google Cloud


Defy Ventures: Using Chromebooks and G Suite to give people a second chance

Editor’s note: Today’s post comes from Charles Hoke, Chief Development Officer of Defy Ventures, a nonprofit that helps current and formerly incarcerated people in 25 U.S. correctional facilities launch new careers. Defy Ventures uses Chromebooks, G Suite and Pixel phones to help people with criminal histories learn about entrepreneurship and research business opportunities.

The prospects for work are bleak for incarcerated people, even when they're released from prison. Research from the American Civil Liberties Union shows that 65 percent of formerly incarcerated individuals are still unemployed one year after their release. But they have the talent to make their way in the outside world, legitimately—what we call “transforming the hustle.” At Defy Ventures, we help these Entrepreneurs-in-Training (EITs) make a new start for themselves by starting their own businesses. We work with them while they’re in prison, and continue to help after their release.

To help EITs develop their business skills, we connect them with technology so they can search online for business opportunities, watch training videos, and communicate with mentors. Chromebooks and G Suite have become key tools in helping EITs realize their dreams.

Most people leaving prison don’t have computers. We used to give donated and refurbished laptops to EITs, or invite them to our office to use our computers—but the laptops and software were often out of date. That’s when we turned to Chromebooks, which auto-updates and always has the latest software, product features and virus protection. Thanks to a collaboration with Google since December 2014, we’re now giving EITs Chromebooks, G Suite accounts and Pixel phones—all of which they get to keep after graduating from the program.

The speed and simplicity of Chromebooks, as well as their reasonable cost, made them perfect for us. Many EITs don’t have a lot of computer knowledge, but it doesn’t take them long to figure out how to use Chromebooks and G Suite. The fast learning curve saves time for our program staff, who would normally have to answer EITs’ hardware and software questions, since we don’t have an IT department. Equipped with Chromebooks, EITs can watch 250 hours of Defy Ventures video tutorials on entrepreneurship, employment readiness, and personal development. Chromebooks also connect EITs to other resources, like job boards, housing lists, and even where to find clothes to wear to interviews.

Defy2
Defy Ventures EIT Eugene Williams

Matching EITs to mentors is an important part of our service. We used to pair them using paper documents and spreadsheets. By placing mentor and EIT information into Google Forms, we streamlined the process so staff can make matches 50 percent faster than before. Our staff is also using G Suite tools like Gmail, Docs and Sheets to collaborate on work projects.

Google technology also helps us maximize our resources. Previously, with only a few borrowed or refurbished laptops, plus our office computers, we could only serve about 30 EITs at a time. Now that EITs have Chromebooks and G Suite, they can work independently, and we can serve as many as 250 EITs at once. The new device setup is quick and easy. We created a 30-minute training course called “Getting to Know your Google Chromebook,” which walks EITs through device setup and the basics of using G Suite. After EITs have completed the course, our program managers follow up with each one to answer any remaining questions they have.

We believe that with Chromebooks and G Suite, we’ll be able to replicate our program in more cities. And by offering EITs better technology, we believe we can improve retention rates and reduce their time to employment or to business launch. We’ve given away 200 Chromebooks to date, and we expect to give away about 1,500 more over the next two years.

While these are long-term impacts, EITs have told us how Chromebooks and G Suite are changing their lives right now. “With this new Chromebook and Pixel phone, I am now able to manage my company seamlessly and more efficiently,” says EIT Aaron Owens, who founded Florida marketing and branding company ArkBM.

Defy3
Defy Ventures EIT Aaron Owens

Formerly incarcerated people have paid their debt to society, but they can remain in invisible handcuffs because of a lack of opportunities. I love seeing the smiles on EITs’ faces and hearing the giddiness in their voices when they realize how much easier it is to pursue their personal goals with the use of technology. And I'm glad we've found the right fit with Chromebooks and G Suite.