Category Archives: Google Africa Blog

Google Africa Blog

Celebrating ten years of grants for CS educators

Over the past 10 years, Google’s programme for the professional development (PD) of Computer Science (CS) educators (formerly known as CS4HS) has funded close to $13 million in grants supporting teacher PD in CS education globally. In Africa, 61 universities and nonprofits dedicated to growing the confidence and skillset of new and future CS educators have received grants that have impacted 5,000 educators from more than 15 countries. 
Hands-on computer science learning at a Code4Girls workshop by the Hapa Foundation
We’re excited to announce our funding cycle is open to school districts, universities, and other education nonprofits around the world for the 2018-2019 school year. Historically, Google’s CS educator PD grants have aimed to help secondary school teachers gain confidence to integrate CS and computational thinking (CT) into their classrooms. To celebrate the tenth anniversary of CS PD funding, we’re excited to announce that the programme will expand to include applications from PD providers for primary school and pre-service teacher education in Africa for the 2018 grant year. 



Meet a past awardee
Through the years, we continue to be impressed by the stories, impact and innovative ways our awardees have used Google’s funding to support and enable educators to teach CS in their classrooms. Meet Albert Opoku, of the Hapa Foundation - a nonprofit organisation in Ghana dedicated to improving lives through social investment projects in the areas of education, entrepreneurship and technology. As a 2017 grantee, Opoku and his team developed the Code4Girls project focussed on professional development for teachers and a training programme for student champions. Together, they then co-delivered in-school workshops in 12 senior high schools across Ghana. “This grant will help us to reach more than 1,200 students in Ghana this year. It’s wonderful to see the teachers and student champions grow in confidence as they work and learn together”. 


Grants are open from today until 2nd March 2018. Learn more about the application process here.


Posted by Claire Conneely, CS Education Program Manager

Meet Datally, a new way to understand, control and save mobile data

Mobile data is expensive for many people around the world. And what’s worse, it’s hard to figure out where it all goes. That means you're never just chatting, playing games or watching videos on your phone—you're also anxiously keeping an eye on how long your data will last.

That’s why we built Datally, an app that helps you understand, control and save data. With Datally, you can save more and do more with your data.
Understand, control and and save mobile data with Datally
Datally helps you do three things:
  • Understand your data. See your usage on a hourly, daily, weekly or monthly basis and get personalized recommendations for how you can save more. 
  • Control your data. Turn on the Data Saver bubble to block background data usage and track real-time data usage while using each of your apps—it’s like a speedometer for your data. You can also block data with one tap if an app’s data usage gets out of control. 
  • Save your data. Sometimes you just need a little more than what you’ve got on your data plan. Datally will tell you if you’re near public Wi-Fi and help you connect. Once you’re done, don’t forget to rate the network quality to help other users.
Track and control mobile data from any app with the Data Saver bubble
We’ve been testing Datally in the Philippines for the past few months, and people are saving up to 30 percent on their data. So today we’re excited to make Datally globally available on the Google Play Store for all phones running Android 5.0 (Lollipop) and higher.

Here’s to saving more so you can do more with your mobile data!

Caesar Sengupta, 
VP, Next Billion Users Team





 ====


Découvrez Datally, une nouvelle application pour comprendre, contrôler et économiser les données mobiles

Pour un grand nombre d'utilisateurs dans le monde entier, les données mobiles coûtent cher. Le pire, c'est qu'il est difficile de comprendre les détails de ce coût. Par conséquent, lorsque vous chattez, jouez ou regardez des vidéos sur votre téléphone, vous vous demandez toujours avec inquiétude combien de temps vos données vont durer.

Voilà pourquoi nous avons conçu Datally, une application qui vous aide à comprendre, à contrôler et à économiser vos données. Avec Datally, vous pouvez ainsi en économiser davantage et mieux les exploiter.

Datally vous offre trois avantages :
  • Comprendre vos données : vous pouvez consulter votre consommation de données par heure, par jour, par semaine ou par mois, mais également obtenir des recommandations personnalisées sur la façon d'économiser plus de données.
  • Contrôler vos données : activez l'info-bulle de l'économiseur de données pour bloquer la consommation de données en arrière-plan et suivre celle qui a lieu en temps réel pendant que vous utilisez chacune de vos applications. C'est le même principe qu'un compteur de vitesse, mais pour vos données. De plus, si une application consomme trop de données, vous pouvez les bloquer d'un simple geste.
  • Économiser vos données : il arrive parfois que votre forfait ne vous permette pas de consommer autant de données que vous le souhaitez, à moins de le dépasser. Datally vous indique si vous êtes à proximité d'un réseau Wi-Fi public et vous aide à vous y connecter. Pensez ensuite à évaluer ce réseau afin d'aider les autres utilisateurs.

Durant nos tests réalisés ces derniers mois aux Philippines, Datally a permis aux utilisateurs d'économiser jusqu'à 30 % de données. Aussi, nous sommes aujourd'hui ravis de proposer l'application sur le Google Play Store aux utilisateurs du monde entier qui possèdent un téléphone équipé d'Android 5.0 (Lollipop) ou version ultérieure.

Nous allons enfin pouvoir économiser nos données mobiles et les optimiser !

Caesar Sengupta
Vice-président, Next Billion Users Team (équipe responsable de la conception d'applications pour le plus grand nombre)

Launchpad comes to Africa to support tech startups! Apply to join the first accelerator class

Earlier this year at Google for Nigeria, our CEO Sundar Pichai made a commitment to support African entrepreneurs building successful technology companies and products. Following up on that commitment, we’re excited to announce Google Developers Launchpad Africa , our new hands-on comprehensive mentorship program tailored exclusively to startups based in Africa.

Building on the success of our global Launchpad Accelerator program, Launchpad Africa will kick-off as a three-month accelerator that provides African startups with over $3 million in equity-free support, working space, travel and PR backing, and access to expert advisers from Google, Africa, and around the world.

The first application period is now open through December 11, 9am PST and the first class will start in early 2018. More classes will be hosted in 2018 and beyond.



What do we look for when selecting startups?
Each startup that applies to Launchpad Africa is evaluated carefully. Below are general guidelines behind our process to help you understand what we look for in our candidates.

All startups in the program must:
  • Be a technology startup.
  • Be based in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, or Uganda (stay tuned for future classes, as we hope to add more countries).
  • Have already raised seed funding.
Additionally, we also consider:
  • The problem you’re trying to solve. How does it create value for users? How are you addressing a real challenge for your home city, country, or Africa broadly?
  • Will you share what you learn for the benefit of other startups in your local ecosystem?
Anyone who spends time in the African technology space knows that the continent is home to some exciting innovations. Over the years, Google has worked with some incredible startups across Africa, tackling everything from healthcare, education, streamlining e-commerce, to improving the food supply chain. We very much look forward to welcoming the first cohort of innovators for Launchpad Africa and continue to work together to drive innovation in the African market.



By Andy Volk, Sub-Saharan Africa Ecosystem Regional Manager & Josh Yellin, Program Manager of Launchpad Accelerator


 ====


Lancement du Programme Launchpad en Afrique pour soutenir les start-up technologiques ! Inscrivez-vous pour participer au premier programme Launchpad Accelerator

Cette année, à l’occasion de l’événement Google pour le Nigeria, Sundar Pichai, notre PDG, a pris l’engagement d’aider les entrepreneurs africains à créer des entreprises technologiques et des produits à succès. Suite à cette décision, nous avons le plaisir d’annoncer le lancement du programme Launchpad Afrique pour Développeurs Google notre nouveau programme complet de tutorat pratique élaboré exclusivement pour les start-up basées en Afrique.

Fort du succès du programme mondial Launchpad Accelerator, le programme Launchpad Afrique est un dispositif sur trois mois destiné à apporter aux start-up africaines plus de 3 millions de dollars sous forme de financement, de mise à disposition d’espaces de travail, d’accompagnement pour les déplacements et la communication, de conseils d’experts de chez Google, originaires d’Afrique et du monde entier.

Les inscriptions sont maintenant ouvertes. Vous pouvez envoyer votre candidature jusqu’au 11 décembre 9h (heure PST). La première session aura lieu début 2018. D’autres sessions seront organisées en 2018 et au-delà.



Quels sont les critères de sélection des start-up ?
Toutes les candidatures de start-au programme Launchpad Afrique font l’objet d’un examen rigoureux. Vous trouverez ci-dessous les principes qui guident notre processus de sélection afin de vous permettre de comprendre nos attentes.
Toutes les start-up doivent répondre aux critères suivants :
  • Être une start-up technologique.
  • Être basée au Ghana, au Kenya, au Nigeria, en Afrique du Sud, en Tanzanie, ou en Ouganda (consultez régulièrement le site pour connaître les dates des programmes à venir, car nous espérons augmenter le nombre de pays bénéficiaires).
  • Avoir déjà lancé une recherche de financement initial.
Nous prenons également en compte les questions suivantes :
  • La problématique que vous essayez de résoudre. En quoi votre start-up crée de la valeur pour les utilisateurs ? Quels moyens vous donnez-vous pour trouver de véritables solutions pour votre ville natale, votre pays ou pour l’Afrique en général ?
  • Vous engagez-vous à partager les connaissances acquises avec d’autres start-up de votre écosystème au niveau local ?
Quiconque s’investit dans l’espace technologique africain sait que ce continent est à l’origine d’innovations passionnantes. Au fil des ans, Google a travaillé avec des start-up exceptionnelles à travers toute l’Afrique. Tous les secteurs sont concernés, de la santé, à l’éducation en passant par, la modernisation du e-commerce, ou l’amélioration de la filière agroalimentaire. Nous nous réjouissons à la perspective d’accueillir les premiers participants au programme Launchpad Afrique et de continuer ensemble à promouvoir l’innovation sur le marché africain.

Posté par Andy Volk, Ecosystem Regional Manager pour l’Afrique subsaharienne et Josh Yellin, Program Manager de Launchpad Accelerator

Discover South Africa’s national parks, nature reserves and UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Over the past 12 months, myself and my team at Drive South Africa have had the privilege of exploring some of South Africa’s most beautiful natural and cultural locations. Even better, today we are able to share the results of that exploration with a global online audience.

That we were able to do so, is thanks to Google’s Street View Loan Camera Program, which allows ordinary people from around the world to help Google map the planet. As the first third-party organisation in South Africa to be a part of the program, we know we had a massive responsibility on our shoulders.


Watch how over 200 volunteers unite to put some of Africa’s wildest locations on Google Maps


The results, we believe, speak for themselves.

Thanks to the efforts of more than 200 volunteers, Street View users can access 170 new trails in South Africa’s wildest locations. These volunteers, who come from all walks of life, hiked, walked, waded and trekked through South Africa national parks, nature reserves and dozens of culturally and historically significant sites in all nine provinces of South Africa.


The Kruger National Park is South Africa’s oldest wilderness area. When in the park, visitors may only walk on wilderness trails, led by specialist rangers.

Crossing the Bloukrans River crossing, on day four of the five-day Otter Trail hiking trail. The Otter Trail is South Africa's most popular hiking trail, often booked out a year in advance.

As a consequence, ordinary people can walk in the footsteps of struggle icon Nelson Mandela, climb seven new trails to the top of Table Mountain, hike the famous five-day Otter Trail, track cheetah on foot, and walk with elephant and other incredible wildlife (the trekkers were guided by qualified rangers in all wilderness areas), to mention a few.

Users can also explore South African UNESCO World Heritage Sites, such as Mapungubwe
Hill, home to an ancient African civilisation, the Richtersveld with its arid moonscapes, the towering Drakensberg Mountains, and iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa’s oldest UNESCO site and a critical habitat for a range of species.

The infamous chain ladders, a daunting part of the Tugela Falls Hiking trail in South Africa's Drakensberg Mountains, a UNESCO World Heritage Site of both cultural and natural significance.

The Nelson Mandela Capture Site in South Africa's KwaZulu-Natal province. Tour guide Lyanda Nyandeni, helped collect these images at the historic location that marks the spot where Mandela was arrested before his 27-years’ imprisonment
While the Drive South Africa team worked hard to put all of this together, we wouldn’t have been able to achieve a fraction of what we have without the support and assistance of Google’s Street View Special Collects team.

Mate Modisha, a field ranger at Cape Nature’s Grootvadersbos Nature Reserve is one of 206 South Africans to carry the Google Trekker camera. Grootvadersbos is a lesser-known reserve, just a few hours from Cape Town.
To explore South Africa’s wildest regions on Google Street View, head over to the Discover
South Africa Street View gallery or take a virtual journey through South Africa with an interactive microsite. The virtual experience combines Street View imagery with video, photos, audio and stories captured during the trekking team’s 50 000km journey around South Africa.

The project, which was supported by South Africa Tourism, SANParks, CapeNature, KZN Ezemvelo Wildlife, Wesgro, dozens of other local tourism organisations and hundreds of South African volunteers, is a vibrant example of the ancient African philosophy of Ubuntu enabled by modern technology.


By Andre Van Kets, Director, Drive South Africa - a Cape Town-based travel company, and a Google StreetView Trekker loan partner



 ====



À la découverte des parcs nationaux, des réserves naturelles et des sites classés au patrimoine mondial de l’UNESCO de l’Afrique du Sud

Depuis ces 12 derniers mois, mon équipe et moi-même chez Drive South Africa avons eu le privilège de pouvoir explorer les plus beaux sites naturels et culturels de l’Afrique du Sud. La bonne nouvelle, c’est qu’aujourd’hui nous sommes en mesure de partager les résultats de ce voyage de découverte avec un public mondial en ligne.

Ce projet a pu se réaliser grâce au Programme de prêt de caméra Street View, mis en place par Google, qui permet à toute personne dans le monde d’aider Google à cartographier la planète. En tant que première organisation indépendante sud-africaine à participer à ce programme, nous avions conscience de la responsabilité qui reposait sur nos épaules.

Selon nous, les résultats parlent d’eux-mêmes.

Grâce aux efforts de plus de 200 bénévoles, les utilisateurs de Street View peuvent avoir accès à 170 nouvelles pistes situées dans les contrées les plus sauvages d’Afrique du Sud. À travers plaines et rivières, ces bénévoles de tous horizons ont arpenté les parcs nationaux, les réserves naturelles et des dizaines de sites culturels et historiques majeurs dans les neuf provinces que compte l’Afrique du Sud.

Ainsi, des gens comme vous et moi peuvent par exemple marcher sur les pas de Nelson Mandela, la figure légendaire de la lutte contre l’apartheid , emprunter sept nouveaux sentiers pour atteindre le sommet de la montagne de la Table ,parcourir la célèbre Otter Trail pendant cinq jours, suivre la piste du guépard à pied , au milieu des éléphants et d’une nature exceptionnelle (les randonneurs étant guidés par des rangers professionnels dans toutes les réserves naturelles).

Les internautes peuvent également découvrir les sites d’Afrique du Sud inscrits au patrimoine mondial de l’UNESCO,comme la colline de Mapungubwe, qui abritait une ancienne civilisation africaine, le Richtersveld avec ses paysages lunaires arides, les imposantes montagnes Drakensberg , ou encore l’Simangaliso Wetland Park , le site sud-africain le plus ancien classé au patrimoine de l’UNESCO, qui constitue un habitat essentiel pour de nombreuses espèces.

Bien que l’équipe de Drive South Africa ait réalisé un travail exceptionnel pour réunir toutes ces données, nous n’aurions quasiment rien pu faire sans l’aide et l’assistance de l’équipe Collections spéciales de Google Street View.

Pour découvrir les régions les plus sauvages d’Afrique du Sud sur Google Street View, cliquez sur Découvrir galerie Street View Afrique du Sud ou optez pour un voyage virtuel à travers l’Afrique du Sud grâce à un microsite interactif. Cette expérience virtuelle associe des images Street View, des vidéos, des photos, des documents audio et des récits recueillis par l’équipe au cours de ce voyage de 50 000 km à travers l’Afrique du Sud.

Ce projet, qui avait reçu le soutien du South Africa Tourism ,de SANParks ,de CapeNature ,de KZN Ezemvelo Wildlife ,de Wesgro, d’un grand nombre d’organisations de tourisme au niveau local et de centaines de bénévoles sud-africains illustre parfaitement l’ancienne philosophie africaine de l’Ubuntu à l’heure des nouvelles technologies.


Posté par Andre Van Kets, Directeur, Drive South Africa. Drive South Africa est une agence de voyages basée au Cap, partenaire du prêt de Trekker Google Street View


Making computer science accessible to more students in Africa

Computer Science (CS) fosters innovation, critical thinking and empowers students with the skills to create powerful tools to solve major challenges. Yet, many students, especially in their the early years, do not have access to opportunities to develop their technical skills.

At Google, we believe that all students deserve these opportunities. That is why, in line with our commitment to prepare 10 million people in Africa for jobs of the future, we are funding 60 community organisations to hold training workshops during Africa Code Week 2017.These workshops will give over 50,000 students a chance to engage with CS and learn programming and computational-thinking skills.


Africa Code Week is a grassroots movement that encourages programming by showing how to bring ideas to life with code, demystifying these skills and bringing motivated students together to learn. Google has been involved in this campaign as a primary partner to SAP since 2015, providing sponsorships to organizations running initiatives to introduce students to CS.

This year, we received more than 300 applications from community organizations across Africa. We worked with the Cape Town Science Centre to select and fund 60 of these organizations that will deliver CS workshops to children and teens (ages 8 to 18) from October 18-25 in 10 African countries (Botswana, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Nigeria, South Africa, Gambia and Togo).

Some of the initiatives we are supporting include:
You can read more about the 60 sponsorship recipients and the activities they’ve planned on the Africa Code Week website. We also participated in the European Commission’s Europe Code Week 2017, funding 60 coding initiatives in 33 European countries.

Google is delighted to support these great efforts. Congratulations to the recipient organizations. Step into the world of Google in Computer Science Education at edu.google.com/cs.

Obum Ekeke, Head of Computer Science Education Programs - UK & Africa

 ====


L’informatique accessible à un plus grand nombre d’étudiants en Afrique

L’informatique favorise l’innovation, encourage la pensée critique et permet aux étudiants d’acquérir les compétences nécessaires à la création d’outils performants pour relever des défis majeurs. On constate cependant que les étudiants, en particulier les plus jeunes, n’ont pas l’opportunité de développer ces compétences techniques.

Chez Google, nous pensons que tous les étudiants méritent de bénéficier de ces opportunités. C’est la raison pour laquelle, dans le cadre de notre engagement à former dix millions de personnes en Afrique aux emplois de demain, nous avons décidé de financer des organismes communautaires chargés de proposer des ateliers de formation pendant la semaine du Code en Afrique 2017. Ces ateliers offriront à plus de 50 000 étudiants l’opportunité de s’initier à l'informatique et de se former à la programmation et à la pensée informatique.

La semaine du code en Afrique est un mouvement populaire qui vise à promouvoir l’apprentissage de la programmation en montrant comment des idées peuvent voir le jour grâce au code, en démythifiant ces compétences et en permettant à des étudiants motivés d’apprendre ensemble. Google est impliqué dans cette campagne en qualité de partenaire principal du SAP depuis 2015 et propose des parrainages à des organismes qui mettent en place des initiatives de formation à l'informatique pour les étudiants.

Cette année, nous avons reçu plus de 300 dossiers de candidature émanant d’organismes communautaires de toute l’Afrique. Nous avons travaillé en collaboration avec le Cape Town Science Centre pour sélectionner et financer 60 organismes qui proposeront des ateliers informatiques aux enfants et aux adolescents (de 8 à 18 ans) du 18 au 25 octobre dans 10 pays africains (le Botswana, le Cameroun, l’Éthiopie, le Ghana, le Kenya, le Lesotho, le Nigeria, l’Afrique du Sud, la Gambie et le Togo).

Exemples d’initiatives que nous soutenons :
Retrouvez plus d’informations sur les bénéficiaires des parrainages et les activités proposées sur le site Internet de la semaine du Code en Afrique. Nous avons également participé à la semaine du Code 2017, sous l’égide de la Commission européenne, en finançant60 activités de codage dans 33 pays européens.

Google est heureux de s’associer à ces belles initiatives. Félicitations aux organismes bénéficiaires. Rejoignez le monde de Google pour la formation en informatique sur edu.google.com/cs.

Obum Ekeke, Directeur des Programmes de formation en informatique - Royaume-Uni et Afrique

Faster, more affordable access to the web across Africa

When it comes to searching, faster is always better. Whether you’re commuting to work, searching for the latest sports news, or for the phone number of a nearby restaurant, quick access to information from the web is crucial. In Africa, we see that nearly 40% of people with Android devices may have a slow or delayed experience while they're on the web due to insufficient RAM (random access memory) on their device.

We’re now introducing a feature which we hope will help you get the information you’re looking for quicker, easier and more affordably. Now for most of Africa, when you search on Google with a low RAM device (512MB of RAM or less) via the Google App, Chrome or Android browser, webpages that you access from Google’s search results page will be optimized to load faster and use less data.



This feature is already available in Indonesia, India, Brazil and Nigeria, and analyses show that these optimized pages load three times faster and use 80 percent less data. Traffic to webpages from Google search also increased by up to 40 percent. However, if you’d prefer to see the original page, you can choose that option at the top of your page.

We hope this feature can help improve the Search experience for millions of people where network connections are slow and access to devices is limited. Search on!

Making the internet work better for everyone in Africa

By 2034 Africa is expected to have the world’s largest working-age population of 1.1 billion—yet only 3 to 4 million jobs are created annually. That means there’s an urgent need to create opportunities for the millions of people on the continent who are creative, smart and driven to succeed. The internet, and technology as a whole, offer great opportunities for creating jobs, growing businesses and boosting economies. But people need the right skills, tools and products to navigate the digital world and to make it work for them, their businesses and their communities.
Caption: Sundar Pichai, Google CEO, at Google for Nigeria event in Lagos
Today, at our Google for Nigeria event in Lagos, we announced progress we’ve made in our products and features for users in Nigeria, including YouTube, Search and Maps. We also announced initiatives focused on digital skills training, education and economic opportunity, and support for African startups and developers.


Digital Skills for Africa
Last year we set out to help bridge the digital skills gap in Africa when we pledged to train one million young people in the region—and we’ve exceeded this target. Through either in-person or online trainings, we help people learn to build a web presence, use Search to find jobs, get tips to enhance their CV, use social media, and so on. Now we’re expanding this program, and committing to prepare another 10 million people for jobs of the future in the next five years. We’ll also be providing mobile developer training to 100,000 Africans to develop world-class apps, with an initial focus on Nigeria, Kenya and South Africa.


Google.org grants
Our charitable arm, Google.org, is committing $20 million over the next five years to nonprofits that are working to improve lives across Africa. We’re giving $2.5 million in initial grants to the nonprofit arms of African startups Gidi Mobile and Siyavula to provide free access to learning for 400,000 low-income students in South Africa and Nigeria. The grantees will also develop new digital learning materials that will be free for anyone to use.

We also want to invite nonprofits from across the continent to share their ideas for how they could impact their community and beyond. So we’re launching a Google.org Impact Challenge in Africa in 2018 to award $5 million in grants. Any eligible nonprofit in Africa can apply, and anyone will be able to help select the best ideas by voting online. 


Launchpad Accelerator Africa
We want to do more to support African entrepreneurs in building successful technology companies and products. Based on our global Launchpad Accelerator program, this initiative will provide more than $3 million in equity-free funding, mentorship, working space and access to expert advisers to more than 60 African startups over three years. Intensive three-month programs, held twice per year, will run out of a new Google Launchpad Space in Lagos—the program’s first location outside of the United States.


Making our products work better in Africa
For people to take advantage of digital opportunities, acquiring the right skills and tools is only part of the equation. Online products and services—including ours—also need to work better in Africa. Today, we’re sharing news about how we’re making YouTube, Search and Maps more useful and relevant for Nigerian users.


YouTube Go
Designed from the ground up, YouTube Go lets you discover, save and share videos you love in a way that’s transparent about the size of downloads. Designed to be “offline” first, the app improves the experience of watching videos on a slower network and gives control over the amount of data used streaming or saving videos. It’s a full YouTube experience, with fresh and relevant video recommendations tailored to your preferences and the ability to share videos quickly and easily with friends nearby. In June, Nigeria became the second country where we started actively testing YouTube Go. Later this year, we’ll be expanding this to a beta launch of the app, available to all Nigerian users.

Lagos now on Street View in Google Maps 
In the last few months, we’ve improved our address search experience in Lagos, by adding thousands of new addresses and streets, outlines of more than a million buildings in commercial and residential areas, and more than 100,000 additional Nigerian small businesses on Google Maps. Today we’re launching Lagos on Street View, with 10,000 kilometers of imagery, including the most important historic roads in the city. You can virtually drive along the Carter Bridge to the National Stadium or across the Eko Bridge, down to the Marina—all on your smartphone.


Faster web results
When you’re on a 2G-like connection or using a low storage device, pages can take a long time to load. We previously launched a feature that streamlines search results so they load with less data and at high speed. Today we’re extending that feature to streamline websites you reach from search results, so that they load with 90 percent less data and five times faster, even on low storage devices.


More local information in Search

We’ve also made several updates to Search to bring more useful, relevant answers and information to people in Nigeria:
  • Knowledge Panels: We’re connecting people with easy access to the answers to things they care about, displaying knowledge cards for everything from local football teams to Nigerian musicians and actors. 
  • Health Cards: Later this year we’ll launch more than 800 knowledge cards detailing common symptoms and treatments for the most prevalent health conditions in Nigeria. We’ve partnered with the University of Ibadan to ensure that answers have been reviewed by Nigerian doctors for local relevance and accuracy. Nigeria is one of the first countries where we’re providing locally tailored health answers on Search. 
  • Posts on Google: Posts makes it possible for musicians, entertainers and other public figures to share updates, images and videos directly on Google, for people to see while they explore on the web. Nigeria is the third country where we’ve made this feature available and some of the country’s popular musicians are already using it.
The things we’re announcing today are what drive us—building platforms and products that are relevant and useful for billions, not just the few, and helping people to succeed in the digital economy. That’s why we hope to equip more people, in Africa and elsewhere, with digital skills and tools. We’re excited to be part of Africa’s evolving digital story. 


Posted by Juliet Ehimuan-Chiazor, Country Manager, Nigeria


 ====


Un Internet plus performant pour tous les utilisateurs africains

D’ici à 2034, l’Afrique comptera la population active la plus importante au monde, avec 1,1 milliard de personnes, alors que 3 à 4 millions d’emplois seulement sont créés chaque année. Il faut donc rapidement développer des opportunités pour des millions d’habitants créatifs, intelligents et ambitieux. L’Internet et, plus généralement, la technologie offrent des possibilités considérables de création d’emploi et de développement des entreprises et des économies. Il faut toutefois posséder les bonnes compétences, les bons outils et les bons produits pour profiter du monde numérique, au niveau des individus, des entreprises et des communautés.

À l’occasion de la manifestation Google pour le Nigeria à Lagos, nous avons présenté nos dernières avancées au niveau des produits et des fonctionnalités pour les utilisateurs nigérians concernant, notamment, YouTube, Search et Maps. Nous avons également annoncé des initiatives de formation aux compétences numériques, d’éducation, d’opportunités économiques et de soutien pour les start-up et développeurs africains.

Compétences numériques en Afrique
L'an dernier, nous nous sommes donné pour objectif de réduire les écarts en Afrique dans le domaine du numérique en nous engageant à former un million de jeunes dans cette région du monde. Cet objectif a été largement atteint. Des formations en présentiel ou en ligne ont été organisées sur le développement de la présence sur Internet, l’utilisation de Search pour trouver un emploi, la mise en valeur du CV, l’utilisation des réseaux sociaux, etc. Ce programme est actuellement re-dimensionné pour préparer dix millions de personnes aux emplois de demain au cours des cinq prochaines années. Nous allons également former 100 000 développeurs mobiles en Afrique pour créer des applis de classe mondiale, en ciblant, dans un premier temps, le Nigeria, le Kenya et l’Afrique du Sud.

Subventions Google.org
Notre filiale caritative, Google.org, s’engage à verser 20 millions de dollars sur les cinq prochaines années pour aider les associations à améliorer la vie des Africains. Une subvention initiale de 2,5 millions de dollars est prévue pour les associations caritatives des start-up africaines Gidi Mobile et Siyavula afin de financer la formation de 400 000 étudiants pauvres en Afrique du Sud et au Nigeria. Cette subvention servira également à financer la création de nouveaux supports d'apprentissage numérique accessibles gratuitement.

Pour profiter des idées des associations de l’ensemble du continent pour améliorer la vie de leur communauté et au-delà, nous allons lancer en 2018 l’initiative Google.org Impact Challenge en Afrique, avec 5 millions de dollars de subventions. Ce concours sera ouvert à toutes les associations africaines éligibles, avec un vote en ligne pour sélectionner les meilleures idées.

Launchpad Accelerator Africa
Nous voulons encore aider davantage les entrepreneurs africains à créer des entreprises et produits technologiques à succès. Dans le cadre de notre programme mondial Launchpad Accelerator, nous allons consacrer plus de 3 millions de dollars au financement de type equity-free funding, au parrainage, à la mise à disposition d’espaces de travail et de conseillers à destination de plus de 60 start-up africaines sur trois ans. Des programmes intensifs de trois mois seront proposés, deux fois par an, depuis un nouveau Google Lauchpad Space à Lagos, premier site créé en dehors des États-Unis.

Amélioration de l’utilisation de nos outils en Afrique
Pour profiter des opportunités du numérique, en dehors des compétences et des outils appropriés, il faut des produits et services en ligne, y compris Google, plus performants en Afrique. Nous allons donc expliquer comment nous adaptons YouTube, Search et Maps aux utilisateurs nigérians.

YouTube Go
Créé à partir de zéro, YouTube Go permet de découvrir, d’enregistrer et de partager des vidéos en indiquant clairement la taille des téléchargements. Conçue pour fonctionner hors connexion dans un premier temps, l'appli améliore le visionnage de vidéos sur un réseau plus lent en contrôlant les données utilisées pour visionner ou enregistrer les vidéos. Cette appli offre tous les avantages de YouTube avec des recommandations adaptées et actualisées suivant les préférences et la possibilité de partager rapidement et facilement des vidéos. Nous avons commencé à tester YouTube Go au Nigeria en juin. Nous développerons en fin d'année une version bêta pour tous les utilisateurs nigérians.

Intégration de Lagos à l’outil Street View de Google Maps
Ces derniers mois, nous avons amélioré la recherche d'adresses à Lagos, avec des milliers d’adresses et de rues, pour intégrer plus d’un million de bâtiments dans les zones commerciales et résidentielles et plus de 100 000 petites entreprises nigérianes sur Google Maps. Nous lançons aujourd’hui Lagos sur Street View, offrant 10 000 kilomètres d’images, avec les rues historiques les plus importantes de la ville. Vous pourrez traverser virtuellement, sur smartphone, le pont Carter jusqu'au stade national ou le pont Eko pour rejoindre Marina Road.

Des résultats plus rapides
Si vous utilisez la 2G ou un appareil peu puissant, les pages peuvent être longues à télécharger. Nous avons lancé une fonctionnalité permettant d’accélérer les résultats de recherche en utilisant moins de données. Cette fonctionnalité va être étendue aux sites Internet consultés à partir des résultats d’une recherche, en utilisant 90 % de données en moins pour un téléchargement cinq fois plus rapide, même sur des appareils de faible capacité.

Des informations localisées dans Search
Search a été actualisé pour fournir des résultats plus utiles et pertinents pour les Nigérians.
  • Knowledge Panels : nous facilitons l'accès aux données intéressant les utilisateurs à travers des Knowledge Cards, qui peuvent porter sur un large choix d’informations allant des équipes locales de football aux musiciens et acteurs nigérians. 
  • Health Cards : nous allons lancer, en fin d'année, plus de 800 fiches d’informations sur les symptômes et traitements des maladies les plus courantes au Nigeria, en partenariat avec l’université d’Ibadan, pour faire vérifier les informations par des médecins nigérians et garantir leur pertinence et leur exactitude. Le Nigeria est l’un des premiers pays bénéficiant de ces informations santé locales sur Search. 
  • Google Posts : Google Posts permet aux musiciens, aux artistes et autres personnalités publiques de partager des informations, des images et des vidéos sur Google, visibles en cours de navigation. Le Nigeria est le troisième pays bénéficiant de cette fonctionnalité. Plusieurs musiciens populaires l’utilisent déjà.

 Toutes ces annonces font écho à notre motivation première : créer des plateformes et produits intéressants pour une majorité d'utilisateurs et non une minorité, et contribuer au succès de chacun à l’ère de l'économie numérique. C’est pourquoi nous espérons offrir des compétences et des outils numériques à davantage d’utilisateurs en Afrique comme ailleurs. Nous sommes fiers de contribuer à l’évolution numérique de l’Afrique. 


Publié par Juliet Ehimuan-Chiazor, Responsable pays, Nigeria

Making the internet work better for everyone in Africa

By 2034 Africa is expected to have the world’s largest working-age population of 1.1 billion—yet only 3 to 4 million jobs are created annually. That means there’s an urgent need to create opportunities for the millions of people on the continent who are creative, smart and driven to succeed. The internet, and technology as a whole, offer great opportunities for creating jobs, growing businesses and boosting economies. But people need the right skills, tools and products to navigate the digital world and to make it work for them, their businesses and their communities.
Caption: Sundar Pichai, Google CEO, at Google for Nigeria event in Lagos
Today, at our Google for Nigeria event in Lagos, we announced progress we’ve made in our products and features for users in Nigeria, including YouTube, Search and Maps. We also announced initiatives focused on digital skills training, education and economic opportunity, and support for African startups and developers.


Digital Skills for Africa
Last year we set out to help bridge the digital skills gap in Africa when we pledged to train one million young people in the region—and we’ve exceeded this target. Through either in-person or online trainings, we help people learn to build a web presence, use Search to find jobs, get tips to enhance their CV, use social media, and so on. Now we’re expanding this program, and committing to prepare another 10 million people for jobs of the future in the next five years. We’ll also be providing mobile developer training to 100,000 Africans to develop world-class apps, with an initial focus on Nigeria, Kenya and South Africa.


Google.org grants
Our charitable arm, Google.org, is committing $20 million over the next five years to nonprofits that are working to improve lives across Africa. We’re giving $2.5 million in initial grants to the nonprofit arms of African startups Gidi Mobile and Siyavula to provide free access to learning for 400,000 low-income students in South Africa and Nigeria. The grantees will also develop new digital learning materials that will be free for anyone to use.

We also want to invite nonprofits from across the continent to share their ideas for how they could impact their community and beyond. So we’re launching a Google.org Impact Challenge in Africa in 2018 to award $5 million in grants. Any eligible nonprofit in Africa can apply, and anyone will be able to help select the best ideas by voting online. 


Launchpad Accelerator Africa
We want to do more to support African entrepreneurs in building successful technology companies and products. Based on our global Launchpad Accelerator program, this initiative will provide more than $3 million in equity-free funding, mentorship, working space and access to expert advisers to more than 60 African startups over three years. Intensive three-month programs, held twice per year, will run out of a new Google Launchpad Space in Lagos—the program’s first location outside of the United States.


Making our products work better in Africa
For people to take advantage of digital opportunities, acquiring the right skills and tools is only part of the equation. Online products and services—including ours—also need to work better in Africa. Today, we’re sharing news about how we’re making YouTube, Search and Maps more useful and relevant for Nigerian users.


YouTube Go
Designed from the ground up, YouTube Go lets you discover, save and share videos you love in a way that’s transparent about the size of downloads. Designed to be “offline” first, the app improves the experience of watching videos on a slower network and gives control over the amount of data used streaming or saving videos. It’s a full YouTube experience, with fresh and relevant video recommendations tailored to your preferences and the ability to share videos quickly and easily with friends nearby. In June, Nigeria became the second country where we started actively testing YouTube Go. Later this year, we’ll be expanding this to a beta launch of the app, available to all Nigerian users.

Lagos now on Street View in Google Maps 
In the last few months, we’ve improved our address search experience in Lagos, by adding thousands of new addresses and streets, outlines of more than a million buildings in commercial and residential areas, and more than 100,000 additional Nigerian small businesses on Google Maps. Today we’re launching Lagos on Street View, with 10,000 kilometers of imagery, including the most important historic roads in the city. You can virtually drive along the Carter Bridge to the National Stadium or across the Eko Bridge, down to the Marina—all on your smartphone.


Faster web results
When you’re on a 2G-like connection or using a low storage device, pages can take a long time to load. We previously launched a feature that streamlines search results so they load with less data and at high speed. Today we’re extending that feature to streamline websites you reach from search results, so that they load with 90 percent less data and five times faster, even on low storage devices.


More local information in Search

We’ve also made several updates to Search to bring more useful, relevant answers and information to people in Nigeria:
  • Knowledge Panels: We’re connecting people with easy access to the answers to things they care about, displaying knowledge cards for everything from local football teams to Nigerian musicians and actors. 
  • Health Cards: Later this year we’ll launch more than 800 knowledge cards detailing common symptoms and treatments for the most prevalent health conditions in Nigeria. We’ve partnered with the University of Ibadan to ensure that answers have been reviewed by Nigerian doctors for local relevance and accuracy. Nigeria is one of the first countries where we’re providing locally tailored health answers on Search. 
  • Posts on Google: Posts makes it possible for musicians, entertainers and other public figures to share updates, images and videos directly on Google, for people to see while they explore on the web. Nigeria is the third country where we’ve made this feature available and some of the country’s popular musicians are already using it.
The things we’re announcing today are what drive us—building platforms and products that are relevant and useful for billions, not just the few, and helping people to succeed in the digital economy. That’s why we hope to equip more people, in Africa and elsewhere, with digital skills and tools. We’re excited to be part of Africa’s evolving digital story. 


Posted by Juliet Ehimuan-Chiazor, Country Manager, Nigeria


 ====


Un Internet plus performant pour tous les utilisateurs africains

D’ici à 2034, l’Afrique comptera la population active la plus importante au monde, avec 1,1 milliard de personnes, alors que 3 à 4 millions d’emplois seulement sont créés chaque année. Il faut donc rapidement développer des opportunités pour des millions d’habitants créatifs, intelligents et ambitieux. L’Internet et, plus généralement, la technologie offrent des possibilités considérables de création d’emploi et de développement des entreprises et des économies. Il faut toutefois posséder les bonnes compétences, les bons outils et les bons produits pour profiter du monde numérique, au niveau des individus, des entreprises et des communautés.

À l’occasion de la manifestation Google pour le Nigeria à Lagos, nous avons présenté nos dernières avancées au niveau des produits et des fonctionnalités pour les utilisateurs nigérians concernant, notamment, YouTube, Search et Maps. Nous avons également annoncé des initiatives de formation aux compétences numériques, d’éducation, d’opportunités économiques et de soutien pour les start-up et développeurs africains.

Compétences numériques en Afrique
L'an dernier, nous nous sommes donné pour objectif de réduire les écarts en Afrique dans le domaine du numérique en nous engageant à former un million de jeunes dans cette région du monde. Cet objectif a été largement atteint. Des formations en présentiel ou en ligne ont été organisées sur le développement de la présence sur Internet, l’utilisation de Search pour trouver un emploi, la mise en valeur du CV, l’utilisation des réseaux sociaux, etc. Ce programme est actuellement re-dimensionné pour préparer dix millions de personnes aux emplois de demain au cours des cinq prochaines années. Nous allons également former 100 000 développeurs mobiles en Afrique pour créer des applis de classe mondiale, en ciblant, dans un premier temps, le Nigeria, le Kenya et l’Afrique du Sud.

Subventions Google.org
Notre filiale caritative, Google.org, s’engage à verser 20 millions de dollars sur les cinq prochaines années pour aider les associations à améliorer la vie des Africains. Une subvention initiale de 2,5 millions de dollars est prévue pour les associations caritatives des start-up africaines Gidi Mobile et Siyavula afin de financer la formation de 400 000 étudiants pauvres en Afrique du Sud et au Nigeria. Cette subvention servira également à financer la création de nouveaux supports d'apprentissage numérique accessibles gratuitement.

Pour profiter des idées des associations de l’ensemble du continent pour améliorer la vie de leur communauté et au-delà, nous allons lancer en 2018 l’initiative Google.org Impact Challenge en Afrique, avec 5 millions de dollars de subventions. Ce concours sera ouvert à toutes les associations africaines éligibles, avec un vote en ligne pour sélectionner les meilleures idées.

Launchpad Accelerator Africa
Nous voulons encore aider davantage les entrepreneurs africains à créer des entreprises et produits technologiques à succès. Dans le cadre de notre programme mondial Launchpad Accelerator, nous allons consacrer plus de 3 millions de dollars au financement de type equity-free funding, au parrainage, à la mise à disposition d’espaces de travail et de conseillers à destination de plus de 60 start-up africaines sur trois ans. Des programmes intensifs de trois mois seront proposés, deux fois par an, depuis un nouveau Google Lauchpad Space à Lagos, premier site créé en dehors des États-Unis.

Amélioration de l’utilisation de nos outils en Afrique
Pour profiter des opportunités du numérique, en dehors des compétences et des outils appropriés, il faut des produits et services en ligne, y compris Google, plus performants en Afrique. Nous allons donc expliquer comment nous adaptons YouTube, Search et Maps aux utilisateurs nigérians.

YouTube Go
Créé à partir de zéro, YouTube Go permet de découvrir, d’enregistrer et de partager des vidéos en indiquant clairement la taille des téléchargements. Conçue pour fonctionner hors connexion dans un premier temps, l'appli améliore le visionnage de vidéos sur un réseau plus lent en contrôlant les données utilisées pour visionner ou enregistrer les vidéos. Cette appli offre tous les avantages de YouTube avec des recommandations adaptées et actualisées suivant les préférences et la possibilité de partager rapidement et facilement des vidéos. Nous avons commencé à tester YouTube Go au Nigeria en juin. Nous développerons en fin d'année une version bêta pour tous les utilisateurs nigérians.

Intégration de Lagos à l’outil Street View de Google Maps
Ces derniers mois, nous avons amélioré la recherche d'adresses à Lagos, avec des milliers d’adresses et de rues, pour intégrer plus d’un million de bâtiments dans les zones commerciales et résidentielles et plus de 100 000 petites entreprises nigérianes sur Google Maps. Nous lançons aujourd’hui Lagos sur Street View, offrant 10 000 kilomètres d’images, avec les rues historiques les plus importantes de la ville. Vous pourrez traverser virtuellement, sur smartphone, le pont Carter jusqu'au stade national ou le pont Eko pour rejoindre Marina Road.

Des résultats plus rapides
Si vous utilisez la 2G ou un appareil peu puissant, les pages peuvent être longues à télécharger. Nous avons lancé une fonctionnalité permettant d’accélérer les résultats de recherche en utilisant moins de données. Cette fonctionnalité va être étendue aux sites Internet consultés à partir des résultats d’une recherche, en utilisant 90 % de données en moins pour un téléchargement cinq fois plus rapide, même sur des appareils de faible capacité.

Des informations localisées dans Search
Search a été actualisé pour fournir des résultats plus utiles et pertinents pour les Nigérians.
  • Knowledge Panels : nous facilitons l'accès aux données intéressant les utilisateurs à travers des Knowledge Cards, qui peuvent porter sur un large choix d’informations allant des équipes locales de football aux musiciens et acteurs nigérians. 
  • Health Cards : nous allons lancer, en fin d'année, plus de 800 fiches d’informations sur les symptômes et traitements des maladies les plus courantes au Nigeria, en partenariat avec l’université d’Ibadan, pour faire vérifier les informations par des médecins nigérians et garantir leur pertinence et leur exactitude. Le Nigeria est l’un des premiers pays bénéficiant de ces informations santé locales sur Search. 
  • Google Posts : Google Posts permet aux musiciens, aux artistes et autres personnalités publiques de partager des informations, des images et des vidéos sur Google, visibles en cours de navigation. Le Nigeria est le troisième pays bénéficiant de cette fonctionnalité. Plusieurs musiciens populaires l’utilisent déjà.

 Toutes ces annonces font écho à notre motivation première : créer des plateformes et produits intéressants pour une majorité d'utilisateurs et non une minorité, et contribuer au succès de chacun à l’ère de l'économie numérique. C’est pourquoi nous espérons offrir des compétences et des outils numériques à davantage d’utilisateurs en Afrique comme ailleurs. Nous sommes fiers de contribuer à l’évolution numérique de l’Afrique. 


Publié par Juliet Ehimuan-Chiazor, Responsable pays, Nigeria

Google News Lab powers digital journalism training for 6,000 journalists in Africa

For journalists, recent advances in digital technology present compelling new opportunities to discover, tell, and share stories—like this one from the Mail & Guardian that uses Google My Maps to highlight top water wasters in metro areas during the drought. But learning how to use new digital tools for reporting can be intimidating or even daunting. This is particularly true in Africa, where digital integration in news and storytelling often remains a challenge. Few journalism institutions offer training programs in digital tools, and news organizations often lack the capability to use new digital technologies in their reporting.
That’s why we’re supporting a new initiative that will offer journalists across Africa training in skills like mobile reporting, mapping, data visualization, verification, and fact checking. In partnership with the World Bank and Code For Africa, this project aims to train more than 6,000 journalists by February 2018, in 12 major African cities: Abuja, Cape Town, Casablanca, Dakar, Dar es Salaam, Durban, Freetown, Johannesburg, Kampala, Lagos, Nairobi and Yaounde. By providing the instruction and support to better use available digital tools available, we hope to empower journalists across Africa to produce cutting-edge and compelling reporting.

Training will take place in three formats:
  • Beginning June 15, we’ll hold in-person training sessions on topics ranging from displaying data with an interactive map to effective reporting with a mobile device. In each city, we’ll conduct trainings in three newsrooms and hold trainings twice a month for the duration of the initiative. 
  • In August, a massive open online course (MOOC) will be made freely available online, covering a range of web concepts and practices for digital journalists. 
  • We will also hold monthly study groups in collaboration with Hacks/Hackers (a global meetup organization) to provide more focused, in-person instruction. These monthly meetings will take place in Cameroon, Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. 

In 2016, we announced our commitment to train 1 million African youth on digital skills during the year to help them create and find jobs. We hope this new initiative also helps contribute to the continued growth of Africa’s digital economy.

Please visit www.academy.codeforafrica.org to learn more and to register.

Posted by Daniel Sieberg, Head of Training & Development, Google News Lab


 ====


Google News Lab à la pointe de la formation au journalisme numérique en Afrique

Pour les journalistes, les avancées récentes dans le domaine des technologies numériques offrent de formidables opportunités pour découvrir, raconter et partager des articles comme celui-ci paru dans le Mail & Guardian qui relate comment l’application Google My Maps permet de repérer les principaux gaspilleurs d’eau dans les zones urbaines pendant la sécheresse. La perspective de se former à l’utilisation des nouveaux outils numériques de reportage a néanmoins de quoi intimider ou même de quoi effrayer. C’est particulièrement vrai en Afrique où l’intégration numérique en termes de médias et de storytelling reste souvent un défi. Seuls quelques instituts proposent des programmes de formation aux outils numériques et bien souvent les organismes de presse ne disposent pas des moyens pour intégrer les nouvelles technologies numériques dans leurs reportages.

C’est pourquoi nous soutenons une nouvelle initiative qui va permettre aux journalistes de plusieurs pays d’Afrique d’acquérir des compétences telles que le reportage mobile, le mapping, la visualisation des données et la vérification des faits. En partenariat avec la Banque mondiale et Code For Africa, ce projet vise à former plus de 6 000 journalistes d’ici février 2018, dans 12 métropoles africaines : Abuja, Le Cap, Casablanca, Dakar, Dar es-Salaam, Durban, Freetown, Johannesburg, Kampala, Lagos, Nairobi et Yaoundé. Nous espérons que la formation à une utilisation plus efficace des outils numériques et l’accompagnement dont ils vont bénéficier vont permettre aux journalistes de toute l’Afrique de produire des reportages passionnants à la pointe de la technologie.

La formation se déroulera en trois temps selon des formats distincts :
  • À partir du 15 juin, nous organiserons des sessions de formation en présentiel sur des sujets allant de la présentation de données à l’aide d’une carte interactive jusqu’au reportage proprement dit avec un dispositif mobile. Dans chaque ville, des formations auront lieu dans trois salles de rédaction et se tiendront deux fois par mois pendant toute la durée de ce programme. 
  • Au mois d’août, un MOOC (massive open online course - cours en ligne) sera accessible gratuitement en ligne. Nous y aborderons un large éventail de concepts et de pratiques web destinés aux journalistes numériques. 
  • En collaboration avec Hacks/Hackers (organisation mondiale de journalistes) nous organiserons également des groupes de travail afin de proposer des formations individualisées et plus ciblées. Trois rencontres mensuelles auront lieu au Cameroun, au Kenya, au Maroc, au Nigeria, au Sénégal, en Sierra Leone, en Afrique du Sud, en Tanzanie et en Ouganda.
En 2016, nous avons annoncé notre engagement à former un million de jeunes Africains aux techniques numériques au cours de l’année afin de les aider à créer et à trouver un emploi. Nous espérons que cette nouvelle initiative contribuera également à favoriser la croissance de l’économie numérique en Afrique.

Consultez le sitewww.academy.codeforafrica.org pour en savoir plus et pour vous inscrire.

Posté par Daniel Sieberg, Head of Training & Development, Google News Lab



CSquared Gets New Investors to Expand Internet Access in Africa

Three billion people around the world are now online, but access remains critically low in Africa, where only 10% of households can connect to the Internet.[1]



In 2011, a team of Googlers identified a major barrier to more affordable, reliable broadband in Africa: the lack of fiber optic networks in large cities. This led to Project Link, an initiative to build world-class, high-speed urban fiber networks in Africa’s metropolises. In 2013 we folded these efforts under a new Google brand called CSquared with the aim of bringing other companies into the market, expanding access and lowering costs. CSquared has built more than 800 km of fiber in the cities of Kampala and Entebbe; and 840 km of fiber in the Ghanaian cities of Accra, Tema, and Kumasi. In both Ghana and Uganda, more than 25 Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) now use these metro fiber networks to offer broadband services and 4G data to end users, with more than 1,200 tower and commercial building sites connected directly to CSquared’s fiber.
Suzan Kitariko, Country Manager for Uganda (fourth from left) with Uganda’s Minister of Communications, John Nasasira (fifth from left) along with partners and Googlers.
CSquared’s network infrastructure supports the needs of entrepreneurs, innovators, and corporate offices. For example, in Uganda, CSquared’s fiber system provides the high-speed last-mile connections for higher education and health research institutions located in the Greater Kampala Metropolitan Area through the Research and Education Network for Uganda.

Digging the trenches in Ghana
In the process of building these wholesale-only, carrier-neutral networks, we realized that CSquared could move even faster by bringing in new partners with strong backgrounds and experience in infrastructure in Africa. So today, CSquared is becoming a four-way partnership that combines the expertise and experience of four companies: Google, Convergence Partners, International Finance Corporation (IFC), and Mitsui & Co., Ltd. CSquared will benefit from Convergence Partners’ deep experience of information and communication technology sector investing in sub-Saharan Africa, IFC's experience as the world’s largest global development finance institution focused on the private sector in emerging markets as well as Mitsui’s cross-industry capabilities, vast investment portfolio, global business presence, and experience as a strategic investor in the ICT segment. Together with our new partners, we believe CSquared can roll-out and operate affordable, high-speed, and reliable infrastructure to further expand internet access in Africa.




While CSquared will work to improve access, Google will continue to give users, businesses and entrepreneurs in Africa a great experience online and help them make the most out of being connected to the internet. Our Digital Skills for Africa project, for example, has now trained over one million people, and will look to provide offline versions of the training materials in local languages to reach individuals and businesses in low-access areas. This is on top of our Google.org education grant of $2 million USD to support Tangerine, which boosts curriculum development in Kenya and boosts teachers’ skills. Earlier this year, we launched Street View in Ghana, Senegal, and Uganda to help people better navigate their cities. Meanwhile, the African content ecosystem is growing: in November 2016 we held the first-ever SSA YouTube Awards in Johannesburg to support video creators in Africa.



The internet is transforming Africa, both Google and CSquared are committed to ensuring that as many people as possible have access to the internet and all the opportunities it can bring.



Posted by Marian Croak, VP Access Strategy & Emerging Markets.




 ====



CSquared s'associe à de nouveaux investisseurs pour étendre l'accès à Internet en Afrique
Trois milliards de personnes sont maintenant connectées; pourtant, cet accès reste extrêmement faible en Afrique, où seuls 10 % des foyers peuvent se connecter à Internet[1].



En 2011, une équipe de Googlers a identifié un obstacle majeur au développement d'une bande passante abordable et fiable en Afrique : le manque de réseaux de fibre optique dans les grandes villes. Cet état de fait a mené à la création de Project Link, une initiative d'implantation urbaine de réseaux de fibre optique à haut débit et de qualité supérieure dans les métropoles africaines. En 2013, nous avons regroupé ces initiatives sous une nouvelle marque Google baptisée CSquared, avec pour objectifs d'inciter d'autres sociétés à intégrer le marché, de développer l'accès et d'abaisser les coûts. CSquared a mis en place plus de 800 km de fibre dans les villes ougandaises de Kampala et d'Entebbe, et 840 km de fibre dans les villes ghanéennes d'Accra, de Tema et de Kumasi. Au Ghana et en Ouganda, plus de 25 fournisseurs de services internet (FAI) et opérateurs de réseau mobile (ORM) exploitent maintenant ces réseaux de fibre urbains pour offrir des services de bande passante et des données 4G aux utilisateurs finaux, plus de 1 000 sites de bureaux et de centres commerciaux étant directement connectés à la fibre de CSquared.



L'équipe ougandaise entourant le ministre des Communications, John Nasasira, au centre, et Suzan Kitariko, responsable nationale pour l'Ouganda



L'infrastructure du réseau de CSquared répond aux besoins des entrepreneurs, des innovateurs et des grandes entreprises. En Ouganda, par exemple, le système de fibre de CSquared assure la connexion finale à débit élevé d'établissements d'enseignement supérieur et de recherche en santé situés dans la zone métropolitaine de Kampala (GKMA) via le Research and Education Network for Uganda (RENU).




Lors de la mise en place de ces réseaux neutres vis-à-vis des opérateurs et vendus sous forme d'ensemble, nous avons réalisé que CSquared pouvait accélérer le processus en intégrant dans l'organisation de nouveaux partenaires disposant d'une expérience et d'une expertise reconnues en matière d'infrastructures en Afrique. C'est pourquoi CSquared s'intègre aujourd'hui dans un partenariat combinant quatre entreprises : Google, Convergence Partners, International Finance Corporation (IFC) et Mitsui & Co., Ltd. (Mitsui). CSquared tirera avantage de la longue expérience de Convergence Partners dans le secteur des TIC en Afrique subsaharienne et de l'expérience d'IFC, la plus grande institution internationale de financement du développement au monde, spécialisée dans le secteur privé sur les marchés émergents avec plus de 40 ans d'expérience dans l'accompagnement au développement du secteur des télécommunications en Afrique. CSquared tirera également parti des capacités intersectorielles de Mitsui, de son vaste portefeuille d'investissement, de sa présence à l'échelle mondiale et de son expérience en tant qu'investisseur stratégique dans le segment des TIC. En collaboration avec nos nouveaux partenaires, nous sommes convaincus que CSquared peut aller encore plus loin dans la mise en place et l'exploitation d'infrastructures abordables et fiables pour le développement de l'accès à Internet en Afrique.



Pendant que CSquared s'efforce d'améliorer l'accès à Internet, Google va continuer à offrir aux utilisateurs, sociétés et entrepreneurs d'Afrique une expérience en ligne toujours plus riche et les aider à optimiser leur utilisation d'Internet. Notre projet L'atelier numérique africain a par exemple permis la formation de plus d'un million de personnes à ce jour, et prévoit la mise à disposition de versions hors ligne des documents de formation dans les langues locales, afin d'aider le public et les entreprises situés dans des régions faiblement connectées. Ce projet s'ajoute à notre subvention Google.org à l'éducation de 2 millions de dollars US octroyée à la plateforme Tangerine, qui facilite le développement des programmes et renforce les compétences des enseignants au Kenya. En début d'année, nous avons lancé Street View au Ghana, au Sénégal et en Ouganda, afin d'aider les populations à mieux naviguer dans leurs villes. Dans le même temps, l'écosystème de contenu africain poursuit sa croissance : en novembre 2016, nous avons organisé les tout premiers SSA YouTube Awards à Johannesburg, afin de soutenir les réalisateurs vidéo en Afrique.



Internet transforme profondément l'Afrique, et Google comme CSquared s'engagent pour faire en sorte qu'un maximum de personnes y aient accès et puissent profiter des opportunités offertes.



Posté par Marian Croak, vice-présidente Stratégie d'accès et marchés émergents