Author Archives: Google Africa Blog

Supporting startups and SMEs in Africa

The Internet is playing a key role in Africa's economic transition, generating new possibilities and paving the path for economic and social growth. According to a 2020 report, Africa’s Internet economy is expected to contribute nearly $189 billion to the continent’s overall GDP by 2025, rising to $712 billion by 2050. At Google, we recognize the immense potential of the ecosystem's key players, and we remain steadfast in our commitment to developing targeted programs that assist them in accessing technical and financial assistance to support them in developing technologies that will benefit everyone.




Today we're excited to announce new initiatives that reaffirm our commitment to African startups, and extend our support for underserved communities. The programs, which include a $3 million USD Black Founders Fund for African startups and a $3 million USD Google.org grant to help low-income communities develop entrepreneurial skills and funding, will help Black founders grow their businesses not only by providing capital but also by providing access to the best of Google resources. We're also welcoming 15 companies from across the continent to the sixth class of our Google for Startups Accelerator: Africa program.




Google for Startups Black Founders Fund Africa
Between 2020 and 2021, more African companies completed more funding rounds than in any prior year, with transactions rising by almost 50%. While remarkable, this achievement is not translating to the same level of success for Black founders on the continent. Research shows that African founded startups find it difficult to secure financial support, and are faced with insufficient starting capital, a lack of angel investors and more.

Last year we announced the Google for Startups Black Founders Fund as part of a series of racial equity commitments to close the funding gap and empower Black entrepreneurs in the US, Brazil and Europe. Given the proven success of the Black Founders Fund around the world, we are expanding the program with the first $3M Black Founders Fund in Africa.

The Google for Startups Black Founders Fund Africa provides grants and technical assistance to early-stage startups led by black and diverse teams, or with a goal of advancing the Black community. This $3M non-dilutive fund will be allocated across a pipeline of 50 investable startups in Africa, with each firm receiving up to $100,000 in cash awards. Each selected company will also receive $220,000 in Google Cloud Credits and Ad Grants, as well as mentoring, technical and scaling assistance from the best of Google. The equity-free fund is available to entrepreneurs developing for Africa, on the continent.

We have partnered with the Co-Creation Hub, a Google for Startups partner and leading tech community hub with presence in Nigeria, Kenya and Rwanda, to distribute the funding to the 50 selected companies across Africa.

Applications are open from today until July 7th and eligible startups can visit goo.gle/BFFAfrica now to apply.




$3 million USD Google.org grant

Beyond the tech startup scene, there are entrepreneurs tackling day-to-day problems on a smaller, but equally significant scale. Our commitment in the region extends to these groups too. Studies indicate that entrepreneurship is essential for unlocking the essential economic benefits that Africa needs to prosper in a post-pandemic environment via employment and wealth development. However, not all entrepreneurs have the resources or know-how to run successful businesses, with women entrepreneurs being at a greater risk of having companies that are the most impacted by the epidemic.


Women entrepreneurs must have access to knowledge, skills, tools, and funding in order to reach their full potential.


Since 2017, Google.org through a $20M commitment has prioritized funding to nonprofit organizations that support access to economic opportunity for women in Sub-Saharan Africa. We recognize that, alongside financing, bespoke learning solutions and mentoring programs are required for accelerating women-led companies.


This is why Google.org is giving $3M to the Tony Elumelu Foundation, who through their annual entrepreneurship program will provide entrepreneurship training, mentorship, coaching and access to networks and key markets for at least 5000 women, as well as seed capital in the form of one-time cash grants to 500 African female informal business-owners in rural and low-income communities across Nigeria, South Africa, Kenya and select Francophone countries. We believe this will enable and prepare these women who otherwise wouldn’t have had the opportunity to navigate their independent businesses journey through the critical start-up and early growth phase.

 



Google for Startups Accelerator: Africa

We introduced the Google for Startups Accelerator: Africa program in 2018 to support the startup ecosystem, and have so far supported 67 startups from 17 African countries who have collectively raised $72M and created 2800 direct jobs.


This year, we selected 15 high-potential startups to join our most diverse class yet, with 47% women cofounders from across seven countries and seven sectors. These companies are using technology to build exciting products and solve some of Africa’s biggest challenges, with massive potential to contribute to the billion dollar Africa internet economy GDP. We are proud to introduce our sixth class of Google for Startups Accelerator: Africa to you today:
  1. Angaza Elimu (Kenya): an Education technology startup delivering quality and relevant education on demand using AI.
  2. Chekkit (Nigeria): A patented consumer intelligence, engagement & loyalty software-as-a-service for authentication, and tracking and tracing of consumer goods and pharmaceutical products.
  3. Emergency Response Africa (Nigeria): A healthcare technology startup connecting first responders and verified emergency-ready hospitals to emergency victims.
  4. Envisionit Deep AI (South Africa): RADIFY is the AI product developed by Envisionit Deep AI that detects and highlights abnormalities across medical diagnostic images.
  5. GeroCare (Nigeria): A cloud-based hospital that enables individuals to provide regular home medical care for their elderly loved ones.
  6. Khula! (South Africa): An ecosystem of digital platforms (mobile and web) that exist to make the agricultural value chain more efficient & fair.
  7. Ndovu (Kenya): A micro-investment platform providing access to financial markets, financial literacy and tools to diversify financial risk.
  8. Nguvu Health (Nigeria): Preventive and Corrective Tech for mental health
  9. OneHealth (Nigeria): A digital-first pharmacy and healthcare platform, leveraging technology to provide access to medicines, information and healthcare providers.
  10. PayWay Ethiopia (Ethiopia): With its fully functional payment technologies, PayWay is digitizing payments in Ethiopia.
  11. Tabiri Analytics Inc (Rwanda): Comprehensive and automated cyber security as a service for enterprises in the underserved markets.
  12. Tendo (Ghana): Tendo enables anyone in Africa to sell online with zero capital investment.
  13. Third.Design (Tunisia): A software-as-a-service (SaaS) platform that helps individuals easily design 3D immersive experiences.
  14. Vittas International (Nigeria): A tech-enabled financing platform that extends credit to healthcare SMEs in Nigeria.
  15. Whoosh (South Africa): A digital payments solution enabling merchants and businesses to expand online.
The programs we're launching today are essential to our efforts to create platforms and initiatives that will aid in the development of Africa's digital economy. We are thrilled to be a part of this story.



Posted by Nitin Gajria, Managing Director, Google Africa & Rowan Barnett, Head of Google.org EMEA

YouTube Announces Class of 2022 Application Date for the #YouTubeBlack Voices Fund

Black stories and experiences are as diverse and complex as the people. But all too often, the portrayals we see are a portrait of a monolithic group. That’s a problem we wanted to address; we hope to use the #YouTubeBlack Voices Fund to promote more authentic and varied perspectives and celebrate Black joy.



When we announced the #YouTubeBlack Voices Fund last year, we launched with the intention of investing in work that amplifies the voices, perspectives, and stories of Black people around the world. We wanted to equip Black creators and artists with the resources and support to enable them to thrive on YouTube. We’re proud of the progress we’ve made through our Class of 2021 grant program, YouTube Originals, and more.


CELEBRATING OUR 2021 GRANTEES
In just seven months, our Class of 2021 creators and artists are increasing their impact and growing their channels because of the hard work they are putting in, the support they have received, and the dynamic communities they are continuing to build. Some of the highlights include:
  • Each of our grantees has been partnered with a dedicated YouTube Strategic Partner manager who is working with them to optimize and grow their channels and we’ve already seen amazing results in channel growth and engagement.
  • More than 132 creators & artist teams across six countries have participated in our inaugural three-week Black Voices Creator Fund Incubator Camps, where guest speakers covered everything from Pre-Production 101, lighting, and digital storytelling to alternative monetization, media coaching and wellbeing. These sessions were led by industry experts including Dyana Williams, Moira Griffin, Alan Soares, Ícaro Silva, Devi Brown, Jamila Jordan Theus, Sarah Janiszewski, Tommy Oliver, Funmilola Adeniyi, Oluwatosin Olaseinde, Jake Wiafe, Jade Raad, Dane Baptiste and Jamal Edwards MBE, among many others.

  • We’ve seen our creators use their grants in a variety of ways. For example:
    • Tassio from Herdeira da Beleza, hired a team and dedicated time to launch a podcast called SentidosDaBeleza (Senses of Beauty), the first podcast in Brazil about makeup for people with visual impairments.
    • Terrell used his grant to upgrade his shooting space and launch a new cooking and comedy show called T and Coco.
    • Tiffany from TiffanyRotheWorkouts purchased all new production equipment and hired an editor. This has helped her upgrade the production value of her weekly live workouts while diversifying her content and monetization strategy.
    • Jabrils has launched his lifelong dream project - he's producing an animated series that is inspired by his Black experience.
    • Winifred from Zeelicious Foods started two new content series, "Dining Etiquette" and "Bachelor Recipes Series" that are resonating well with viewers.
    • The Humble Penny partnered with an editor to uplevel their production and produce a career-planning series called 'How much do they make?’
    • Vanessa Kanbi invested in better production equipment to boost her content value and explore new content collaborations.



  • Artists have used their funding to develop both impactful and creative work that speaks to their personal lives. Yung Baby Tate released the vibrant music video for her self-empowerment anthem, “I Am,” while Brent Faiyaz celebrated the importance of women in his life through the rollout of “Show U Off,”which were both featured on YouTube Music's Released playlist. As part of YouTube Music’s Africa Month celebration, Sho Madjozi, Sauti Sol, and Fireboy DML, hosted exclusive live stream virtual concerts on each of their Official Artist Channels. And Mariah The Scientist performed an exclusive live set for YouTube Music Nights from Center Stage in Atlanta, in support of the National Independent Venu Association (NIVA).

  • We partnered with several artists and organizations (Masego, 2 Chainz, Kitty Cash, The Legacy Series, The MOBO Awards) to develop the #YouTubeBlack Music moments which included content series, live streams, and events. The #YouTubeBlack Music moments are celebrations of Black culture, identity, and experiences from the perspective of artists and thought leaders in Music.
  • To deepen the impact of our work, building on our artist and creator grants, and content investments, our Music team also worked with Project Level, The Gathering Spot and Since the 80s to launch Future Insiders, to date reaching over 180 at-risk and underserved youth aspiring to enter the music and creative industries. We’ll expand globally in 2021.





ORIGINAL PROGRAMMING SPOTLIGHTING RACIAL JUSTICE AND DIVERSE BLACK EXPERIENCES
In addition to supporting our Class of 2021, we are also committed to inspiring transformational conversations on racial justice and portraying diverse Black experiences through YouTube Originals projects, including episodes of “Glad You Asked,” a third installment of “Bear Witness, Take Action,” the upcoming new series “The Outsiders” and “Onyx Family Dinner,” as well as recent successes with “HBCU Homecoming 2020: Meet Me On The Yard,” “Black Renaissance,” “Resist,” “Trapped: Cash Bail in America,” “A Day in the Live: Wizkid,” and “Bear Witness, Take Action 2.” Additional shows are currently in production and slated to be released in the coming months.






WELCOMING APPLICANTS FOR THE NEXT WAVE OF #YOUTUBEBLACK VOICES GRANTS


We’re excited about the work that has already happened and looking forward to the work that is still to come later this year and throughout the duration of the Fund. On June 21, 2021 we will officially open grant applications for the #YouTubeBlack Voices Fund Class of 2022 and I’d like to invite you to apply to be part of our next class. In addition to creators and artists, we are expanding eligibility to songwriters and producers. Also, for the first time, we’re opening up applications for those based in Canada, in addition to the U.S., UK, Brazil, and Sub-Saharan Africa. Artist, and Songwriter/Producer grants will also be available in Australia.

We are committed to being advocates and allies to the diverse communities that call YouTube home and we are continuing to expand our efforts to support other marginalized and underrepresented communities. We will have more to share on those initiatives in the coming months. It’s a responsibility we embrace and also an incredible opportunity to make a difference and leave a lasting positive impact. We’re up for the challenge and look forward to promoting equity and inclusion for the long-term.






With gratitude,
Malik Ducard - on behalf of an engaged and passionate YouTube team



For more information about our music-specific initiatives for the #YouTubeBlack Voices Fund, please visit:

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Supporting Small Businesses in Africa: Google for Small Business launched across Sub-Saharan Africa

Small businesses are the lifeblood of the African economy. In Nigeria and Kenya, SMEs contribute to 84% of all local jobs and In South Africa SMEs contribute to 52% of the country's GDP (source). SMBs in Africa have been hard hit by the pandemic with 56% of workers in urban jobs in Nigeria stopping work. ( source)




At Google , we are passionate about  small and medium businesses; not so long ago, in 1998, we ourselves started out as a small business. This is why, as we celebrate International Small Business Month in June, we are reaffirming our support for small retail firms in Africa through new programs focused at bolstering their recovery efforts.




Launching Google for Small Business
We have launched a new website, Google for Small Business, dedicated to help small African businesses take and grow their businesses online and continue to reach customers during the Covid-19 pandemic. The free website will guide businesses along every step of their journey from setting up a Business Profile on Google, to creating a free website, along with tips and advice on how to reach and grow their customer base. The platform will also allow business owners to tailor their approach, in their own time, to operating online based on their own specific needs.


Last year we announced a set of programs to assist 500,000 African small businesses recover from the financial effects of Covid-19. This Google for Small business website complements existing Google tools such Market Finder for SMEs aiming to export to new markets, and Marketing Kit for assistance with developing marketing materials.

Businesses can also reach out to our partner Africa118 to get verified on Google my Business.

SMB digital skills webinars
Helping more people understand how to utilise the Web to improve themselves and grow their businesses is something we’ve been particularly passionate about. Our digital skills programmes have reached over 5 million people across Africa, many of whom are business owners. As part of this programme, this month we'll be hosting 3 one-hour long retail SMB-focused webinars on YouTube, covering topics like Analytics, Digital Marketing, and Ads with Google.


The webinars will be available for free on 9, 16, and 23 June and interested attendees are invited to register at goo.gle/smbwebinars


Featuring African small business
Our efforts to promote small businesses in Africa includes creating forums for information sharing and cross-policing of ideas. We will be sharing the stories of small businesses who use digital technologies from Google and others to expand their online presence, reach new consumers, and make a difference in their local communities. The series, known as #ShopSmallFridays will premiere on the Google Africa Twitter account, and will feature inspiring stories of small businesses, with a focus on African triumphs.

Please follow the #ShopSmallFriday series on our Google Africa Twitter account.







If you’re inspired to support small retail businesses, encourage them to sign up for our digital skills training or take a look at G4SMB




Posted by Asha Patel, Head, B2B Marketing, Sub-Saharan Africa

We’re celebrating Africa Day and enjoying the power of African culture and music

Today we come together to celebrate Africa Day - the annual commemoration of the African Union - by inviting you to experience the power of African culture and music with YouTube Music and Google Arts & Culture. Through an array of virtual festivities, people across the continent and the diaspora are celebrating unity through our shared history and culture. We live in unprecedented times, and the past year has proven how online gatherings, music and culture can help us connect with loved ones and inspire people across borders.




Continue celebrating Africa Day with Google Arts & Culture and learn more about the continent's rich cultural heritage. Here are 12 ways to get you started:




1. Celebrate the best of African Music with YouTube
Tonight at 7PM CAT, we invite you to join our 2nd ‘Africa Day Concert’ in collaboration with MTV Base Africa and Idris Elba, who is also hosting the concert. It is a musical homage to Africa and the next global wave of artists and will stream globally exclusively on MTV Base Africa YouTube channel and broadcast across Africa on MTV Base (DStv Channel). Africa’s most celebrated superstars will introduce the next global wave of talent at this year’s event. This includes the iconic and legendary musician Angelique Kidjo, Congolese singer-songwriter Fally Ipupa and the legendary internationally renowned South African artist Yvonne Chaka Chaka amongst others. The concert will also shine a spotlight on some of the most dynamic emerging artists from all over Africa. This includes Rozzy Sokota (Sierra Leone), Ary (Angola) and Mohamed Ramadan (Egypt). As if that’s not enough, a jammed packed line-up of African and global superstars including Amina (Kenya), Azawi (Uganda), Blxckie (South Africa), Boris Kodjoe (USA), Ckay (Nigeria), Cleo Ice Queen (Zambia) Dr Bone (South Africa), Drizilik (Sierra Leone), Ehiz ( Nigeria), Emtee (South Africa), Fik Fameica (Uganda), Innoss’B (DRC), Jay Rox (Zambia), Kamo Mphela (South Africa), Lady Kuda (Zimbabwe), Locnville (South Africa), Mark Angel (Nigeria), Mr P (Nigeria), Ms Red (Zimbabwe), Nadia Mukami (Kenya), Nomalanga Shozi (South Africa), Pierre Emerick Aubameyang (Gabon), Shirazee (Benin), Slapdee (Zambia), Soraia Ramos (Cape Verde), Tendai “The Beast'' Mtawarira (South Africa), Tresor (South Africa), Wema (Tanzania), Will Packer (USA) and William last KRM (Botswana).

If you're up for extending the party after the concert, we invite you to listen to the YouTube Music Playlist and get to know Africa’s next wave of talent making their mark on the global stage.


2. Step inside Africa’s cultural institutions and explore their collections
There are thousands of iconic museums, galleries, and cultural sites in Africa, including Kenya's African Heritage House. Virtually visit 32 cultural institutions across the continent and read over 300 expert-curated stories on art, identity, music, fashion, food and more.
3. Be inspired by Africa's trailblazing women
Let the voices of women from the past and present inspire you. Meet a courageous freedom fighter, let Mama Nike ignite your creativity, learn about activist Winnie Mandela's bravery, take in the remarkable story of Queen Tiye and score a goal with a strong women's football team.


4. Which Kenyan superhero are you? 

Step back in time with 61 Kenyan heroes and discover how they fought for their communities’ land, freedom and spiritual well-being. Take the quiz to find out who your super alter-ego would be. 


Drawing on Afrofuturism, be inspired by artists from the diaspora and Osborne Macharia to create your own Afrofuturist world. Release your inner superpowers and let your imagination be your guide. 


Superheroes of Kenya, Shujaa Stories and National Museums of Kenya, 2020




5. Feel the buzz of Africa's most populous city 

Step inside Lagos, Nigeria's most populous city, with Èkó for Show, and let over 100 creatives inspire you. Start singing Afrobeat tunes with Reekado Banks, paint the lagoon with Victor Ehikamenor, meet the stars of Nollywood with Iké Udé and let Davido inspire your taste buds. 

Continue your journey to South Africa and feel the urban vibe with musicians Busiswa and Muzi. Let them take you on a personal city tour and learn how Durban and Johannesburg have impacted their lives. 

 

6. Place an African masterpiece in your home 

Search for your favorite African artist and click on the Art Projector feature to display their artwork in front of you. Start with paintings by Ali Omar Ermes, Ben Enwonwu, Mohammed Khadda, Nja Mahdaoui, Wangechi Mutu, William Kentridge and Wosene Worke Kosrof. 


Discover more about contemporary African art and its artists by visiting Jean Pigozzi’s Pocket Gallery in augmented reality. Can you spot the paintings by artist Chéri Samba and Esther Mahlangu

Pigozzi Collection Pocket Gallery



7. Feel the power of African literature 

Let poet Siphokazi Jonas' love letter to her home country inspire you, and learn more about what identity means to author Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o. Celebrate Africa’s greatest stories by joining the #AfricaReads challenge with YouTube. Share a video of you reading a book by your favourite African author or watch how people across the continent came together to read Lọlá Shónẹ́yìn's novel 'The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives.' 


8. Crack the hieroglyphic code 

Still curious about words and languages? We challenge you to crack the hieroglyphic code from Ancient Egypt with the AI-powered tool Fabricius. You can also use emojis to create secret codes with friends. 

Fabricius: Learn, Play, and Work, Google Arts & Culture



9. Go on a wildlife adventure 

Africa is home to some of the world's most extraordinary wildlife and nature. Learn more about the importance of conservation with the last male northern white rhino or join a virtual game to meet Africa's big five: lion, leopard, rhino, elephant, and buffalo. 


Continue your adventure by taking in the beauty and majesty of Africa from the top. Virtually climb the Great Pyramid of Giza or learn more about Africa's spectacular mountains, including the Kilimanjaro, Mount Patti and the Table Mountain. 

Addo Elephant National Park, Eastern Cape, South Africa, South African Tourism



10. Join the movement to preserve Africa’s wonders

Climate change is impacting nature, historical sites and communities across the continent. Be inspired by the people of Kilwa Kisiwani in Tanzania, and learn how planting mangrove trees and using technology can help save historical ruins and communities.

Walking Towards the Main Door of Gereza Fort in Kilwa Kisiwani, CyArk, 2018



11. Turn your lens on Africa 

Join Africa's photographers in capturing and sharing culture in new ways. Be inspired by legendary photojournalist James Barnor, take a look back at 10 years of LagosPhoto Festival and learn how to turn the street into a runway with Stephen Tayo. 

Ibeji (brothers), Stephen Tayo, Homecoming, 2019




12. Explore Black history beyond the continent 

African culture has had a transformative impact on the world and keeps fueling creativity in the diaspora. Join rapper Nas in paying homage to the long tradition of black musicians and storytellers who inspire us to this day. Learn more about Black history and culture in the United States, the United Kingdom or explore 50 years of black creativity through the exhibition ‘Get Up, Stand Up Now.’ 

                                




Find out more on YouTube Music and with the Google Arts & Culture app on Android or iOS.




Alex Okosi, Managing Director of Emerging Markets in Europe, the Middle East and Africa






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How anyone can make Maps more accessible




With Google Maps, we want to make it easier to get around, explore and get things done for everyone — and that includes people with disabilities. One way that we make sure our Maps have up-to-date information about details, like if a restaurant has tables suitable for people who use wheelchairs, is through our community of Local Guides. In honor of Global Accessibility Awareness Day, we’re sharing tips from some of these people about how anyone can contribute to a more accessible world — both on and off of the map.



Make an accessibility checklist for your reviews
When you add a review on Google Maps you can create your own template or accessibility checklist to make sure you have the most helpful details covered.


Tushar Suradkar, a Local Guide from India, created a system that helps him make sure all of his reviews covers the accessibility details he cares about — like if a place has tactile paths for the visually impaired, ramp access, and wheelchair-accessible entrances, restrooms, parking and elevators. Each time he leaves a review, he fills in a self-created template that makes these details clear and noticeable so people looking for this information can spot it.

Tushar’s accessibility checklist used on Google Maps reviews.



Add accessibility attributes to your business or places you’ve visited
After visiting a place or business, you can help indicate which accessibility features a place has — like whether it has a wheelchair-accessible entrance, wheelchair-accessible restroom, wheelchair-accessible parking — by answering questions about the business on the Google Maps app.


And if you’re a business owner or manager with a verified Business Profile on Google, you can add attributes to your Business Profile on Search and Maps. In addition to existing accessibility attributes, we recently added the assistive hearing loop attribute that indicates if somewhere, like a movie theater or library, has a sound system that is compatible with hearing aids. If attributes aren’t relevant to your business, you have even more ways you can make your business more accessible by using tools such as Live Transcribe, Live Caption, and TalkBack on Android.

        Accessibility attributes displayed on Google Maps.


Create lists to curate accessible places on Google Maps

Another way to share local knowledge is by creating public lists on Google Maps. You can make lists of places like accessible museums in your city or the most wheelchair accessible restaurants in your neighborhood.  



Asongfac Lily Rospeen, a Local Guide from the Southwest region of Cameroon, curates lists like her Accessibility Buea list that includes wheelchair accessible banks, hotels, hospitals, bookshops, pharmacies, and supermarkets in her city. 





Spread the word about accessibility
Let others know about all the ways they can contribute to Maps to make it more accessible through attributes, reviews and more. Take inspiration from the Local Guides community.


Emeka Ulor, a Local Guide from Nigeria, has rallied other people to add accessibility data to Google Maps and help make it more inclusive. He started the One Accessibility project, recruiting more than 20 volunteers and hosting more than 100 meet-ups to encourage people to add accessibility information to Google Maps. His reviews include information about wheelchair accessible parking, entrances, restrooms, lighting, Braille and seating to help inform people about the accessibility of their destination.


You can read more about these Local Guides and how others in the community are making Google Maps more accessible on Connect, our blog and forum for Local Guides.



Posted by Mara Chomsky, Director, Local Guides 

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The Future is Africa: African Developers are Building for the World

Five years ago, 3 young South Africans, Matthew Elan Smith, Ndabenhle Junior Ngulube and Marnus van Heerden teamed up at an insurtech innovation challenge marking the beginning of their tech entrepreneurship journey together. After months of technical work and early-access testing with a few users, the team launched Pineapple: a peer to peer insurance platform that allowed registered members to cover the things they owned through a mobile app. Pineapple now has over 80,000 users and is working to establish partnerships with regional insurance companies to extend value to their member network.


Pineapple’s founders are part of Africa’s digital talent that is shaping the future of the region’s technology landscape. They are also part of the 67 startups that have successfully graduated from the Google for Startups Accelerator Africa in the last 3 years. We established the Accelerator to provide growth-stage African startups access to the best of Google - our people, practices, processes and technology. These startups, from 10 countries across Africa, have had great impact on Africa’s economy creating 2,800 jobs, and attracting USD $72m in investment. We are continuing this commitment to Africa’s founders and recently announced the 6th class of Accelerator Africa which will kick off in June this year.


Over the past decade, Google has been dedicated to supporting Africa’s developer and startup ecosystem growth through a wide spectrum of programs. To help measure and share the size of Africa’s technology ecosystem, Google worked with Accenture in 2020 on research to highlight its strengths and opportunities, which established that there are close to 700,000 software developers in Africa.


Today we are launching the latest chapter in this journey with the release of our Google I/O 2021 talk “The Future is Africa: African Developers are Building for the World”, sharing insights from our years of work with developers across the African continent.




Google’s Developer Community Programs
Across the continent, developer communities are growing, creating an entry point for young developers looking to connect with their peers and upskill. Back in 2009, Faiz Bashir, a Nigerian software developer, established the first Google Technology User Group in Africa, thereby planting the seeds for what would grow to be the largest developer network across the continent. There are currently over 150 Google Developer Groups in 36 countries, and over 200 Google Developer Student Clubs in institutions of higher learning across Africa. These developer communities host regular events, workshops and conferences designed to share and learn together. Developers are able to apply their knowledge and connections to build great products and advance their skills and careers, as well as give back by helping others learn.


Google is also committed to building a developer ecosystem where women developers can thrive. Our Women Techmakers program is dedicated to supporting women in technology through community initiatives for them to connect and network, build visibility and access exclusive training resources. Ire Aderinokun joined the first International Women’s Day Summit in Lagos in 2016 where she learnt about the Google Developers Experts network. She went ahead and applied, and is now part of a global network of developers with deep expertise in Google’s technologies and who volunteer their time to share their knowledge with others.


Training for Africa’s Software Developers
The Google and IFC e-Conomy Africa 2020 report also established the need for upskilling and education opportunities for developers to boost their capabilities. In line with this, Google has an ongoing commitment to train 100,000 African developers on Android, Mobile Web and Cloud technologies. To date, Google’s Africa Developer Scholarship program has offered 77,000 training opportunities to developers from 54 African countries, as well as professional certification opportunities to the top 1,500 learners. Our content partner for the program, Pluralsight, provides a custom learning platform for the developers to not just learn, but also continuously assess and apply acquired skills as they progress through the training. Looking forward to how this developer training translates directly into employment opportunities, Google has been working with Andela to develop a job network which will provide developers who go through the program access to entry-level work opportunities. Applications are open until May 28 for the 2021 Google Africa Developer Scholarship class, with 40,000 training opportunities available for African developers.


We welcome you to view our I/O talk The Future is Africa: African Developers are Building for the World, and to dive deeper into the data behind our talk by reading the Google and IFC e-Conomy Africa 2020 report, and the Africa Technology Ecosystem 2020 research. Developers, we hope to see you at an upcoming meetup!



Posted by
Andy Volk, Head of Developer Ecosystem, Sub-Saharan Africa &
John Kimani, Program Manager, Developer Ecosystem



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L’avenir passe par l’Afrique : Les développeurs africains construisent pour le monde

Il y a cinq ans, à l’occasion d’un concours d’innovation dans le domaine de l’assurance, trois jeunes Sud-Africains, Matthew Elan Smith, Ndabenhle Junior Ngulube et Marnus van Heerden se sont associés, marquant ainsi le début de leur aventure commune dans l’entrepreneuriat technologique. Après des mois de travail sur la partie technique et de tests préliminaires auprès d’un nombre réduit d’utilisateurs, l’équipe a lancé Pineapple, une plateforme d’assurance en « peer-to-peer » qui permet aux membres inscrits d’assurer leurs biens au moyen d’une application mobile. Pineapple compte désormais plus de 80 000 utilisateurs avec pour objectif d’établir des partenariats avec des compagnies d’assurance régionales afin d’accroître la valeur de son réseau.


Les fondateurs de Pineapple font partie des talents numériques africains qui construisent l’avenir du paysage technologique de cette région du monde. Ces jeunes hommes font également partie des 67 créateurs de start-up qui ont obtenu leur diplôme dans le cadre du programme accélérateur de Start-up Google for Startups Accelerator Africa au cours de ces trois dernières années. Nous avons créé l’accélérateur pour permettre aux jeunes entreprises africaines en phase de croissance d’accéder au meilleur de Google, à savoir nos collaborateurs, nos pratiques, nos processus et notre technologie. Ces start-up ont vu le jour dans 10 pays d’Afrique et elles ont eu un impact considérable sur l’économie africaine en permettant de créer 2800 emplois et d’attirer 72 millions de dollars d’investissements. Nous poursuivons cet engagement en faveur des créateurs d’entreprise africains et avons récemment annoncé le lancement de la 6e promotion d’Accelerator Africa qui démarrera en juin de cette année.


Au cours des dix années qui viennent de s’écouler, Google s’est attaché à soutenir la croissance de l’écosystème des développeurs et des start-up en Afrique par la mise en place d’un large éventail de programmes. Afin d’évaluer et de mettre en avant l’importance de l’écosystème technologique de l’Afrique, Google s’est associé à Accenture en 2020 dans le cadre d’une étude visant à faire ressortir les atouts et les opportunités de ce secteur. Cette étude a montré que ce continent compte près de 700 000 développeurs de logiciels en Afrique.


Aujourd’hui, nous lançons la dernière étape de ce parcours avec la mise en ligne de la conférence Google I/O 2021 « L’avenir passe par l’Afrique : Les développeurs africains construisent pour le monde », occasion pour nos équipes de partager les connaissances acquises au fil de ses années de travail auprès des développeurs du continent africain.



Programmes à l’intention de la communauté des développeurs Google
Sur tout le continent, le nombre de communautés de développeurs ne cesse d’augmenter, créant une porte d’entrée pour les jeunes développeurs qui cherchent à nouer des contacts avec leurs pairs et à monter en compétence. En 2009, Faiz Bashir, développeur de logiciels nigérian, a créé le premier groupe d’utilisateurs de la technologie Google en Afrique, jetant ainsi les bases de ce qui allait devenir le plus grand réseau de développeurs du continent. Il existe actuellement plus de 150 Groupes de développeurs Google répartis dans 36 pays, et plus de 200 Clubs d’étudiants Google Developer au sein des établissements d’enseignement supérieur africains. Ces communautés de développeurs organisent régulièrement des événements, des ateliers et des conférences axés sur le partage des connaissances et l’apprentissage en commun. Ainsi, les développeurs sont en mesure d’appliquer leurs connaissances et leurs réseaux pour créer d’excellents produits, améliorer leurs compétences et progresser dans leur carrière, tout en donnant en retour afin d’aider d’autres professionnels à se former.


Google s’est également engagé à créer un écosystème de développeurs dans lequel les femmes ont toute leur place. Notre programme Women Techmakers a pour but de soutenir les femmes dans le domaine de la technologie par le biais d’initiatives communautaires leur permettant d’établir des liens et de travailler en réseau, de renforcer leur visibilité et d’accéder à des ressources de formation spécifiques. Ire Aderinokun a participé au premier sommet organisé à Lagos en 2016, à l’occasion de la Journée internationale des femmes, où elle a découvert le réseau Google Developers Experts. Elle a posé sa candidature et fait désormais partie d’un réseau mondial de développeurs possédant une expertise approfondie des technologies de Google et qui donnent de leur temps pour partager leurs connaissances.



Formation destinée aux développeurs de logiciels basés en Afrique
Le rapport de Google et de l’IFC e-Conomy Africa 2020 a également montré la nécessité d’offrir aux développeurs des possibilités de perfectionnement et de formation afin de renforcer leurs capacités. Dans cette optique, Google s’est engagé à former 100 000 développeurs africains aux technologies Android, Web mobile et Cloud. À ce jour, le programme de bourses d’études destiné aux développeurs africains mis en place par Google a proposé 77 000 offres de formation à des développeurs issus de 54 pays africains, ainsi que des possibilités de certification professionnelle aux 1500 premiers. Pluralsight, notre partenaire de contenu pour ce programme fournit une plateforme d’apprentissage personnalisée permettant aux développeurs non seulement d’apprendre, mais aussi d’évaluer et d’appliquer en permanence les compétences acquises au fur et à mesure de leur progression. Soucieux de voir comment cette formation de développeur se traduit directement en opportunités d’emploi, Google a travaillé avec Andela pour mettre en place un réseau d’offres d’emploi qui permettra aux développeurs qui suivent le programme d’accéder à des postes de niveau junior. Les candidatures sont ouvertes jusqu’au 28 mai pour la promotion de d’étudiants bénéficiant de bourses Google Africa 2021, avec 40 000 offres de formation destinées aux développeurs africains.


Nous vous invitons à visionner notre conférence I/O L’avenir passe par Afrique : Les développeurs africains construisent pour le monde. Pour aller plus loin, nous vous recommandons la lecture du rapport e-Conomie Afrique 2020 réalisé par Google et l’IFC ainsi que de l’étude sur L’écosystème technologique de l’Afrique 2020. Développeurs, nous espérons vous rencontrer à l’occasion d’un prochain événement !



Poste par
Andy Volk, responsable de l’écosystème des développeurs, Afrique subsaharienne et
John Kimani, Directeur de programmes, Écosystème des développeurs

The Future is Africa: African Developers are Building for the World

Five years ago, 3 young South Africans, Matthew Elan Smith, Ndabenhle Junior Ngulube and Marnus van Heerden teamed up at an insurtech innovation challenge marking the beginning of their tech entrepreneurship journey together. After months of technical work and early-access testing with a few users, the team launched Pineapple: a peer to peer insurance platform that allowed registered members to cover the things they owned through a mobile app. Pineapple now has over 80,000 users and is working to establish partnerships with regional insurance companies to extend value to their member network.


Pineapple’s founders are part of Africa’s digital talent that is shaping the future of the region’s technology landscape. They are also part of the 67 startups that have successfully graduated from the Google for Startups Accelerator Africa in the last 3 years. We established the Accelerator to provide growth-stage African startups access to the best of Google - our people, practices, processes and technology. These startups, from 10 countries across Africa, have had great impact on Africa’s economy creating 2,800 jobs, and attracting USD $72m in investment. We are continuing this commitment to Africa’s founders and recently announced the 6th class of Accelerator Africa which will kick off in June this year.


Over the past decade, Google has been dedicated to supporting Africa’s developer and startup ecosystem growth through a wide spectrum of programs. To help measure and share the size of Africa’s technology ecosystem, Google worked with Accenture in 2020 on research to highlight its strengths and opportunities, which established that there are close to 700,000 software developers in Africa.


Today we are launching the latest chapter in this journey with the release of our Google I/O 2021 talk “The Future is Africa: African Developers are Building for the World”, sharing insights from our years of work with developers across the African continent.




Google’s Developer Community Programs
Across the continent, developer communities are growing, creating an entry point for young developers looking to connect with their peers and upskill. Back in 2009, Faiz Bashir, a Nigerian software developer, established the first Google Technology User Group in Africa, thereby planting the seeds for what would grow to be the largest developer network across the continent. There are currently over 150 Google Developer Groups in 36 countries, and over 200 Google Developer Student Clubs in institutions of higher learning across Africa. These developer communities host regular events, workshops and conferences designed to share and learn together. Developers are able to apply their knowledge and connections to build great products and advance their skills and careers, as well as give back by helping others learn.


Google is also committed to building a developer ecosystem where women developers can thrive. Our Women Techmakers program is dedicated to supporting women in technology through community initiatives for them to connect and network, build visibility and access exclusive training resources. Ire Aderinokun joined the first International Women’s Day Summit in Lagos in 2016 where she learnt about the Google Developers Experts network. She went ahead and applied, and is now part of a global network of developers with deep expertise in Google’s technologies and who volunteer their time to share their knowledge with others.


Training for Africa’s Software Developers
The Google and IFC e-Conomy Africa 2020 report also established the need for upskilling and education opportunities for developers to boost their capabilities. In line with this, Google has an ongoing commitment to train 100,000 African developers on Android, Mobile Web and Cloud technologies. To date, Google’s Africa Developer Scholarship program has offered 77,000 training opportunities to developers from 54 African countries, as well as professional certification opportunities to the top 1,500 learners. Our content partner for the program, Pluralsight, provides a custom learning platform for the developers to not just learn, but also continuously assess and apply acquired skills as they progress through the training. Looking forward to how this developer training translates directly into employment opportunities, Google has been working with Andela to develop a job network which will provide developers who go through the program access to entry-level work opportunities. Applications are open until May 28 for the 2021 Google Africa Developer Scholarship class, with 40,000 training opportunities available for African developers.


We welcome you to view our I/O talk The Future is Africa: African Developers are Building for the World, and to dive deeper into the data behind our talk by reading the Google and IFC e-Conomy Africa 2020 report, and the Africa Technology Ecosystem 2020 research. Developers, we hope to see you at an upcoming meetup!



Posted by
Andy Volk, Head of Developer Ecosystem, Sub-Saharan Africa &
John Kimani, Program Manager, Developer Ecosystem



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L’avenir passe par l’Afrique : Les développeurs africains construisent pour le monde

Il y a cinq ans, à l’occasion d’un concours d’innovation dans le domaine de l’assurance, trois jeunes Sud-Africains, Matthew Elan Smith, Ndabenhle Junior Ngulube et Marnus van Heerden se sont associés, marquant ainsi le début de leur aventure commune dans l’entrepreneuriat technologique. Après des mois de travail sur la partie technique et de tests préliminaires auprès d’un nombre réduit d’utilisateurs, l’équipe a lancé Pineapple, une plateforme d’assurance en « peer-to-peer » qui permet aux membres inscrits d’assurer leurs biens au moyen d’une application mobile. Pineapple compte désormais plus de 80 000 utilisateurs avec pour objectif d’établir des partenariats avec des compagnies d’assurance régionales afin d’accroître la valeur de son réseau.


Les fondateurs de Pineapple font partie des talents numériques africains qui construisent l’avenir du paysage technologique de cette région du monde. Ces jeunes hommes font également partie des 67 créateurs de start-up qui ont obtenu leur diplôme dans le cadre du programme accélérateur de Start-up Google for Startups Accelerator Africa au cours de ces trois dernières années. Nous avons créé l’accélérateur pour permettre aux jeunes entreprises africaines en phase de croissance d’accéder au meilleur de Google, à savoir nos collaborateurs, nos pratiques, nos processus et notre technologie. Ces start-up ont vu le jour dans 10 pays d’Afrique et elles ont eu un impact considérable sur l’économie africaine en permettant de créer 2800 emplois et d’attirer 72 millions de dollars d’investissements. Nous poursuivons cet engagement en faveur des créateurs d’entreprise africains et avons récemment annoncé le lancement de la 6e promotion d’Accelerator Africa qui démarrera en juin de cette année.


Au cours des dix années qui viennent de s’écouler, Google s’est attaché à soutenir la croissance de l’écosystème des développeurs et des start-up en Afrique par la mise en place d’un large éventail de programmes. Afin d’évaluer et de mettre en avant l’importance de l’écosystème technologique de l’Afrique, Google s’est associé à Accenture en 2020 dans le cadre d’une étude visant à faire ressortir les atouts et les opportunités de ce secteur. Cette étude a montré que ce continent compte près de 700 000 développeurs de logiciels en Afrique.


Aujourd’hui, nous lançons la dernière étape de ce parcours avec la mise en ligne de la conférence Google I/O 2021 « L’avenir passe par l’Afrique : Les développeurs africains construisent pour le monde », occasion pour nos équipes de partager les connaissances acquises au fil de ses années de travail auprès des développeurs du continent africain.



Programmes à l’intention de la communauté des développeurs Google
Sur tout le continent, le nombre de communautés de développeurs ne cesse d’augmenter, créant une porte d’entrée pour les jeunes développeurs qui cherchent à nouer des contacts avec leurs pairs et à monter en compétence. En 2009, Faiz Bashir, développeur de logiciels nigérian, a créé le premier groupe d’utilisateurs de la technologie Google en Afrique, jetant ainsi les bases de ce qui allait devenir le plus grand réseau de développeurs du continent. Il existe actuellement plus de 150 Groupes de développeurs Google répartis dans 36 pays, et plus de 200 Clubs d’étudiants Google Developer au sein des établissements d’enseignement supérieur africains. Ces communautés de développeurs organisent régulièrement des événements, des ateliers et des conférences axés sur le partage des connaissances et l’apprentissage en commun. Ainsi, les développeurs sont en mesure d’appliquer leurs connaissances et leurs réseaux pour créer d’excellents produits, améliorer leurs compétences et progresser dans leur carrière, tout en donnant en retour afin d’aider d’autres professionnels à se former.


Google s’est également engagé à créer un écosystème de développeurs dans lequel les femmes ont toute leur place. Notre programme Women Techmakers a pour but de soutenir les femmes dans le domaine de la technologie par le biais d’initiatives communautaires leur permettant d’établir des liens et de travailler en réseau, de renforcer leur visibilité et d’accéder à des ressources de formation spécifiques. Ire Aderinokun a participé au premier sommet organisé à Lagos en 2016, à l’occasion de la Journée internationale des femmes, où elle a découvert le réseau Google Developers Experts. Elle a posé sa candidature et fait désormais partie d’un réseau mondial de développeurs possédant une expertise approfondie des technologies de Google et qui donnent de leur temps pour partager leurs connaissances.



Formation destinée aux développeurs de logiciels basés en Afrique
Le rapport de Google et de l’IFC e-Conomy Africa 2020 a également montré la nécessité d’offrir aux développeurs des possibilités de perfectionnement et de formation afin de renforcer leurs capacités. Dans cette optique, Google s’est engagé à former 100 000 développeurs africains aux technologies Android, Web mobile et Cloud. À ce jour, le programme de bourses d’études destiné aux développeurs africains mis en place par Google a proposé 77 000 offres de formation à des développeurs issus de 54 pays africains, ainsi que des possibilités de certification professionnelle aux 1500 premiers. Pluralsight, notre partenaire de contenu pour ce programme fournit une plateforme d’apprentissage personnalisée permettant aux développeurs non seulement d’apprendre, mais aussi d’évaluer et d’appliquer en permanence les compétences acquises au fur et à mesure de leur progression. Soucieux de voir comment cette formation de développeur se traduit directement en opportunités d’emploi, Google a travaillé avec Andela pour mettre en place un réseau d’offres d’emploi qui permettra aux développeurs qui suivent le programme d’accéder à des postes de niveau junior. Les candidatures sont ouvertes jusqu’au 28 mai pour la promotion de d’étudiants bénéficiant de bourses Google Africa 2021, avec 40 000 offres de formation destinées aux développeurs africains.


Nous vous invitons à visionner notre conférence I/O L’avenir passe par Afrique : Les développeurs africains construisent pour le monde. Pour aller plus loin, nous vous recommandons la lecture du rapport e-Conomie Afrique 2020 réalisé par Google et l’IFC ainsi que de l’étude sur L’écosystème technologique de l’Afrique 2020. Développeurs, nous espérons vous rencontrer à l’occasion d’un prochain événement !



Poste par
Andy Volk, responsable de l’écosystème des développeurs, Afrique subsaharienne et
John Kimani, Directeur de programmes, Écosystème des développeurs

Search, explore and shop the world’s information, powered by AI


AI advancements push the boundaries of what Google products can do. Nowhere is this clearer than at the core of our mission to make information more accessible and useful for everyone.

We've spent more than two decades developing not just a better understanding of information on the web, but a better understanding of the world. Because when we understand information, we can make it more helpful — whether you’re a remote student learning a complex new subject, a caregiver looking for trusted information on COVID vaccines or a parent searching for the best route home.




Deeper understanding with MUM
One of the hardest problems for search engines today is helping you with complex tasks — like planning what to do on a family outing. These often require multiple searches to get the information you need. In fact, we find that it takes people eight searches on average to complete complex tasks.

With a new technology called Multitask Unified Model, or MUM, we're able to better understand much more complex questions and needs, so in the future, it will require fewer searches to get things done. Like BERT, MUM is built on a Transformer architecture, but it’s 1,000 times more powerful and can multitask in order to unlock information in new ways. MUM not only understands language, but also generates it. It’s trained across 75 different languages and many different tasks at once, allowing it to develop a more comprehensive understanding of information and world knowledge than previous models. And MUM is multimodal, so it understands information across text and images and in the future, can expand to more modalities like video and audio.

Imagine a question like: “I’ve hiked Mt. Adams and now want to hike Mt. Fuji next fall, what should I do differently to prepare?” This would stump search engines today, but in the future, MUM could understand this complex task and generate a response, pointing to highly relevant results to dive deeper. We’ve already started internal pilots with MUM and are excited about its potential for improving Google products.


Information comes to life with Lens and AR
People come to Google to learn new things, and visuals can make all the difference. Google Lens lets you search what you see — from your camera, your photos or even your search bar. Today we’re seeing more than 3 billion searches with Lens every month, and an increasingly popular use case is learning. For example, many students might have schoolwork in a language they aren't very familiar with. That’s why we’re updating the Translate filter in Lens so it’s easy to copy, listen to or search translated text, helping students access education content from the web in over 100 languages.

 

Google Lens’s Translate filter applied to homework


AR is also a powerful tool for visual learning. With the new AR athletes in Search, you can see signature moves from some of your favorite athletes in AR — like Simone Biles’s famous balance beam routine.

Simone Biles’s balance beam routine surfaced by the AR athletes in Search feature




Evaluate information with About This Result
Helpful information should be credible and reliable, and especially during moments like the pandemic or elections, people turn to Google for trustworthy information.

Our ranking systems are designed to prioritize high-quality information, but we also help you evaluate the credibility of sources, right in Google Search. Our About This Result feature provides details about a website before you visit it, including its description, when it was first indexed and whether your connection to the site is secure.

 


This month, we’ll start rolling out About This Result to all English results worldwide, with more languages to come. Later this year, we’ll add even more detail, like how a site describes itself, what other sources are saying about it and related articles to check out.

 



Exploring the real world with Maps
Google Maps transformed how people navigate, explore and get things done in the world — and we continue to push the boundaries of what a map can be with industry-first features like AR navigation in Live View at scale. We recently announced we’re on track to launch over 100 AI-powered improvements to Google Maps by the end of year, and today, we’re introducing a few of the newest ones. Our new routing updates are designed to reduce the likelihood of hard-braking on your drive using machine learning and historical navigation information — which we believe could eliminate over 100 million hard-braking events in routes driven with Google Maps each year.

If you’re looking for things to do, our more tailored map will spotlight relevant places based on time of day and whether or not you’re traveling. Enhancements to Live View and detailed street maps will help you explore and get a deep understanding of an area as quickly as possible. And if you want to see how busy neighborhoods and parts of town are, you’ll be able to do this at a glance as soon as you open Maps.


More ways to shop with Google
People are shopping across Google more than a billion times per day, and our AI-enhanced Shopping Graph — our deep understanding of products, sellers, brands, reviews, product information and inventory data — powers many features that help you find exactly what you’re looking for.


Because shopping isn’t always a linear experience, we’re introducing new ways to explore and keep track of products. Now, when you take a screenshot, Google Photos will prompt you to search the photo with Lens, so you can immediately shop for that item if you want. And on Chrome, we’ll help you keep track of shopping carts you’ve begun to fill, so you can easily resume your virtual shopping trip. We're also working with retailers to surface loyalty benefits for customers earlier, to help inform their decisions.

Last year we made it free for merchants to sell their products on Google. Now, we’re introducing a new, simplified process that helps Shopify’s 1.7 million merchants make their products discoverable across Google in just a few clicks.

Whether we’re understanding the world’s information, or helping you understand it too, we’re dedicated to making our products more useful every day. And with the power of AI, no matter how complex your task, we’ll be able to bring you the highest quality, most relevant results.


Posted by Prabhakar Raghavan
Senior Vice President, Search & Assistant, Geo, Ads, Commerce, Payments & NBU

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More ways we’re making every day safer with Google


Every day, we focus on making sure you’re in control of your data by building products that are secure by default and private by design. At this year’s I/O, we’re introducing new features and technologies to keep you safer with Google.


Putting you in control of your data
Privacy is personal. That's why we make it easy for you to choose the settings that are right for you — whether that’s one place to manage settings in your Google Account, Auto-Delete options, or controls that appear in context when you’re using our products. We announced a number of new controls today:
  • Quick delete in Search. We’re introducing a new, “quick delete” option to delete the last 15 minutes of your Search history with a single tap from the Google Account Menu.
  • A passcode protected Locked Folder in Photos. Have you ever handed your phone to show someone a photo, but worried they might scroll to a personal or sensitive image — like a photo of your passport or a surprise gift? “Locked Folder” is a new feature in Google Photos — a passcode-protected space where select photos can be saved separately. These photos won’t show up as you scroll through your grid or in shared albums. This feature is coming to Google Pixels first, and more Android devices throughout the year.
  • Location History reminders in your Maps Timeline. Now, when you see places you've visited in your Timeline, we'll remind you that it's because you turned on Location History — which you can easily turn off right there in your Timeline.

Captions: 1. New “quick delete” option in Search.  2. The new Locked Folder in Photos 3. Location History reminders in your Maps Timeline. 


We’re also introducing new, industry-leading transparency and permission features on Android 12. The new OS includes a Privacy Dashboard where you will see a timeline of when apps accessed your camera, microphone, or device location. We’ve also added indicators that show when your camera or microphone are in use, as well as easy toggles to disable access to both across your device. And you can now choose to share your approximate location with an app instead of a precise one.
 

Building products that are secure by default
As recent high-profile third-party security incidents show, your information isn’t private if it’s not secure. With AI-driven technologies that protect billions of users around the world, our products are secure by default: every day, we block 100 million phishing attempts and 15 billion spam messages in Gmail and encrypt 4 billion photos. And Safe Browsing on Chrome and most other browsers helps keep the rest of the Internet secure, automatically protecting more than 4 billion devices.

One of the biggest security risks is still the continued reliance on passwords — they’re often easy to crack, used across multiple sites, or stolen in phishing attacks. That’s why we’ve been working towards a password-free future — focusing on safer ways to authenticate your identity and building multiple layers of protection into your Google Account, like automatic enrollment in 2-step verification.

But because passwords are still required for most online accounts, we’ve also continued to improve our Password Manager, built directly into Chrome, Android and now iOS, to help you create, remember, save and auto-fill passwords across the web. Today, we announced new enhancements to Password Manager:
  • A new tool that makes it easy to import passwords from other password managers
  • Deeper integrations with Chrome and Android to seamlessly fill your passwords across sites and apps, regardless of whether you’re on desktop or on mobile
  • Password Alerts that automatically warn you if we detect one of your saved passwords has been compromised via a third party breach.
  • A smart way to fix compromised passwords in Chrome with a simple tap. For supported sites and apps, whenever Password Manager finds a password that may have been compromised, you’ll see a "change password" button from Assistant. When you tap the button, the Assistant will not only navigate to the site, but also go through the entire process of changing your password. This feature is available on Android devices and will be rolling out to more sites and apps in the future.

Captions: 1. A new way to fix compromised passwords in Chrome. 2. A new tool to import passwords from other password managers to Password Manager. 3. Password Alerts. 



Making our products private by design
We’ve pioneered new computing technologies like Federated Learning (invented by Google researchers in 2016) that make it possible to deliver helpful experiences while protecting individual data and privacy. We’ve also led on Differential Privacy, which powers some of our most helpful features and products, from our COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports to traffic predictions in Maps, without revealing individual user data. And this expertise guides our work on broader industry initiatives, like the open-source Privacy Sandbox.

Now, we’re continuing that work with Android's Private Compute Core, which keeps your information safe and private for a number of popular AI-driven features like Live Caption (which displays captions based on audio), Now Playing (which tells you the song that’s playing) and Smart Reply (which suggests short responses to messages and emails). For these features, the audio and language processing happens exclusively on your device. Like the rest of Android, Private Compute Core is open source — it’s fully inspectable and verifiable by the security community.

We’ll continue our work to make every day safer with Google with new controls, advanced security, and privacy-preserving technologies.


Jen Fitzpatrick
SVP, Core

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De nouvelles fonctionnalités pour plus de sécurité avec Google

Chaque jour, nous veillons à ce que nos utilisateurs aient le contrôle de leurs données en proposant des produits qui prévoient, dès leur conception, un degré élevé de sécurité et de protection de la vie privée. À l’occasion des conférences I/O de cette année, nous présentons de nouvelles fonctionnalités et technologies destinées à renforcer la sécurité avec Google.


Un contrôle plus facile des données personnelles
Chacun doit pouvoir gérer ce qui relève de sa vie privée. C’est pourquoi nous faisons en sorte que nos utilisateurs puissent personnaliser facilement leurs paramètres, notamment en regroupant ce qui concerne leur compte Google, les options de suppression automatique ou encore les contrôles qui apparaissent en contexte lors de l’utilisation de nos produits. Nous présentons aujourd’hui de nouveaux outils de contrôle :
  • Suppression rapide des données de recherche. Nous introduisons une nouvelle option qui permet d’effacer les 15 dernières minutes de l’historique de recherche d’un simple clic dans le menu du compte Google.
  • Un dossier verrouillé protégé par un code d’accès dans Photos. Qui n’a jamais craint, en montrant une photo à quelqu’un sur son téléphone, de voir apparaître une image personnelle ou sensible, comme une photo de passeport ou un cadeau surprise ? Le « Dossier verrouillé » est une nouvelle fonctionnalité de Google Photos. Il s’agit d’un espace protégé par un mot de passe qui permet de sauvegarder séparément certaines photos. Elles n’apparaîtront pas automatiquement dans la grille de photos, ni dans les albums partagés. Cette fonctionnalité sera proposée dans un premier temps sur les téléphones Google Pixels, puis sur d’autres appareils Android au cours de l’année.
  • Rappels sur le récapitulatif de vos trajets Google Maps. Désormais, quand un utilisateur voit le récapitulatif de ses trajets dans son compte Google, nous lui rappelons que cette fonction se déclenche quand l’historique des positions est activé et qu’il est possible de la désactiver directement dans les Commandes relatives à l’activité Google Maps.
Nous présentons également de nouvelles fonctionnalités pionnières au sein de l’industrie sur la transparence et les autorisations avec Android 12. Le nouveau système d’exploitation comprend un tableau de bord de confidentialité qui montre où et quand les applications ont eu accès à votre caméra, à votre micro ou à la localisation de votre appareil. Nous avons également ajouté des indicateurs qui montrent quand votre caméra ou votre micro sont utilisés, ainsi que des boutons d’activation intuitifs permettant de désactiver l’un ou l’autre sur votre téléphone. Enfin, il est désormais possible d’indiquer aux applications souhaitant accéder à la position un emplacement approximatif et non précis.



Des produits conçus pour être sûrs par défaut
Comme le montrent certains incidents récents, les informations personnelles d’un utilisateur ne sont pas considérées comme privées si elles ne sont pas sécurisées. Grâce à des technologies basées sur l’intelligence artificielle qui protègent des milliards d’utilisateurs dans le monde, nos produits sont sécurisés par défaut : chaque jour, nous bloquons 100 millions de tentatives d’hameçonnage et 15 milliards de spams dans Gmail et nous chiffrons 4 milliards de photos. Enfin, la navigation sécurisée sur Chrome et sur la plupart des autres navigateurs contribue à un Internet plus sûr en général, en protégeant automatiquement plus de 4 milliards d’appareils.

L’un des principaux problèmes en matière de sécurité est l’omniprésence des mots de passe : ils sont souvent faciles à deviner, utilisés sur plusieurs sites et peuvent être volés lors d’opérations d’hameçonnage. C’est pourquoi nous œuvrons pour un avenir sans mots de passe en cherchant des manières plus sûres de vérifier l’identité des utilisateurs et en équipant les comptes Google de plusieurs niveaux de protection, comme la connexion automatique via la validation en deux étapes.

Toutefois, puisque la plupart des comptes en ligne nécessitent encore un mot de passe, nous avons également poursuivi les mises à jour du Gestionnaire de mots de passe, intégré à Chrome, Android et désormais à iOS, pour aider les utilisateurs à créer, mémoriser et sauvegarder leurs identifiants ainsi qu’à remplir les formulaires automatiquement lorsqu’ils se connectent sur des sites Web. Aujourd’hui, nous dévoilons les dernières améliorations du Gestionnaire de mots de passe :
  • Un nouvel outil permettant d’importer facilement des mots de passe à partir de gestionnaires tiers.
  • Une intégration plus poussée avec Chrome et Android pour un remplissage plus fluide des mots de passe sur tous les sites et toutes les applications, tant sur un smartphone que sur un ordinateur.
  • Une extension « Alertes mots de passe » qui avertit automatiquement l’utilisateur quand l’un des mots de passe enregistrés est compromis lors d’une intrusion par un tiers.
  • Une méthode innovante pour modifier les mots de passe compromis sur Chrome d’un simple clic. Ainsi, si le Gestionnaire de mots de passe détecte la mise en danger d’un mot de passe sur un site ou une application prise en charge, l’Assistant Google propose un bouton « Modifier le mot de passe » à l’utilisateur. Si ce dernier clique sur le bouton, l’Assistant ouvre le site concerné et se charge même de changer le mot de passe. Cette fonctionnalité existe déjà sur les appareils Android et sera bientôt opérationnelle sur plus de sites et d’applications.


La confidentialité au cœur de nos produits
Google est à l’origine d’innovations dans le domaine des technologies informatiques, comme l’apprentissage fédéré, inventé par nos chercheurs en 2016, dans le domaine des technologies informatiques. Nous pouvons ainsi offrir aux internautes une expérience satisfaisante tout en protégeant la sécurité et la confidentialité de leurs données. Nous sommes également des pionniers de la confidentialité différentielle que nous appliquons à nos fonctionnalités et à nos outils les plus essentiels, notamment à nos rapports sur la mobilité des populations en temps de COVID-19 et aux prédictions concernant l’état de la circulation sur Google Maps, sans dévoiler les informations personnelles des utilisateurs. Nous nous appuyons également sur cette expertise dans le cadre d’initiatives ouvertes à plus grande échelle, comme la Privacy Sandbox.

Aujourd’hui, nous poursuivons nos efforts pour l’aboutissement de l’initiative Private Compute Core d’Android, qui préservera la confidentialité et la sécurité de plusieurs fonctionnalités basées sur l’intelligence artificielle, comme Live Caption (qui crée des sous-titres à partir de contenus vocaux), Now Playing (qui affiche des informations sur la chanson en cours de lecture) et Smart Reply (qui propose des réponses courtes pour les courriels et les messages). Dans le cas de ces fonctionnalités, l’analyse du langage et des contenus audio se fait exclusivement sur l’appareil de chaque utilisateur. Private Compute Core sera libre d’accès, tout comme le reste d’Android, et la communauté de la cybersécurité pourra mener à bien les inspections et les vérifications qu’elle juge nécessaires.

Chaque jour, nous poursuivons nos efforts pour accroître la sécurité sur Google au moyen de nouveaux contrôles, d’outils de sécurité de pointe et de technologies protégeant la confidentialité.


Posté par Jen Fitzpatrick, SVP, Core

Our continued commitment to helping grow the startup ecosystem in Africa

African startups have experienced significant growth in recent years. This much-desired course is critical for driving the growth in entrepreneurship that will lead to the survival of the continent. According to the Africa Internet Economy 2020 report, sponsored by Google and the International Finance Corporation, Africa’s Internet economy is poised to boost the continent’s economy by 5.25% in the next five years. The report comments that the headwinds brought by COVID-19 will not deter the projected growth of Africa’s internet economy, which is expected to contribute nearly $189 billion to Africa’s GDP by 2025 with a forecasted increase to $712 billion by 2050.


African developers and startups play a crucial role in the transformation of the continent's economy, creating new opportunities and paving the way for economic and social development. At Google, we recognize Africa’s exceptional digital talent and potential, and that is why we are committed to providing critical support to African startups. This year, we will be opening applications for the 6th class of the Google for Startups Accelerator Africa programme while also launching new developer scholarships in partnership with Pluralsight and Andela.

                     [Startups from the inaugural Accelerator class celebrating their graduation, 2018]

 

Today, we are making two announcements at a virtual event where we are hosting media, key industry players, policy leads, startup executives and investors driving the growth of Africa’s tech ecosystem. The event, #Build4Africa, is providing opportunities to review trends unfolding throughout the internet economy, paying special attention to the support of developers and startups in Africa.


Applications for the Class 6 Google for Startups Accelerator Africa programme, a three-month programme that is slated to start on 21 June 2021, will be open until 14 May 2021. The online programme (which includes 3 intensive virtual training bootcamps, mentorship and Google product support) is open to applications from 17 countries across Africa, including Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Tunisia, Uganda and Zimbabwe. The aim is to support the advancement of the startups through their crucial growth phases.


The new scholarships for Android, Web and Google Cloud development will be offered to beginner and intermediate developers resident in Africa. A total of 40,000 scholarships will be offered to developers spread across Mobile and Cloud development tracks and, at the end of the training, the top 1,000 students will earn a full scholarship to certify in Android or Cloud development.


Last year, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the first virtual class of Google for Startups Accelerator kicked off with 20 startups from seven countries undergoing a 12-week virtual journey to redefine their offering while receiving mentoring and attending workshops.

                                      [Team Voyc.ai pitching their solution at the GFS investor immersion]

 

                                    [GFS Accelerator alumni participated in an investor immersion, 2019]

 

In recent years, we have worked to support developer communities across Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • In 2020, Africa’s first Google Developers Space (a hub for African developers, entrepreneurs and startups) was launched in Lagos, Nigeria. This followed the commitment made by Sundar Pichai to African entrepreneurs in July 2017. The space is where entrepreneurs, developers, venture capitalists and investors can connect and collaborate with each other.
  • 11 startups were also selected last year to participate in the fully digital inaugural Google for Startups Accelerator on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The 11 were selected based on their vision to address challenges outlined in the UN’s SDGs including poverty, inequality, climate, environmental degradation, prosperity, and peace and justice.
  • Through Google Developer Groups (GDG) and Women Techmakers, we provide training aligned with real-life job competency requirements. There are 173 active GDGs providing opportunities for developers to converge around similar interests at talks and hands-on workshops.

Community groups engage in activities like Study Jams facilitated by developers, for developers. Today there are more than 120 active developer communities across 25 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.


We are excited to continue our journey with African startup and developer communities because we believe that Africa’s startup ecosystem is a key driver of economic growth on the continent. The growth of all players in the tech space is collective; the success of one lays the path for others.




Nitin Gajria, Managing Director, Google Africa



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Poursuite de notre engagement en faveur de la croissance de l’écosystème des startup africaines

Depuis ces dernières années, les « success stories » des start-up africaines se multiplient. Cette formation très attendue est essentielle pour encourager le développement de l’esprit d’entreprise en Afrique, gage de la réussite de ce continent. Selon le Rapport Africa Internet Economy 2020, réalisé avec le soutien de Google et de l’IFC, l’économie générée par Internet en Afrique devrait stimuler l’économie du continent de 5,25 % au cours des cinq prochaines années. Le rapport indique que le ralentissement de l’économie dû à la COVID-19 ne freinera pas les prévisions de croissance de l’économie de l’internet en Afrique, qui devrait contribuer à près de 189 milliards de dollars du PIB de l’Afrique d’ici 2025, avec une augmentation estimée à 712 milliards de dollars à l’horizon 2050.



Les développeurs et les start-up implantés en Afrique jouent un rôle crucial dans la transformation de l’économie du continent, en créant de nouvelles opportunités et en ouvrant la voie au développement économique et social. Chez Google, nous mesurons pleinement le talent et le potentiel numériques exceptionnels de l’Afrique, c’est pourquoi nous nous engageons à apporter un soutien essentiel aux jeunes entreprises africaines. Cette année, nous allons ouvrir les candidatures pour la 6e promotion de l’accélérateur de start-up Google Africa Google for Startups Accelerator Africa nous offrons également de nouvelles bourses d’études destinées aux développeurs en partenariat avec Pluralsight et Andela.



Aujourd’hui, nous faisons deux annonces lors d’un événement virtuel où nous accueillons les médias, des acteurs clés de ce secteur, des responsables politiques, des dirigeants de start-up et des investisseurs qui contribuent à la croissance de l’écosystème technologique africain. Sous le hashtag #Build4Africa, cet événement permet de passer en revue les tendances qui se dessinent dans l’économie de l’Internet, en accordant une attention particulière au soutien apporté aux développeurs et aux start-up installés en Afrique.



Les candidatures pour la 6e promotion du programme accélérateur de start-up (Google for Startups Accelerator Africa), programme de trois mois qui devrait débuter le 21 juin 2021, seront ouvertes jusqu’au 14 mai 2021. Les candidatures à ce programme en ligne (qui comprend trois sessions de formation intensive, un dispositif de mentorat et une assistance pour les produits Google) sont ouvertes. Dix-sept pays d’Afrique, dont l’Égypte, l’Éthiopie, le Ghana, le Kenya, le Nigeria le Sénégal. L’Afrique du Sud, la Tanzanie, la Tunisie, l’Ouganda et le Zimbabwe sont concernés. L’objectif est de soutenir le développement des start-up dans leurs phases cruciales de croissance.



Les nouvelles bourses pour le développement des applications Android, Web et Google Cloud seront proposées aux développeurs de niveau débutant et intermédiaire résidant en Afrique. Ce sont au total 40 000 bourses qui seront accordées aux développeurs répartis entre les filières de développement mobile et cloud. À l’issue de la formation, les 1000 premiers étudiants recevront une bourse complète pour obtenir une certification en développement Android ou Cloud.



L’année dernière, en raison de la pandémie de COVID-19, la première formation en distanciel du programme Google for Startups Accelerator a démarré avec 20 start-up installées dans sept pays qui ont suivi un parcours virtuel de 12 semaines pour redéfinir leur offre, en bénéficiant d’un dispositif de mentorat et d’ateliers.



Ces dernières années, notre objectif a été de soutenir les communautés de développeurs en Afrique subsaharienne.
  • En 2020, le premier Google Developers Space d’Afrique (un hub réservé aux développeurs, aux entrepreneurs et aux start-up implantés en Afrique) a été lancé à Lagos, au Nigeria. Cette initiative fait suite à l’engagement pris par Sundar Pichai devant les entrepreneurs africains en juillet 2017. Cet espace est le lieu où les entrepreneurs, les développeurs, les investisseurs en capital-risque et les investisseurs peuvent se connecter et collaborer les uns avec les autres.
  • Onze start-up ont également été sélectionnées l’année dernière pour participer à la première session entièrement numérique de Google for Startups Accelerator, consacrée aux Objectifs de développement durable (ODD). Ces 11 entreprises ont été sélectionnées sur la base de leur vision pour relever les défis des ODD définis par l’ONU, notamment la pauvreté, les inégalités, le climat, la dégradation de l’environnement, la prospérité, la paix et la justice.
  • Par le biais de Groupes de développeurs Google (GDG) et de Women Techmakers nous proposons des formations qui correspondent aux compétences professionnelles requises dans la vie réelle. Il existe 173 GDG actifs qui offrent aux développeurs la possibilité de se rencontrer sur des thématiques communes lors de conférences et d’ateliers pratiques.
  • Des groupes communautaires mettent en place des activités comme Study Jams. Ces groupes de travail sont animés par des développeurs pour des développeurs. On compte aujourd’hui plus de 120 communautés actives de développeurs réparties dans 25 pays d’Afrique subsaharienne.
Nous sommes heureux de poursuivre notre aventure avec les communautés de start-up et de développeurs d’Afrique, car nous sommes convaincus que l’écosystème des start-up africaines est un moteur essentiel de la croissance économique de ce continent. La croissance de tous les acteurs de l’espace technologique est collective ; la réussite de l’un ouvre la voie à celle des autres.



Nitin Gajria, directeur général de Google Afrique et Onajite Emerhor, responsable de l’accélérateur Google for Startups Africa