Category Archives: YouTube Creators

The Official YouTube Partners and Creators Blog

‘Tis the Season of Giving on YouTube!

Today we kick off the final sprint in YouTube’s Season of Giving! Over the past few weeks, creators from all over the country  and the world – have rallied their fans to raise money and awareness for causes near and dear to their hearts.

This week the creator frenzy-of-goodness goes into overdrive with livestreams, collabs and special events focused on bringing the YouTube community together, all in the name of generosity.

Read on for all the details!


Stephanie and MatPat of The Game Theorists at St. Jude in Memphis. 


The Game Theorists take over Giving Tuesday for St. Jude


Warning: You aren't going to get anything done this Tuesday, because you’re going to be watching The Game Theorists’ all-day livestream in support of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital!

MatPat and Stephanie Patrick are bringing together some of your favorite creators for a 9-hour livestream like no other. You know amazing things are going to happen when Binging with Babish, The Completionist, Dawko, Jackie Aina, Because Science (Kyle Hill), Markiplier, Miranda Sings, NateWantstoBattle, TheOdd1sOut, Rhett and Link, Rosanna Pansino, SomethingElseYT, The Try Guys, and VSauce3 band together. This mighty crew of creators is dedicated to helping St. Jude defeat childhood cancer and other life-threatening childhood diseases.

And just to up the ante, Scott Cawthon, creator of the insanely popular game, Five Nights at Freddy’s, has committed that he’ll personally donate $500,000 to St. Jude if fans can find easter eggs in an unreleased, made-just-for-the-event game, launching on Tuesday, within one hour of the game going live. Join MatPat, Markiplier and Dawko as they work together to unlock money for St. Jude and #CancelCancer.

The livestream kicks off at 10 a.m. PT. You aren’t going to want to miss a moment!




Have you bought your tree yet?


MrBeast and Mark Rober, the creators and masterminds behind #TeamTrees, joined forces with the goal of raising $20 million to plant 20 million trees by January 1, 2020. The juggernaut campaign is rolling into its final weeks, with only 4 million trees to go!

From all over the world, people have rallied behind the simplicity of the campaign: $1 raised plants 1 tree. Donations flooded in from the start. Within the first 48 hours of launch, #TeamTrees raised $5 million. And within the first week, people uploaded over 3,800 videos with the #TeamTrees tag on YouTube.

#TeamTrees has proven that the sum of many small actions of kindness can make a huge, positive impact on the world. And there is still time to buy a tree, join the movement and become part of this historic fundraiser!

Creators choose, everyone wins!


This week YouTube will be filled with opportunities to learn more about causes and share donations. Check out the many fundraisers: from the 13th annual Project for Awesome from Hank and John Green (aka vlogbrothers) to Khan Academy’s All in for Education livestream to Hope For Paws rescuing animals and much more.

We’ve created a playlist to help you find some of the top fundraisers planned for Giving Week. Come for the great videos, stay for the great causes!

The spirit of generosity and support is one of the things that makes our community so special. On behalf of everyone at YouTube, thank you to all of the creators, fans and friends who are using their voices to make the world a better place.

— The YouTube Team


My final letter in 2019: Updates for this year

Illustrations by Christopher DeLorenzo


Dear creators and artists,




Every quarter, I give you an update on the highlights of the past few months. In August, I did something different and wrote to you about our top priority: the importance of striking the right balance between openness and responsibility. I did this because I received a number of questions about the viability of an open platform, and I wanted to emphasize our commitment to both openness and responsibly protecting our community.




Today I’m returning to our usual format because there are so many new updates to share on our three key priorities: supporting creator and artist success, improving communication and engagement, and living up to our responsibility.




But before I jump into these sections, I want to let all of you know that YouTube as a platform for creators continues to thrive. Compared to last year, the number of creators with a million or more subscribers has grown 65 percent, and creators earning five or six figures, annually, has increased more than 40 percent.




We always say that creators are the heart of YouTube. So, with that, let me move to our next section… supporting your success!




Supporting creator and artist success





One of the biggest issues we heard about from you this year was around copyright claims, in particular about aggressive manual claiming of short music clips used in monetized videos. Those claims often resulted in all revenue going to the rightsholder, regardless of the length of the music claimed.




I’m glad to report we've made progress. A few months ago, we made changes that removed the financial incentive to claim very short and unintentional music use. We also required timestamps for all manual claims so you know exactly which part of your video is being claimed, and made updates to our editing tools so you can easily remove manually claimed content from your videos.




In the months ahead, we’re working to move all creators to the new-and-improved YouTube Studio. We’re making this switch because Classic Studio was built on older technology that doesn’t allow us to put out bug fixes or introduce the new features you’ve requested as quickly as we’d like. Many of YouTube Studio’s updates are inspired by requests from creators, and we think you’ll like its exclusive features, including the new dashboard, powerful analytics, and real-time performance metrics. Access to Classic will be removed for the majority of creators early next year, and you’ll be individually notified in advance of a change to your access. We know it can be hard to change the tools you work with every day, but we believe this new foundation will help us innovate more quickly on your behalf.




We’re also looking to support your success by helping you monetize in new ways that go beyond traditional ad revenue and tap into the viewer-creator connection. Today, thousands of channels have more than doubled their YouTube revenue by using new features that help fans engage with creators, like Super Chat, Channel Memberships, and Merchandise. More than 100,000 channels have received Super Chat, and some streams are earning more than $400 per minute as fans reach out to creators to say hello, send congratulations, or just to connect. And we’re building on the success of Super Chat by expanding the launch of Super Stickers to eligible creators in 60 countries around the world.




And since we expanded YouTube Stories last year, more creators are using Stories not just to connect with existing subscribers, but also to find new ones. Over the last year, creators who used an active Story on their channel saw an average increase to their subscriber count of more than eight percent compared to creators without Stories.




We’re also running experiments to help match content that could be considered edgy with advertising that fits their brand. As you know, yellow icons are a signal that only limited advertising can run on a particular video because of its content. We’re working to identify advertisers who are interested in edgier content, like a marketer looking to promote an R-rated movie, so we can match them with creators whose content fits their ads. In its first month, this program resulted in hundreds of thousands of dollars in ads on yellow icon videos. You can learn more here.




For gaming creators, we’ve heard loud and clear that our policies need to differentiate between real-world violence and gaming violence. We have a policy update coming soon that will do just that. The new policy will have fewer restrictions for violence in gaming, but maintain our high bar to protect audiences from real-world violence.




Improving communication and engagement





Meeting creators is always a highlight for me, and this year I’ve met with YouTubers around the globe. A few months ago in London, I sat down with Alfie Deyes, and celebrated the 10 year anniversary of his first YouTube video. I recently spoke with Juanpa Zurita and Emma Chamberlain about their creative process, and took some tough questions from MatPat of The Game Theorists at YouTube’s first-ever Gaming Creator Summit. I also met with a group of creators in Europe this summer, including Patricia Bright, PewDiePie, Jacksepticeye, Sallys Welt, VisualPolitik, Mrbruff and Jessica Kellgren-Fozard.




To help creators have a better understanding of our guidelines, we will expand our Self Certification pilot next year to hundreds of thousands of YouTube Partner Program (YPP) creators. This program lets creators self-report how their video complies with ad policies. It’s a reinforcing process: the more accurate you are in your self-reporting, the more our system trusts you. Not only does Self Certification give creators more control, it also provides specific feedback on why a video might have monetization issues.




We’ve also heard creators say it feels like an inconvenience when we run experiments or make changes. They ask why we’re trying to fix something that doesn’t seem broken, and they want more of a heads up. So I wanted to give more insights into our development processes.




We are always looking for ways to improve the YouTube experience. Every change we make was tested many times, in several variations, before we roll it out. In the last year alone, we launched over 2,500 updates to YouTube. That means every new feature is developed after we test three or four potential versions to determine what works best for users and creators. It’s through all these changes ⁠— big and small ⁠— that we deliver a better product for you to broadcast yourself and make a living in the new creative economy. We’ll do a better job of communicating with you about why we’re undertaking these efforts and how they might impact you. Please remember that our experiments enable us to ultimately have a better outcome for all viewers and creators.




Lastly, I wanted to mention that we continue to work to support your well being. Many of you have shared your stories about burnout, and we appreciated your honesty. We want to encourage you to take care of yourself and invest in recovery. In particular, I’ve heard some creators say they feel like they can’t take a break from filming because they’re concerned their channel will suffer. So I asked the product team at YouTube to look into it. They went over data from the last six years and found good news. Across millions of channels and hundreds of different time frames for breaks, the same thing was true: On average, channels had more views when they returned than they had right before they left. If you need to take some time off, your fans will understand. After all, they tune into your channel because of you.




Living up to our responsibility





You’ve heard me say before that my number one priority is to balance our responsibility to protect our community with the responsibility to protect freedom of expression. One of the most common questions I get is about how we make policy changes and why it seems to take so long.




These changes take time because, behind the scenes we bring together hundreds of people at YouTube, in consultation with outside experts. When we updated our hate speech policy a few months ago, we consulted with experts in areas like violent extremism, supremacy, civil rights and free speech. These in-depth conversations help us determine how to write guidelines that will protect our community in the long run. We went through a similar process earlier this year when we updated our policy toward pranks and challenges.




We need to ensure our policies address how these issues arise in different cultures and languages, and we also want to make sure our policies can be easily understood by users around the world. YouTube trains all of our reviewers before we implement a new policy, so it will be applied consistently, regardless of what country a user is in when they use YouTube.




We also make sure that every policy works in practice and not just in theory. Before a new policy is launched, we test to make sure that our reviewers rate content with a high level of accuracy under the new guidelines. If they don’t, we send the guidelines back and try again. We want to ensure that content is consistently rated correctly, rather than rushing through a change.




Right now, we’re in the process of updating our harassment policy guidelines, and we’ll keep you posted as they’re finalized. As with all our policy updates, we’re talking with creators to make sure we’re addressing the issues that are most important to the YouTube community.




We’re also changing how we treat data for children’s content on YouTube as part of a settlement with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the New York Attorney General that addresses COPPA concerns.




In order to identify content made for kids, we recently implemented a new audience setting where creators must designate whether their content is made for kids. Starting in January, certain features that rely on user data, such as comments and personalized advertising, will no longer be available on content made for kids. We know there are still many questions about how this is going to affect creators and we’ll provide updates along the way. You can read more about this change here.




Finally, I wanted to share some thoughts as I’ve spent more time with policymakers around the world, from New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern to legislators in Washington, D.C. to regulators in Europe who are translating Article 17, the EU copyright directive previously called Article 13, into local law. In all of these conversations, it’s clear that we need to continue to help people understand the creator economy, how it contributes to jobs around the world, and how regulation could impact your businesses.




Last year, I wrote to you about how Article 17 could have unintended consequences that might impact your livelihood. Thanks to all of the creator involvement, we were able to make improvements to the legislation — in particular, securing liability protections when we make best efforts to match copyright material with rights owners. This change made a big difference and moved the copyright directive in a better direction for the internet and YouTube. Now it’s up to European countries to turn the legislation into national laws. As the process moves forward, we're meeting with governments and inviting local creators to help explain to legislators how Article 17 could affect creators like you.




We’re in this together. We'll continue to keep you posted as we advocate for responsible copyright reform. We hope to see some early drafts of the new legislation in 2020, but it will take a few years for each EU country to implement Article 17.




I’d like to close by saying how powerful it is when creators do good work around the world. So many of you were inspired by Mr. Beast and Mark Rober’s #teamtrees challenge to help plant 20 million trees by January 2020. Last month, I was honored to join in the challenge and plant a tree with Mark.




The response from creators to #teamtrees has been so impressive. If you keep up this pace, we’ll hit the goal of 20 million trees! We're excited to help creators support their favorite causes with tools like the YouTube Donate button. In the next few months, the Donate button will come out of beta and become available to thousands of creators in the U.S. — and later expand to more countries — giving you the opportunity to embed a fundraising campaign next to your videos and live streams.




It’s so inspiring to see all of your great work. Keep it up!

Susan Wojcicki



Introducing Super Stickers: Another way to help you earn money while connecting with your viewers


Like Bushiba over there, your fans want to say hello, connect with you, and even share their appreciation.

Whether it’s to congratulate you for a game well played!
Or thank you for keeping up the good work, your fans are looking to deepen their connections with you in fun, new ways.

That is why we’re so excited to launch Super Stickers!


Super Stickers are launching today in 60 countries to all eligible creators (same creator eligibility criteria as Super Chat), allowing your viewers to buy cool stickers to connect with you during live streams and Premieres.




Our initial release comes with 8 distinct sticker packs, 5 of which are animated and have unique bios that add even more color to your connections with fans. If your viewers like Popo the hippopotamus, they can send you stickers the next time you’re on a hot streak. Once you enable Super Stickers, be sure to explore the sticker packs to learn more about Energetic Lemon and Baby Lemon, Bushiba, Biggest Fans, and others!





A new way to help you earn money on YouTube





Super Stickers are inspired by the success we’ve seen with Super Chat, which allows fans to purchase messages that stand out within a live chat and Premieres. There are now over 100,000 channels who have received Super Chats, with some streams earning more than $400 per minute.




Enabling Super Stickers is as simple as a click of a button! And if you already use Super Chat, you’ll be automatically opted in. Your fans can also choose from a wide range of prices.




Connect with even more fans including your international viewers!





Our first launch and upcoming launches of Super Stickers include translated sticker packs for English, French, Japanese, Korean, and Portuguese, making it easier for your international viewers to connect with you, even if they don’t share the same language.




More stickers coming soon!





We want to continue building great connections between you and your fans, while building more ways to help you to earn revenue. In the coming months, we’re excited to create and release more sticker packs for you and your fans.




If you haven’t used Super Chat yet, learn how to get started with Super Stickers here!




Posted by Zhouzhou He, Product Manager

Pasta Grannies: Sharing pasta with the world, one nonna at a time

 Nonna Bridiga demonstrates her technique for tagliatelle in her Italian home kitchen. (YouTube)


A bowl of homemade pasta is one of the most comforting foods in the world, but making it by hand is no mean feat. It can take years to master the delicate art of perfect tortellini and ravioli, and as families get busier and busier, the traditional art of making homemade pasta is dwindling, even in Italy.




Enter Pasta Grannies! Food writer Vicky Bennison started her channel as a way to catalogue the traditional handmade pasta skills of Italy’s grandmothers. For the past five years, she has crisscrossed the country, inviting her audience into the homes of these nonnas as they lovingly prepare their favorite dishes. Whether it’s demonstrating a rare regional specialty or sharing their techniques for mastering the classics, the Pasta Grannies are inspiring the next generation of home cooks.









But it’s more than just a cooking tutorial, it’s also helping to preserve centuries-old culinary culture. As Vicky says, “YouTube is just the most fantastic way for these women to pass on their skills and traditions to their grandchildren, their great-grandchildren and the rest of the world.”




YouTube traveled to Italy with Vicky to learn more about what propels her vision for Pasta Grannies, the art of making pasta by hand, and to meet the nonnas in person.




Jodi Ropert

Updates to YouTube’s verification program

When viewers come to YouTube, it’s important that they know the channel they are watching is the official presence of the creator, artist, public figure or company that it represents. With that in mind, we’re announcing upcoming changes to our channel verification program starting in late October. There are two parts to the new verification program, a new look and new eligibility requirements.



New look




Currently, verified channels have a checkmark next to their channel name. Through our research, we found that viewers often associated the checkmark with an endorsement of content, not identity. To reduce confusion about what being verified means, we’re introducing a new look that helps distinguish the official channel of the creator, celebrity or brand it represents.






As YouTube has expanded features where viewers interact with channels, including community posts, live chats and comments, the checkmark has been displayed inconsistently. The new look will be displayed more consistently across channel pages, search and comments, and is more difficult to replicate, so that viewers can be sure of a channel’s identity. This new look will also replace the existing music note on Official Artist Channels on YouTube.



New eligibility requirements




Under our current eligibility requirements, channels with more than 100,000 subscribers can be verified regardless of need for proof of authenticity. That worked well when YouTube was smaller, but as YouTube has grown and the ecosystem has become more complex, we needed a new way to verify the identity of channels and help users find the official channel they’re looking for.



Our new criteria prioritizes verifying prominent channels that have a clear need for proof of authenticity. We look at a number of factors to determine if a channel meets this criteria, including:




  • Authenticity: Does this channel belong to the real creator, artist, public figure or company it claims to represent?
  • Prominence: Does this channel represent a well-known or highly searched creator, artist, public figure or company? Is this channel widely recognized outside of YouTube and have a strong presence online? Is this a popular channel that has a very similar name to many other channels?




The new criteria will apply for all channels. Channels that meet the new requirements no longer need to apply; we will automatically apply the new verified treatment. For more info about verification and eligibility, check out our Help Center.




Jonathan McPhie, Product Manager

Susan Wojcicki: Preserving openness through responsibility

Dear creators and artists,



As I do every quarter, I’d like to pause and reflect on my priorities and how I can help you be successful on YouTube. But rather than our usual update on this quarter’s highlights and lowlights, I want to take a minute to talk about something that is incredibly important to me personally, and the future of this platform: openness and how we balance that with our responsibility to protect the community.



YouTube is built on the premise of openness. Based on this open platform, millions of creators around the world have connected with global audiences and many of them have built thriving businesses in the process. But openness comes with its challenges, which is why we also have Community Guidelines that we update on an ongoing basis. Most recently, this includes our hate speech policy and our upcoming harassment policy. When you create a place designed to welcome many different voices, some will cross the line. Bad actors will try to exploit platforms for their own gain, even as we invest in the systems to stop them. As more issues come into view, a rising chorus of policymakers, press and pundits are questioning whether an open platform is valuable... or even viable.



Despite these concerns, I believe preserving an open platform is more important than ever.



First, openness leads to opportunity. Today’s creators have built an entire creative economy and are redefining the face of media. They are truly next-generation media businesses, with millions of views and global brands, who are contributing to local and global economies, and creating jobs. These are creators that would not have had a chance to break through in a more closed media landscape. Creators like Swedish robotics enthusiast Simone Giertz and blind lifestyle vlogger Molly Burke, both unconventional in their appeal and passed over by traditional media, are finding huge success on YouTube managing businesses, selling merchandise, creating jobs for other people and creating real economic value in their communities. Or creators like Laura Vitale, Sallys Welt and Helen's Recipes have turned their passion for food into full-time professions, complete with successful channels, cookbooks and more. And they are not alone. A report from Ryerson University found that YouTube creators have created 28,000 full time jobs just in Canada. And 20% of eligible Canadian creators are creating jobs for others. Around the globe, the number of channels earning more than $100,000 continues to climb 40% year over year.



Openness has also helped foster community. On an open platform, a shared experience can unite people in amazing ways. For example, Ryleigh Hawkins from New Zealand started her channel, Tourettes Teen, to spread awareness about what it’s like to live with Tourette’s syndrome. Her informative, joyful and humorous videos have earned her fans around the world and let others with this potentially isolating condition know they are not alone. And teens are sharing their college rejection videos, serving as a reminder that this painful moment happens to everyone and people do bounce back.



And finally, openness leads to learning. As a daughter of two teachers and a lifelong learner, I’ve been especially inspired to see Edutubers like Origin of Everything, Manual do Mundo, Eddie Woo and Excel is Fun turn YouTube into the world’s largest classroom. Every time I meet someone new and ask them about YouTube, I hear a story about something they learned on the site: how YouTube helped a student ace her math homework, a mom fix a broken garage door, or an employee master a new job skill.



Let me be clear, none of this happens without openness. Without an open system, diverse and authentic voices have trouble breaking through. And the voices that do get a platform often sound like those who already have one. That small business built on someone sharing their passion for soapmaking never takes off. That bullied teen can’t find a community that looks and feels like them and lets them know that it gets better. And that curious person obsessed with planetary physics and looking for a few videos is probably out of luck.



A commitment to openness is not easy. It sometimes means leaving up content that is outside the mainstream, controversial or even offensive. But I believe that hearing a broad range of perspectives ultimately makes us a stronger and more informed society, even if we disagree with some of those views. A large part of how we protect this openness is not just guidelines that allow for diversity of speech, but the steps that we’re taking to ensure a responsible community. I’ve said a number of times this year that this is my number one priority. A responsible approach toward managing what’s on our platform protects our users and creators like you. It also means we can continue to foster all the good that comes from an open platform.



Problematic content represents a fraction of one percent of the content on YouTube and we’re constantly working to reduce this even further. This very small amount has a hugely outsized impact, both in the potential harm for our users, as well as the loss of faith in the open model that has enabled the rise of your creative community. One assumption we’ve heard is that we hesitate to take action on problematic content because it benefits our business. This is simply not true — in fact, the cost of not taking sufficient action over the long term results in lack of trust from our users, advertisers, and you, our creators. We want to earn that trust.



This is why we’ve been investing significantly over the past few years in the teams and systems that protect YouTube. Our approach towards responsibility involves four “Rs”:

  • We REMOVE content that violates our policy as quickly as possible. And we’re always looking to make our policies clearer and more effective, as we’ve done with pranks and challenges, child safety, and hate speech just this year. We aim to be thoughtful when we make these updates and consult a wide variety of experts to inform our thinking, for example we talked to dozens of experts as we developed our updated hate speech policy. We also report on the removals we make in our quarterly Community Guidelines enforcement report. I also appreciate that when policies aren’t working for the creator community, you let us know. One area we’ve heard loud and clear needs an update is creator-on-creator harassment. I said in my last letter that we’d be looking at this and we will have more to share in the coming months.
  • We RAISE UP authoritative voices when people are looking for breaking news and information, especially during breaking news moments. Our breaking and top news shelves are available in 40 countries and we’re continuing to expand that number.
  • We REDUCE the spread of content that brushes right up against our policy line. Already, in the U.S. where we made changes to recommendations earlier this year, we’ve seen a 50% drop of views from recommendations to this type of content, meaning quality content has more of a chance to shine. And we've begun experimenting with this change in the UK, Ireland, South Africa and other English-language markets.
  • And we set a higher bar for what channels can make money on our site, REWARDING trusted, eligible creators. Not all content allowed on YouTube is going to match what advertisers feel is suitable for their brand, we have to be sure they are comfortable with where their ads appear. This is also why we’re enabling new revenue streams for creators like Super Chat and Memberships. Thousands of channels have more than doubled their total YouTube revenue by using these new tools in addition to advertising.




The stories I hear from creators like you inspire me every day. The community you’ve created is living proof that an internet that reflects a broad range of ideas can change the world for the better. You’ve built something incredible; it’s our job to strike the right balance between openness and responsibility so that future generations of creators and users can, as well.



Susan Wojcicki

Updates to our manual Content ID claiming policies

In Susan’s April Creator Letter, she shared that improving creators’ experience with copyright claims is one of our top priorities. One concerning trend we’ve seen is aggressive manual claiming of very short music clips used in monetized videos. These claims can feel particularly unfair, as they transfer all revenue from the creator to the claimant, regardless of the amount of music claimed. A little over a month ago, we took a first step in addressing this by requiring copyright owners to provide timestamps for all manual claims so you know exactly which part of your video is being claimed. We also made updates to our editing tools in Creator Studio that allow you to use those timestamps to remove manually claimed content from your videos, automatically releasing the claim and restoring monetization.



Today, we’re announcing additional changes to our manual claiming policies intended to improve fairness in the creator ecosystem, while still respecting copyright owners’ rights to prevent unlicensed use of their content.



Including someone else’s content without permission — regardless of how short the clip is — means your video can still be claimed and copyright owners will still be able to prevent monetization or block the video from being viewed. However, going forward, our policies will forbid copyright owners from using our Manual Claiming tool to monetize creator videos with very short or unintentional uses of music. This change only impacts claims made with the Manual Claiming tool, where the rightsholder is actively reviewing the video. Claims created by the Content ID match system, which are the vast majority, are not impacted by this policy. Without the option to monetize, some copyright owners may choose to leave very short or unintentional uses unclaimed. Others may choose to prevent monetization of the video by any party. And some may choose to apply a block policy.



As always, the best way to avoid these issues is to not use unlicensed content in your videos, even when it’s unintentional music playing in the background (i.e. vlogging in a store with music playing in the background). Instead, choose content from trusted sources such as the YouTube Audio Library, which has new tracks added every month. If you do find yourself with an unintended claim, you can use our editing tools to remove the claimed content and the restrictions that come with it. And, of course, if you feel that your use qualifies for an exception to copyright, like Fair Use, be sure you understand what that means and how our dispute process works before uploading your video.



Our enforcement of these new policies will apply to all new manual claims beginning in mid-September, providing adequate time for copyright owners to adapt. Once we start enforcement, copyright owners who repeatedly fail to adhere to these policies will have their access to Manual Claiming suspended.



We strive to make YouTube a fair ecosystem for everyone, including songwriters, artists, and YouTube creators. We acknowledge that these changes may result in more blocked content in the near-term, but we feel this is an important step toward striking the right balance over the long-term. Our goal is to unlock new value for everyone by powering creative reuse and content mashups, while fairly compensating all rightsholders.



— The YouTube Team

VidCon 2019

Happy 10th annual VidCon, creators! We're here with our Chief Product Officer, Neal Mohan, who's keynoting it up. His main message? All the ways YouTube will continue to support and help drive new opportunities for you in the next decade and beyond. Read how YouTube's planning to do all this — thanks to some of our new initiatives — here.

— The YouTube Team

More information and better tools to resolve manual Content ID claims

As Susan mentioned in her April Creator Letter, we’re making it easier for creators to understand and remove manually claimed content in their videos. We’ve heard from creators that the recent uptick of manual claims, especially for short segments, has led to some confusion, as the claims sometimes lack key information that can help to resolve the issue. While it’s important that creators understand and respect copyright, it’s also important that they have knowledge of who is claiming content in their videos, where it appears, and what they can do about it. Starting today, we will require copyright owners to provide timestamps to indicate exactly where their content appears in videos they manually claim, and we’re improving our video editing tools in Creator Studio to make it easier for creators to remove the content associated with these claims.

Manual Claiming is a tool within Content ID that allows select copyright owners to manually make claims on videos that were not automatically made by our Content ID matching system. Previously, we did not require copyright owners using the Manual Claiming tool to provide timestamps, so it was sometimes unclear to creators which parts of their videos were being claimed and in addition, unlike edits that removed content identified by automated claims, the claims wouldn’t be automatically released.

We’re making the experience better for you in two important ways:

1. Copyright owners must now provide timestamps for exactly what part of your video is being manually claimed.

Just as you would if you receive an automatic claim from our Content ID matching system, you’ll now see timestamps in Creator Studio when you get a manual claim. Check out the Video Copyright Info page in YouTube Studio that offers a visualization of where the manually-claimed content appears in your video, and also, it provides more info about the content being claimed. We’ll be evaluating the accuracy of these timestamps. Copyright owners who repeatedly fail to provide accurate data will have their access to manual claiming revoked.

2. You can use our editing tools to remove the content claimed manually in your video which will now automatically release the claims.

We’ve updated our editing tools to make it easier to remove manually claimed content from your video. If you choose to remove the content, the claim will now be released automatically. Below are some of the options you have without having to edit and upload a new video:
  • Mute all sound when the claimed song plays: If you get a claim for a piece of music in your video, you can now mute the time-stamped segment.
  • Replace the song: If you don’t want to mute the audio entirely, you can instead swap out the music with one of our free-to-use songs from the YouTube Audio Library. We also added new visual indicators below the video player, which show exactly what segment of the video is claimed. This can help you position the audio track in such a way that will remove the claims from your video.
  • Trim out the content: You also have the option to cut out the time-stamped segment from your video using the Trim feature in the YouTube Editor.
We’re still working on several improvements here, like having an explicit Trim option in the Video Copyright Info page that will allow you to trim out the claimed content with just one click. You can learn more about these changes in our Help Center.

Remember, if you receive a claim that you believe is incorrect, you have the right to dispute it. You know the most about the content in your videos and whether it was used appropriately, so we built the dispute process to empower you to escalate any problems to the copyright owner, and even as far as the courts, if you choose. If both you and the person claiming your video are attempting to monetize it, we will continue to show ads on the video during the dispute process and make sure the appropriate party gets the revenue once the dispute is resolved.

Our work won’t stop here. We’re always looking to find ways to improve the creator copyright experience while also balancing the rights of copyright owners. Stay tuned for more to come.



Julian Bill, Product Manager



More information and better tools to resolve manual Content ID claims

As Susan mentioned in her April Creator Letter, we’re making it easier for creators to understand and remove manually claimed content in their videos. We’ve heard from creators that the recent uptick of manual claims, especially for short segments, has led to some confusion, as the claims sometimes lack key information that can help to resolve the issue. While it’s important that creators understand and respect copyright, it’s also important that they have knowledge of who is claiming content in their videos, where it appears, and what they can do about it. Starting today, we will require copyright owners to provide timestamps to indicate exactly where their content appears in videos they manually claim, and we’re improving our video editing tools in Creator Studio to make it easier for creators to remove the content associated with these claims.

Manual Claiming is a tool within Content ID that allows select copyright owners to manually make claims on videos that were not automatically made by our Content ID matching system. Previously, we did not require copyright owners using the Manual Claiming tool to provide timestamps, so it was sometimes unclear to creators which parts of their videos were being claimed and in addition, unlike edits that removed content identified by automated claims, the claims wouldn’t be automatically released.

We’re making the experience better for you in two important ways:

1. Copyright owners must now provide timestamps for exactly what part of your video is being manually claimed.

Just as you would if you receive an automatic claim from our Content ID matching system, you’ll now see timestamps in Creator Studio when you get a manual claim. Check out the Video Copyright Info page in YouTube Studio that offers a visualization of where the manually-claimed content appears in your video, and also, it provides more info about the content being claimed. We’ll be evaluating the accuracy of these timestamps. Copyright owners who repeatedly fail to provide accurate data will have their access to manual claiming revoked.

2. You can use our editing tools to remove the content claimed manually in your video which will now automatically release the claims.

We’ve updated our editing tools to make it easier to remove manually claimed content from your video. If you choose to remove the content, the claim will now be released automatically. Below are some of the options you have without having to edit and upload a new video:
  • Mute all sound when the claimed song plays: If you get a claim for a piece of music in your video, you can now mute the time-stamped segment.
  • Replace the song: If you don’t want to mute the audio entirely, you can instead swap out the music with one of our free-to-use songs from the YouTube Audio Library. We also added new visual indicators below the video player, which show exactly what segment of the video is claimed. This can help you position the audio track in such a way that will remove the claims from your video.
  • Trim out the content: You also have the option to cut out the time-stamped segment from your video using the Trim feature in the YouTube Editor.
We’re still working on several improvements here, like having an explicit Trim option in the Video Copyright Info page that will allow you to trim out the claimed content with just one click. You can learn more about these changes in our Help Center.

Remember, if you receive a claim that you believe is incorrect, you have the right to dispute it. You know the most about the content in your videos and whether it was used appropriately, so we built the dispute process to empower you to escalate any problems to the copyright owner, and even as far as the courts, if you choose. If both you and the person claiming your video are attempting to monetize it, we will continue to show ads on the video during the dispute process and make sure the appropriate party gets the revenue once the dispute is resolved.

Our work won’t stop here. We’re always looking to find ways to improve the creator copyright experience while also balancing the rights of copyright owners. Stay tuned for more to come.



Julian Bill, Product Manager