Tag Archives: Quantum Computing

Quantum Advantage in Learning from Experiments

In efforts to learn about the quantum world, scientists face a big obstacle: their classical experience of the world. Whenever a quantum system is measured, the act of this measurement destroys the “quantumness” of the state. For example, if the quantum state is in a superposition of two locations, where it can seem to be in two places at the same time, once it is measured, it will randomly appear either ”here” or “there”, but not both. We only ever see the classical shadows cast by this strange quantum world.

A growing number of experiments are implementing machine learning (ML) algorithms to aid in analyzing data, but these have the same limitations as the people they aim to help: They can’t directly access and learn from quantum information. But what if there were a quantum machine learning algorithm that could directly interact with this quantum data?

In “Quantum Advantage in Learning from Experiments”, a collaboration with researchers at Caltech, Harvard, Berkeley, and Microsoft published in Science, we show that a quantum learning agent can perform exponentially better than a classical learning agent at many tasks. Using Google’s quantum computer, Sycamore, we demonstrate the tremendous advantage that a quantum machine learning (QML) algorithm has over the best possible classical algorithm. Unlike previous quantum advantage demonstrations, no advances in classical computing power could overcome this gap. This is the first demonstration of a provable exponential advantage in learning about quantum systems that is robust even on today's noisy hardware.

Quantum Speedup
QML combines the best of both quantum computing and the lesser-known field of quantum sensing.

Quantum computers will likely offer exponential improvements over classical systems for certain problems, but to realize their potential, researchers first need to scale up the number of qubits and to improve quantum error correction. What’s more, the exponential speed-up over classical algorithms promised by quantum computers relies on a big, unproven assumption about so-called “complexity classes” of problems — namely, that the class of problems that can be solved on a quantum computer is larger than those that can be solved on a classical computer.. It seems like a reasonable assumption, and yet, no one has proven it. Until it's proven, every claim of quantum advantage will come with an asterisk: that it can do better than any known classical algorithm.

Quantum sensors, on the other hand, are already being used for some high-precision measurements and offer modest (and proven) advantages over classical sensors. Some quantum sensors work by exploiting quantum correlations between particles to extract more information about a system than it otherwise could have. For example, scientists can use a collection of N atoms to measure aspects of the atoms’ environment like the surrounding magnetic fields. Typically the sensitivity to the field that the atoms can measure scales with the square root of N. But if one uses quantum entanglement to create a complex web of correlations between the atoms, then one can improve the scaling to be proportional to N. But as with most quantum sensing protocols, this quadratic speed-up over classical sensors is the best one can ever do.

Enter QML, a technology that straddles the line between quantum computers and quantum sensors. QML algorithms make computations that are aided by quantum data. Instead of measuring the quantum state, a quantum computer can store quantum data and implement a QML algorithm to process the data without collapsing it. And when this data is limited, a QML algorithm can squeeze exponentially more information out of each piece it receives when considering particular tasks.

Comparison of a classical machine learning algorithm and a quantum machine learning algorithm. The classical machine learning algorithm measures a quantum system, then performs classical computations on the classical data it acquires to learn about the system. The quantum machine learning algorithm, on the other hand, interacts with the quantum states produced by the system, giving it a quantum advantage over the CML.

To see how a QML algorithm works, it’s useful to contrast with a standard quantum experiment. If a scientist wants to learn about a quantum system, they might send in a quantum probe, such as an atom or other quantum object whose state is sensitive to the system of interest, let it interact with the system, then measure the probe. They can then design new experiments or make predictions based on the outcome of the measurements. Classical machine learning (CML) algorithms follow the same process using an ML model, but the operating principle is the same — it’s a classical device processing classical information.

A QML algorithm instead uses an artificial “quantum learner.” After the quantum learner sends in a probe to interact with the system, it can choose to store the quantum state rather than measure it. Herein lies the power of QML. It can collect multiple copies of these quantum probes, then entangle them to learn more about the system faster.

Suppose, for example, the system of interest produces a quantum superposition state probabilistically by sampling from some distribution of possible states. Each state is composed of n quantum bits, or qubits, where each is a superposition of “0” and “1” — all learners are allowed to know the generic form of the state, but must learn its details.

In a standard experiment, where only classical data is accessible, every measurement provides a snapshot of the distribution of quantum states, but since it’s only a sample, it is necessary to measure many copies of the state to reconstruct it. In fact, it will take on the order of 2n copies.

A QML agent is more clever. By saving a copy of the n-qubit state, then entangling it with the next copy that comes along, it can learn about the global quantum state more quickly, giving a better idea of what the state looks like sooner.

Basic schematic of the QML algorithm. Two copies of a quantum state are saved, then a “Bell measurement” is performed, where each pair is entangled and their correlations measured.

The classical reconstruction is like trying to find an image hiding in a sea of noisy pixels — it could take a very long time to average-out all the noise to know what the image is representing. The quantum reconstruction, on the other hand, uses quantum mechanics to isolate the true image faster by looking for correlations between two different images at once.

Results
To better understand the power of QML, we first looked at three different learning tasks and theoretically proved that in each case, the quantum learning agent would do exponentially better than the classical learning agent. Each task was related to the example given above:

  1. Learning about incompatible observables of the quantum state — i.e., observables that cannot be simultaneously known to arbitrary precision due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, like position and momentum. But we showed that this limit can be overcome by entangling multiple copies of a state.
  2. Learning about the dominant components of the quantum state. When noise is present, it can disturb the quantum state. But typically the “principal component” — the part of the superposition with the highest probability — is robust to this noise, so we can still glean information about the original state by finding this dominant part.
  3. Learning about a physical process that acts on a quantum system or probe. Sometimes the state itself is not the object of interest, but a physical process that evolves this state is. We can learn about various fields and interactions by analyzing the evolution of a state over time.

In addition to the theoretical work, we ran some proof-of-principle experiments on the Sycamore quantum processor. We started by implementing a QML algorithm to perform the first task. We fed an unknown quantum mixed state to the algorithm, then asked which of two observables of the state was larger. After training the neural network with simulation data, we found that the quantum learning agent needed exponentially fewer experiments to reach a prediction accuracy of 70% — equating to 10,000 times fewer measurements when the system size was 20 qubits. The total number of qubits used was 40 since two copies were stored at once.

Experimental comparison of QML vs. CML algorithms for predicting a quantum state’s observables. While the number of experiments needed to achieve 70% accuracy with a CML algorithm (“C” above) grows exponentially with the size of the quantum state n, the number of experiments the QML algorithm (“Q”) needs is only linear in n. The dashed line labeled “Rigorous LB (C)” represents the theoretical lower bound (LB) — the best possible performance — of a classical machine learning algorithm.

In a second experiment, relating to the task 3 above, we had the algorithm learn about the symmetry of an operator that evolves the quantum state of their qubits. In particular, if a quantum state might undergo evolution that is either totally random or random but also time-reversal symmetric, it can be difficult for a classical learner to tell the difference. In this task, the QML algorithm can separate the operators into two distinct categories, representing two different symmetry classes, while the CML algorithm fails outright. The QML algorithm was completely unsupervised, so this gives us hope that the approach could be used to discover new phenomena without needing to know the right answer beforehand.

Experimental comparison of QML vs. CML algorithms for predicting the symmetry class of an operator. While QML successfully separates the two symmetry classes, the CML fails to accomplish the task.

Conclusion
This experimental work represents the first demonstrated exponential advantage in quantum machine learning. And, distinct from a computational advantage, when limiting the number of samples from the quantum state, this type of quantum learning advantage cannot be challenged, even by unlimited classical computing resources.

So far, the technique has only been used in a contrived, “proof-of-principle” experiment, where the quantum state is deliberately produced and the researchers pretend not to know what it is. To use these techniques to make quantum-enhanced measurements in a real experiment, we’ll first need to work on current quantum sensor technology and methods to faithfully transfer quantum states to a quantum computer. But the fact that today’s quantum computers can already process this information to squeeze out an exponential advantage in learning bodes well for the future of quantum machine learning.

Acknowledgements
We would like to thank our Quantum Science Communicator Katherine McCormick for writing this blog post. Images reprinted with permission from Huang et al., Science, Vol 376:1182 (2022).

Source: Google AI Blog


Hybrid Quantum Algorithms for Quantum Monte Carlo

The intersection between the computational difficulty and practical importance of quantum chemistry challenges run on quantum computers has long been a focus for Google Quantum AI. We’ve experimentally simulated simple models of chemical bonding, high-temperature superconductivity, nanowires, and even exotic phases of matter such as time crystals on our Sycamore quantum processors. We’ve also developed algorithms suitable for the error-corrected quantum computers we aim to build, including the world’s most efficient algorithm for large-scale quantum computations of chemistry (in the usual way of formulating the problem) and a pioneering approach that allows for us to solve the same problem at an extremely high spatial resolution by encoding the position of the electrons differently.

Despite these successes, it is still more effective to use classical algorithms for studying quantum chemistry than the noisy quantum processors we have available today. However, when the laws of quantum mechanics are translated into programs that a classical computer can run, we often find that the amount of time or memory required scales very poorly with the size of the physical system to simulate.

Today, in collaboration with Dr. Joonho Lee and Professor David Reichmann at Colombia, we present the Nature publication “Unbiasing Fermionic Quantum Monte Carlo with a Quantum Computer”, where we propose and experimentally validate a new way of combining classical and quantum computation to study chemistry, which can replace a computationally-expensive subroutine in a powerful classical algorithm with a “cheaper”, noisy, calculation on a small quantum computer. To evaluate the performance of this hybrid quantum-classical approach, we applied this idea to perform the largest quantum computation of chemistry to date, using 16 qubits to study the forces experienced by two carbon atoms in a diamond crystal. Not only was this experiment four qubits larger than our earlier chemistry calculations on Sycamore, we were also able to use a more comprehensive description of the physics that fully incorporated the interactions between electrons.

Google’s Sycamore quantum processor. Photo Credit: Rocco Ceselin.

A New Way of Combining Quantum and Classical
Our starting point was to use a family of Monte Carlo techniques (projector Monte Carlo, more on that below) to give us a useful description of the lowest energy state of a quantum mechanical system (like the two carbon atoms in a crystal mentioned above). However, even just storing a good description of a quantum state (the “wavefunction”) on a classical computer can be prohibitively expensive, let alone calculating one.

Projector Monte Carlo methods provide a way around this difficulty. Instead of writing down a full description of the state, we design a set of rules for generating a large number of oversimplified descriptions of the state (for example, lists of where each electron might be in space) whose average is a good approximation to the real ground state. The “projector” in projector Monte Carlo refers to how we design these rules — by continuously trying to filter out the incorrect answers using a mathematical process called projection, similar to how a silhouette is a projection of a three-dimensional object onto a two-dimensional surface.

Unfortunately, when it comes to chemistry or materials science, this idea isn’t enough to find the ground state on its own. Electrons belong to a class of particles known as fermions, which have a surprising quantum mechanical quirk to their behavior. When two identical fermions swap places, the quantum mechanical wavefunction (the mathematical description that tells us everything there is to know about them) picks up a minus sign. This minus sign gives rise to the famous Pauli exclusion principle (the fact that two fermions cannot occupy the same state). It can also cause projector Monte Carlo calculations to become inefficient or even break down completely. The usual resolution to this fermion sign problem involves tweaking the Monte Carlo algorithm to include some information from an approximation to the ground state. By using an approximation (even a crude one) to the lowest energy state as a guide, it is usually possible to avoid breakdowns and even obtain accurate estimates of the properties of the true ground state.

Top: An illustration of how the fermion sign problem appears in some cases. Instead of following the blue line curve, our estimates of the energy follow the red curve and become unstable. Bottom: An example of the improvements we might see when we try to fix the sign problem. By using a quantum computer, we hope to improve the initial guess that guides our calculation and obtain a more accurate answer.

For the most challenging problems (such as modeling the breaking of chemical bonds), the computational cost of using an accurate enough initial guess on a classical computer can be too steep to afford, which led our collaborator Dr. Joonho Lee to ask if a quantum computer could help. We had already demonstrated in previous experiments that we can use our quantum computer to approximate the ground state of a quantum system. In these earlier experiments we aimed to measure quantities (such as the energy of the state) that are directly linked to physical properties (like the rate of a chemical reaction). In this new hybrid algorithm, we instead needed to make a very different kind of measurement: quantifying how far the states generated by the Monte Carlo algorithm on our classical computer are from those prepared on the quantum computer. Using some recently developed techniques, we were even able to do all of the measurements on the quantum computer before we ran the Monte Carlo algorithm, separating the quantum computer’s job from the classical computer’s.

A diagram of our calculation. The quantum processor (right) measures information that guides the classical calculation (left). The crosses indicate the qubits, with the ones used for the largest experiment shaded green. The direction of the arrows indicate that the quantum processor doesn’t need any feedback from the classical calculation. The red bars represent the parts of the classical calculation that are filtered out by the data from the quantum computer in order to avoid the fermion sign problem and get a good estimate of properties like the energy of the ground state.

This division of labor between the classical and the quantum computer helped us make good use of both resources. Using our Sycamore quantum processor, we prepared a kind of approximation to the ground state that would be difficult to scale up classically. With a few hours of time on the quantum device, we extracted all of the data we needed to run the Monte Carlo algorithm on the classical computer. Even though the data was noisy (like all present-day quantum computations), it had enough signal that it was able to guide the classical computer towards a very accurate reconstruction of the true ground state (shown in the figure below). In fact, we showed that even when we used a low-resolution approximation to the ground state on the quantum computer (just a few qubits encoding the position of the electrons), the classical computer could efficiently solve a much higher resolution version (with more realism about where the electrons can be).

Top left: a diagram showing the sixteen qubits we used for our largest experiment. Bottom left: an illustration of the carbon atoms in a diamond crystal. Our calculation focused on two atoms (the two that are highlighted in translucent yellow). Right: A plot showing how the error in the total energy (closer to zero is better) changes as we adjust the lattice constant (the spacing between the two carbon atoms). Many properties we might care about, such as the structure of the crystal, can be determined by understanding how the energy varies as we move the atoms around. The calculations we performed using the quantum computer (red points) are comparable in accuracy to two state-of-the-art classical methods (yellow and green triangles) and are extremely close to the numbers we would have gotten if we had a perfect quantum computer rather than a noisy one (black points). The fact that these red and black points are so close tells us that the error in our calculation comes from using an approximate ground state on the quantum computer that was too simple, not from being overwhelmed by noise on the device.

Using our new hybrid quantum algorithm, we performed the largest ever quantum computation of chemistry or materials science. We used sixteen qubits to calculate the energy of two carbon atoms in a diamond crystal. This experiment was four qubits larger than our first chemistry calculations on Sycamore, we obtained more accurate results, and we were able to use a better model of the underlying physics. By guiding a powerful classical Monte Carlo calculation using data from our quantum computer, we performed these calculations in a way that was naturally robust to noise.

We’re optimistic about the promise of this new research direction and excited to tackle the challenge of scaling these kinds of calculations up towards the boundary of what we can do with classical computing, and even to the hard-to-study corners of the universe. We know the road ahead of us is long, but we’re excited to have another tool in our growing toolbox.

Acknowledgements
I’d like to thank my co-authors on the manuscript, Bryan O’Gorman, Nicholas Rubin, David Reichman, Ryan Babbush, and especially Joonho Lee for their many contributions, as well as Charles Neill and Pedram Rousham for their help executing the experiment. I’d also like to thank the larger Google Quantum AI team, who designed, built, programmed, and calibrated the Sycamore processor.

Source: Google AI Blog


Resolving High-Energy Impacts on Quantum Processors

Quantum processors are made of superconducting quantum bits (qubits) that — being quantum objects — are highly susceptible to even tiny amounts of environmental noise. This noise can cause errors in quantum computation that need to be addressed to continue advancing quantum computers. Our Sycamore processors are installed in specially designed cryostats, where they are sealed away from stray light and electromagnetic fields and are cooled down to very low temperatures to reduce thermal noise.

However, the world is full of high-energy radiation. In fact, there’s a tiny background of high-energy gamma rays and muons that pass through everything around us all the time. While these particles interact so weakly that they don’t cause any harm in our day-to-day lives, qubits are sensitive enough that even weak particle interactions can cause significant interference.

In “Resolving Catastrophic Error Bursts from Cosmic Rays in Large Arrays of Superconducting Qubits”, published in Nature Physics, we identify the effects of these high-energy particles when they impact the quantum processor. To detect and study individual impact events, we use new techniques in rapid, repetitive measurement to operate our processor like a particle detector. This allows us to characterize the resulting burst of errors as they spread through the chip, helping to better understand this important source of correlated errors.

The Dynamics of a High-Energy Impact
The Sycamore quantum processor is constructed with a very thin layer of superconducting aluminum on a silicon substrate, onto which a pattern is etched to define the qubits. At the center of each qubit is the Josephson junction, a superconducting component that defines the distinct energy levels of the qubit, which are used for computation. In a superconducting metal, electrons bind together into a macroscopic, quantum state, which allows electrons to flow as a current with zero resistance (a supercurrent). In superconducting qubits, information is encoded in different patterns of oscillating supercurrent going back and forth through the Josephson junction.

If enough energy is added to the system, the superconducting state can be broken up to produce quasiparticles. These quasiparticles are a problem, as they can absorb energy from the oscillating supercurrent and jump across the Josephson junction, which changes the qubit state and produces errors. To prevent any energy from being absorbed by the chip and producing quasiparticles, we use extensive shielding for electric and magnetic fields, and powerful cryogenic refrigerators to keep the chip near absolute zero temperature, thus minimizing the thermal energy.

A source of energy that we can’t effectively shield against is high-energy radiation, which includes charged particles and photons that can pass straight through most materials. One source of these particles are tiny amounts of radioactive elements that can be found everywhere, e.g., in building materials, the metal that makes up our cryostats, and even in the air. Another source is cosmic rays, which are extremely energetic particles produced by supernovae and black holes. When cosmic rays impact the upper atmosphere, they create a shower of high-energy particles that can travel all the way down to the surface and through our chip. Between radioactive impurities and cosmic ray showers, we expect a high energy particle to pass through a quantum chip every few seconds.

When a high-energy impact event occurs, energy spreads through the chip in the form of phonons. When these arrive at the superconducting qubit layer, they break up the superconducting state and produce quasiparticles, which cause the qubit errors we observe.

When one of these particles impinges on the chip, it passes straight through and deposits a small amount of its energy along its path through the substrate. Even a small amount of energy from these particles is a very large amount of energy for the qubits. Regardless of where the impact occurs, the energy quickly spreads throughout the entire chip through quantum vibrations called phonons. When these phonons hit the aluminum layer that makes up the qubits, they have more than enough energy to break the superconducting state and produce quasiparticles. So many quasiparticles are produced that the probability of the qubits interacting with one becomes very high. We see this as a sudden and significant increase in errors over the whole chip as those quasiparticles absorb energy from the qubits. Eventually, as phonons escape and the chip cools, these quasiparticles recombine back into the superconducting state, and the qubit error rates slowly return to normal.

A high-energy particle impact (at time = 0 ms) on a patch of the quantum processor, showing error rates for each qubit over time. The event starts by rapidly spreading error over the whole chip, before saturating and then slowly returning to equilibrium.

Detecting Particles with a Computer
The Sycamore processor is designed to perform quantum error correction (QEC) to improve the error rates and enable it to execute a variety of quantum algorithms. QEC provides an effective way of identifying and mitigating errors, provided they are sufficiently rare and independent. However, in the case of a high-energy particle going through the chip, all of the qubits will experience high error rates until the event cools off, producing a correlated error burst that QEC won’t be able to correct. In order to successfully perform QEC, we first have to understand what these impact events look like on the processor, which requires operating it like a particle detector.

To do so, we take advantage of recent advances in qubit state preparation and measurement to quickly prepare each qubit in their excited state, similar to flipping a classical bit from 0 to 1. We then wait for a short idle time and measure whether they are still excited. If the qubits are behaving normally, almost all of them will be. Further, the qubits that experience a decay out of their excited state won’t be correlated, meaning the qubits that have errors will be randomly distributed over the chip.

However, during the experiment we occasionally observe large error bursts, where all the qubits on the chip suddenly become more error prone all at once. This correlated error burst is a clear signature of a high-energy impact event. We also see that, while all qubits on the chip are affected by the event, the qubits with the highest error rates are all concentrated in a “hotspot” around the impact site, where slightly more energy is deposited into the qubit layer by the spreading phonons.

To detect high-energy impacts, we rapidly prepare the qubits in an excited state, wait a little time, and then check if they’ve maintained their state. An impact produces a correlated error burst, where all the qubits show a significantly elevated error rate, as shown around time = 8 seconds above.

Next Steps
Because these error bursts are severe and quickly cover the whole chip, they are a type of correlated error that QEC is unable to correct. Therefore, it’s very important to find a solution to mitigate these events in future processors that are expected to rely on QEC.

Shielding against these particles is very difficult and typically requires careful engineering and design of the cryostat and many meters of shielding, which becomes more impractical as processors grow in size. Another approach is to modify the chip, allowing it to tolerate impacts without causing widespread correlated errors. This is an approach taken in other complex superconducting devices like detectors for astronomical telescopes, where it’s not possible to use shielding. Examples of such mitigation strategies include adding additional metal layers to the chip to absorb phonons and prevent them from getting to the qubit, adding barriers in the chip to prevent phonons spreading over long distances, and adding traps for quasiparticles in the qubits themselves. By employing these techniques, future processors will be much more robust to these high-energy impact events.

As the error rates of quantum processors continue to decrease, and as we make progress in building a prototype of an error-corrected logical qubit, we're increasingly pushed to study more exotic sources of error. While QEC is a powerful tool for correcting many kinds of errors, understanding and correcting more difficult sources of correlated errors will become increasingly important. We’re looking forward to future processor designs that can handle high energy impacts and enable the first experimental demonstrations of working quantum error correction.

Acknowledgements
This work wouldn’t have been possible without the contributions of the entire Google Quantum AI Team, especially those who worked to design, fabricate, install and calibrate the Sycamore processors used for this experiment. Special thanks to Rami Barends and Lev Ioffe, who led this project.

Source: Google AI Blog


Demonstrating the Fundamentals of Quantum Error Correction

The Google Quantum AI team has been building quantum processors made of superconducting quantum bits (qubits) that have achieved the first beyond-classical computation, as well as the largest quantum chemical simulations to date. However, current generation quantum processors still have high operational error rates — in the range of 10-3 per operation, compared to the 10-12 believed to be necessary for a variety of useful algorithms. Bridging this tremendous gap in error rates will require more than just making better qubits — quantum computers of the future will have to use quantum error correction (QEC).

The core idea of QEC is to make a logical qubit by distributing its quantum state across many physical data qubits. When a physical error occurs, one can detect it by repeatedly checking certain properties of the qubits, allowing it to be corrected, preventing any error from occurring on the logical qubit state. While logical errors may still occur if a series of physical qubits experience an error together, this error rate should exponentially decrease with the addition of more physical qubits (more physical qubits need to be involved to cause a logical error). This exponential scaling behavior relies on physical qubit errors being sufficiently rare and independent. In particular, it’s important to suppress correlated errors, where one physical error simultaneously affects many qubits at once or persists over many cycles of error correction. Such correlated errors produce more complex patterns of error detections that are more difficult to correct and more easily cause logical errors.

Our team has recently implemented the ideas of QEC in our Sycamore architecture using quantum repetition codes. These codes consist of one-dimensional chains of qubits that alternate between data qubits, which encode the logical qubit, and measure qubits, which we use to detect errors in the logical state. While these repetition codes can only correct for one kind of quantum error at a time1, they contain all of the same ingredients as more sophisticated error correction codes and require fewer physical qubits per logical qubit, allowing us to better explore how logical errors decrease as logical qubit size grows.

In “Removing leakage-induced correlated errors in superconducting quantum error correction”, published in Nature Communications, we use these repetition codes to demonstrate a new technique for reducing the amount of correlated errors in our physical qubits. Then, in “Exponential suppression of bit or phase flip errors with repetitive error correction”, published in Nature, we show that the logical errors of these repetition codes are exponentially suppressed as we add more and more physical qubits, consistent with expectations from QEC theory.

Layout of the repetition code (21 qubits, 1D chain) and distance-2 surface code (7 qubits) on the Sycamore device.

Leaky Qubits
The goal of the repetition code is to detect errors on the data qubits without measuring their states directly. It does so by entangling each pair of data qubits with their shared measure qubit in a way that tells us whether those data qubit states are the same or different (i.e., their parity) without telling us the states themselves. We repeat this process over and over in rounds that last only one microsecond. When the measured parities change between rounds, we’ve detected an error.

However, one key challenge stems from how we make qubits out of superconducting circuits. While a qubit needs only two energy states, which are usually labeled |0 and |1, our devices feature a ladder of energy states, |0, |1, |2, |3, and so on. We use the two lowest energy states to encode our qubit with information to be used for computation (we call these the computational states). We use the higher energy states (|2, |3 and higher) to help achieve high-fidelity entangling operations, but these entangling operations can sometimes allow the qubit to “leak” into these higher states, earning them the name leakage states.

Population in the leakage states builds up as operations are applied, which increases the error of subsequent operations and even causes other nearby qubits to leak as well — resulting in a particularly challenging source of correlated error. In our early 2015 experiments on error correction, we observed that as more rounds of error correction were applied, performance declined as leakage began to build.

Mitigating the impact of leakage required us to develop a new kind of qubit operation that could “empty out” leakage states, called multi-level reset. We manipulate the qubit to rapidly pump energy out into the structures used for readout, where it will quickly move off the chip, leaving the qubit cooled to the |0 state, even if it started in |2 or |3. Applying this operation to the data qubits would destroy the logical state we’re trying to protect, but we can apply it to the measure qubits without disturbing the data qubits. Resetting the measure qubits at the end of every round dynamically stabilizes the device so leakage doesn’t continue to grow and spread, allowing our devices to behave more like ideal qubits.

Applying the multi-level reset gate to the measure qubits almost totally removes leakage, while also reducing the growth of leakage on the data qubits.

Exponential Suppression
Having mitigated leakage as a significant source of correlated error, we next set out to test whether the repetition codes give us the predicted exponential reduction in error when increasing the number of qubits. Every time we run our repetition code, it produces a collection of error detections. Because the detections are linked to pairs of qubits rather than individual qubits, we have to look at all of the detections to try to piece together where the errors have occurred, a procedure known as decoding. Once we’ve decoded the errors, we then know which corrections we need to apply to the data qubits. However, decoding can fail if there are too many error detections for the number of data qubits used, resulting in a logical error.

To test our repetition codes, we run codes with sizes ranging from 5 to 21 qubits while also varying the number of error correction rounds. We also run two different types of repetition codes — either a phase-flip code or bit-flip code — that are sensitive to different kinds of quantum errors. By finding the logical error probability as a function of the number of rounds, we can fit a logical error rate for each code size and code type. In our data, we see that the logical error rate does in fact get suppressed exponentially as the code size is increased.

Probability of getting a logical error after decoding versus number of rounds run, shown for various sizes of phase-flip repetition code.

We can quantify the error suppression with the error scaling parameter Lambda (Λ), where a Lambda value of 2 means that we halve the logical error rate every time we add four data qubits to the repetition code. In our experiments, we find Lambda values of 3.18 for the phase-flip code and 2.99 for the bit-flip code. We can compare these experimental values to a numerical simulation of the expected Lambda based on a simple error model with no correlated errors, which predicts values of 3.34 and 3.78 for the bit- and phase-flip codes respectively.

Logical error rate per round versus number of qubits for the phase-flip (X) and bit-flip (Z) repetition codes. The line shows an exponential decay fit, and Λ is the scale factor for the exponential decay.

This is the first time Lambda has been measured in any platform while performing multiple rounds of error detection. We’re especially excited about how close the experimental and simulated Lambda values are, because it means that our system can be described with a fairly simple error model without many unexpected errors occurring. Nevertheless, the agreement is not perfect, indicating that there’s more research to be done in understanding the non-idealities of our QEC architecture, including additional sources of correlated errors.

What’s Next
This work demonstrates two important prerequisites for QEC: first, the Sycamore device can run many rounds of error correction without building up errors over time thanks to our new reset protocol, and second, we were able to validate QEC theory and error models by showing exponential suppression of error in a repetition code. These experiments were the largest stress test of a QEC system yet, using 1000 entangling gates and 500 qubit measurements in our largest test. We’re looking forward to taking what we learned from these experiments and applying it to our target QEC architecture, the 2D surface code, which will require even more qubits with even better performance.


1A true quantum error correcting code would require a two dimensional array of qubits in order to correct for all of the errors that could occur. 

Source: Google AI Blog


Achieving Precision in Quantum Material Simulations

In fall of 2019, we demonstrated that the Sycamore quantum processor could outperform the most powerful classical computers when applied to a tailor-made problem. The next challenge is to extend this result to solve practical problems in materials science, chemistry and physics. But going beyond the capabilities of classical computers for these problems is challenging and will require new insights to achieve state-of-the-art accuracy. Generally, the difficulty in performing quantum simulations of such physical problems is rooted in the wave nature of quantum particles, where deviations in the initial setup, interference from the environment, or small errors in the calculations can lead to large deviations in the computational result.

In two upcoming publications, we outline a blueprint for achieving record levels of precision for the task of simulating quantum materials. In the first work, we consider one-dimensional systems, like thin wires, and demonstrate how to accurately compute electronic properties, such as current and conductance. In the second work, we show how to map the Fermi-Hubbard model, which describes interacting electrons, to a quantum processor in order to simulate important physical properties. These works take a significant step towards realizing our long-term goal of simulating more complex systems with practical applications, like batteries and pharmaceuticals.

A bottom view of one of the quantum dilution refrigerators during maintenance. During the operation, the microwave wires that are floating in this image are connected to the quantum processor, e.g., the Sycamore chip, bringing the temperature of the lowest stage to a few tens of milli-degrees above absolute zero temperature.

Computing Electronic Properties of Quantum Materials
In “Accurately computing electronic properties of a quantum ring”, to be published in Nature, we show how to reconstruct key electronic properties of quantum materials. The focus of this work is on one-dimensional conductors, which we simulate by forming a loop out of 18 qubits on the Sycamore processor in order to mimic a very narrow wire. We illustrate the underlying physics through a series of simple text-book experiments, starting with a computation of the “band-structure” of this wire, which describes the relationship between the energy and momentum of electrons in the metal. Understanding such structure is a key step in computing electronic properties such as current and conductance. Despite being an 18-qubit algorithm consisting of over 1,400 logical operations, a significant computational task for near-term devices, we are able to achieve a total error as low as 1%.

The key insight enabling this level of accuracy stems from robust properties of the Fourier transform. The quantum signal that we measure oscillates in time with a small number of frequencies. Taking a Fourier transform of this signal reveals peaks at the oscillation frequencies (in this case, the energy of electrons in the wire). While experimental imperfections affect the height of the observed peaks (corresponding to the strength of the oscillation), the center frequencies are robust to these errors. On the other hand, the center frequencies are especially sensitive to the physical properties of the wire that we hope to study (e.g., revealing small disorders in the local electric field felt by the electrons). The essence of our work is that studying quantum signals in the Fourier domain enables robust protection against experimental errors while providing a sensitive probe of the underlying quantum system.

(Left) Schematic of the 54-qubit quantum processor, Sycamore. Qubits are shown as gray crosses and tunable couplers as blue squares. Eighteen of the qubits are isolated to form a ring. (Middle) Fourier transform of the measured quantum signal. Peaks in the Fourier spectrum correspond to the energy of electrons in the ring. Each peak can be associated with a traveling wave that has fixed momentum. (Right) The center frequency of each peak (corresponding to the energy of electrons in the wire) is plotted versus the peak index (corresponding to the momentum). The measured relationship between energy and momentum is referred to as the ‘band structure’ of the quantum wire and provides valuable information about electronic properties of the material, such as current and conductance.

Quantum Simulation of the Fermi-Hubbard Model
In “Observation of separated dynamics of charge and spin in the Fermi-Hubbard model”, we focus on the dynamics of interacting electrons. Interactions between particles give rise to novel phenomena such as high temperature superconductivity and spin-charge separation. The simplest model that captures this behavior is known as the Fermi-Hubbard model. In materials such as metals, the atomic nuclei form a crystalline lattice and electrons hop from lattice site to lattice site carrying electrical current. In order to accurately model these systems, it is necessary to include the repulsion that electrons feel when getting close to one another. The Fermi-Hubbard model captures this physics with two simple parameters that describe the hopping rate (J) and the repulsion strength (U).

We realize the dynamics of this model by mapping the two physical parameters to logical operations on the qubits of the processor. Using these operations, we simulate a state of the electrons where both the electron charge and spin densities are peaked near the center of the qubit array. As the system evolves, the charge and spin densities spread at different rates due to the strong correlations between electrons. Our results provide an intuitive picture of interacting electrons and serve as a benchmark for simulating quantum materials with superconducting qubits.

(Left top) Illustration of the one-dimensional Fermi-Hubbard model in a periodic potential. Electrons are shown in blue, with their spin indicated by the connected arrow. J, the distance between troughs in the electric potential field, reflects the “hopping” rate, i.e., the rate at which electrons transition from one trough in the potential to another, and U, the amplitude, represents the strength of repulsion between electrons. (Left bottom) The simulation of the model on a qubit ladder, where each qubit (square) represents a fermionic state with spin-up or spin-down (arrows). (Right) Time evolution of the model reveals separated spreading rates of charge and spin. Points and solid lines represent experimental and numerical exact results, respectively. At t = 0, the charge and spin densities are peaked at the middle sites. At later times, the charge density spreads and reaches the boundaries faster than the spin density.

Conclusion
Quantum processors hold the promise to solve computationally hard tasks beyond the capability of classical approaches. However, in order for these engineered platforms to be considered as serious contenders, they must offer computational accuracy beyond the current state-of-the-art classical methods. In our first experiment, we demonstrate an unprecedented level of accuracy in simulating simple materials, and in our second experiment, we show how to embed realistic models of interacting electrons into a quantum processor. It is our hope that these experimental results help progress the goal of moving beyond the classical computing horizon.

Source: Google AI Blog


Quantum Machine Learning and the Power of Data

Quantum computing has rapidly advanced in both theory and practice in recent years, and with it the hope for the potential impact in real applications. One key area of interest is how quantum computers might affect machine learning. We recently demonstrated experimentally that quantum computers are able to naturally solve certain problems with complex correlations between inputs that can be incredibly hard for traditional, or “classical”, computers. This suggests that learning models made on quantum computers may be dramatically more powerful for select applications, potentially boasting faster computation, better generalization on less data, or both. Hence it is of great interest to understand in what situations such a “quantum advantage” might be achieved.

The idea of quantum advantage is typically phrased in terms of computational advantages. That is, given some task with well defined inputs and outputs, can a quantum computer achieve a more accurate result than a classical machine in a comparable runtime? There are a number of algorithms for which quantum computers are suspected to have overwhelming advantages, such as Shor’s factoring algorithm for factoring products of large primes (relevant to RSA encryption) or the quantum simulation of quantum systems. However, the difficulty of solving a problem, and hence the potential advantage for a quantum computer, can be greatly impacted by the availability of data. As such, understanding when a quantum computer can help in a machine learning task depends not only on the task, but also the data available, and a complete understanding of this must include both.

In “Power of data in quantum machine learning”, published in Nature Communications, we dissect the problem of quantum advantage in machine learning to better understand when it will apply. We show how the complexity of a problem formally changes with the availability of data, and how this sometimes has the power to elevate classical learning models to be competitive with quantum algorithms. We then develop a practical method for screening when there may be a quantum advantage for a chosen set of data embeddings in the context of kernel methods. We use the insights from the screening method and learning bounds to introduce a novel method that projects select aspects of feature maps from a quantum computer back into classical space. This enables us to imbue the quantum approach with additional insights from classical machine learning that shows the best empirical separation in quantum learning advantages to date.

Computational Power of Data
The idea of quantum advantage over a classical computer is often framed in terms of computational complexity classes. Examples such as factoring large numbers and simulating quantum systems are classified as bounded quantum polynomial time (BQP) problems, which are those thought to be handled more easily by quantum computers than by classical systems. Problems easily solved on classical computers are called bounded probabilistic polynomial (BPP) problems.

We show that learning algorithms equipped with data from a quantum process, such as a natural process like fusion or chemical reactions, form a new class of problems (which we call BPP/Samp) that can efficiently perform some tasks that traditional algorithms without data cannot, and is a subclass of the problems efficiently solvable with polynomial sized advice (P/poly). This demonstrates that for some machine learning tasks, understanding the quantum advantage requires examination of available data as well.


Geometric Test for Quantum Learning Advantage

Informed by the results that the potential for advantage changes depending on the availability of data, one may ask how a practitioner can quickly evaluate if their problem may be well suited for a quantum computer. To help with this, we developed a workflow for assessing the potential for advantage within a kernel learning framework. We examined a number of tests, the most powerful and informative of which was a novel geometric test we developed.

In quantum machine learning methods, such as quantum neural networks or quantum kernel methods, a quantum program is often divided into two parts, a quantum embedding of the data (an embedding map for the feature space using a quantum computer), and the evaluation of a function applied to the data embedding. In the context of quantum computing, quantum kernel methods make use of traditional kernel methods, but use the quantum computer to evaluate part or all of the kernel on the quantum embedding, which has a different geometry than a classical embedding. It was conjectured that a quantum advantage might arise from the quantum embedding, which might be much better suited to a particular problem than any accessible classical geometry.

We developed a quick and rigorous test that can be used to quickly compare a particular quantum embedding, kernel, and data set to a range of classical kernels and assess if there is any opportunity for quantum advantage across, e.g., possible label functions such as those used for image recognition tasks. We define a geometric constant g, which quantifies the amount of data that could theoretically close that gap, based on the geometric test. This is an extremely useful technique for deciding, based on data constraints, if a quantum solution is right for the given problem.

Projected Quantum Kernel Approach
One insight revealed by the geometric test, was that existing quantum kernels often suffered from a geometry that was easy to best classically because they encouraged memorization, instead of understanding. This inspired us to develop a projected quantum kernel, in which the quantum embedding is projected back to a classical representation. While this representation is still hard to compute with a classical computer directly, it comes with a number of practical advantages in comparison to staying in the quantum space entirely.

Geometric quantity g, which quantifies the potential for quantum advantage, depicted for several embeddings, including the projected quantum kernel introduced here.

By selectly projecting back to classical space, we can retain aspects of the quantum geometry that are still hard to simulate classically, but now it is much easier to develop distance functions, and hence kernels, that are better behaved with respect to modest changes in the input than was the original quantum kernel. In addition the projected quantum kernel facilitates better integration with powerful non-linear kernels (like a squared exponential) that have been developed classically, which is much more challenging to do in the native quantum space.

This projected quantum kernel has a number of benefits over previous approaches, including an improved ability to describe non-linear functions of the existing embedding, a reduction in the resources needed to process the kernel from quadratic to linear with the number of data points, and the ability to generalize better at larger sizes. The kernel also helps to expand the geometric g, which helps to ensure the greatest potential for quantum advantage.

Data Sets Exhibit Learning Advantages
The geometric test quantifies potential advantage for all possible label functions, however in practice we are most often interested in specific label functions. Using learning theoretic approaches, we also bound the generalization error for specific tasks, including those which are definitively quantum in origin. As the advantage of a quantum computer relies on its ability to use many qubits simultaneously but previous approaches scale poorly in number of qubits, it is important to verify the tasks at reasonably large qubit sizes ( > 20 ) to ensure a method has the potential to scale to real problems. For our studies we verified up to 30 qubits, which was enabled by the open source tool, TensorFlow-Quantum, enabling scaling to petaflops of compute.

Interestingly, we showed that many naturally quantum problems, even up to 30 qubits, were readily handled by classical learning methods when sufficient data were provided. Hence one conclusion is that even for some problems that look quantum, classical machine learning methods empowered by data can match the power of quantum computers. However, using the geometric construction in combination with the projected quantum kernel, we were able to construct a data set that exhibited an empirical learning advantage for a quantum model over a classical one. Thus, while it remains an open question to find such data sets in natural problems, we were able to show the existence of label functions where this can be the case. Although this problem was engineered and a quantum computational advantage would require the embeddings to be larger and more challenging, this work represents an important step in understanding the role data plays in quantum machine learning.

Prediction accuracy as a function of the number of qubits (n) for a problem engineered to maximize the potential for learning advantage in a quantum model. The data is shown for two different sizes of training data (N).

For this problem, we scaled up the number of qubits (n) and compared the prediction accuracy of the projected quantum kernel to existing kernel approaches and the best classical machine learning model in our dataset. Moreover, a key takeaway from these results is that although we showed the existence of datasets where a quantum computer has an advantage, for many quantum problems, classical learning methods were still the best approach. Understanding how data can affect a given problem is a key factor to consider when discussing quantum advantage in learning problems, unlike traditional computation problems for which that is not a consideration.

Conclusions
When considering the ability of quantum computers to aid in machine learning, we have shown that the availability of data fundamentally changes the question. In our work, we develop a practical set of tools for examining these questions, and use them to develop a new projected quantum kernel method that has a number of advantages over existing approaches. We build towards the largest numerical demonstration to date, 30 qubits, of potential learning advantages for quantum embeddings. While a complete computational advantage on a real world application remains to be seen, this work helps set the foundation for the path forward. We encourage any interested readers to check out both the paper and related TensorFlow-Quantum tutorials that make it easy to build on this work.

Acknowledgements
We would like to acknowledge our co-authors on this paper — Michael Broughton, Masoud Mohseni, Ryan Babbush, Sergio Boixo, and Hartmut Neven, as well as the entirety of the Google Quantum AI team. In addition, we acknowledge valuable help and feedback from Richard Kueng, John Platt, John Preskill, Thomas Vidick, Nathan Wiebe, Chun-Ju Wu, and Balint Pato.


1Current affiliation — Institute for Quantum Information and Matter and Department of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, Caltech, Pasadena, CA, USA

Source: Google AI Blog


Google I/O 2021: Being helpful in moments that matter

 

It’s great to be back hosting our I/O Developers Conference this year. Pulling up to our Mountain View campus this morning, I felt a sense of normalcy for the first time in a long while. Of course, it’s not the same without our developer community here in person. COVID-19 has deeply affected our entire global community over the past year and continues to take a toll. Places such as Brazil, and my home country of India, are now going through their most difficult moments of the pandemic yet. Our thoughts are with everyone who has been affected by COVID and we are all hoping for better days ahead.

The last year has put a lot into perspective. At Google, it’s also given renewed purpose to our mission to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful. We continue to approach that mission with a singular goal: building a more helpful Google, for everyone. That means being helpful to people in the moments that matter and giving everyone the tools to increase their knowledge, success, health, and happiness. 

Helping in moments that matter

Sometimes it’s about helping in big moments, like keeping 150 million students and educators learning virtually over the last year with Google Classroom. Other times it’s about helping in little moments that add up to big changes for everyone. For example, we’re introducing safer routing in Maps. This AI-powered capability in Maps can identify road, weather, and traffic conditions where you are likely to brake suddenly; our aim is to reduce up to 100 million events like this every year. 

Reimagining the future of work

One of the biggest ways we can help is by reimagining the future of work. Over the last year, we’ve seen work transform in unprecedented ways, as offices and coworkers have been replaced by kitchen countertops and pets. Many companies, including ours, will continue to offer flexibility even when it’s safe to be in the same office again. Collaboration tools have never been more critical, and today we announced a new smart canvas experience in Google Workspace that enables even richer collaboration. 

Smart Canvas integration with Google Meet

Responsible next-generation AI

We’ve made remarkable advances over the past 22 years, thanks to our progress in some of the most challenging areas of AI, including translation, images and voice. These advances have powered improvements across Google products, making it possible to talk to someone in another language using Assistant’s interpreter mode, view cherished memories on Photos, or use Google Lens to solve a tricky math problem. 

We’ve also used AI to improve the core Search experience for billions of people by taking a huge leap forward in a computer’s ability to process natural language. Yet, there are still moments when computers just don’t understand us. That’s because language is endlessly complex: We use it to tell stories, crack jokes, and share ideas — weaving in concepts we’ve learned over the course of our lives. The richness and flexibility of language make it one of humanity’s greatest tools and one of computer science’s greatest challenges. 

Today I am excited to share our latest research in natural language understanding: LaMDA. LaMDA is a language model for dialogue applications. It’s open domain, which means it is designed to converse on any topic. For example, LaMDA understands quite a bit about the planet Pluto. So if a student wanted to discover more about space, they could ask about Pluto and the model would give sensible responses, making learning even more fun and engaging. If that student then wanted to switch over to a different topic — say, how to make a good paper airplane — LaMDA could continue the conversation without any retraining.

This is one of the ways we believe LaMDA can make information and computing radically more accessible and easier to use (and you can learn more about that here). 

We have been researching and developing language models for many years. We’re focused on ensuring LaMDA meets our incredibly high standards on fairness, accuracy, safety, and privacy, and that it is developed consistently with our AI Principles. And we look forward to incorporating conversation features into products like Google Assistant, Search, and Workspace, as well as exploring how to give capabilities to developers and enterprise customers.

LaMDA is a huge step forward in natural conversation, but it’s still only trained on text. When people communicate with each other they do it across images, text, audio, and video. So we need to build multimodal models (MUM) to allow people to naturally ask questions across different types of information. With MUM you could one day plan a road trip by asking Google to “find a route with beautiful mountain views.” This is one example of how we’re making progress towards more natural and intuitive ways of interacting with Search.

Pushing the frontier of computing

Translation, image recognition, and voice recognition laid the foundation for complex models like LaMDA and multimodal models. Our compute infrastructure is how we drive and sustain these advances, and TPUs, our custom-built machine learning processes, are a big part of that. Today we announced our next generation of TPUs: the TPU v4. These are powered by the v4 chip, which is more than twice as fast as the previous generation. One pod can deliver more than one exaflop, equivalent to the computing power of 10 million laptops combined. This is the fastest system we’ve ever deployed, and a historic milestone for us. Previously to get to an exaflop, you needed to build a custom supercomputer. And we'll soon have dozens of TPUv4 pods in our data centers, many of which will be operating at or near 90% carbon-free energy. They’ll be available to our Cloud customers later this year.

(Left) TPU v4 chip tray; (Right) TPU v4 pods at our Oklahoma data center 

It’s tremendously exciting to see this pace of innovation. As we look further into the future, there are types of problems that classical computing will not be able to solve in reasonable time. Quantum computing can help. Achieving our quantum milestone was a tremendous accomplishment, but we’re still at the beginning of a multiyear journey. We continue to work to get to our next big milestone in quantum computing: building an error-corrected quantum computer, which could help us increase battery efficiency, create more sustainable energy, and improve drug discovery. To help us get there, we’ve opened a new state of the art Quantum AI campus with our first quantum data center and quantum processor chip fabrication facilities.

Inside our new Quantum AI campus.

Safer with Google

At Google we know that our products can only be as helpful as they are safe. And advances in computer science and AI are how we continue to make them better. We keep more users safe by blocking malware, phishing attempts, spam messages, and potential cyber attacks than anyone else in the world.

Our focus on data minimization pushes us to do more, with less data. Two years ago at I/O, I announced Auto-Delete, which encourages users to have their activity data automatically and continuously deleted. We’ve since made Auto-Delete the default for all new Google Accounts. Now, after 18 months we automatically delete your activity data, unless you tell us to do it sooner. It’s now active for over 2 billion accounts.

All of our products are guided by three important principles: With one of the world’s most advanced security infrastructures, our products are secure by default. We strictly uphold responsible data practices so every product we build is private by design. And we create easy to use privacy and security settings so you’re in control.

Long term research: Project Starline

We were all grateful to have video conferencing over the last year to stay in touch with family and friends, and keep schools and businesses going. But there is no substitute for being together in the room with someone. 

Several years ago we kicked off a project called Project Starline to use technology to explore what’s possible. Using high-resolution cameras and custom-built depth sensors, it captures your shape and appearance from multiple perspectives, and then fuses them together to create an extremely detailed, real-time 3D model. The resulting data is many gigabits per second, so to send an image this size over existing networks, we developed novel compression and streaming algorithms that reduce the data by a factor of more than 100. We also developed a breakthrough light-field display that shows you the realistic representation of someone sitting in front of you. As sophisticated as the technology is, it vanishes, so you can focus on what’s most important. 

We’ve spent thousands of hours testing it at our own offices, and the results are promising. There’s also excitement from our lead enterprise partners, and we’re working with partners in health care and media to get early feedback. In pushing the boundaries of remote collaboration, we've made technical advances that will improve our entire suite of communications products. We look forward to sharing more in the months ahead.

A person having a conversation with someone over Project Starline.

Solving complex sustainability challenges

Another area of research is our work to drive forward sustainability. Sustainability has been a core value for us for more than 20 years. We were the first major company to become carbon neutral in 2007. We were the first to match our operations with 100% renewable energy in 2017, and we’ve been doing it ever since. Last year we eliminated our entire carbon legacy. 

Our next ambition is our biggest yet: operating on carbon free energy by the year 2030. This represents a significant step change from current approaches and is a moonshot on the same scale as quantum computing. It presents equally hard problems to solve, from sourcing carbon-free energy in every place we operate to ensuring it can run every hour of every day. 

Building on the first carbon-intelligent computing platform that we rolled out last year, we’ll soon be the first company to implement carbon-intelligent load shifting across both time and place within our data center network. By this time next year we’ll be shifting more than a third of non-production compute to times and places with greater availability of carbon-free energy. And we are working to apply our Cloud AI with novel drilling techniques and fiber optic sensing to deliver geothermal power in more places, starting in our Nevada data centers next year.

Investments like these are needed to get to 24/7 carbon-free energy, and it’s happening in Mountain View, California, too. We’re building our new campus to the highest sustainability standards. When completed, these buildings will feature a first- of- its- kind, dragonscale solar skin, equipped with 90,000 silver solar panels and the capacity to generate nearly 7 megawatts. They will house the largest geothermal pile system in North America to help heat buildings in the winter and cool them in the summer. It’s been amazing to see it come to life.

(Left) Rendering of the new Charleston East campus in Mountain View, California; (Right) Model view with dragon scale solar skin.

A celebration of technology

I/O isn’t just a celebration of technology but of the people who use it, and build it — including the millions of developers around the world who joined us virtually today. Over the past year we’ve seen people use technology in profound ways: to keep themselves healthy and safe, to learn and grow, to connect, and to help one another through really difficult times. It’s been inspiring to see and has made us more committed than ever to being helpful in the moments that matter. 

I look forward to seeing everyone at next year’s I/O — in person, I hope. Until then, be safe and well.

Posted by Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google and Alphabet

Scaling Up Fundamental Quantum Chemistry Simulations on Quantum Hardware

Accurate computational prediction of chemical processes from the quantum mechanical laws that govern them is a tool that can unlock new frontiers in chemistry, improving a wide variety of industries. Unfortunately, the exact solution of quantum chemical equations for all but the smallest systems remains out of reach for modern classical computers, due to the exponential scaling in the number and statistics of quantum variables. However, by using a quantum computer, which by its very nature takes advantage of unique quantum mechanical properties to handle calculations intractable to its classical counterpart, simulations of complex chemical processes can be achieved. While today’s quantum computers are powerful enough for a clear computational advantage at some tasks, it is an open question whether such devices can be used to accelerate our current quantum chemistry simulation techniques.

In “Hartree-Fock on a Superconducting Qubit Quantum Computer”, appearing today in Science, the Google AI Quantum team explores this complex question by performing the largest chemical simulation performed on a quantum computer to date. In our experiment, we used a noise-robust variational quantum eigensolver (VQE) to directly simulate a chemical mechanism via a quantum algorithm. Though the calculation focused on the Hartree-Fock approximation of a real chemical system, it was twice as large as previous chemistry calculations on a quantum computer, and contained ten times as many quantum gate operations. Importantly, we validate that algorithms being developed for currently available quantum computers can achieve the precision required for experimental predictions, revealing pathways towards realistic simulations of quantum chemical systems. Furthermore, we have released the code for the experiment, which uses OpenFermion, our open source repository for quantum computations of chemistry.

Google’s Sycamore processor mounted in a cryostat, recently used to demonstrate quantum supremacy and the largest quantum chemistry simulation on a quantum computer. Photo Credit: Rocco Ceselin

Developing an Error Robust Quantum Algorithm for Chemistry
There are a number of ways to use a quantum computer to simulate the ground state energy of a molecular system. In this work we focused on a quantum algorithm “building block”, or circuit primitive, and perfect its performance through a VQE (more on that later). In the classical setting this circuit primitive is equivalent to the Hartree-Fock model and is an important circuit component of an algorithm we previously developed for optimal chemistry simulations. This allows us to focus on scaling up without incurring exponential simulation costs to validate our device. Therefore, robust error mitigation on this component is crucial for accurate simulations when scaling to the “beyond classical” regime.

Errors in quantum computation emerge from interactions of the quantum circuitry with the environment, causing erroneous logic operations — even minor temperature fluctuations can cause qubit errors. Algorithms for simulating chemistry on near-term quantum devices must account for these errors with low overhead, both in terms of the number of qubits or additional quantum resources, such as implementing a quantum error correcting code. The most popular method to account for errors (and why we used it for our experiment) is to use a VQE. For our experiment, we selected the VQE we developed a few years ago, which treats the quantum processor like an neural network and attempts to optimize a quantum circuit’s parameters to account for noisy quantum logic by minimizing a cost function. Just like how classical neural networks can tolerate imperfections in data by optimization, a VQE dynamically adjusts quantum circuit parameters to account for errors that occur during the quantum computation.

Enabling High Accuracy with Sycamore
The experiment was run on the Sycamore processor that was recently used to demonstrate quantum supremacy. Though our experiment required fewer qubits, even higher quantum gate fidelity was needed to resolve chemical bonding. This led to the development of new, targeted calibration techniques that optimally amplify errors so they can be diagnosed and corrected.

Energy predictions of molecular geometries by the Hartree-Fock model simulated on 10 qubits of the Sycamore processor.

Errors in the quantum computation can originate from a variety of sources in the quantum hardware stack. Sycamore has 54-qubits and consists of over 140 individually tunable elements, each controlled with high-speed, analog electrical pulses. Achieving precise control over the whole device requires fine tuning more than 2,000 control parameters, and even small errors in these parameters can quickly add up to large errors in the total computation.

To accurately control the device, we use an automated framework that maps the control problem onto a graph with thousands of nodes, each of which represent a physics experiment to determine a single unknown parameter. Traversing this graph takes us from basic priors about the device to a high fidelity quantum processor, and can be done in less than a day. Ultimately, these techniques along with the algorithmic error mitigation enabled orders of magnitude reduction in the errors.

Left: The energy of a linear chain of Hydrogen atoms as the bond distance between each atom is increased. The solid line is the Hartree-Fock simulation with a classical computer while the points are computed with the Sycamore processor. Right: Two accuracy metrics (infidelity and mean absolute error) for each point computed with Sycamore. “Raw” is the non-error-mitigated data from Sycamore. “+PS” is data from a type of error mitigation correcting the number of electrons. “+Purification” is a type of error mitigation correcting for the right kind of state. “+VQE” is the combination of all the error mitigation along with variational relaxation of the circuit parameters. Experiments on H8, H10, and H12 show similar performance improvements upon error mitigation.

Pathways Forward
We hope that this experiment serves as a blueprint for how to run chemistry calculations on quantum processors, and as a jumping off point on the path to physical simulation advantage. One exciting prospect is that it is known how to modify the quantum circuits used in this experiment in a simple way such that they are no longer efficiently simulable, which would determine new directions for improved quantum algorithms and applications. We hope that the results from this experiment can be used to explore this regime by the broader research community. To run these experiments, you can find the code here.

Source: Google AI Blog


Announcing TensorFlow Quantum: An Open Source Library for Quantum Machine Learning



“Nature isn’t classical, damnit, so if you want to make a simulation of nature, you’d better make it quantum mechanical.” — Physicist Richard Feynman

Machine learning (ML), while it doesn’t exactly simulate systems in nature, has the ability to learn a model of a system and predict the system’s behavior. Over the past few years, classical ML models have shown promise in tackling challenging scientific issues, leading to advancements in image processing for cancer detection, forecasting earthquake aftershocks, predicting extreme weather patterns, and detecting new exoplanets. With the recent progress in the development of quantum computing, the development of new quantum ML models could have a profound impact on the world’s biggest problems, leading to breakthroughs in the areas of medicine, materials, sensing, and communications. However, to date there has been a lack of research tools to discover useful quantum ML models that can process quantum data and execute on quantum computers available today.

Today, in collaboration with the University of Waterloo, X, and Volkswagen, we announce the release of TensorFlow Quantum (TFQ), an open-source library for the rapid prototyping of quantum ML models. TFQ provides the tools necessary for bringing the quantum computing and machine learning research communities together to control and model natural or artificial quantum systems; e.g. Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum (NISQ) processors with ~50 - 100 qubits.

Under the hood, TFQ integrates Cirq with TensorFlow, and offers high-level abstractions for the design and implementation of both discriminative and generative quantum-classical models by providing quantum computing primitives compatible with existing TensorFlow APIs, along with high-performance quantum circuit simulators.

What is a Quantum ML Model?
A quantum model has the ability to represent and generalize data with a quantum mechanical origin. However, to understand quantum models, two concepts must be introduced - quantum data and hybrid quantum-classical models.

Quantum data exhibits superposition and entanglement, leading to joint probability distributions that could require an exponential amount of classical computational resources to represent or store. Quantum data, which can be generated / simulated on quantum processors / sensors / networks include the simulation of chemicals and quantum matter, quantum controlquantum communication networks, quantum metrology, and much more.

A technical, but key, insight is that quantum data generated by NISQ processors are noisy and are typically entangled just before the measurement occurs. However, applying quantum machine learning to noisy entangled quantum data can maximize extraction of useful classical information. Inspired by these techniques, the TFQ library provides primitives for the development of models that disentangle and generalize correlations in quantum data, opening up opportunities to improve existing quantum algorithms or discover new quantum algorithms.

The second concept to introduce is hybrid quantum-classical models. Because near-term quantum processors are still fairly small and noisy, quantum models cannot use quantum processors alone — NISQ processors will need to work in concert with classical processors to become effective. As TensorFlow already supports heterogeneous computing across CPUs, GPUs, and TPUs, it is a natural platform for experimenting with hybrid quantum-classical algorithms.

TFQ contains the basic structures, such as qubits, gates, circuits, and measurement operators that are required for specifying quantum computations. User-specified quantum computations can then be executed in simulation or on real hardware. Cirq also contains substantial machinery that helps users design efficient algorithms for NISQ machines, such as compilers and schedulers, and enables the implementation of hybrid quantum-classical algorithms to run on quantum circuit simulators, and eventually on quantum processors.

We’ve used TensorFlow Quantum for hybrid quantum-classical convolutional neural networks, machine learning for quantum control, layer-wise learning for quantum neural networks, quantum dynamics learning, generative modeling of mixed quantum states, and learning to learn with quantum neural networks via classical recurrent neural networks. We provide a review of these quantum applications in the TFQ white paper; each example can be run in-browser via Colab from our research repository.

How TFQ works
TFQ allows researchers to construct quantum datasets, quantum models, and classical control parameters as tensors in a single computational graph. The outcome of quantum measurements, leading to classical probabilistic events, is obtained by TensorFlow Ops. Training can be done using standard Keras functions.

To provide some intuition on how to use quantum data, one may consider a supervised classification of quantum states using a quantum neural network. Just like classical ML, a key challenge of quantum ML is to classify “noisy data”. To build and train such a model, the researcher can do the following:
  1. Prepare a quantum dataset - Quantum data is loaded as tensors (a multi-dimensional array of numbers). Each quantum data tensor is specified as a quantum circuit written in Cirq that generates quantum data on the fly. The tensor is executed by TensorFlow on the quantum computer to generate a quantum dataset.
  2. Evaluate a quantum neural network model - The researcher can prototype a quantum neural network using Cirq that they will later embed inside of a TensorFlow compute graph. Parameterized quantum models can be selected from several broad categories based on knowledge of the quantum data's structure. The goal of the model is to perform quantum processing in order to extract information hidden in a typically entangled state. In other words, the quantum model essentially disentangles the input quantum data, leaving the hidden information encoded in classical correlations, thus making it accessible to local measurements and classical post-processing.
  3. Sample or Average - Measurement of quantum states extracts classical information in the form of samples from a classical random variable. The distribution of values from this random variable generally depends on the quantum state itself and on the measured observable. As many variational algorithms depend on mean values of measurements, also known as expectation values, TFQ provides methods for averaging over several runs involving steps (1) and (2).
  4. Evaluate a classical neural networks model - Once classical information has been extracted, it is in a format amenable to further classical post-processing. As the extracted information may still be encoded in classical correlations between measured expectations, classical deep neural networks can be applied to distill such correlations.
  5. Evaluate Cost Function - Given the results of classical post-processing, a cost function is evaluated. This could be based on how accurately the model performs the classification task if the quantum data was labeled, or other criteria if the task is unsupervised.
  6. Evaluate Gradients & Update Parameters - After evaluating the cost function, the free parameters in the pipeline should be updated in a direction expected to decrease the cost. This is most commonly performed via gradient descent.
A high-level abstract overview of the computational steps involved in the end-to-end pipeline for inference and training of a hybrid quantum-classical discriminative model for quantum data in TFQ. To see the code for an end-to-end example, please check the “Hello Many-Worlds” example, the quantum convolutional neural networks tutorial, and our guide.
A key feature of TensorFlow Quantum is the ability to simultaneously train and execute many quantum circuits. This is achieved by TensorFlow’s ability to parallelize computation across a cluster of computers, and the ability to simulate relatively large quantum circuits on multi-core computers. To achieve the latter, we are also announcing the release of qsim (github link), a new high performance open source quantum circuit simulator, which has demonstrated the ability to simulate a 32 qubit quantum circuit with a gate depth of 14 in 111 seconds on a single Google Cloud node (n1-ultramem-160) (see this paper for details). The simulator is particularly optimized for multi-core Intel processors. Combined with TFQ, we have demonstrated 1 million circuit simulations for 20 qubit quantum circuit at a gate depth of 20 in 60 minutes on a Google Cloud node (n2-highcpu-80). See the TFQ white paper, Section II E on the Quantum Circuit Simulation with qsim for more information.

Looking Forward
Today, TensorFlow Quantum is primarily geared towards executing quantum circuits on classical quantum circuit simulators. In the future, TFQ will be able to execute quantum circuits on actual quantum processors that are supported by Cirq, including Google’s own processor Sycamore.

To learn more about TFQ, please read our white paper and visit the TensorFlow Quantum website. We believe that bridging the ML and Quantum communities will lead to exciting new discoveries across the board and accelerate the discovery of new quantum algorithms to solve the world’s most challenging problems.

Acknowledgements
This open source project is led by the Google AI Quantum team, and was co-developed by the University of Waterloo, Alphabet’s X, and Volkswagen. A special thanks to the University of Waterloo, whose students made major contributions to this open source software through multiple internship projects at the Google AI Quantum lab.

Source: Google AI Blog


Quantum Supremacy Using a Programmable Superconducting Processor



Physicists have been talking about the power of quantum computing for over 30 years, but the questions have always been: will it ever do something useful and is it worth investing in? For such large-scale endeavors it is good engineering practice to formulate decisive short-term goals that demonstrate whether the designs are going in the right direction. So, we devised an experiment as an important milestone to help answer these questions. This experiment, referred to as a quantum supremacy experiment, provided direction for our team to overcome the many technical challenges inherent in quantum systems engineering to make a computer that is both programmable and powerful. To test the total system performance we selected a sensitive computational benchmark that fails if just a single component of the computer is not good enough.

Today we published the results of this quantum supremacy experiment in the Nature article, “Quantum Supremacy Using a Programmable Superconducting Processor”. We developed a new 54-qubit processor, named “Sycamore”, that is comprised of fast, high-fidelity quantum logic gates, in order to perform the benchmark testing. Our machine performed the target computation in 200 seconds, and from measurements in our experiment we determined that it would take the world’s fastest supercomputer 10,000 years to produce a similar output.
Left: Artist's rendition of the Sycamore processor mounted in the cryostat. (Full Res Version; Forest Stearns, Google AI Quantum Artist in Residence) Right: Photograph of the Sycamore processor. (Full Res Version; Erik Lucero, Research Scientist and Lead Production Quantum Hardware)
The Experiment
To get a sense of how this benchmark works, imagine enthusiastic quantum computing neophytes visiting our lab in order to run a quantum algorithm on our new processor. They can compose algorithms from a small dictionary of elementary gate operations. Since each gate has a probability of error, our guests would want to limit themselves to a modest sequence with about a thousand total gates. Assuming these programmers have no prior experience, they might create what essentially looks like a random sequence of gates, which one could think of as the “hello world” program for a quantum computer. Because there is no structure in random circuits that classical algorithms can exploit, emulating such quantum circuits typically takes an enormous amount of classical supercomputer effort.

Each run of a random quantum circuit on a quantum computer produces a bitstring, for example 0000101. Owing to quantum interference, some bitstrings are much more likely to occur than others when we repeat the experiment many times. However, finding the most likely bitstrings for a random quantum circuit on a classical computer becomes exponentially more difficult as the number of qubits (width) and number of gate cycles (depth) grow.
Process for demonstrating quantum supremacy.
In the experiment, we first ran random simplified circuits from 12 up to 53 qubits, keeping the circuit depth constant. We checked the performance of the quantum computer using classical simulations and compared with a theoretical model. Once we verified that the system was working, we ran random hard circuits with 53 qubits and increasing depth, until reaching the point where classical simulation became infeasible.
Estimate of the equivalent classical computation time assuming 1M CPU cores for quantum supremacy circuits as a function of the number of qubits and number of cycles for the Schrödinger-Feynman algorithm. The star shows the estimated computation time for the largest experimental circuits.
This result is the first experimental challenge against the extended Church-Turing thesis, which states that classical computers can efficiently implement any “reasonable” model of computation. With the first quantum computation that cannot reasonably be emulated on a classical computer, we have opened up a new realm of computing to be explored.

The Sycamore Processor
The quantum supremacy experiment was run on a fully programmable 54-qubit processor named “Sycamore.” It’s comprised of a two-dimensional grid where each qubit is connected to four other qubits. As a consequence, the chip has enough connectivity that the qubit states quickly interact throughout the entire processor, making the overall state impossible to emulate efficiently with a classical computer.

The success of the quantum supremacy experiment was due to our improved two-qubit gates with enhanced parallelism that reliably achieve record performance, even when operating many gates simultaneously. We achieved this performance using a new type of control knob that is able to turn off interactions between neighboring qubits. This greatly reduces the errors in such a multi-connected qubit system. We made further performance gains by optimizing the chip design to lower crosstalk, and by developing new control calibrations that avoid qubit defects.

We designed the circuit in a two-dimensional square grid, with each qubit connected to four other qubits. This architecture is also forward compatible for the implementation of quantum error-correction. We see our 54-qubit Sycamore processor as the first in a series of ever more powerful quantum processors.
Heat map showing single- (e1; crosses) and two-qubit (e2; bars) Pauli errors for all qubits operating simultaneously. The layout shown follows the distribution of the qubits on the processor. (Courtesy of Nature magazine.)

Testing Quantum Physics
To ensure the future utility of quantum computers, we also needed to verify that there are no fundamental roadblocks coming from quantum mechanics. Physics has a long history of testing the limits of theory through experiments, since new phenomena often emerge when one starts to explore new regimes characterized by very different physical parameters. Prior experiments showed that quantum mechanics works as expected up to a state-space dimension of about 1000. Here, we expanded this test to a size of 10 quadrillion and find that everything still works as expected. We also tested fundamental quantum theory by measuring the errors of two-qubit gates and finding that this accurately predicts the benchmarking results of the full quantum supremacy circuits. This shows that there is no unexpected physics that might degrade the performance of our quantum computer. Our experiment therefore provides evidence that more complex quantum computers should work according to theory, and makes us feel confident in continuing our efforts to scale up.

Applications
The Sycamore quantum computer is fully programmable and can run general-purpose quantum algorithms. Since achieving quantum supremacy results last spring, our team has already been working on near-term applications, including quantum physics simulation and quantum chemistry, as well as new applications in generative machine learning, among other areas.

We also now have the first widely useful quantum algorithm for computer science applications: certifiable quantum randomness. Randomness is an important resource in computer science, and quantum randomness is the gold standard, especially if the numbers can be self-checked (certified) to come from a quantum computer. Testing of this algorithm is ongoing, and in the coming months we plan to implement it in a prototype that can provide certifiable random numbers.

What’s Next?
Our team has two main objectives going forward, both towards finding valuable applications in quantum computing. First, in the future we will make our supremacy-class processors available to collaborators and academic researchers, as well as companies that are interested in developing algorithms and searching for applications for today’s NISQ processors. Creative researchers are the most important resource for innovation — now that we have a new computational resource, we hope more researchers will enter the field motivated by trying to invent something useful.

Second, we’re investing in our team and technology to build a fault-tolerant quantum computer as quickly as possible. Such a device promises a number of valuable applications. For example, we can envision quantum computing helping to design new materials — lightweight batteries for cars and airplanes, new catalysts that can produce fertilizer more efficiently (a process that today produces over 2% of the world’s carbon emissions), and more effective medicines. Achieving the necessary computational capabilities will still require years of hard engineering and scientific work. But we see a path clearly now, and we’re eager to move ahead.

Acknowledgements
We’d like to thank our collaborators and contributors — University of California Santa Barbara, NASA Ames Research Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Forschungszentrum Jülich, and many others who helped along the way.


Source: Google AI Blog