Tag Archives: creators

YouTube Reveals the Top Videos of 2020: Canadians watched to learn, game, and find joy

This year, we took gaming to a new level, practiced how to Toosie Slide, and found ways to laugh and learn in quarantine. As we finally close out the year, we’re taking a look back at what Canadians watched on YouTube with the Top Trending Canadian creators and videos lists.

In 2020, Canadians came to YouTube to stay informed, learn new skills, and find entertainment and sources of joy. And Canadian creators provided no shortage of options, with new ways to connect with their online communities. To keep us moving and staying active, MadFit made exercise at home easier with no-equipment workouts and routines for small spaces. The Hacksmith’s team used the power of STEM to make a plasma lightsaber. And Julie Nolke kept us laughing, as we imagined how we would explain the pandemic to our past selves.

Top Canadian Creators
  1. MadFit
  2. The Hacksmith
  3. Linus Tech Tips
  4. AzzyLand
  5. Disguised Toast

Top Breakout Canadian Creators
  1. MadFit
  2. Disguised Toast
  3. Julie Nolke
  4. Graser
  5. Heather Robertson

This year's #1 video shows how we learned new skills, like how to construct a ninja warrior course for squirrels. We laughed amidst uncertainty with a remix to Prime Minister Trudeau’s interesting choice of words at a COVID-19 briefing. And we were delighted by watching 10-year-old Roberta Battaglia compete in America’s Got Talent, bringing tears to the audience’s (and our!) eyes.

Canada’s Top Trending Videos
  1. Mark Rober, Building the Perfect Squirrel Proof Bird Feeder
  2. Dream, Minecraft Speedrunner VS 3 Hunters GRAND FINALE
  3. Anonymotif, Justin Trudeau Sings "Speaking Moistly"
  4. Netflix is a Joke, 8:46 - Dave Chappelle
  5. NikkieTutorials, I'm Coming Out.
  6. America’s Got Talent, Golden Buzzer: 10-Year-Old Roberta Battaglia Sings Lady Gaga's "Shallow" - America's Got Talent 2020
  7. MrBeast, $250,000 Influencer Rock, Paper, Scissors Tournament
  8. JeffreeStar, We Broke Up.
  9. Dude Perfect, Quarantine Stereotypes
  10. Paris Hilton, The Real Story of Paris Hilton | This is Paris Official Documentary

In music, 2020 was the year of Justin Bieber and Drake, with both Canadian superstars releasing chart-topping hits. Collectively, they earned half of the 10 slots on the Top Music videos list.

Canada’s Top Music Videos
  1. Future, Life is Good ft. Drake
  2. Tekashi 6ix9ine, Gooba
  3. Justin Bieber, Yummy
  4. Eminem, Godzilla ft. Juice WRLD
  5. Sidhu Moose Wala, Old Skool
  6. Cardi B, WAP ft. Megan Thee Stallion
  7. Drake, Toosie Slide
  8. DaBaby, ROCKSTAR ft Roddy Ricch
  9. Justin Bieber, Intentions ft. Quavo
  10. Drake, Laugh Now, Cry Later

When it came to ads, we watched relatable content that addressed the challenges and opportunities of our new normal. No Frills sang about physical distancing in “A Cart Apart”, SkipTheDishes and Jon Hamm encouraged Canadians to support local restaurants, and Rick Mercer ranted about discovering the beauty of our country.

Canada’s Top Ads
  1. Kia Canada - All-New Kia Seltos | Subcompact SUV built for the real you
  2. CANADA Explore | Explorez - Rick Mercer's rant on travel in Canada | Explore Canada
  3. Apple Canada - Shot on iPhone 11 Pro — Hockey Tape — Apple
  4. No Frills - A Cart Apart – A No Frills Track
  5. Chromebook - Switch to Chromebook - Watch Netflix Offline
  6. IGA - IGA x Bleu Jeans Bleu - Oublie pas tes sacs (vidéoclip officiel)
  7. Air Canada - Air Canada: Ready for Takeoff
  8. IKEA Canada - IKEA Canada | Make the Most of Home | Episode 1 with Marcy Mussari
  9. Historica Canada - Heritage Minute: Liberation of the Netherlands
  10. SkipTheDishes - Jon Hamm Thanks Canadians

As the world changed in unimaginable ways, these creators, brands and artists helped make this year just a little brighter, sharing music, workout routines, and some great laughs. We can’t wait to see what they do in 2021.

For a deeper look at the way video trends shaped digital culture in 2020, check out the Culture & Trends site.

YouTube Reveals the Top Videos of 2020: Canadians watched to learn, game, and find joy

This year, we took gaming to a new level, practiced how to Toosie Slide, and found ways to laugh and learn in quarantine. As we finally close out the year, we’re taking a look back at what Canadians watched on YouTube with the Top Trending Canadian creators and videos lists.

In 2020, Canadians came to YouTube to stay informed, learn new skills, and find entertainment and sources of joy. And Canadian creators provided no shortage of options, with new ways to connect with their online communities. To keep us moving and staying active, MadFit made exercise at home easier with no-equipment workouts and routines for small spaces. The Hacksmith’s team used the power of STEM to make a plasma lightsaber. And Julie Nolke kept us laughing, as we imagined how we would explain the pandemic to our past selves.

Top Canadian Creators
  1. MadFit
  2. The Hacksmith
  3. Linus Tech Tips
  4. AzzyLand
  5. Disguised Toast

Top Breakout Canadian Creators
  1. MadFit
  2. Disguised Toast
  3. Julie Nolke
  4. Graser
  5. Heather Robertson

This year's #1 video shows how we learned new skills, like how to construct a ninja warrior course for squirrels. We laughed amidst uncertainty with a remix to Prime Minister Trudeau’s interesting choice of words at a COVID-19 briefing. And we were delighted by watching 10-year-old Roberta Battaglia compete in America’s Got Talent, bringing tears to the audience’s (and our!) eyes.

Canada’s Top Trending Videos
  1. Mark Rober, Building the Perfect Squirrel Proof Bird Feeder
  2. Dream, Minecraft Speedrunner VS 3 Hunters GRAND FINALE
  3. Anonymotif, Justin Trudeau Sings "Speaking Moistly"
  4. Netflix is a Joke, 8:46 - Dave Chappelle
  5. NikkieTutorials, I'm Coming Out.
  6. America’s Got Talent, Golden Buzzer: 10-Year-Old Roberta Battaglia Sings Lady Gaga's "Shallow" - America's Got Talent 2020
  7. MrBeast, $250,000 Influencer Rock, Paper, Scissors Tournament
  8. JeffreeStar, We Broke Up.
  9. Dude Perfect, Quarantine Stereotypes
  10. Paris Hilton, The Real Story of Paris Hilton | This is Paris Official Documentary

In music, 2020 was the year of Justin Bieber and Drake, with both Canadian superstars releasing chart-topping hits. Collectively, they earned half of the 10 slots on the Top Music videos list.

Canada’s Top Music Videos
  1. Future, Life is Good ft. Drake
  2. Tekashi 6ix9ine, Gooba
  3. Justin Bieber, Yummy
  4. Eminem, Godzilla ft. Juice WRLD
  5. Sidhu Moose Wala, Old Skool
  6. Cardi B, WAP ft. Megan Thee Stallion
  7. Drake, Toosie Slide
  8. DaBaby, ROCKSTAR ft Roddy Ricch
  9. Justin Bieber, Intentions ft. Quavo
  10. Drake, Laugh Now, Cry Later

When it came to ads, we watched relatable content that addressed the challenges and opportunities of our new normal. No Frills sang about physical distancing in “A Cart Apart”, SkipTheDishes and Jon Hamm encouraged Canadians to support local restaurants, and Rick Mercer ranted about discovering the beauty of our country.

Canada’s Top Ads
  1. Kia Canada - All-New Kia Seltos | Subcompact SUV built for the real you
  2. CANADA Explore | Explorez - Rick Mercer's rant on travel in Canada | Explore Canada
  3. Apple Canada - Shot on iPhone 11 Pro — Hockey Tape — Apple
  4. No Frills - A Cart Apart – A No Frills Track
  5. Chromebook - Switch to Chromebook - Watch Netflix Offline
  6. IGA - IGA x Bleu Jeans Bleu - Oublie pas tes sacs (vidéoclip officiel)
  7. Air Canada - Air Canada: Ready for Takeoff
  8. IKEA Canada - IKEA Canada | Make the Most of Home | Episode 1 with Marcy Mussari
  9. Historica Canada - Heritage Minute: Liberation of the Netherlands
  10. SkipTheDishes - Jon Hamm Thanks Canadians

As the world changed in unimaginable ways, these creators, brands and artists helped make this year just a little brighter, sharing music, workout routines, and some great laughs. We can’t wait to see what they do in 2021.

For a deeper look at the way video trends shaped digital culture in 2020, check out the Culture & Trends site.

Find A Way Together, #WithMe on YouTube

This year has demanded a lot of each of us. And we’ve all been finding our own ways to cope. 
But despite the uncertainty, something profound has been happening on YouTube. People are coming together to support each other, and creators are doing what they do best: showing up for their communities. Whether it’s pausing to check in, find a moment of joy, reflect or simply express vulnerability, creators are sharing their expertise, stories, passions, and a little bit more of themselves. And these simple acts are making a difference. 
For World Mental Health Day, Mental Health Week Australia and National Mental Health Month—we want to shine a light on our YouTube community, and creators who are sharing their stories, and helping others find ways to speak out, take care, and cope. 
Thank you to the registered mental health organisations like Black Dog Institute, Project Rockit and headspace Australia on the platform for sharing your expert knowledge and resources with us. And thank you to the many other creators—from yoga instructors to musicians, from gardeners to gamers—for providing emotional support and a sense of connection just by opening up and talking about what you’re going through. You are all helping us take better care of ourselves and each other. 


Turning to YouTube for Support and Comfort 
Videos related to many practices associated with coping with anxiety and stress, including many hobbies, yoga and exercise, have seen increases in viewership this year. 
Aussie creator Chloe Ting, was one channel offering locals in lockdown an outlet. Videos with ‘Chloe Ting’ or ‘Chloe Ting Challenge’ or ‘#chloetingchallenge’ in the title generated more than 140 million views globally since March 15, 2020.1 
Videos with prayer in the title are also among those seeing an increase in views—up 70 percent in the first quarter of 2020 compared to the prior year.2 Prayer plays an important role in the lives of many, especially in handling stressful situations, and these videos may offer a feeling of solace. They also offer a way to continue participating in religious practices, and to maintain a routine during a time that is anything but routine. 

Mental health exists on a spectrum from illness to wellness and, as such, impacts every single one of us. If you’re looking for ways to take care or you’re interested to hear how others are coping with different experiences, below are a few videos to explore. For more, check out our Mental Health Awareness Playlist


Meet Sarah Chrisp 
Kiwi entrepreneur Sarah aka Wholesale Ted usually shares advice on ecommerce with her 620k fans. This week saw a break in tradition though, when she posted this video on her struggle with anxiety, depression and burnout, and how she restored her sense of wellbeing, and balance. 


Meet Maaz 
He’s a trained medical doctor turned animator extraordinaire. This video breaks away from Maaz’s renowned comedic take on life events and stories, as he talks about the discrimination he faced growing up as Muslim Pakastani in Australia, and how he has learned to be comfortable in his own skin. 


Meet Jason Stephenson 
Average daily views of videos related to insomnia more than doubled after April 1 compared to the first quarter of the year,3 and in turn, average daily views of videos related to guided meditation with “sleep” in the title increased 25 percent in April, compared to March.4  
So find a comfy seat, close down your eyes and take a moment. Jason has attracted almost two million fans to his channel, sharing weekly guided meditations, inspirational talks and affirmations to help you de-stress, find calm and get better sleep. 


Meet Erin May Henry 
Based in Melbourne, Erin has become a go-to for videos on positive self-talk. Tune in for videos like this one on self-care routines, healthy habits and life lessons that’ll help you feel motivated, and supported.


Meet Jamie Perkins 
He shares honest stories about the ins and outs of being a dad to two young daughters. Jamie created his YouTube channel to provide fun, inspirational videos on his approach to life and raising little ones. In this video created for World Mental Health Day, he talks gratitude, and what helps him get through. 


What creators are doing on YouTube is no small thing. Talking openly about coping matters. When creators promote healthy ways of coping and share adaptive skills and tips, they not only inspire us to try new strategies, but they also begin to chip away at the stigma associated with talking about and taking care of our mental health. And when stigma is reduced, we’re more likely to reach out and ask for the additional help we may need. 

If you're looking for support or want to talk, help is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, anywhere in Australia and New Zealand: 
Lifeline Australia | 13 11 14 
Kids Helpline | 1800 55 1800 
Beyond Blue | 1300 22 4636 

Lifeline New Zealand | 0800 54 33 54 
Youthline New Zealand | 0800 376 633 

For research-informed mental health resources and free support tools, check out Black Dog Institute.



1 YouTube data, Global, 15 March 2020 - 5 July 2020
2 YouTube data, Global, jan - Mar 2019, Jan - Mar 2020 
3 YouTube data, Global, January - April 2020 
4 YouTube data, Global, March - April 2020 

Find A Way Together, #WithMe on YouTube

This year has demanded a lot of each of us. And we’ve all been finding our own ways to cope. 
But despite the uncertainty, something profound has been happening on YouTube. People are coming together to support each other, and creators are doing what they do best: showing up for their communities. Whether it’s pausing to check in, find a moment of joy, reflect or simply express vulnerability, creators are sharing their expertise, stories, passions, and a little bit more of themselves. And these simple acts are making a difference. 
For World Mental Health Day, Mental Health Week Australia and National Mental Health Month—we want to shine a light on our YouTube community, and creators who are sharing their stories, and helping others find ways to speak out, take care, and cope. 
Thank you to the registered mental health organisations like Black Dog Institute, Project Rockit and headspace Australia on the platform for sharing your expert knowledge and resources with us. And thank you to the many other creators—from yoga instructors to musicians, from gardeners to gamers—for providing emotional support and a sense of connection just by opening up and talking about what you’re going through. You are all helping us take better care of ourselves and each other. 


Turning to YouTube for Support and Comfort 
Videos related to many practices associated with coping with anxiety and stress, including many hobbies, yoga and exercise, have seen increases in viewership this year. 
Aussie creator Chloe Ting, was one channel offering locals in lockdown an outlet. Videos with ‘Chloe Ting’ or ‘Chloe Ting Challenge’ or ‘#chloetingchallenge’ in the title generated more than 140 million views globally since March 15, 2020.1 
Videos with prayer in the title are also among those seeing an increase in views—up 70 percent in the first quarter of 2020 compared to the prior year.2 Prayer plays an important role in the lives of many, especially in handling stressful situations, and these videos may offer a feeling of solace. They also offer a way to continue participating in religious practices, and to maintain a routine during a time that is anything but routine. 

Mental health exists on a spectrum from illness to wellness and, as such, impacts every single one of us. If you’re looking for ways to take care or you’re interested to hear how others are coping with different experiences, below are a few videos to explore. For more, check out our Mental Health Awareness Playlist


Meet Sarah Chrisp 
Kiwi entrepreneur Sarah aka Wholesale Ted usually shares advice on ecommerce with her 620k fans. This week saw a break in tradition though, when she posted this video on her struggle with anxiety, depression and burnout, and how she restored her sense of wellbeing, and balance. 


Meet Maaz 
He’s a trained medical doctor turned animator extraordinaire. This video breaks away from Maaz’s renowned comedic take on life events and stories, as he talks about the discrimination he faced growing up as Muslim Pakastani in Australia, and how he has learned to be comfortable in his own skin. 


Meet Jason Stephenson 
Average daily views of videos related to insomnia more than doubled after April 1 compared to the first quarter of the year,3 and in turn, average daily views of videos related to guided meditation with “sleep” in the title increased 25 percent in April, compared to March.4  
So find a comfy seat, close down your eyes and take a moment. Jason has attracted almost two million fans to his channel, sharing weekly guided meditations, inspirational talks and affirmations to help you de-stress, find calm and get better sleep. 


Meet Erin May Henry 
Based in Melbourne, Erin has become a go-to for videos on positive self-talk. Tune in for videos like this one on self-care routines, healthy habits and life lessons that’ll help you feel motivated, and supported.


Meet Jamie Perkins 
He shares honest stories about the ins and outs of being a dad to two young daughters. Jamie created his YouTube channel to provide fun, inspirational videos on his approach to life and raising little ones. In this video created for World Mental Health Day, he talks gratitude, and what helps him get through. 


What creators are doing on YouTube is no small thing. Talking openly about coping matters. When creators promote healthy ways of coping and share adaptive skills and tips, they not only inspire us to try new strategies, but they also begin to chip away at the stigma associated with talking about and taking care of our mental health. And when stigma is reduced, we’re more likely to reach out and ask for the additional help we may need. 

If you're looking for support or want to talk, help is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, anywhere in Australia and New Zealand: 
Lifeline Australia | 13 11 14 
Kids Helpline | 1800 55 1800 
Beyond Blue | 1300 22 4636 

Lifeline New Zealand | 0800 54 33 54 
Youthline New Zealand | 0800 376 633 

For research-informed mental health resources and free support tools, check out Black Dog Institute.



1 YouTube data, Global, 15 March 2020 - 5 July 2020
2 YouTube data, Global, jan - Mar 2019, Jan - Mar 2020 
3 YouTube data, Global, January - April 2020 
4 YouTube data, Global, March - April 2020