Tag Archives: COVID-19

Helping COVID-19 responders find hotels

Meghan is an Intensive Care Unit nurse treating coronavirus patients in Indiana, and she’s been staying at a Hilton hotel with special accommodations for COVID-19 responders. As she explains, "Reducing the risk of bringing something home to my family has made a huge difference in my peace of mind.” 

Across the Atlantic Ocean, in London, Ruby is in a similar situation. She’s a doctor who’s also treating coronavirus patients. "I was really worried about being in the same space as my family,” says Ruby. “I wanted to find a hotel nearby that could host me, but it was difficult to find one.” 

Healthcare professionals, first responders and other essential workers like Meghan and Ruby can now find hotels with special policies for COVID-19 responders—like free or discounted rooms—using Google Search or Maps. For example, they can search for “hotels for essential workers in New York” or “hotels in New York” and narrow the results using a new filter for “COVID-19 responder rooms.”

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                                COVID-19 responder hotel room results on Google Search

On Google Maps and google.com/travel, a tip will appear at the top of the results if hotels in the area have a special policy for frontline workers. As on Google Search, there’s a new filter for COVID-19 responder rooms, which will show participating hotels. COVID-19 responders can then call the hotel directly to learn more about its policies and book.

To keep track of which properties are offering special accommodations, we’re working with partners including Choice Hotels International, Hilton, and IHG Hotels & Resorts, as well as the American Hotel & Lodging Association. Our initial efforts have focused on the United States and United Kingdom, and we hope to launch global coverage as soon as possible.

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Filter and and see hotels with COVID-19 responder accommodations on Google Maps

If you’re a hotel owner and have discounts or special accommodations for frontline or essential workers, let us know by signing into Google My Business and adding the attribute to your Business Profile, or get help from Google My Business support. 

Thank you to all the frontline, medical and essential workers who are helping others during this time and to the hotels hosting these heroes. We hope these updates make it easier and less stressful to find and book hotels if you need to right now.

Exposure Notification API launches to support public health agencies

Note: The following is a joint statement from Apple and Google.

One of the most effective techniques that public health officials have used during outbreaks is called contact tracing. Through this approach, public health officials contact, test, treat and advise people who may have been exposed to an affected person. One new element of contact tracing is Exposure Notifications: using privacy-preserving digital technology to tell someone they may have been exposed to the virus. Exposure Notification has the specific goal of rapid notification, which is especially important to slowing the spread of the disease with a virus that can be spread asymptomatically.   

To help, Apple and Google cooperated to build Exposure Notifications technology that will enable apps created by public health agencies to work more accurately, reliably and effectively across both Android phones and iPhones. Over the last several weeks, our two companies have worked together, reaching out to public health officials, scientists, privacy groups and government leaders all over the world to get their input and guidance. 

Starting today, our Exposure Notifications technology is available to public health agencies on both iOS and Android. What we’ve built is not an app—rather public health agencies will incorporate the API into their own apps that people install. Our technology is designed to make these apps work better. Each user gets to decide whether or not to opt-in to Exposure Notifications; the system does not collect or use location from the device; and if a person is diagnosed with COVID-19, it is up to them whether or not to report that in the public health app. User adoption is key to success and we believe that these strong privacy protections are also the best way to encourage use of these apps.  

Today, this technology is in the hands of public health agencies across the world who will take the lead and we will continue to support their efforts. 

Support for Native small businesses during COVID-19

Throughout the United States, COVID-19 has disproportionately impacted communities of color— including Indian Country. Closures of Native American small businesses, in keeping with social distancing guidelines, have led to serious economic challenges, not just for business owners, but for the communities they serve and represent as well. 

So to support these small businesses, Grow with Google and the National Congress of American Indians are partnering to help create economic opportunity in Native communities. The NCAI is the country’s oldest, largest and most representative American Indian and Alaska Native organization, with a mission to improve the quality of life for Native communities and peoples.

The signature piece of this partnership is the NCAI Indian Country Digital Trainers Program, which offers Grow with Google training for small businesses and job seekers in Native communities. People who attend these virtual workshops gain valuable digital skills, like how to create a Search-friendly website for their business, or how to analyze customer trends and use that data to make business decisions.

The NCAI Indian Country Digital Trainers are a cohort of eight tribal community members—Native librarians, educators, and technologists with impressive track records on workforce development. Each member of the cohort has been trained by Google to offer workshops virtually to folks in their local communities.

Penny Gage National Congress of American Indians Digital Trainer

Penny Gage, one of eight NCAI Indian Country Digital Trainers.

That includes Penny Gage in Anchorage, a member of the Sitka Tribe of Alaska and an economic development consultant who supports economic growth. Penny leads virtual workshops for small business owners in Alaska’s city center and remote communities across the state.

“Digital skills are a critical component of business survival during this time and this is about adding more tools to our toolbox,” she says. "We’re working with entrepreneurs, helping them connect with customers and work more efficiently, and offering advice.”

Engaging customers online is a new challenge for many, and Native small businesses across Indian Country are hungry for more information. On May 21, the National Congress of American Indians and Grow with Google will co-host a free national webinar called “Build Your Digital Skills and Online Presence.” This Grow with Google OnAir workshop will help attendees discover Google tools to manage their businesses during this time of uncertainty. In addition, participants will hear from tribal leaders and small business owners regarding the importance of Native business resiliency

After the webinar, attendees will have an opportunity to sign up for free one-on-one coaching sessions with an NCAI Indian Country Digital Trainer. During these first come, first served 30-minute sessions, attendees can get additional help on topics like G Suite, Ads and YouTube. It’s our aim to provide support for communities that are hard hit by COVID-19. We hope these free resources can be helpful as Native small business owners plan their next steps.

How Android Enterprise supports healthcare mobility needs

We’ve been deeply inspired  by the work of medical professionals and first responders throughout the COVID-19 crisis and we’re encouraged, humbled and thankful for their efforts. We also appreciate the healthcare IT community, who are playing a vital role in deploying and managing mobile devices to address hospitals’ critical response needs. 

Many of these IT admins around the world have reached out to us for guidance with deploying and using devices in these settings. To provide a one-stop resource for healthcare organizations looking to stand up and scale mobility initiatives with Android devices, we’ve launched a new community for IT admins and partners who are supporting their organizations with Android.

Supporting healthcare IT admins

The Healthcare IT Response Community has been organized to address specific use cases that have been especially challenging during this time.  It features best practices from Google on how to help securely deploy devices and offers a forum for the healthcare IT community to connect with each other and learn from their experiences with deploying devices for appropriate, non-medical uses. This effort is also providing a way for IT admins to learn from our mobility partners, many of whom have generously volunteered to offer guidance on device selection, managing a device fleet, and supporting deployments. They also participate in the discussion boards, sharing ideas and answering technical questions.    

We are very grateful to our global partners, such as Samsung, MobileIron, BT and more who have already made a difference in helping hospitals and other healthcare organizations get devices configured for appropriate, non-medical uses and into the hands of those who need them.

We've been able to offer help to King’s Health Partners and King’s College London with Life Lines, a project that has rapidly deployed thousands of secure, managed tablets to hundreds of ICUs in the UK. Similarly, at hospitals in the US, we’re helping to deploy a number of managed Pixel phones and Pixel Slates configured with Google Meet to facilitate communication between patients and their families. We are looking forward to further collaboration with our partners to innovate and serve the healthcare community in these challenging times.

How to get involved

We welcome the participation of healthcare organizations who may need guidance in quickly setting up a deployment, as well as mobility partners who want to lend their support. Here’s how to get started:

  • If you are looking for support for your organization’s deployment, or inquiring on behalf of a customer, fill out the Healthcare IT Response Community nomination form. Once approved, we’ll send you information on accessing the community.

  • If you are a partner who would like to offer help, please register for access on our community portal. 

We look forward to further supporting the healthcare community’s mobility needs, so please do reach out to us if there are additional ways we can help. To learn more about how to deploy Android devices for your organization, visit android.com/enterprise.

How Android Enterprise supports healthcare mobility needs

We’ve been deeply inspired  by the work of medical professionals and first responders throughout the COVID-19 crisis and we’re encouraged, humbled and thankful for their efforts. We also appreciate the healthcare IT community, who are playing a vital role in deploying and managing mobile devices to address hospitals’ critical response needs. 

Many of these IT admins around the world have reached out to us for guidance with deploying and using devices in these settings. To provide a one-stop resource for healthcare organizations looking to stand up and scale mobility initiatives with Android devices, we’ve launched a new community for IT admins and partners who are supporting their organizations with Android.

Supporting healthcare IT admins

The Healthcare IT Response Community has been organized to address specific use cases that have been especially challenging during this time.  It features best practices from Google on how to help securely deploy devices and offers a forum for the healthcare IT community to connect with each other and learn from their experiences with deploying devices for appropriate, non-medical uses. This effort is also providing a way for IT admins to learn from our mobility partners, many of whom have generously volunteered to offer guidance on device selection, managing a device fleet, and supporting deployments. They also participate in the discussion boards, sharing ideas and answering technical questions.    

We are very grateful to our global partners, such as Samsung, MobileIron, BT and more who have already made a difference in helping hospitals and other healthcare organizations get devices configured for appropriate, non-medical uses and into the hands of those who need them.

We've been able to offer help to King’s Health Partners and King’s College London with Life Lines, a project that has rapidly deployed thousands of secure, managed tablets to hundreds of ICUs in the UK. Similarly, at hospitals in the US, we’re helping to deploy a number of managed Pixel phones and Pixel Slates configured with Google Meet to facilitate communication between patients and their families. We are looking forward to further collaboration with our partners to innovate and serve the healthcare community in these challenging times.

How to get involved

We welcome the participation of healthcare organizations who may need guidance in quickly setting up a deployment, as well as mobility partners who want to lend their support. Here’s how to get started:

  • If you are looking for support for your organization’s deployment, or inquiring on behalf of a customer, fill out the Healthcare IT Response Community nomination form. Once approved, we’ll send you information on accessing the community.

  • If you are a partner who would like to offer help, please register for access on our community portal. 

We look forward to further supporting the healthcare community’s mobility needs, so please do reach out to us if there are additional ways we can help. To learn more about how to deploy Android devices for your organization, visit android.com/enterprise.

Dr. Karen DeSalvo on “putting information first” during COVID-19

Dr. Karen DeSalvo knows how to deal with a crisis. She was New Orleans Health Commissioner following Hurricane Katrina and a senior official at the Department of Health and Human Services when Ebola broke out. And now, as Google’s Chief Health Officer, she’s become the company’s go-to medical expert, advising our leaders on how to react to the coronavirus. Dr. DeSalvo has been a voice of reassurance for Googlers, but her expertise is helpful outside of Google, too. I recently spoke to Dr. DeSalvo about how we’ll get through the crisis, what Google is doing to help and what makes her optimistic despite the challenges we face. 


How is the coronavirus different from other public health crises you’ve dealt with? 
In my work in New Orleans, whether it was a hurricane, a fire or a power outage, we drew resources from other parts of the country if we needed help. In this case, the entire world has been impacted. Everyone is living with uncertainty, disrupted supply chains, impacts on travel and social infrastructure. While this creates a sense of community that I hope will continue beyond the pandemic, the downside is that we have less opportunity to send assistance to other places. Where there is opportunity, we’ve seen people paying it forward, like when California deployed ventilators to the East Coast. The sense of community that grows out of any disaster is the bright spot, for me.


How are industries sharing ideas and research in this global crisis?
Physicians are using technology to talk to each other constantly about what they’re seeing and doing, and in prior outbreaks this real-time communication wasn’t possible. It makes a huge difference in clinical care. In the medical community, you sometimes have to pay for a journal article. But now if you want to read about COVID-19, it’s free for any researcher, scientist, clinician or layperson. That’s putting information first, putting knowledge and science above proprietary interest. 

It’s happening in science, too. For instance, there’s a collaboration between competitors in the private sector on designing trials and assessing the outcome of drugs and vaccines. At Google, our Deepmind colleagues were able to use quantum computing to show protein folding, helping advance the thinking about therapeutics and vaccines. I don’t think we’ve seen this spirit of collaboration in the history of science, and it’s one of the reasons I’m so optimistic. 


What is Google doing to help curb misinformation?
In this historic moment, access to the right information at the right time will save lives. Period. This is why our Search teams design our ranking systems to promote the most relevant and reliable information available. We build these protections in advance so they’re ready when a crisis hits, and this approach serves as a strong defense against misinformation.  


When COVID-19 began to escalate, we built features on top of those fundamental protections to help people find information from local health authorities. We initially launched an SOS alert with the World Health Organization to make resources about COVID-19 easily discoverable. This has evolved into an expanded Search experience, providing easy access to more authoritative information, alongside new data and visualizations. 


We’re surfacing content that’s accessible to a whole range of communities, and there’s constant vigilance to remove misinformation on platforms like YouTube—this includes videos or other information that could be harmful to people.

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COVID-19 information on Search. 

What does it mean to be Google’s Chief Health Officer?
My role is to bring a holistic view of emotional, physical and social health and well-being to Google’s products and services, particularly under Google Health. During this pandemic, my team has also thought about how Google can assist public health efforts. This has meant anything from the Community Mobility Reports, a tool to help measure the impact of social distancing, to building playlists in partnership with YouTube geared towards clinicians, and showing testing sites for COVID-19 all over the world.


In the general public, what behaviors or mentalities have arisen that should continue in the future?
First, there are fundamental ways to reduce the transmission of communicable diseases like the flu or, in some communities, measles or tuberculosis. If you’re able to, it’s important to stay home if you’re sick, wash your hands, cough into your elbow—I call these the “Grandma rules.” Second, there are a lot of components to health: social health, emotional well-being, financial stability. Health is driven by more than just medical care, and this is a moment for us to remember that a holistic approach matters. 


What should business owners consider for when restrictions begin to lift?
They need to prepare for a world in which employees can work remotely as much as possible. Policies will still recommend social distancing, but we also need to create an environment where people who are sick feel comfortable staying home. That’s not realistic for every small business, so paying attention to the basic hygiene stuff—Do the Five—is also important. 


After Katrina, there was this time when the world was paying attention and trying to help, but the emotional and social impact on our community lasted for months. There will be some of that after this pandemic, because you can’t just flip a switch and have people go back to work. That’s the important thing—being patient as people put themselves back into a normal routine. 

Health is driven by more than just medical care, and this is a moment for us to remember that a holistic approach matters.

Taking off your Chief Health Officer hat, how do you reassure friends and family when they’re worried about this situation?
Medically, we need to be patient and let the scientists do their thing. It’s probably going to take until summer or early fall in the northern hemisphere to get clarity on what therapeutics work. The end game is to develop a vaccine so we can make sure everybody is protected. This is going to be a long journey with many months ahead, so we need to pace ourselves. 

Statistically, more people will have anxiety and depression from COVID-19 than will actually get COVID-19. To share tips on mental well-being, we recently launched the “Be Kind To Your Mind” PSA on Google Search.

Lastly, I remind those who are privileged to have a safe space to stay home when other people can’t. I think about my previous work with low income patients, and how this crisis impacts them as well as communities of color, non-native English speakers, and individuals with disabilities. Staying home is not safe, comfortable and financially feasible for everybody. We should all be doing what we can for our neighbors and our friends and the people who aren’t always seen.

Building a more resilient world together

Posted by Billy Rutledge, Director of the Coral team

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Recently, we’ve seen communities respond to the challenges of the coronavirus pandemic by using technology in new ways to effect positive change. It’s increasingly important that our systems are able to adapt to new contexts, handle disruptions, and remain efficient.

At Coral, we believe intelligence at the edge is a key ingredient towards building a more resilient future. By making the latest machine learning tools easy-to-use and accessible, innovators can collaborate to create solutions that are most needed in their communities. Developers are already using Coral to build solutions that can understand and react in real-time, while maintaining privacy for everyone present.

Helping our communities stay safe, together

As mandatory isolation measures begin to relax, compliance with safe social distancing protocol has become a topic of primary concern for experts across the globe. Businesses and individuals have been stepping up to find ways to use technology to help reduce the risk and spread. Many efforts are employing the benefits of edge AI—here are a few early stage examples that have inspired us.

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In Belgium, engineers at Edgise recently used Coral to develop an occupancy monitor to aid businesses in managing capacity. With the privacy preserving properties of edge AI, businesses can anonymously count how many customers enter and exit a space, signaling when the area is too full.

A research group at the Sathyabama Institute of Science and Technology in India are using Coral to develop a wearable device to serve as a COVID-19 cough counter and health monitor, allowing medical professionals to better care for low risk patients in an outpatient capacity. Coral's Edge TPU enables biometric data to be processed efficiently, without draining the limited power resources available in wearable devices.

All across the US, hospitals are seeking solutions to ensure adherence to hygiene policy amongst hospital staff. In one example, a device incorporates the compact, affordable and offline benefits of the Coral modules to aid in handwashing practices at numerous stations throughout a facility.

And around the world, members of the PyImageSearch community are exploring how to train a COVID-19: Face Mask Detector model using TensorFlow that can be used to identify whether people are wearing a mask. Open source frameworks can empower anyone to develop solutions, and with Coral components we can help bring those benefits to everyone.

Eliciting a global response

In an effort to rally greater community involvement, Coral has joined The United Nations Development Programme and Hackster.io, as a sponsor of the COVID-19 Detect and Protect Challenge. The initiative calls on developers to build affordable and reproducible solutions that support response efforts in developing countries. All ideas are welcome—whether they use ML or not—and we encourage you to participate.

To make edge ML capabilities even easier to integrate, we’re also announcing a price reduction for the Coral products widely used for experimentation and prototyping. Our Dev Board will now be offered at $129.99, the USB Accelerator at $59.99, the Camera Module at $19.99, and the Enviro Board at $14.99. Additionally, we are introducing the USB Accelerator into 10 new markets: Ghana, Thailand, Singapore, Oman, Philippines, Indonesia, Kenya, Malaysia, Israel, and Vietnam. For more details, visit Coral.ai/products.

We’re excited to see the solutions developers will bring forward with Coral. And as always, please keep sending us feedback at [email protected]

Mount Sinai health care workers team up with Google Nest

Editor’s note: This story is guest authored by Robbie Freeman, MSN, RN-BC, who works at Mount Sinai in New York. 

As the person responsible for Mount Sinai’s clinical innovation, over the years I’ve been tasked with spearheading initiatives that leverage technology, AI and data science to improve the quality of patient care and safety. Our health systems in New York—and across the world—have been devastated by the impact of the Coronavirus.

For the last several months, our team has been put to the test and faced unforeseen challenges and heartbreak. The rapidly moving situation was made even more dire because of the rising number of critical patients, the government mandate to ramp up bed capacity and the need to preserve personal protective equipment (PPE).

We needed to find a way to give caregivers the ability to check on and communicate with patients that could supplement in-person checks, also helping reduce the use of PPE. Together with Google, we explored how to build a Nest Camera experience that would help health care workers more efficiently care for patients and preserve PPE.  

Starting this week, we began installing two Nest Cameras in more than a hundred rooms being used to help Coronavirus patients⁠—in most rooms one will be used to monitor and communicate with patients and the other will monitor their vitals. Video from the cameras will be livestreamed to a purpose built console located in Mount Sinai nurse stations (Google will not store this footage or have access to it). This purpose-built console was designed to aid health care workers; it allows for monitoring patients, tracking vitals and talking with the patients. Now that health care providers can help patients from their stations, it saves both time and PPE. 

We worked together for several weeks to create a solution designed to adhere to current regulatory guidelines, HIPAA and other legal and regulatory requirements. Every minute saved by remotely monitoring the patients can be offered to assist another person in need. It’s extremely fulfilling to see our work make a difference in the lives of our patients, their families and our hospital staff. 

While Mount Sinai was the first hospital to work with Google, we won’t be the last. Google is working to provide 10,000 Nest Cams with the purpose built console to hospitals across the country. We’re grateful to see a decline in the number of new patients. We’re lucky to have partnered quickly with the Nest team at Google to help our staff deliver the type of care needed for so many right now.  

Resources for mental health support during COVID-19

The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted lives around the world. In addition to the lives lost to the virus, as many communities enter the second and third month under stay-at-home orders, there is a rising mental health toll, too. In a national survey released by the American Psychiatric Association in March, 36 percent of respondents said that COVID-19 was seriously impacting their mental health; 48 percent were anxious about getting infected; and 57 percent reported concern that COVID-19 will seriously impact their finances.


As a trained psychiatrist, I know firsthand the importance of bringing out into the open the issue of mental health. While it might be years between the first onset of symptoms and someone seeking help, the internet is often the first place people turn to find out more about mental disorders. To help address the emerging mental health crisis we’re sharing “Be Kind to Your Mind," which includes resources on mental wellbeing from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Whenever people in the U.S. search for information about coping with the pandemic, or on COVID-19 and mental health, we’ll show a public service announcement with tips to cope with stress during COVID-19. To raise awareness of the importance of mental wellbeing during these times, we'll highlight these resources on Google's homepage tomorrow.

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Whenever people in the U.S. search for information about coping with the pandemic, we’ll show a public service announcement with tips to cope with stress during COVID-19.

With May being Mental Health Awareness Month, we want to highlight a few other resources and tools across Google and YouTube that promote mental wellbeing.


Self-assessment questionnaires for depression and PTSD

When people search on Google for information about mental health conditions we provide panels with information from authoritative sources like Mayo Clinic that detail symptoms, treatments, and provide an overview of the different types of specialists who can help. On the info panels for depression and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we provide direct access to clinically-validated self-assessment questionnaires that ask some of the same types of questions a mental health professional might ask. Based on a person’s answers, these self-assessment tools provide information on risk, along with links to more resources. Results to these questionnaires are not logged. We hope they can provide insight and help people have a more informed conversation with their doctor. We will add more self-assessment  questionnaires over time to cover more conditions.


Self-care content on YouTube

Over the last few months, YouTube has seen a 35 percent increase in views of meditation videos, and growing popularity of mindfulness and wellbeing content. YouTube is making videos like these and other mental health resources more widely available to anyone around the world, for free, by spotlighting channels and playlists that have wellbeing and mindfulness-focused content. Countless YouTube creators, like Dr. Mike and Kati Morton, educate their communities as they help reduce the stigma associated with mental health. YouTube is also launching relevant YouTube Originals, including a “BookTube” episode featuring top authors like Melinda Gates and Elizabeth Gilbert offering their best book recommendations.

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Finding virtual care options, quickly

Because of stay-at-home orders and restrictions that limit in-person interactions, many mental health care providers (including therapists and psychiatrists) are now providing telehealth care, like conducting therapy sessions over video conference. To make these options easier to find, we now allow providers to highlight their virtual care services on their Google Business Profile. So now, when you search for a mental health provider in products like Search and Maps, you may see an “Online care” link that can take you to their virtual care page, or even schedule a virtual appointment.


While the stigma around mental health has lessened in recent years, many people still find it hard to reach out to get help. By providing access to mental health resources, services and information across our products, we hope to make it easier for people to seek help and receive proper care.


What’s trending: understanding rising consumer interests

Since COVID-19 began, we’ve heard from our retail and brand manufacturing partners that they’re hungry for more insights on how consumer interests are changing, given fluctuations in consumer demand. We see these changes reflected in how people are searching on Google. Last month, there were spikes in search interest for household supplies and jigsaw puzzles as people spent more time at home. This month we’ve seen surging interest for sewing machines and baking materials in the U.S., and tetherball sets and chalk in the United Kingdom and Australia. 

Businesses are using a variety of resources to understand changing consumer interests—including Google Trends, social listening, surveys, and their own data—in order to help make decisions on the fly. But if they don’t know what to look for, there isn’t an easy way to understand which product categories are gaining in popularity, and might pose an opportunity.

That’s why we’re launching a rising retail categories tool on Think with Google. It surfaces fast-growing, product-related categories in Google Search, the locations where they’re growing, and the queries associated with them. This is the first time we’ve provided this type of insight on the product categories that people are searching for. 

Rising Retail Categories

When we previewed the data with a group of businesses, they had lots of creative ideas for how they might apply it—whether for content creation, promotional efforts, or even new products and services. Here were some of their ideas for how it could help:

  • Content creation: A cookware company noticed that “flour” was a growing category in the United States. The team was inspired to explore partnering with a famous local chef to create engaging content about recipes that incorporate flour. 
  • Promotion: A jewelry and accessories company noted rising interest in products in the “free weights” category, so the team thought they might partner with fitness influencers who could help promote their products. Similarly, an online business said it would regularly reference the data to inform which products to feature on its homepage throughout the pandemic. 

  • Product ideas: An apparel company with a fast and flexible production model said its team would use this data to inspire new product line ideas.

For the next few months, we’ll update the tool with fresh data every day and hope this will help businesses of all sizes find new pockets of consumer interest. For additional resources and insights, sign up for the Think with Google newsletter. 

Source: Search