Author Archives: Aaron Brindle

Applications are now open for the second Google Cloud Accelerator Canada Cohort

We’re inviting Canadian cloud-native technology startups to apply for the second Google Cloud Accelerator Canada cohort. The intensive 10-week virtual bootcamp helps startups prepare for the next phase of growth and development in their journey. 

Throughout the pandemic, we’ve seen just how important the role of cloud technology is in almost every sector. From healthcare to education, retail to manufacturing, cloud technology keeps us connected, and helps us maintain continuity in our schools, work and businesses. 

We know the need for cloud-based solutions will continue to grow, that’s why we launched the first Google Cloud Accelerator Canada last year, entirely dedicated to supporting cloud-native technology startups. The accelerator was the first of it’s kind at Google, designed to bring the best of our programs, products, people and technology to startups doing interesting work in cloud. 

“We are thrilled to be at the start of our second journey in meeting and building meaningful relationships with this new Google Canada Accelerator Cloud cohort,” said James Lambe, Managing Director of Google Cloud Canada. 




Last year, twelve startups were selected for our inaugural cohort, representing a range of industries including healthcare, hospitality and real estate. We worked with founders and their teams to help solve some of the top challenges facing their startup and provided 1:1 mentorship from an array of Google Cloud experts. We also offered support in AI/ML, design/UX, Android, web, product strategy, sales, marketing, and more. 

Today, we’re excited to announce that applications are now open for the second Google Cloud Accelerator Canada. The 10-week virtual accelerator will offer cloud mentorship and technical project support, as well as deep dives and workshops on product design, customer acquisition and leadership development for cloud startup founders and leaders. 

The Accelerator is best suited for funded, revenue generating startups who have a minimum of five employees and are well-positioned for their next phase of growth. In order to ensure Google can provide meaningful value, startups should aim to leverage either Cloud or AI/ML technologies in their product, service, or operations, or show an interest in leveraging these technologies in the future. 

Applications are now open until March 1, 2022 and the accelerator will kick off this April. Interested startups leveraging cloud to drive growth and innovation are encouraged to apply here

Speaking our language: The importance of a Mandarin Pixel 6 ad with Simu Liu



It’s 2001 and Nickelback’s “How You Remind Me” is blaring from car radios, Drake made his debut on “Degrassi: The Next Generation”, we were all recovering from the shock of 9/11. And Harry Potter first appeared on movie screens giving us the license to believe in magic. Chris Hadfield was the first Canadian to do a space walk. And yet, we could only take fuzzy, grainy photos with our cell phones. 

Twenty years later, the world has changed, online and off. The Harry Potter crew are no longer children and we’ve moved from Nickelback to The Weeknd. The hit musical Come from Away is returning to the stage to remind us that human connection and kindness still define us as Canadians. And wow, can we ever take a high quality photo with our new cell phones (especially with the Pixel, naturally). 

Google Canada has changed, too. This month marks the 20th anniversary of Google’s arrival in Canada. And if you don’t remember the pomp and circumstance around the event, it’s because there wasn’t any. 

Google Canada began with a single hire in a small workspace in Toronto in 2001 and a few short years later, Google opened its Montréal office. In 2005, Google set up shop in Canada’s technology hub, Waterloo, Ontario, and over the years we have become a part of the Waterloo region technology community, contributing volunteer hours to STEM education programs and hiring engineers to build Google products that Canadians and people around the world use every day. And now, Google Canada is home to more than 2,500 employees. 

We’ve had our share of adventures - bringing maps to the north, helping Canadian businesses tap into the digital economy, opening Cloud regions in Montréal and Toronto to serve Canadian businesses, introducing the world to Canadian creators on YouTube and building new offices in Waterloo, Toronto and Montréal. For the past twenty years, we’ve been fortunate enough to help Canadians search, grow and connect to the world around them using Google products and services. 

Creating opportunity for all Canadians 
During our time here, Google Canada has been investing in the communities where we live and work, through Google.org Community Grants, Google for Startups Accelerator programs, and investments in digital skills training. Over the last 20 years, Google has invested $25 million in Canadian non profits, looking to expand economic opportunity and to help Canadians learn new skills, through commitments to organizations like NPower Canada and ComIT

And we have a long history of working closely with community partners and organizations across Canada to make STEM programs accessible to all students. In 2021, we reached more than 200,000 Canadian learners through STEM outreach and we trained approximately 4,000 educators in CS First. Our STEM and CS First outreach is orchestrated by Google Canada in conjunction with The Cobblestone Collective and supplemented by our Google Canada volunteers to support their local communities. 

 A home for Canadian engineering excellence 

Canada has been synonymous with top notch computer science and engineering for more than 50 years. And most recently, AI research and advancement. It’s for this reason that in 2013 Google welcomed Geoffrey Hinton, a pioneer in the field of deep learning, to the Google Toronto office. And in 2016, Google Research started a Canadian centre of AI excellence by bringing Google Brain to Montréal. Google Brain is a deep learning artificial intelligence research team dedicated to artificial intelligence and every day, these world-leading teams tackle some of the biggest technological challenges of our time. 

Google Canada engineers have conceived of, developed, and implemented innovative products that many Canadians might take for granted: 
  • In 2011, Google Canada engineers played a key role in the development of the first Gmail app for iOS, bringing a Gmail app to the world for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch
  • The Cloud Healthcare API, developed by the Cloud Healthcare & Life Sciences team in Waterloo since 2017, allows healthcare customers to organize and analyze their healthcare data in a scalable, compliant and privacy sensitive way. In 2020, the Cloud Healthcare API became widely available to healthcare organizations around the world. 
  • Our Safe Browsing team in Montréal protects over 4 billion devices worldwide each year, delivering millions of warnings a month about phishing scams and other online threats. 
Providing platforms for Canadian success stories: 
For over 20 years, Google has helped Canadian businesses of all sizes use our digital tools to grow and reach customers across the globe. Before COVID-19, making the transition to digital was aspirational for most business owners. When the pandemic upended all of our lives, it became essential. To better understand how Google products helped Canadian workers and businesses in 2020, Google commissioned independent consultancy Public First to take a look and they found that Google’s search and advertising tools helped provide an estimated $26 billion in economic activity for over 600,000 businesses in Canada. And in 2020 alone, the total economic impact of Google products and services in Canada is equivalent to 1.3% of total GDP, or the equivalent of supporting 235,000 jobs. 

 And YouTube has facilitated the rise of the Canadian creator economy, helping content creators build sustainable businesses on the platform. A report by Oxford Economics estimates that in 2020, YouTube’s creative ecosystem contributed approximately $923 million to Canada’s GDP. In that same period YouTube supported the equivalent of 34,100 full-time employment jobs across Canada. Access to YouTube’s open platform continues to create a real and positive impact on the wider Canadian economy, and we can’t wait to watch the next generation of Canadian creators grow, create and connect on the platform. 

This month, Google Canada is officially 20 years old and more than 2,500 Googlers strong. We’re working, living, and growing in communities across this country. We’re delivering innovations that are helping people through the toughest times of their lives. And we’re doing all of that as we stay committed to the same goal we were founded on: to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. 

It only seems fitting that to celebrate the past 20 years, we take a look back at the most interesting searches over these two decades, to reflect back what Canadians have been curious about. And it turns out, what we’re most curious about is us. At its heart, Google is a place for people to ask questions – about ourselves, current events, and the world we are striving to create. So, after 20 years of Googling, we just wanted to say to all Canadians: thanks for asking. 

Here’s to everything that comes next. 

Our $600,000 commitment to reskill Indigenous job seekers for new careers in technology





Research shows there’s a significant skills and education gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations in Canada, particularly when it comes to connectivity, graduation rates and digital literacy. And the economic impact of the pandemic has increased this divide, disproportionately impacting the employment rates of Indigenous populations. As Canada rebuilds post COVID-19, we have an opportunity to build back a more inclusive and resilient economy. 



That’s why today, Google Canada announced a $600,000 commitment to provide free digital skills training to Indigenous job seekers across Canada. The support includes a $500,000 Google.org grant towards ComIT’s Recoding Futures IT training program, an additional $100,000 in funding to support Indspire with their education and job training programs and an allocation of Google Career Certificate scholarships for Indigenous job seekers. 



ComIT’s Recoding Futures program was created last year with the support of Google.org to provide IT training to Indigenous learners across Canada. In the first year of the Recoding Futures program, we saw overwhelming interest, with over 800 applicants, double than what was expected. Our additional support of the program moving forwards will allow ComIT to expand the program and accommodate as many applicants as possible. The program runs virtually and covers topics like Design Thinking, HTML, CSS, Javascript .NET, Python, React and Node. 



Google Canada’s $100,000 commitment to Indspire will support their existing job training programs, and we will also provide an allocation of dedicated Google Career Certificate scholarships for Indigenous job seekers. The scholarships can be used towards Google Career Certificate courses, which are delivered through NPower Canada and equips learners with theoretical and practical knowledge to be successful in an entry-level technology job. 



Applications are now open for ComIT’s Recoding Futures program. Interested applicants can visit ComIT.org to register. 



For more information on Google Career Certificates visit g.co/certificates-canada. To find out more on scholarships available, visit Indspire’s website



Today’s support is in addition to Google Canada’s $2 million commitment to reskill job seekers for new careers in technology in under six months, announced earlier this year. We look forward to working alongside ComIT and Indspire to help bridge the longstanding digital divide between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities, increase free access to digital skills education and support economic growth within Indigenous communities. 


Our $600,000 commitment to reskill Indigenous job seekers for new careers in technology





Research shows there’s a significant skills and education gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations in Canada, particularly when it comes to connectivity, graduation rates and digital literacy. And the economic impact of the pandemic has increased this divide, disproportionately impacting the employment rates of Indigenous populations. As Canada rebuilds post COVID-19, we have an opportunity to build back a more inclusive and resilient economy. 



That’s why today, Google Canada announced a $600,000 commitment to provide free digital skills training to Indigenous job seekers across Canada. The support includes a $500,000 Google.org grant towards ComIT’s Recoding Futures IT training program, an additional $100,000 in funding to support Indspire with their education and job training programs and an allocation of Google Career Certificate scholarships for Indigenous job seekers. 



ComIT’s Recoding Futures program was created last year with the support of Google.org to provide IT training to Indigenous learners across Canada. In the first year of the Recoding Futures program, we saw overwhelming interest, with over 800 applicants, double than what was expected. Our additional support of the program moving forwards will allow ComIT to expand the program and accommodate as many applicants as possible. The program runs virtually and covers topics like Design Thinking, HTML, CSS, Javascript .NET, Python, React and Node. 



Google Canada’s $100,000 commitment to Indspire will support their existing job training programs, and we will also provide an allocation of dedicated Google Career Certificate scholarships for Indigenous job seekers. The scholarships can be used towards Google Career Certificate courses, which are delivered through NPower Canada and equips learners with theoretical and practical knowledge to be successful in an entry-level technology job. 



Applications are now open for ComIT’s Recoding Futures program. Interested applicants can visit ComIT.org to register. 



For more information on Google Career Certificates visit g.co/certificates-canada. To find out more on scholarships available, visit Indspire’s website



Today’s support is in addition to Google Canada’s $2 million commitment to reskill job seekers for new careers in technology in under six months, announced earlier this year. We look forward to working alongside ComIT and Indspire to help bridge the longstanding digital divide between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities, increase free access to digital skills education and support economic growth within Indigenous communities. 


You Can’t Stop The Beat – Apple Music now available on Nest Devices in Canada

We’ve got the music covered for your next holiday party! As of today, you can now ask Google Assistant on Google Nest and other Assistant-enabled smart speakers and displays to play your favorites on Apple Music in Canada. 

Apple Music subscribers can search and play songs, albums and playlists just by using their voice. Not sure what you want to listen to? You can also use your Google Assistant to play music by genre, mood or activity. 

To set up Apple Music on your device, first link your Apple Music account in the Google Home app. After it is set up, you can easily queue up your favorite playlist, artist, or any of the award-winning Apple Music Radio stations live streaming today’s hits, classics, and country to play over your connected device. 

Users also have the ability to set Apple Music as your default music streaming service in the Google Home App for a seamless integration and playback experience. 

With Apple Music now available on Nest devices such as Nest Mini, Nest Audio, Nest Hub and Nest Hub Max, Apple Music subscribers now have more choices when it comes to where they can utilize their Apple Music service. 

Australia, Canada, India, S. Korea and Mexico are the latest regions to offer Apple Music on compatible devices. Last year, Apple Music began rolling out on Nest and other Assistant-enabled smart speakers and displays in the US, UK, France, Germany and Japan.

A look back at Canada’s #YearInSearch: 2021

In 2021, Canadians searched for how to recover, and ways to come back stronger.

We searched for “COVID vaccine near me”, “vaccine passport” and “What percentage of Canada is vaccinated?”. We looked inward and tried to better understand Canada’s history when we searched for Residential schools, and asked “Why were they created?”. We were engaged voters, searching for “Federal Election” and “How to register to vote in Canada”. And from local to global, Canadians searched for ongoing current events to find information and answers.

Canada’s 2021 Year in Search:





Top Searches in Sports

With the return of live sporting events in 2021, it’s no surprise that top searches were for NBA and NHL. We found ways to re-connect through games, as we searched and celebrated Canadian athletes like Leylah Fernandez, Andre De Grasse, Penny Oleksiak, and so many other local heroes.
Top Searches in Entertainment

Like last year, people continued to search for ways to stay connected and entertained at home. The South Korean success, Squid Game, was the most searched TV show, while also appearing on several other lists this year. Canadians also came out in full force to search and support Simu Liu as this year’s superhero in Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings.



This December also marks 20 years of Google in Canada. We took a look back at the top searches over 20 years, and found that the most searched topic in Canada is, well, Canada. While on the surface this is pretty funny, there is something very special about a country in search of itself. We searched “What it means to be Canadian,” “How to immigrate to Canada,” and “What native land am I on?” Canadians continue to question, research and understand how we can be the best version of ourselves. Looking back, we at Google are so proud to be a small part of the lives of Canadians - businesses that come to the platform to grow their business, new Canadians that use Translate for day-to-day interactions, or parents trying to understand what their kids mean when they keep saying “YOLO”.

As Canadians continue to find ways to heal, to connect, and to build back stronger, search on. 
Explore more of the 2021 Canadian trending lists here.
Hibaq Ali and Alexandra Klein, Google Canada



Google, MLSE and the NBA extend partnership through to 2026

Here at Google, we believe progress happens through the power of the ‘we’, not the ‘I’. That’s why we create truly open and helpful products that bring people together, while partnering with organizations that share this same vision. 

With that in mind, we’re thrilled to announce our partnership with Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment (MLSE) and the NBA to make Google Pixel the official smartphone of the Toronto Raptors, Toronto Maple Leafs, and the NBA for the next five seasons. 

This partnership will leverage the strengths of MLSE’s full ecosystem of sports brands, including the Raptors, Maple Leafs, Toronto FC and Argos, reaching millions of fans across Canada. 

The beginnings of this partnership date back to October 2017, when we collaborated with the Raptors for the launch of Google Home. As part of this deal, Google Nest will remain the official smart home technology partner of both MLSE and the NBA through to the 2025-2026 season, and Chromebook will become the official laptop of the Raptors, Leafs, TFC and Argos. 


Why is this important? The answer is simple. Having an open ecosystem of accessible and friendly smartphones, home computing, powered by Google software and connected objects helps Canadians reach their goals while staying connected. 

We think human progress, big and small, can only happen when technology speaks to everybody, for everybody, in the most inclusive, open, friendly and human way. This aligns with MLSE’s commitment to establish partnerships with organizations and co-create purpose-driven programs. 

This partnership will further showcase the innovation and helpfulness that Google hardware and products bring through a series of advertisements, entertaining content and fresh activations featuring exciting sports talent from our own backyard. 

This is bold and changemaking, just like our culture and our communities. Together, we’re better - and we can’t wait to share more in the coming months.