Author Archives: Aaron Brindle

Return to travel: Where Canadians are planning their next trip

As vaccine uptake continues to rise across the country, and government travel restrictions for fully-vaccinated Canadians start to loosen, many people are taking all of their stored-up holiday dreams and are starting to plan vacations again. 


We’re seeing more searches in Canada for travel-related destination information — like travel restrictions by country and where to travel, which both recently hit all-time highs. As Canadians start to re-engage with the travel industry, we were curious to see how their plans are coming along. Do Canadians want to plan a trip within the country, or are they ready to travel abroad? What are some of the top spots they want to visit? We took a look at what Canadians are searching for as they get back to planning their next trip.


Where Canadians are looking to travel 

When it comes to travelling locally or abroad, search interest for both international and domestic travel is starting to climb, with a steady uptick starting in June. In fact, Canadian search interest for both international and domestic travel are reaching all-time highs. 


And as many workplaces across the country switch to remote models, we’re also seeing a rise in a new type of travel - staycations and workcations. Over the last few months, searches in Canada for staycations and workcations have both hit all-time highs. 


When it comes to vacation planning, we took a look at some of the top destinations Canadians are searching for. 


Top searched domestic destinations Canadians are searching for in Travel, past month: 

  1. Toronto 
  2. Vancouver 
  3. Calgary 
  4. Montreal 
  5. Niagara Falls 
  6. Edmonton 
  7. Quebec City 
  8. Whistler 
  9. Banff 
  10. Ottawa 


“One of the benefits of this pandemic is that Canadians have an increased appreciation for what their own communities and regions have to offer travellers,” says Gloria Loree, CMO, Destinations Canada. “With the recent news of the border reopening plan, our industry is not only excited to welcome back visitors, but we believe Canadians and their passion for what this country has to offer will have a positive impact in influencing decisions to travel to and within Canada. And our research shows that the diversity of our people, landscapes and experiences are just what curious travellers are seeking.” 


Top searched international destinations Canadians are searching for in travel, past month: 

  1. Italy 
  2. United States 
  3. Mexico 
  4. India 
  5. France 
  6. Dubai 
  7. Greece 
  8. Japan 
  9. United Kingdom 
  10. Cuba 


"As we transition into a period of significant recovery many of our assumptions on the rebuild are coming to fruition. Domestic flight demand has seen steady increases over the past few months and we're seeing strong demand for international travel, such as Europe and sun destinations, as travel restrictions are expected to decrease. We're excited to welcome back travellers in greater numbers" says Mark Nasr, SVP, Products, Marketing and eCommerce at Air Canada 


As Canadians begin to plan, here are the top questions they’re searching for: 

  1. Who can travel to Canada? 
  2. When can Canadians travel to the US? 
  3. Where can Canadians travel? 
  4. Where to get a PCR test for travel? 
  5. What is considered essential travel? 


International interest in travelling to Canada is on the rise 

When you look at search interest to Canadian destinations, more and more international tourists are starting to consider travelling to Canada


Top 10 Canadian destinations most searched by the world (excluding Canada) in Travel, past month:

  1. Toronto 
  2. Vancouver 
  3. Banff 
  4. Niagara Falls 
  5. Montreal 
  6. Calgary 
  7. Ottawa 
  8. Victoria 
  9. Jasper 
  10. Edmonton 


If you're ready to plan a trip, here are a few updates to keep you informed on the latest travel guidance and explore potential destinations. 


Stay up to date on travel guidance 

When you look for travel information like flights, hotels or things to do, Search will let you know if there are COVID-19 related travel advisories or restrictions for your destination. Now, we’re adding more travel restriction details, like whether you’ll need to quarantine upon arrival or provide proof of test results or immunization records. 


You can now also track travel advisories or restrictions for your destination and get email updates. If you are signed into your Google account, you can toggle, “Receive an email if this guidance changes.” You'll be notified when restrictions are added, lifted or reduced. 





If you use Maps to plan travel, you can use the COVID layer within the app to see how cases are trending in an area. You can also access quick links to trusted local resources so you’ll know at a glance if there are specific guidelines or restrictions you need to follow. 


Get destination ideas for when you’re ready to travel 

Where will you go on your first trip when you're ready to travel again? It's exciting to think about, and we've made some updates to Explore to help you get started. Google Flights fans may already be familiar with the Explore map, which shows flight prices for different destinations if you’re flexible on where and when you’re traveling. 


Now, Explore has its own tab on Google.com/travel and has been redesigned so you can browse more than just flights. You’ll see more destinations on the map — including smaller cities and national parks — and if you have a certain type of trip in mind, you can filter destinations for interests like outdoors, beaches or skiing. If you only want to see cities with an airport, select flights only in "Travel Mode." When you pick a destination, we'll show you if there's a travel advisory or restriction and, in addition to the best flights, you’ll see other helpful information for planning your trip, like hotels, things to do, the best time to visit and more. 




More choice for travellers with free hotel booking links 

For many years, we’ve helped travellers choose the right hotel by providing a list of relevant properties, along with information like reviews, photos and hotel amenities. Hotel booking links have been offered via Hotel Ads, which display real-time pricing and availability for specific dates of travel. We've seen that users find these hotel booking links to be highly useful and partners find them to be a valuable source of potential customers. 


We’ve now improved this experience by making it free for hotels and travel companies around the world to appear in hotel booking links, on google.com/travel. With full access to a wider range of hotel prices, users will have a more comprehensive set of options as they research their trip and ultimately decide where to book. 


For all hotels and travel companies, this change brings a new, free way to reach potential customers. And our testing of this new feature shows that all partner types — from individual hotels to online travel agents — benefit from free booking links through increased booking traffic and user engagement. 


Whatever type of trip you’re planning (or just starting to think about), we hope these tools will help you make travel decisions with confidence. 


Helping you navigate crowds 

Before you go, search for your destination on Google Maps, then scroll down on the Business Profile to see how busy a place typically is or how busy it is right now. With busyness information, you’ll know instantly you’re about to face a long line or a big crowd and can adjust your plans accordingly. 


Also check to see how crowded your bus, train, or subway car is likely to be — so you’ll know if you’re likely to grab a seat or if you should wait for another train. You’ll be able to see transit crowdedness predictions for over 10,000 transit agencies in 100 countries around the world. 

Emancipation Day: Ushering in Another Year of a Long Black Tradition in Canada

Editor's note: This blog was guest written by Natasha Henry, a historian and educator. She is the author of Emancipation Day: Celebrating Freedom in Canada and Talking about Freedom: Celebrating Emancipation Day in Canada. Natasha is also the president of the Ontario Black History Society. 

"Freedom is the most precious of our treasures, and it will not be allowed to vanish so long as men survived who offered their lives for it." ~ Paul Robeson 

August 1st, 2021 marks the 187th Emancipation Day, which is also known as August First and West India Day. The occasion recognizes the legal abolition of slavery in the British empire on August 1st, 1834. The legislation, the Slavery Abolition Act, applied to most British colonies, including Canada, where the last vestiges of enslavement were nearing the end after gradual abolition in Ontario. For some who remained in a state of forced servitude through apprenticeships in the Caribbean, freedom was delayed for four more years until August 1st, 1838. 

The day became an instant occasion of celebration for the formerly enslaved and later by their descendants. Emancipation Day is a longstanding Black tradition for Black peoples. Some white Canadians and First Nations people observed and participated in solidarity. It has been commemorated across Canada from Nova Scotia to British Columbia at different points in time, through to today. August First was marked with church services, speakers, parades with marching bands and floats, performances, banquets, toasts and resolutions, outings, leisure activities, and protest. The commemoration was filled with symbols and imagery, messages of uplift and Black collective self-determination, and demands of racial justice. 

The street parades, like today’s public demonstrations, were an important site for Black Canadians. They celebrated, gathered in camaraderie, and exercised resistance in the main streets of towns and cities. Black people dressed in costumes and regalia and carried signs and banners. Dignitaries, community leaders, war veterans, and performers led the processions. 

In 1967, the roots of Emancipation Day celebrations influenced the creation of Caribana in Toronto. Introduced as part of the programming for Canada’s centennial celebration, Caribbean immigrants shared the forms of observing Emancipation Day and freedom through carnival to the establishment of this popular African Canadian festival. The floats and costumes created a spectacle of colour heavily influenced by African motifs and Black cultural symbols. They played music, sang songs, and danced.
Black men and women planned and organized Emancipation Day events for small and large crowds, welcoming people who travelled by all means to come together. The Big Picnic at Port Dalhousie and the Greatest Freedom Show on Earth in Windsor were the two largest Emancipation Day events in the 20th century. The day was observed with both formal programming and in more relaxed settings with family reunions or homecomings. Emancipation Day commemorations were an interweaving of faith, thanksgiving, education, family, remembrance, resistance, community, hope, and promise.

 

The Greatest Freedom Show on Earth - The Story of Walter Perry from RJ Huggins on Vimeo.

A consistent element of Emancipation Day was protest and the persistent pursuit of freedom and citizenship. Black communities raised the issues of segregated schools, limited employment opportunities, housing restrictions, their ability to exercise their right to vote, the denial of business services and access to public facilities, and racial discrimination in other areas of Canadian society. They identified demands, set agendas to make their concerns known, and pursued redress. 

Freedom is the core theme and over time, it has been defined in different ways. Freedom is a process. Those who secured their freedom from enslavement through various avenues actively constructed and practiced freedom. Descendants of the enslaved have continued to define and demand freedom. Along with the underlying theme of freedom, there were other themes and messages of culture, community, resistance and pride, creatively woven into the occasion. 

We continue to be on the way to freedom as we face racial inequities entrenched in the legacies of racial slavery. Full freedom remains elusive for the descendants of the Transatlantic slave trade because the racial hierarchies and ideologies formed out of slavery persists to this day. This reality was brought to the world stage last year with the social unrest that spread globally. Emancipation Day signifies an integral component of the historical and ongoing movement for Black lives. 

Earlier this year, Bill M-36 passed in the House of Parliament by unanimous consent, declaring that August 1st will be nationally recognized as Emancipation Day. It is an opportunity to strengthen the ties between Black Canadians across the country and to celebrate together, to carry on the long held, rich, cultural tradition of our ancestors. 

The national stage should raise awareness among all Canadians about our country’s own history of slavery and systemic anti-Black racism. An integral part of increasing public education must include the integration of mandated learning expectations in curriculum in every province and territory that acknowledges the 400-year presence of people of African descent in Canada. It should also be utilized as a platform to hold governments to account. I applaud this step and the efforts to make it happen. I don’t want this national acknowledgement to receive just symbolic recognition and performative platitudes. It should be seen as another platform to agitate for real, impactful policy changes for Black Canadians.

   

In researching and writing about Emancipation Day, I have learned even more about the lives, experiences, struggles, and contributions of Black people across this country. It is a history to celebrate and to honour year-round. My experience has also inspired me to keep the flames of freedom alive for younger generations. 

Join the Ontario Black History Society for our annual Emancipation Day Event on Sunday, August 1st at 6pm: https://goo.gle/3BXGcok

The National Film Board of Canada offers a selection of films exploring Canada's history of slavery and racism to watch this Emancipation Day.

MEET FOUNDRY’S NEW CLASS OF 2021

YouTube Music announces the largest global class to date with 27 independent artists joining the program - 2 from Canada
Today, YouTube Music is excited to welcome the 2021 class of Foundry, our global artist development program. Foundry is focused on serving independent music because we believe that the creative potential of independent artists is unmatched

Receiving our most applications ever, the 2021 Foundry Class is the largest to date with 27 artists representing 14 countries and a broad spectrum of musical heritage. Toronto-based R&B artist Ebhoni and from Weyburn Saskatchewan, country singer Tenille Arts, are joining the Foundry class of 2021.

As part of the program, artists will receive dedicated partner support from YouTube and seed funding invested into the development of their content. The combination of access to resources and great teams enables artists to create and launch their music with greater impact and global reach. Since its beginnings in 2015 as a workshop series, Foundry has supported more than 150 developing artists across 15 countries, including breakout alumni like Arlo Parks, Dave, Dua Lipa, Lime Cordiale, Gunna, HARDY, Natanael Cano, Novelbright, Omar Apollo, Rosalía, and Tems

You can’t really go anywhere in New York City right now without hearing WizKid and Tems’ “Essence,” the slow-burning collaboration that just made its debut on the Billboard Hot 100. 

“Being a part of Foundry was an amazing experience,” said Tems. “You get to connect with so many incredible artists and build relationships with wonderful people. It’s an opportunity to grow, and connect more with the world.” 

Foundry is designed for artists who have a vision for their own success. Tems is a star and she’s still independent, building her career in an industry where artists have more options than ever before. Foundry celebrates artists, their courage, and reduces barriers to entry. This group of artists are driving their careers forward as independents, building communities that allow them freedom to grow on their own terms. We are so proud to spotlight and play a part in developing indie talent, and will continue supporting these artists every step of the way.

Welcome and congrats to the Foundry Class of 2021! 
 
Ambar Lucid Fort Collins, Colorado, United States
Ambar Lucid: “I have always known that I wanted to be an artist. I just knew it was what to do, even if I didn’t completely understand it at times. I would describe my music as magical, healing, and inspiring. To me, being independent means having creative control and power over myself and my art. Success means being able to do things my way while having a loyal group of supporters with me throughout my journey.” 


Bad Milk Medellín, Colombia
Bad Milk: “I think success is inspiring other people, and that’s my main goal. My music is chameleonic; I love to experiment with different sounds and portray different emotions. I don’t enjoy putting my creativity in a box. I see music as a mission. It’s definitely what I came here to do. I’m blessed to have the most caring and hard working team by my side. Working with a humongous platform like YouTube is crazy and overwhelming in the best way possible. It creates a space for artists like me to find new fans around the world.” 

Bella Shmurda Lagos, Nigeria Video
Bella Shmurda: “The music I do connects with everybody and has a message to pass. It goes beyond just music: it’s spiritual, and that’s what it’s described as ‘conscious’. Being an independent artist can mean funding your career personally, leading and working with your team to achieve all your goals. Foundry is an opportunity to elevate my career, and being a part of the program is a big win for me and for my team.”

Blessd Medellín, Colombia Video 
Blessd: “Being an artist is a dream I always had and also something I needed to do for my family. As an independent artist, I feel free. YouTube is my main social network to connect with my audience and it’s incredible to be a part of Foundry. I see this as a very big moment in my career.” 

chilldspot Tokyo, Japan Video
chilldspot: “As independent artists, we can express what we really want to say and what we feel exactly. More than anything, to enjoy music is the biggest goal for us. With this support, we will be able to produce more of the video works that we are obsessed with and fans around the world will have chances to get to know us.” 

Doul Tokyo, Japan
Doul: “I want to share my music with people all around the world, and touch their soul through my expressions such as my sound, lyrics, fashion or makeup. Thanks to Foundry, people who have never heard of me can get to know me and my music.” 

Ebhoni Toronto, Canada
 Ebhoni: “Everything I talk about in my music is a real moment: my story, my mood, my experience. To me, independence means individuality. I feel the most success as I achieve the goals that I set for myself, from very small to very lofty. I first fell in love with music by watching people do covers on YouTube, and starting to experiment with singing and making songs my own. I see Foundry as a way to allow more people to discover my music and connect with me.”

Enny London, England 
Enny: “Since childhood I had a love for music and the older I got, the more the desire grew. I would describe my music as a new vibe with an old feel and a fresh perspective. Being an independent artist means being a bit more hands on with all sides of your music. It might mean more work for you and your team but it makes the wins both small and big even more gratifying. For me, success is seeing people discover and connect with your music. And also knowing you've done the best you can, when creating and releasing your art.” 

Fana Hues Pasadena, California, United States 
Fana Hues: “When creating a project, I sprinkle all parts of myself throughout to build a sonic journal. Integrity is crucial; My art has to stay true to me constantly. Being an independent artist provides the freedom to dream as freely as I want, and my vision comes to fruition without compromise. With the support of Foundry, I’ll be able to add more shades and hues to my canvas, giving the world more of my vision while nurturing and growing my craft.” 

Junior Mesa Bakersfield, California, United States
Junior Mesa: “Being independent is a mentality. Claiming independence is saying: We are not the same! I will not conform to your standards. I will express myself in a way that satisfies my will, not yours!” I’ve basically been raised by YouTube, and it’s a huge honor to be recognized.”

Marina Sena Taiobeiras, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Marina Sena: “To be an independent artist is to have determination, free will, freedom. I love being an independent artist, making the sound that really is all about me. I don't think Foundry could come at a better time. After starting my solo career on the right foot and being about to release my first full album, there’s nothing better than support to bet on my sound and make it reach people all over the world.

Meekz Manchester, England
Meekz: “Everything I've put out has been sentimental to me and had a great value, deeper than just music and shooting a video. I'm telling stories in a different way, in a Meekz way. The passion always comes through. To be an independent artist takes a lot of dedication, focus, and behind the scenes work. The bigger you get in life, the challenges get bigger, and you learn to deal with them better, and overcome them. Success for me is about improvement, progression and growing with each release. It’s about building relationships and doing for people what you’d expect them to do for you. The future of independent artists to me is looking great. We make popular happen.”

Paranoid 1966 Alicante, Spain
Paranoid 1966: “My friends pushed me to start singing and writing songs more seriously. Now, I always try to bring new sounds that say something about myself. With my producer Boixy, I always try to innovate. I want to be able to develop my art and music without ties to any constraints. Foundry is a great opportunity to take my creativity to a new level.” 

Paris Texas Los Angeles, California, United States
Paris Texas: “Being an independent artist means your ideas mold the landscape of whatever field you're in. Success as an independent artist means that whatever you've done in your field is cemented, statued, and acknowledged by artists all across the board. I would describe our music and work as a lot of good ideas and having fun.”

Raveena New York City, New York and Stamford, Connecticut, United States 
Raveena: “I always had an innate desire to be an artist and to express myself and be ultra-vulnerable. My music is experimental, with a backbone of pop sensibility. Visuals are also a huge part of my artistry and I love bringing people into my colorful, dream-like world. When I have a big vision, I find friends and collaborators to help me elevate my dreams along the way. I was actually really concerned about being able to create all the visions I see in my head for my upcoming album’s music videos, but I feel so supported in my endeavors, thanks to Foundry.”

Reggie Houston, Texas, United States
reggie: “My music tells you about me. It gives you something to relate to. I want the world to know I’m human. To me an independent artist is someone who is free to do what they want and move how they want. It’s a constant grind: you’re always talking to your team. You’re playing the game with other artists who have a lot of people behind them. But you get to make everything exactly how you want to make it. As creators, I hope we can get to a point where we can sustain ourselves. I hope the future of independent music is that it’s not even called independent music, because it’s such a normal way of doing business.” 

Rote Mütze Raphi Munich, Germany
Rote Mütze Raphi: “I can’t remember when I started to sing, it must have been around the time I started to think. I always said to the people around me that making music is my biggest goal. People often laugh about clear statements like this if you are young and without experience and success. But for me there wasn’t any trigger necessary to decide to become a musician. There was no alternative. Being a musician means everything to me, I can do what I really love. For me I’m successful when I can touch people with my music and maybe even help them to go through a hard time.”

SE SO NEON Seoul, South Korea
SE SO NEON: “We make a spectrum of colorful music that crosses the boundaries of genres, love for vintage textures, emotions and explosive energy that resonate deep in the heart, and above all, the pursuit of novelty. We’re happy to participate in Foundry, as we’re focusing not only on our activities in Korea but also on our success as a global act.”

Seedhe Maut New Delhi, Delhi, India
Seedhe Maut: “Our whole lives, we’d been told this is how we had to live or do. Hip-hop helped us articulate our hopes and ambitions and be who we truly wanted to be. Once you’ve tasted that kind of freedom, that happiness and belonging, why would you ever choose to do anything else? We represent a generation that dares to dream and wants to live life on its own terms. With our music, we hope to give a voice to others like us who go against the grain and follow through on their convictions, whether that be as an artist, gamer, accountant, or whatever. As long as it’s true to you. No compromises, no regrets. Being independent grants us the freedom to evolve in any direction that we feel like. The downside of that can be that sometimes, great ideas get sidelined due to limited resources. Foundry helps remove some of those hurdles, and we’re extremely helpful to unleash our full creative potential onto the world.”

Shygirl London, England 
Shygirl: “My music is lusty and precious, experimental yet familiar. Being an independent artist means choosing your own narrative on a daily basis. I see Foundry as an opportunity to expand and think even bigger.”

Sinéad Harnett Los Angeles, California, United States  
Sinead Harnett: “My music is honest, and influenced by classic R&B. A healing, aural hug, if you will. Being an artist is something I’ve put so much time and work into, just simply for the love of it. I never knew it would become my career, but I knew I would want to write and sing forever. I feel lucky to be independent, in the sense that I’m living up to my expectations and no one else’s. It’s not always easy, but trusting in and carving out your own vision is exhilarating. I believe success as an independent artist lies in having creative control, and in being able to sell out tours and connect to fans. Being supported by an epic team for my visuals and music will be a huge step in my career. I’m excited to reach new audiences and introduce myself to people that don’t know about me yet. Foundry is a big look, and I’m so excited to make it count.”

Snail Mail Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Snail Mail: “To me, being an independent artist is about the songwriting craft and maintaining integrity, while also getting to do whatever I want creatively. Snail Mail started with basement shows and tours that my bandmates and I booked ourselves, so I take a lot of pride in the work that it took to get where I am today. I define immediate success as putting out music that I would listen to myself and long term success as being able to make music for as long as it feels right to do so.”

SoFaygo Atlanta, Georgia, United States
SoFaygo: “Being an independent artist means going harder than anyone else. There is more to prove. You can do and be whatever you want if you just believe in yourself.”

Sycco Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Sycco: “Sycco music is colourful and excitable. I think my energy tends to exude those qualities. I love being my own boss, and answering to myself even when it gets hard. The satisfaction of getting something right and ticking off goals no matter how big or small is so fulfilling, and unlike any other feeling.”

Tenille Arts Nashville, Tennessee, United States 
Tenille Arts: “My music is country, with modern lyrics and melodies. It’s vulnerable, honest, fun, and talks about real life. Being from Canada originally, I was influenced by Shania Twain to go to Nashville and start my career there, and country music always seemed like the natural decision for me. I made my first trip to Nashville after posting covers on my YouTube channel, so Foundry giving me the opportunity to have exposure I’ve always dreamed of really feels like a full circle moment. I want to share my music with a lot of people and have a lasting impact. My big goal is to have a headlining arena tour, and I don’t feel limited at all by being an independent artist. I think it’s all possible!”

Tokischa Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
Tokischa: “My music has no labels. It’s a free, new wave. I’m excited to stand out in countries that are far from my culture.”

Tuyo São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Tuyo: “Tuyo is more about a feeling than a type of sound or genre. We mix very delicate vocals with strong rhythms. It’s music for floating, for flying. We are whole, happy and successful when we can communicate with people through music. Foundry will help us achieve our goal of starting musical conversations with people around the world, and to improve our work and make it more meaningful.” 

MEET FOUNDRY’S NEW CLASS OF 2021

YouTube Music announces the largest global class to date with 27 independent artists joining the program - 2 from Canada
Today, YouTube Music is excited to welcome the 2021 class of Foundry, our global artist development program. Foundry is focused on serving independent music because we believe that the creative potential of independent artists is unmatched

Receiving our most applications ever, the 2021 Foundry Class is the largest to date with 27 artists representing 14 countries and a broad spectrum of musical heritage. Toronto-based R&B artist Ebhoni and from Weyburn Saskatchewan, country singer Tenille Arts, are joining the Foundry class of 2021.

As part of the program, artists will receive dedicated partner support from YouTube and seed funding invested into the development of their content. The combination of access to resources and great teams enables artists to create and launch their music with greater impact and global reach. Since its beginnings in 2015 as a workshop series, Foundry has supported more than 150 developing artists across 15 countries, including breakout alumni like Arlo Parks, Dave, Dua Lipa, Lime Cordiale, Gunna, HARDY, Natanael Cano, Novelbright, Omar Apollo, Rosalía, and Tems

You can’t really go anywhere in New York City right now without hearing WizKid and Tems’ “Essence,” the slow-burning collaboration that just made its debut on the Billboard Hot 100. 

“Being a part of Foundry was an amazing experience,” said Tems. “You get to connect with so many incredible artists and build relationships with wonderful people. It’s an opportunity to grow, and connect more with the world.” 

Foundry is designed for artists who have a vision for their own success. Tems is a star and she’s still independent, building her career in an industry where artists have more options than ever before. Foundry celebrates artists, their courage, and reduces barriers to entry. This group of artists are driving their careers forward as independents, building communities that allow them freedom to grow on their own terms. We are so proud to spotlight and play a part in developing indie talent, and will continue supporting these artists every step of the way.

Welcome and congrats to the Foundry Class of 2021! 
 
Ambar Lucid Fort Collins, Colorado, United States
Ambar Lucid: “I have always known that I wanted to be an artist. I just knew it was what to do, even if I didn’t completely understand it at times. I would describe my music as magical, healing, and inspiring. To me, being independent means having creative control and power over myself and my art. Success means being able to do things my way while having a loyal group of supporters with me throughout my journey.” 


Bad Milk Medellín, Colombia
Bad Milk: “I think success is inspiring other people, and that’s my main goal. My music is chameleonic; I love to experiment with different sounds and portray different emotions. I don’t enjoy putting my creativity in a box. I see music as a mission. It’s definitely what I came here to do. I’m blessed to have the most caring and hard working team by my side. Working with a humongous platform like YouTube is crazy and overwhelming in the best way possible. It creates a space for artists like me to find new fans around the world.” 

Bella Shmurda Lagos, Nigeria Video
Bella Shmurda: “The music I do connects with everybody and has a message to pass. It goes beyond just music: it’s spiritual, and that’s what it’s described as ‘conscious’. Being an independent artist can mean funding your career personally, leading and working with your team to achieve all your goals. Foundry is an opportunity to elevate my career, and being a part of the program is a big win for me and for my team.”

Blessd Medellín, Colombia Video 
Blessd: “Being an artist is a dream I always had and also something I needed to do for my family. As an independent artist, I feel free. YouTube is my main social network to connect with my audience and it’s incredible to be a part of Foundry. I see this as a very big moment in my career.” 

chilldspot Tokyo, Japan Video
chilldspot: “As independent artists, we can express what we really want to say and what we feel exactly. More than anything, to enjoy music is the biggest goal for us. With this support, we will be able to produce more of the video works that we are obsessed with and fans around the world will have chances to get to know us.” 

Doul Tokyo, Japan
Doul: “I want to share my music with people all around the world, and touch their soul through my expressions such as my sound, lyrics, fashion or makeup. Thanks to Foundry, people who have never heard of me can get to know me and my music.” 

Ebhoni Toronto, Canada
 Ebhoni: “Everything I talk about in my music is a real moment: my story, my mood, my experience. To me, independence means individuality. I feel the most success as I achieve the goals that I set for myself, from very small to very lofty. I first fell in love with music by watching people do covers on YouTube, and starting to experiment with singing and making songs my own. I see Foundry as a way to allow more people to discover my music and connect with me.”

Enny London, England 
Enny: “Since childhood I had a love for music and the older I got, the more the desire grew. I would describe my music as a new vibe with an old feel and a fresh perspective. Being an independent artist means being a bit more hands on with all sides of your music. It might mean more work for you and your team but it makes the wins both small and big even more gratifying. For me, success is seeing people discover and connect with your music. And also knowing you've done the best you can, when creating and releasing your art.” 

Fana Hues Pasadena, California, United States 
Fana Hues: “When creating a project, I sprinkle all parts of myself throughout to build a sonic journal. Integrity is crucial; My art has to stay true to me constantly. Being an independent artist provides the freedom to dream as freely as I want, and my vision comes to fruition without compromise. With the support of Foundry, I’ll be able to add more shades and hues to my canvas, giving the world more of my vision while nurturing and growing my craft.” 

Junior Mesa Bakersfield, California, United States
Junior Mesa: “Being independent is a mentality. Claiming independence is saying: We are not the same! I will not conform to your standards. I will express myself in a way that satisfies my will, not yours!” I’ve basically been raised by YouTube, and it’s a huge honor to be recognized.”

Marina Sena Taiobeiras, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Marina Sena: “To be an independent artist is to have determination, free will, freedom. I love being an independent artist, making the sound that really is all about me. I don't think Foundry could come at a better time. After starting my solo career on the right foot and being about to release my first full album, there’s nothing better than support to bet on my sound and make it reach people all over the world.

Meekz Manchester, England
Meekz: “Everything I've put out has been sentimental to me and had a great value, deeper than just music and shooting a video. I'm telling stories in a different way, in a Meekz way. The passion always comes through. To be an independent artist takes a lot of dedication, focus, and behind the scenes work. The bigger you get in life, the challenges get bigger, and you learn to deal with them better, and overcome them. Success for me is about improvement, progression and growing with each release. It’s about building relationships and doing for people what you’d expect them to do for you. The future of independent artists to me is looking great. We make popular happen.”

Paranoid 1966 Alicante, Spain
Paranoid 1966: “My friends pushed me to start singing and writing songs more seriously. Now, I always try to bring new sounds that say something about myself. With my producer Boixy, I always try to innovate. I want to be able to develop my art and music without ties to any constraints. Foundry is a great opportunity to take my creativity to a new level.” 

Paris Texas Los Angeles, California, United States
Paris Texas: “Being an independent artist means your ideas mold the landscape of whatever field you're in. Success as an independent artist means that whatever you've done in your field is cemented, statued, and acknowledged by artists all across the board. I would describe our music and work as a lot of good ideas and having fun.”

Raveena New York City, New York and Stamford, Connecticut, United States 
Raveena: “I always had an innate desire to be an artist and to express myself and be ultra-vulnerable. My music is experimental, with a backbone of pop sensibility. Visuals are also a huge part of my artistry and I love bringing people into my colorful, dream-like world. When I have a big vision, I find friends and collaborators to help me elevate my dreams along the way. I was actually really concerned about being able to create all the visions I see in my head for my upcoming album’s music videos, but I feel so supported in my endeavors, thanks to Foundry.”

Reggie Houston, Texas, United States
reggie: “My music tells you about me. It gives you something to relate to. I want the world to know I’m human. To me an independent artist is someone who is free to do what they want and move how they want. It’s a constant grind: you’re always talking to your team. You’re playing the game with other artists who have a lot of people behind them. But you get to make everything exactly how you want to make it. As creators, I hope we can get to a point where we can sustain ourselves. I hope the future of independent music is that it’s not even called independent music, because it’s such a normal way of doing business.” 

Rote Mütze Raphi Munich, Germany
Rote Mütze Raphi: “I can’t remember when I started to sing, it must have been around the time I started to think. I always said to the people around me that making music is my biggest goal. People often laugh about clear statements like this if you are young and without experience and success. But for me there wasn’t any trigger necessary to decide to become a musician. There was no alternative. Being a musician means everything to me, I can do what I really love. For me I’m successful when I can touch people with my music and maybe even help them to go through a hard time.”

SE SO NEON Seoul, South Korea
SE SO NEON: “We make a spectrum of colorful music that crosses the boundaries of genres, love for vintage textures, emotions and explosive energy that resonate deep in the heart, and above all, the pursuit of novelty. We’re happy to participate in Foundry, as we’re focusing not only on our activities in Korea but also on our success as a global act.”

Seedhe Maut New Delhi, Delhi, India
Seedhe Maut: “Our whole lives, we’d been told this is how we had to live or do. Hip-hop helped us articulate our hopes and ambitions and be who we truly wanted to be. Once you’ve tasted that kind of freedom, that happiness and belonging, why would you ever choose to do anything else? We represent a generation that dares to dream and wants to live life on its own terms. With our music, we hope to give a voice to others like us who go against the grain and follow through on their convictions, whether that be as an artist, gamer, accountant, or whatever. As long as it’s true to you. No compromises, no regrets. Being independent grants us the freedom to evolve in any direction that we feel like. The downside of that can be that sometimes, great ideas get sidelined due to limited resources. Foundry helps remove some of those hurdles, and we’re extremely helpful to unleash our full creative potential onto the world.”

Shygirl London, England 
Shygirl: “My music is lusty and precious, experimental yet familiar. Being an independent artist means choosing your own narrative on a daily basis. I see Foundry as an opportunity to expand and think even bigger.”

Sinéad Harnett Los Angeles, California, United States  
Sinead Harnett: “My music is honest, and influenced by classic R&B. A healing, aural hug, if you will. Being an artist is something I’ve put so much time and work into, just simply for the love of it. I never knew it would become my career, but I knew I would want to write and sing forever. I feel lucky to be independent, in the sense that I’m living up to my expectations and no one else’s. It’s not always easy, but trusting in and carving out your own vision is exhilarating. I believe success as an independent artist lies in having creative control, and in being able to sell out tours and connect to fans. Being supported by an epic team for my visuals and music will be a huge step in my career. I’m excited to reach new audiences and introduce myself to people that don’t know about me yet. Foundry is a big look, and I’m so excited to make it count.”

Snail Mail Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Snail Mail: “To me, being an independent artist is about the songwriting craft and maintaining integrity, while also getting to do whatever I want creatively. Snail Mail started with basement shows and tours that my bandmates and I booked ourselves, so I take a lot of pride in the work that it took to get where I am today. I define immediate success as putting out music that I would listen to myself and long term success as being able to make music for as long as it feels right to do so.”

SoFaygo Atlanta, Georgia, United States
SoFaygo: “Being an independent artist means going harder than anyone else. There is more to prove. You can do and be whatever you want if you just believe in yourself.”

Sycco Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Sycco: “Sycco music is colourful and excitable. I think my energy tends to exude those qualities. I love being my own boss, and answering to myself even when it gets hard. The satisfaction of getting something right and ticking off goals no matter how big or small is so fulfilling, and unlike any other feeling.”

Tenille Arts Nashville, Tennessee, United States 
Tenille Arts: “My music is country, with modern lyrics and melodies. It’s vulnerable, honest, fun, and talks about real life. Being from Canada originally, I was influenced by Shania Twain to go to Nashville and start my career there, and country music always seemed like the natural decision for me. I made my first trip to Nashville after posting covers on my YouTube channel, so Foundry giving me the opportunity to have exposure I’ve always dreamed of really feels like a full circle moment. I want to share my music with a lot of people and have a lasting impact. My big goal is to have a headlining arena tour, and I don’t feel limited at all by being an independent artist. I think it’s all possible!”

Tokischa Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
Tokischa: “My music has no labels. It’s a free, new wave. I’m excited to stand out in countries that are far from my culture.”

Tuyo São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Tuyo: “Tuyo is more about a feeling than a type of sound or genre. We mix very delicate vocals with strong rhythms. It’s music for floating, for flying. We are whole, happy and successful when we can communicate with people through music. Foundry will help us achieve our goal of starting musical conversations with people around the world, and to improve our work and make it more meaningful.” 

Sharing More Olympic Moments with CBC Sports on YouTube

Editors Note: This blog was guest written by Perdita Felicien, an author, two-time Olympian, ten-time National Champion and the first Canadian woman to win a World Championship gold medal in track and field. Felicien is host of Tokyo Today and proud member of CBC's Tokyo 2020 broadcast team.
 

This summer in Tokyo, thousands of athletes from around the world will come together and compete on the world’s biggest sporting stage. Some athletes will compete for the first time, others for the last, all will have their eyes on the podium, ready to cement their name in history. Each will carry with them their own journey to the Olympic Games and have their own story to tell of how it all unfolded. 

The Olympic Games is a larger than life event, broadcasted to every corner of the world. The events however, are only the tip of the iceberg - a culmination of years of hard work. What most don’t see are the winding roads and the uphill climb that brought the athletes to the start line. I know first hand that qualifying for the Olympics is no easy feat. Access to training facilities, finding the right coaches and mentors, gaining financial support and weathering injuries are just a few of the obstacles athletes must first overcome. That’s why the Olympic Games are more than just a sporting event, it’s a celebration of years of training, hard work, and sacrifice. 

Olympians play a powerful role in bringing communities together. We inspire others with our skill, grit and determination and every two years, the world has the pleasure of watching us compete for glory at the Olympic Games. As a proud member of CBC’s Olympic broadcast team, we believe it is important to go beyond event coverage and share more moments leading up to and during the Olympic Games that help to create a closer connection between audiences and athletes. 

This summer, CBC is making the Olympic Games more accessible to Canadians by offering more ways to watch, and more Olympic-themed content to enjoy. Through CBC Sports on YouTube, audiences can get a deeper look at the Olympic journey with athlete interviews, full event recaps, viral moments and more behind the scenes content. CBC’s goal is to give audiences more access to Tokyo 2020 and showcase the athletes and the moments that will surely become part of Olympic history.

Bell Partners with Google Cloud to Deliver Next-generation Network Experiences for Canadians

Today, Bell Canada and Google Cloud announced a strategic partnership to power Bell’s company-wide digital transformation, enhance its network and IT infrastructure, and enable a more sustainable future.

If you would like to learn more about this news, click through to read the full press release in English and French.

How Google Canada Is Acknowledging Canada Day

Today, Canadians from coast to coast to coast are celebrating Canada Day, a day that is steeped in traditions and a great sense of national pride. 

In the midst of these celebrations, we also recognize the need to acknowledge horrific elements of our shared history that have caused intergenerational trauma and pain for Indigenous people. 

Here at Google Canada, we are deliberately making space for Indigenous communities while encouraging Canadians to learn more about reconciliation. 

Here are some helpful resources: 
If you, or people you know, need immediate assistance, the Indian Residential School Survivors Society (IRSSS) Emergency Crisis Line is available 24/7 for those that may need counselling support: 1-800-721-0066 or 1-866-925-4419.

Douglas Coupland x Google Research: The intersection of art and technology

Have you ever noticed that the word art is embedded in ARTificial intelligence? Neither did we, but when the opportunity presented itself to explore how artificial intelligence (AI) inspires artistic expression — with the help of internationally renowned Canadian artist Douglas Coupland — the Google Research team jumped on it. This collaboration, with the support of Google Arts & Culture, culminated in a project called Slogans for the Class of 2030, which spotlights the experiences of the first generation of young people whose lives are fully intertwined with the existence of AI. 


This collaboration was brought to life by first introducing Coupland’s written work to a machine learning language model. Machine learning is a form of AI that provides computer systems the ability to automatically learn from data. In this case, Google research scientists tuned a machine learning algorithm with Coupland’s 30-year body of written work — more than a million words — so it would familiarize itself with the author’s unique style of writing. From there, curated general-public social media posts on selected topics were added to teach the algorithm how to craft short-form, topical statements. 



Once the algorithm was trained, the next step was to process and reassemble suggestions of text, data, for Coupland to use as inspiration to create twenty-five Slogans for the Class of 2030. In his own words:



A common theme in Coupland’s work is the investigation of the human condition through the lens of pop culture. The focus on the class of 2030 was intentional. Coupland wanted to create works that would serve as inspiration for students in their early teens who will be graduating from university in 2030. For those teens considering their future career paths, he’d hope that this collaboration would trigger a broader conversation on the vast possibilities in the field and would acquaint them to the fact that AI does not have to be strictly scientific, it can be artful. 



Unveiled today, all twenty-five thought provoking and visually rich digital slogans are yours to experience on Google Arts & Culture alongside Coupland’s artistic statement and other behind the scenes material. This isn't Douglas’ first collaboration with Google Arts & Culture, in 2019 Coupland’s Vancouver art exhibition was captured virtually. In 2015 and 2016, he joined the Google Arts & Culture Lab residency in Paris where he collaborated with engineers to develop many works including the Search book and the Living Internet


In an effort to celebrate Canadian talent, multiple venues across Canada have signed on to display the slogans, for a limited time, on larger-than-life digital screens allowing curious minds to experience them in an immersive way. The screens include the Terry Fox Memorial Plaza at BC Place Stadium in Vancouver B. C., the Len Werry TELUS building in downtown Calgary, the downtown Toronto TELUS building and select Pattison screens across Canada. 



“These art installations displayed at TELUS buildings in Calgary and Toronto are being showcased at the perfect time, as the weather is warming and more of us are safely re-exploring our neighbourhoods by spending time outdoors,” said Scott Dutchak, TELUS Vice-President of Real Estate. “Calgarians will already be familiar with the unique Douglas Coupland light display at TELUS Sky, and we jumped at the opportunity for more of our buildings to showcase the beauty of AI and art coming together, and to celebrate Douglas Couplands inspiring and captivating words.” 


Technology has always played a role in creating new types of possibilities that inspire artists — from the sounds of distortion to the electronic sounds of synths for musicians for example. Today, advances in AI are opening up new possibilities for other forms of art and we look forward to seeing what the crossroads of art and technology bring to life. 




Mary Two-Axe Earley’s fight for equality changed Canada

The Mary Two-Axe Earley Google Doodle created by Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) guest artist Star Horn. See it live at google.ca on June 28, 2021

This blog is guest-written by Kanien’keháka (Mohawk) filmmaker Courtney Montour. She is the writer & director of “Mary Two-Axe Earley: I Am Indian Again.” If you head over to the homepage today, you'll see the Doodle honours Mary Two-Axe Earley, a Kanien’keháka (Mohawk) woman who fought for more than two decades to challenge sex discrimination against First Nations women embedded in Canada’s Indian Act.

Mary Two-Axe Earley is a name I grew up always knowing. We are both Kanien’keháka (Mohawk) from Kahnà:wake, located across the river from Montreal, Quebec. I was a teenager when Mary passed away in 1996, too young to fully grasp the impact she had on people’s lives across Canada. I set out to make “Mary Two-Axe Earley: I Am Indian Again” to bring attention to a pivotal figure who is often overlooked in accounts of this country’s history. 

Mary fought for more than two decades to challenge sex discrimination against First Nations women in Canada’s Indian Act and became a key figure in Canada’s women’s rights movement. The Indian Act of 1876 defines who is an “Indian” and who can belong to an “Indian band” (now referred to as First Nations). The federal government targeted First Nations women, stripping them of their Indian status (their recognition as an Indian) if they married a non-Indian man. These laws banned First Nations women and their children who lost their status from living in their communities, denying them access to critical social programs and voting rights in their community, and severing their ties to identity and culture. Thousands of First Nations women affected by this legislation are still waiting to be recognized by Canada.

   
Mohawk filmmaker Courtney Montour describes her new documentary on Mary Two-Axe Earley, whose fight for the rights of First Nations women made her a pivotal figure in Canada’s women’s rights movement. 
Mary garnered the support of influential political figures and women’s rights activists. She led with love, compassion and persistence, something that I see so many of our women carrying with them as they continue this crucial work for sex equality.
Mary Two-Axe Earley (centre) at the Montreal Botanical Garden tree planting ceremony (mid-1970s). Photo courtesy of Rosemary Two Rivers 
Making “Mary Two-Axe Earley: I Am Indian Again” was a four-year journey that connected me with Mary’s supporters from across the country. I quickly realized that the biggest challenge would be finding audio and visual archives. I was saddened and frustrated to discover that so few images from Mary’s well-documented, more than 20-year fight remained in Canada’s media and archival institutions. This instilled a sense of urgency to bring Mary’s story to the screen for the very first time even more. 

Abenaki filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin, who mentored me on my short doc “Flat Rocks,” gifted me audio recordings she taped with Mary over several months in 1984. They were recorded in Mary’s home, around the kitchen table, where Mary’s advocacy began. They are the roots of the documentary, allowing Mary to tell her story in her own words.
Mary Two-Axe Earley with René Lévesque, Premier of Quebec, at the First Ministers’ Conference on Aboriginal Constitutional Matters, Ottawa (1983). Credit: National Film Board of Canada 
The film chronicles some of the results of Mary’s work. On June 28, 1985, nearly two decades after Mary began her fight against sex discrimination in the Indian Act, the Parliament of Canada passed Bill C-31, an amendment to restore Indian status to women who had lost it through marriage. The Bill was effective April 17, 1985. And the movement for sex equality continues today: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) cited sex discrimination in the Indian Act as a root cause of violence and discrimination faced by First Nations women in Canada. 

As National Indigenous History Month in Canada draws to a close, Canadians and Indigenous communities are grappling with Canada’s failure to properly acknowledge the historical and ongoing genocide of Indigenous Peoples in this country. At the end of May, the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation found the remains of 215 children who had been buried in unmarked graves at the site of a former Indian residential school in British Columbia. And searches are being done at other former residential schools. A week later, the Government of Canada released the long-awaited National Action Plan to end violence against Indigenous women and girls. Critics say the government’s plan lacks tangible goals, a detailed timeframe and budget. 

I’m reminded of a moment in the film when Mary reflects on the first time she spoke out, at the 1968 Royal Commission on the Status of Women in Ottawa. She worried about the consequences of doing so — of potentially being forced to leave her home and her community. But Mary pushed ahead. She secretly organized and hid on a bus full of women to travel to the Royal Commission. Mary was leading a movement. “In ’68, nobody dare say anything against the Indian Act,” said Mary. 

Today we honour the legacy of Mary Two-Axe Earley and all the women who continue to demand sex equality for First Nations women and their children. Her work still has an impact on our lives today, inspiring us to speak out against these injustices and to collectively uplift First Nations women. Mary shows us that our history matters, our women matter and our families matter. 

“Mary Two-Axe Earley: I Am Indian Again” is produced and distributed by the National Film Board of Canada and is currently screening on the film festival circuit. In December 2021, the film will be available for educators and teachers via CAMPUS, as well as for community screenings across Canada and will be launched on NFB.ca/ONF.ca for free streaming across Canada in June 2022. Watch the trailer now at https://www.nfb.ca/film/mary-two-axe-earley. For more information on CAMPUS, please visit https://help.nfb.ca/contact-the-nfb/. To book a community screening, please contact Donna Cowan at [email protected].

-- 
Òn:wa wenhniserá:te' Kanien'kehá:ka karáhstha' Star Horn ioráhston ne Koráhne aó:wen Google Doodle. Wa'tiakononhwerá:ton' ki' ne Mary Two-Axe Earley. Ehtà:ke tiakoká:raton ne Courtney Montour, Kanien'kehá:ka Teióia'ks Iakón:nis. "Mary Two-Axe Earley: Skonkwehón:we Á:re" iakohiá:ton tánon' tiakoniarotáhrhon. 

Shontonkwatehiahróntie' shikhehsennaienté:ri ne Mary Two-Axe Earley. Teiakenitsá:ron Kanien'kehá:ka na'teiakeniia'tò:ten' tánon' Kahnawà:ke iontiatehià:ron, ísi' na'kaniatará:ti Tiohtià:ke tkaná:taien. Tióhton iawén:re tewen'niáwe tánon' tióhton niwáhsen ià:ia'k shiiohseratátie' sha'ontóhetste' ne Mary, tánon' nì:'i shitià:tase'. Iah ki' ní: thiewákhe' tó: niió:re' tsi ionkhiia'takéhnhen ne Koráhne. Né: ká:ti' wa'katerihwahténtia'te' ákhsa' kí:ken teióia'ks "Mary Two-Axe Earley: Skonkwehón:we Á:re". Wà:kehrek aonsakerihó:wanahte' tsi niiehsennowá:nen, nè:'e tsi iotkà:te' enhon'nikonhrón:ni' tsi iah thahatiká:raton' tsi niiakoié:ren nó:nen enhatiká:raton' tsi nitiawénhseron ne Koráhne. 

Skáhere' ne tewáhsen niiohserá:ke ieiakorihwà:re' ne takaténionke' ne Indian Act kaianerénhsera' né: tsi kà:ron nitionáttehkwe' ne konnón:kwe tsi ní:ioht ne ronnón:kwe ne kaianerenhserá:kon. Tho ki' nontá:we' tsi wa'éhente' ne Koráhne tsi kontirihwáia'ks ne konnón:kwe aotiianerenhsera'shòn:'a aorihwà:ke. Indian Act sha'té:kon iawén:re tewen'niáwe tánon' tsá:ta niwáhsen ià:ia'k nikaianerenhserò:ten' tewanónhtons ónhka onkwehón:we enkénhake' (indian iontatena'tónhkwen) tánon' ónhka enwá:ton' eniontià:taren' ne onkwehón:we raotinakerahserá:kon (Indian Band rotina'tónhkwen). Kakoráhsera' wahshakotiia'tará:ko' ne konnonkwehón:we ne ahshakotiianerenhseráhkhwa' tóka' ahotiniákonke' ne iah tehonnonkwehón:we. Kaianerénhsera' wa'akóhnhe'se' ne konwatiianerenhseráhkhwen konnonkwehón:we tánon' akotiien'okòn:'a ne raonatená:takon ahatinákereke', ahotiia'takehnhahtsheraientà:seronke' tánon' ne akontatshennarà:na' tsi tehonnitiohkwakénnie's. Wa'akó:ia'khse' tsi nahò:ten' ionatstáhkwen ne konnonkwehón:we akontatena'tónhkhwake', tánon' wa'akóhkhwa' tsi niiotirihò:ten'. Tewen'niawe'ékhon tsi nikón:ti ne konnonkwehón:we shé:kon kaianerénhsera' kahsnonhsó:kon tkontiia'tò:ron tánon' iotihrhá:re' ne aonsahshakotiianerenhserawíhon' ne Kakoráhsera'. 

É:so iá:kon ne iekó:ra tánon' ierihwáia'ks ne konnón:kwe aotirihwà:ke wa'tkonwatihswanéta' ne Mary. Akwáhs kanoronhkhwahtsherá:kon, atennitenrahtsherá:kon tánon' atkontahkwahtsherá:kon ienenhrí:neskwe'. É:so kón:ti ne konnón:kwe khé:kens ne tho sha'teiotiierenhátie' tsi iotiio'tátie' ne kaianerenhserá:kon sha'taonsahonátteke' ne konnón:kwe tánon' ronnón:kwe. 

Kaié:ri niiohserá:ke wakón:ni' ne "Mary Two Axe-Earley: Skonkwehón:we Á:re". Kwah shikón:ni é:so iá:kon ne tekonwatihswanéten ne Mary wa'tiakwatatientéhrha'ne'. Kanakerahserakwé:kon nitiakawenónhseron. Óksa'k wa'kattokáhstsi' tsi né: aonhà:'a entewakentó:ra'se' ne thé:nen iakowennáten tóka' ni' ieia'tarónnion aketshenrión:ko' tsi iontahkwenniaientahkhwa'kó:wa. Onke'nikonhraksà:ten' tánon' onkena'kón:ni' tsi iah é:so tetká:ien ne Mary ieia'tarónnion ne Koráhne tsi iontahkwenniaientahkhwa'kó:wa's ne tká:ra's tánon' ón:kwe ieia'tarónnion. Arohátien tsi kwah tewáhsen niiohserá:ke shakotíhseron tánon' shakoti'nikonhrarátie'skwe'. Thó:ner ki' é:so tsi wa'tewakhsteríha'te' ne aontontié:renhte' taióia'ke' ne Mary akoká:ra'. 

Abenaki ionkwehón:we Alanis Obomsawin tetewakerihwahsnie'séhahkwe' shikón:ni ne "Flat Rocks" teióia'ks. Aónha ki' ón:kon' ne Mary iakowennatárion, né: ne tióhton iawén:re tewen'niáwe tánon' sha'té:kon niwáhsen kaié:ri shiiohseratátie' wa'akowennáta' tsi iakoká:raton. Mary tsi tiakonónhsote' tsi iekhonnià:tha' atekhwahrahtsherákta iotiwennáten, tsi ki' kwah nón:we Mary taiontáhsawen' aierihwaia'ákhseke'. Ohtehra'shòn:'a ne thí:ken akokara'shòn:'a, ón:ton' aionkhikaratón:hahse' ne Mary teióia'ks nón:we. 

Teióia'ks oh niioieránion ne Mary akoio'ténhsera'. Tewáhsen niiohserá:ke iakorihwáien, ieiakorihwà:re' ne sha'taonsahonátteke' ne ronnón:kwe tánon' konnón:kwe áse'ken Indian Act iakokèn:ron ne konnonkwehón:we. Sok ki' Ohiarí:ha tewáhsen sha'té:kon shiská:rahkwe' tióhton iawén:re tewen'niáwe tánon' sha'té:kon niwáhsen wísk shiiohserá:te' Kakoráhsera' wahatiianerenhseróhetste' ne' Kaianerénhsera' Aón:ton C-31 (Bill C-31). Iehotiiéhston tehotiténion ne kaianerénhsera', són:ton' ne konnonkwehón:we iotiniá:kon tóka' ni' iotiniakòn:ne aonsaiotiianerenhseraientà:seron'. Shé:kon ki' nòn:wa wenhniseraténion iotiianerenhserahskéhnhen ne konnón:kwe sha'taonsahonátteke' tsi ní:ioht ne ronnón:kwe. Kentiónhkwa ne rotirihwisá:kon tánon' rotiri'wanón:ton ne kanakerahserakwé:kon oh niiawèn:'en tsi konwatiia'taié:was tánon' konwanahsehtánion ne konnonkwehón:we tánon' kontiksa'okòn:'a, kí:ken kentióhkwa ohna'kénhaton rotihiá:ton tsi rotirihwatshénrion tsi Indian Act tiorihón:ni tsi konwatikarewahtánions tánon' konwatikenhren'seronniánions ne konnonkwehón:we ne Koráhne nón:we. 

 Tsi ó:nen iotenhni'to'kta'onhátie' ne Onkwehón:we Akawenhnì:ta' ne Koráhne, Korahró:non tánon' Onkwehón:we shé:kon tehonatatiénhton ne aonsahontate'nikonhrahserón:ni' áse'ken Kakoráhsera' iah orihwí:io tha'tehatirihwa'serákwas oh nihotiieránion tsi niiohseré:son's tánon' né: ó:ni' tsi thahón:nehre' ahshakonáhton'te' nonkwehón:we nok ahatirihwáhtòn:thake' ne onkwehón:we tsi nihotirihò:ten's. Tsi ontenhni'tò:kten' ne Onerahtohkó:wa, tsi Tsonontati'kó:wa (British Columbia) nón:we, tsi rontientáhkhwahkwe' ne ronnonkwehón:we ratiksa'okòn:'a, Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc onkwehón:we sahatihstien'tatshenrión:ko' ne tékeni tewen'niáwe tánon' wísk iawén:re nihá:ti ratiksa'okòn:'a thatiia'tatárion, iah tekentstenhró:ton. Sok ki' tsahià:khsera ohnà:ken, Kakoráhsera' tahónhtka'we' ne kanonión:ni ne oh nenkaié:ren ne tóhsa akonwatikarewahtaniónhseke' ne konnonkwehón:we tánon' kontiksa'okòn:'a. Tsi niiá:kon ne iakohiatonhseraka'én:ion nahò:ten thonahtkà:wen ión:ton tsi iah thiekaié:ri tsi ní:ioht tsi karihwahseronniánion ne ahatirihwaié:rite', kátke eh tho nenkaieránionke' tánon' ka' néntewe' ne ohwísta'. 

Nè:'e ki' sonkwehiahráhkwen' tsi wa'eká:raton' ne Mary néne tiotierénhton sha'onthró:ri' nahò:ten tiakawehtáhkwen tánon' iah teierihwanòn:we'skwe', tióhton iawén:re tewen'niáwe tánon' ià:ia'k niwáhsen sha'té:kon shiiohserá:te' nen' nè:'e ne Royal Commission ne Kanà:tso nonkwá:ti. Teiako'nikonhrhá:rahkwe' oh naiakoia'tawèn: enke' tóka' aiakotatì:'on áse'ken wate'shennaién:tahkwe' ne ahshakotinakerakwáhtonke' tsi tiakotená:taien. Nek tsi sénha'k ia'ontáthreke'. Karihwahsehtòn:ke iakoterihwahseronníhne ne skátne konnonkwehón:we iakoia'takarénie's akontíta' tánon' akontáhsehte' oh naiá:wen'ne' ne Royal Commission nón:we iakón:newe'. Iakonenhrí:nonhkwe' ne Mary. Iaká:wen, "Né: ne tióhton iawén:re tewen'niáwe tánon' ià:ia'k niwáhsen sha'té:kon shiiohserátie', iah ónhka teiakote'nientèn:'en ne aierihwáia'ke' ne Indian Act." 

Òn:wa wenhniserá:te' wa'tiethinonhwerá:ton' ne Mary Two-Axe Earley tánon' akwé:kon tsi nikón:ti ne konnón:kwe shé:kon iotiianerenhserahskéhnhen ne sha'taonsahonátteke' ne konnonkwehón:we tánon' akotiien'okòn:'a raotirihwà:ke. Shé:kon ne òn:wa wenhniseraténion ionkwaia'takehnhenhátie' ne tsi ní:kon iakoio'tèn:'en. Shé:kon ieionkhi'nikonhrà:reks ne aietewarihwaia'ákhseke' kí:ken nahò:ten' iah tekarihwakwaríhsion, tánon' ne enskátne aiethi'nikonhrakará:tate' ne konnonkwehón:we. Mary ionkhina'tón:ni tsi káhsta ne onkwakara'shòn:'a tsi nitiawénhseron, kontiia'tanó:ron ne konnonkwehón:we tánon' onkwahwatsire'shòn:'a. 

National Film Board of Canada rotíhson tánon' tehonrenià:tha' ne "Mary Two-Axe Earley: Skonkwehón:we Á:re" teióia'ks, nok nó:nen'k teioia'ákhons tsi nón:we tewaterihwahtentia'tánion ne teioia'ksokòn:'a aionterohrókha'. Nó:nen enská:ra'ne' ne Tsothóhrha' 2021, kí:ken teióia'ks enwá:ton' enhotiientà:seron' ne shakotirihonnién:ni, CAMPUS nón:we enwá:ton' ienhonterò:roke', tánon' tsi kanatakè:ron ó:ni' entkarà:seron' ne Koráhne. Ohiarí:ha 2022 NFB.ca/ONF.ca ne Koráhne nón:we entká:ra'ne', iah thé:nen thaiokaraién:take'. Ken'k ní:kon ia'saterò:rok ne https://www.nfb.ca/film/mary-two-axe-earley nón:we. Tóka' enhséhrheke' ne sénha aiesató:kenhse' nahò:ten' ne CAMPUS, https://help.nfb.ca/contact-the-nfb/ nón:we iahá:se'. Tóka' enhséhrheke' ne saná:takon aontaká:ra'ne', Donna Cowan ia'shehiá:ton's ne [email protected] nón:we.

Mary Two-Axe Earley’s fight for equality changed Canada

The Mary Two-Axe Earley Google Doodle created by Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) guest artist Star Horn. See it live at google.ca on June 28, 2021

This blog is guest-written by Kanien’keháka (Mohawk) filmmaker Courtney Montour. She is the writer & director of “Mary Two-Axe Earley: I Am Indian Again.” If you head over to the homepage today, you'll see the Doodle honours Mary Two-Axe Earley, a Kanien’keháka (Mohawk) woman who fought for more than two decades to challenge sex discrimination against First Nations women embedded in Canada’s Indian Act.

Mary Two-Axe Earley is a name I grew up always knowing. We are both Kanien’keháka (Mohawk) from Kahnà:wake, located across the river from Montreal, Quebec. I was a teenager when Mary passed away in 1996, too young to fully grasp the impact she had on people’s lives across Canada. I set out to make “Mary Two-Axe Earley: I Am Indian Again” to bring attention to a pivotal figure who is often overlooked in accounts of this country’s history. 

Mary fought for more than two decades to challenge sex discrimination against First Nations women in Canada’s Indian Act and became a key figure in Canada’s women’s rights movement. The Indian Act of 1876 defines who is an “Indian” and who can belong to an “Indian band” (now referred to as First Nations). The federal government targeted First Nations women, stripping them of their Indian status (their recognition as an Indian) if they married a non-Indian man. These laws banned First Nations women and their children who lost their status from living in their communities, denying them access to critical social programs and voting rights in their community, and severing their ties to identity and culture. Thousands of First Nations women affected by this legislation are still waiting to be recognized by Canada.

   
Mohawk filmmaker Courtney Montour describes her new documentary on Mary Two-Axe Earley, whose fight for the rights of First Nations women made her a pivotal figure in Canada’s women’s rights movement. 
Mary garnered the support of influential political figures and women’s rights activists. She led with love, compassion and persistence, something that I see so many of our women carrying with them as they continue this crucial work for sex equality.
Mary Two-Axe Earley (centre) at the Montreal Botanical Garden tree planting ceremony (mid-1970s). Photo courtesy of Rosemary Two Rivers 
Making “Mary Two-Axe Earley: I Am Indian Again” was a four-year journey that connected me with Mary’s supporters from across the country. I quickly realized that the biggest challenge would be finding audio and visual archives. I was saddened and frustrated to discover that so few images from Mary’s well-documented, more than 20-year fight remained in Canada’s media and archival institutions. This instilled a sense of urgency to bring Mary’s story to the screen for the very first time even more. 

Abenaki filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin, who mentored me on my short doc “Flat Rocks,” gifted me audio recordings she taped with Mary over several months in 1984. They were recorded in Mary’s home, around the kitchen table, where Mary’s advocacy began. They are the roots of the documentary, allowing Mary to tell her story in her own words.
Mary Two-Axe Earley with René Lévesque, Premier of Quebec, at the First Ministers’ Conference on Aboriginal Constitutional Matters, Ottawa (1983). Credit: National Film Board of Canada 
The film chronicles some of the results of Mary’s work. On June 28, 1985, nearly two decades after Mary began her fight against sex discrimination in the Indian Act, the Parliament of Canada passed Bill C-31, an amendment to restore Indian status to women who had lost it through marriage. The Bill was effective April 17, 1985. And the movement for sex equality continues today: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) cited sex discrimination in the Indian Act as a root cause of violence and discrimination faced by First Nations women in Canada. 

As National Indigenous History Month in Canada draws to a close, Canadians and Indigenous communities are grappling with Canada’s failure to properly acknowledge the historical and ongoing genocide of Indigenous Peoples in this country. At the end of May, the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation found the remains of 215 children who had been buried in unmarked graves at the site of a former Indian residential school in British Columbia. And searches are being done at other former residential schools. A week later, the Government of Canada released the long-awaited National Action Plan to end violence against Indigenous women and girls. Critics say the government’s plan lacks tangible goals, a detailed timeframe and budget. 

I’m reminded of a moment in the film when Mary reflects on the first time she spoke out, at the 1968 Royal Commission on the Status of Women in Ottawa. She worried about the consequences of doing so — of potentially being forced to leave her home and her community. But Mary pushed ahead. She secretly organized and hid on a bus full of women to travel to the Royal Commission. Mary was leading a movement. “In ’68, nobody dare say anything against the Indian Act,” said Mary. 

Today we honour the legacy of Mary Two-Axe Earley and all the women who continue to demand sex equality for First Nations women and their children. Her work still has an impact on our lives today, inspiring us to speak out against these injustices and to collectively uplift First Nations women. Mary shows us that our history matters, our women matter and our families matter. 

“Mary Two-Axe Earley: I Am Indian Again” is produced and distributed by the National Film Board of Canada and is currently screening on the film festival circuit. In December 2021, the film will be available for educators and teachers via CAMPUS, as well as for community screenings across Canada and will be launched on NFB.ca/ONF.ca for free streaming across Canada in June 2022. Watch the trailer now at https://www.nfb.ca/film/mary-two-axe-earley. For more information on CAMPUS, please visit https://help.nfb.ca/contact-the-nfb/. To book a community screening, please contact Donna Cowan at [email protected].

-- 
Òn:wa wenhniserá:te' Kanien'kehá:ka karáhstha' Star Horn ioráhston ne Koráhne aó:wen Google Doodle. Wa'tiakononhwerá:ton' ki' ne Mary Two-Axe Earley. Ehtà:ke tiakoká:raton ne Courtney Montour, Kanien'kehá:ka Teióia'ks Iakón:nis. "Mary Two-Axe Earley: Skonkwehón:we Á:re" iakohiá:ton tánon' tiakoniarotáhrhon. 

Shontonkwatehiahróntie' shikhehsennaienté:ri ne Mary Two-Axe Earley. Teiakenitsá:ron Kanien'kehá:ka na'teiakeniia'tò:ten' tánon' Kahnawà:ke iontiatehià:ron, ísi' na'kaniatará:ti Tiohtià:ke tkaná:taien. Tióhton iawén:re tewen'niáwe tánon' tióhton niwáhsen ià:ia'k shiiohseratátie' sha'ontóhetste' ne Mary, tánon' nì:'i shitià:tase'. Iah ki' ní: thiewákhe' tó: niió:re' tsi ionkhiia'takéhnhen ne Koráhne. Né: ká:ti' wa'katerihwahténtia'te' ákhsa' kí:ken teióia'ks "Mary Two-Axe Earley: Skonkwehón:we Á:re". Wà:kehrek aonsakerihó:wanahte' tsi niiehsennowá:nen, nè:'e tsi iotkà:te' enhon'nikonhrón:ni' tsi iah thahatiká:raton' tsi niiakoié:ren nó:nen enhatiká:raton' tsi nitiawénhseron ne Koráhne. 

Skáhere' ne tewáhsen niiohserá:ke ieiakorihwà:re' ne takaténionke' ne Indian Act kaianerénhsera' né: tsi kà:ron nitionáttehkwe' ne konnón:kwe tsi ní:ioht ne ronnón:kwe ne kaianerenhserá:kon. Tho ki' nontá:we' tsi wa'éhente' ne Koráhne tsi kontirihwáia'ks ne konnón:kwe aotiianerenhsera'shòn:'a aorihwà:ke. Indian Act sha'té:kon iawén:re tewen'niáwe tánon' tsá:ta niwáhsen ià:ia'k nikaianerenhserò:ten' tewanónhtons ónhka onkwehón:we enkénhake' (indian iontatena'tónhkwen) tánon' ónhka enwá:ton' eniontià:taren' ne onkwehón:we raotinakerahserá:kon (Indian Band rotina'tónhkwen). Kakoráhsera' wahshakotiia'tará:ko' ne konnonkwehón:we ne ahshakotiianerenhseráhkhwa' tóka' ahotiniákonke' ne iah tehonnonkwehón:we. Kaianerénhsera' wa'akóhnhe'se' ne konwatiianerenhseráhkhwen konnonkwehón:we tánon' akotiien'okòn:'a ne raonatená:takon ahatinákereke', ahotiia'takehnhahtsheraientà:seronke' tánon' ne akontatshennarà:na' tsi tehonnitiohkwakénnie's. Wa'akó:ia'khse' tsi nahò:ten' ionatstáhkwen ne konnonkwehón:we akontatena'tónhkhwake', tánon' wa'akóhkhwa' tsi niiotirihò:ten'. Tewen'niawe'ékhon tsi nikón:ti ne konnonkwehón:we shé:kon kaianerénhsera' kahsnonhsó:kon tkontiia'tò:ron tánon' iotihrhá:re' ne aonsahshakotiianerenhserawíhon' ne Kakoráhsera'. 

É:so iá:kon ne iekó:ra tánon' ierihwáia'ks ne konnón:kwe aotirihwà:ke wa'tkonwatihswanéta' ne Mary. Akwáhs kanoronhkhwahtsherá:kon, atennitenrahtsherá:kon tánon' atkontahkwahtsherá:kon ienenhrí:neskwe'. É:so kón:ti ne konnón:kwe khé:kens ne tho sha'teiotiierenhátie' tsi iotiio'tátie' ne kaianerenhserá:kon sha'taonsahonátteke' ne konnón:kwe tánon' ronnón:kwe. 

Kaié:ri niiohserá:ke wakón:ni' ne "Mary Two Axe-Earley: Skonkwehón:we Á:re". Kwah shikón:ni é:so iá:kon ne tekonwatihswanéten ne Mary wa'tiakwatatientéhrha'ne'. Kanakerahserakwé:kon nitiakawenónhseron. Óksa'k wa'kattokáhstsi' tsi né: aonhà:'a entewakentó:ra'se' ne thé:nen iakowennáten tóka' ni' ieia'tarónnion aketshenrión:ko' tsi iontahkwenniaientahkhwa'kó:wa. Onke'nikonhraksà:ten' tánon' onkena'kón:ni' tsi iah é:so tetká:ien ne Mary ieia'tarónnion ne Koráhne tsi iontahkwenniaientahkhwa'kó:wa's ne tká:ra's tánon' ón:kwe ieia'tarónnion. Arohátien tsi kwah tewáhsen niiohserá:ke shakotíhseron tánon' shakoti'nikonhrarátie'skwe'. Thó:ner ki' é:so tsi wa'tewakhsteríha'te' ne aontontié:renhte' taióia'ke' ne Mary akoká:ra'. 

Abenaki ionkwehón:we Alanis Obomsawin tetewakerihwahsnie'séhahkwe' shikón:ni ne "Flat Rocks" teióia'ks. Aónha ki' ón:kon' ne Mary iakowennatárion, né: ne tióhton iawén:re tewen'niáwe tánon' sha'té:kon niwáhsen kaié:ri shiiohseratátie' wa'akowennáta' tsi iakoká:raton. Mary tsi tiakonónhsote' tsi iekhonnià:tha' atekhwahrahtsherákta iotiwennáten, tsi ki' kwah nón:we Mary taiontáhsawen' aierihwaia'ákhseke'. Ohtehra'shòn:'a ne thí:ken akokara'shòn:'a, ón:ton' aionkhikaratón:hahse' ne Mary teióia'ks nón:we. 

Teióia'ks oh niioieránion ne Mary akoio'ténhsera'. Tewáhsen niiohserá:ke iakorihwáien, ieiakorihwà:re' ne sha'taonsahonátteke' ne ronnón:kwe tánon' konnón:kwe áse'ken Indian Act iakokèn:ron ne konnonkwehón:we. Sok ki' Ohiarí:ha tewáhsen sha'té:kon shiská:rahkwe' tióhton iawén:re tewen'niáwe tánon' sha'té:kon niwáhsen wísk shiiohserá:te' Kakoráhsera' wahatiianerenhseróhetste' ne' Kaianerénhsera' Aón:ton C-31 (Bill C-31). Iehotiiéhston tehotiténion ne kaianerénhsera', són:ton' ne konnonkwehón:we iotiniá:kon tóka' ni' iotiniakòn:ne aonsaiotiianerenhseraientà:seron'. Shé:kon ki' nòn:wa wenhniseraténion iotiianerenhserahskéhnhen ne konnón:kwe sha'taonsahonátteke' tsi ní:ioht ne ronnón:kwe. Kentiónhkwa ne rotirihwisá:kon tánon' rotiri'wanón:ton ne kanakerahserakwé:kon oh niiawèn:'en tsi konwatiia'taié:was tánon' konwanahsehtánion ne konnonkwehón:we tánon' kontiksa'okòn:'a, kí:ken kentióhkwa ohna'kénhaton rotihiá:ton tsi rotirihwatshénrion tsi Indian Act tiorihón:ni tsi konwatikarewahtánions tánon' konwatikenhren'seronniánions ne konnonkwehón:we ne Koráhne nón:we. 

 Tsi ó:nen iotenhni'to'kta'onhátie' ne Onkwehón:we Akawenhnì:ta' ne Koráhne, Korahró:non tánon' Onkwehón:we shé:kon tehonatatiénhton ne aonsahontate'nikonhrahserón:ni' áse'ken Kakoráhsera' iah orihwí:io tha'tehatirihwa'serákwas oh nihotiieránion tsi niiohseré:son's tánon' né: ó:ni' tsi thahón:nehre' ahshakonáhton'te' nonkwehón:we nok ahatirihwáhtòn:thake' ne onkwehón:we tsi nihotirihò:ten's. Tsi ontenhni'tò:kten' ne Onerahtohkó:wa, tsi Tsonontati'kó:wa (British Columbia) nón:we, tsi rontientáhkhwahkwe' ne ronnonkwehón:we ratiksa'okòn:'a, Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc onkwehón:we sahatihstien'tatshenrión:ko' ne tékeni tewen'niáwe tánon' wísk iawén:re nihá:ti ratiksa'okòn:'a thatiia'tatárion, iah tekentstenhró:ton. Sok ki' tsahià:khsera ohnà:ken, Kakoráhsera' tahónhtka'we' ne kanonión:ni ne oh nenkaié:ren ne tóhsa akonwatikarewahtaniónhseke' ne konnonkwehón:we tánon' kontiksa'okòn:'a. Tsi niiá:kon ne iakohiatonhseraka'én:ion nahò:ten thonahtkà:wen ión:ton tsi iah thiekaié:ri tsi ní:ioht tsi karihwahseronniánion ne ahatirihwaié:rite', kátke eh tho nenkaieránionke' tánon' ka' néntewe' ne ohwísta'. 

Nè:'e ki' sonkwehiahráhkwen' tsi wa'eká:raton' ne Mary néne tiotierénhton sha'onthró:ri' nahò:ten tiakawehtáhkwen tánon' iah teierihwanòn:we'skwe', tióhton iawén:re tewen'niáwe tánon' ià:ia'k niwáhsen sha'té:kon shiiohserá:te' nen' nè:'e ne Royal Commission ne Kanà:tso nonkwá:ti. Teiako'nikonhrhá:rahkwe' oh naiakoia'tawèn: enke' tóka' aiakotatì:'on áse'ken wate'shennaién:tahkwe' ne ahshakotinakerakwáhtonke' tsi tiakotená:taien. Nek tsi sénha'k ia'ontáthreke'. Karihwahsehtòn:ke iakoterihwahseronníhne ne skátne konnonkwehón:we iakoia'takarénie's akontíta' tánon' akontáhsehte' oh naiá:wen'ne' ne Royal Commission nón:we iakón:newe'. Iakonenhrí:nonhkwe' ne Mary. Iaká:wen, "Né: ne tióhton iawén:re tewen'niáwe tánon' ià:ia'k niwáhsen sha'té:kon shiiohserátie', iah ónhka teiakote'nientèn:'en ne aierihwáia'ke' ne Indian Act." 

Òn:wa wenhniserá:te' wa'tiethinonhwerá:ton' ne Mary Two-Axe Earley tánon' akwé:kon tsi nikón:ti ne konnón:kwe shé:kon iotiianerenhserahskéhnhen ne sha'taonsahonátteke' ne konnonkwehón:we tánon' akotiien'okòn:'a raotirihwà:ke. Shé:kon ne òn:wa wenhniseraténion ionkwaia'takehnhenhátie' ne tsi ní:kon iakoio'tèn:'en. Shé:kon ieionkhi'nikonhrà:reks ne aietewarihwaia'ákhseke' kí:ken nahò:ten' iah tekarihwakwaríhsion, tánon' ne enskátne aiethi'nikonhrakará:tate' ne konnonkwehón:we. Mary ionkhina'tón:ni tsi káhsta ne onkwakara'shòn:'a tsi nitiawénhseron, kontiia'tanó:ron ne konnonkwehón:we tánon' onkwahwatsire'shòn:'a. 

National Film Board of Canada rotíhson tánon' tehonrenià:tha' ne "Mary Two-Axe Earley: Skonkwehón:we Á:re" teióia'ks, nok nó:nen'k teioia'ákhons tsi nón:we tewaterihwahtentia'tánion ne teioia'ksokòn:'a aionterohrókha'. Nó:nen enská:ra'ne' ne Tsothóhrha' 2021, kí:ken teióia'ks enwá:ton' enhotiientà:seron' ne shakotirihonnién:ni, CAMPUS nón:we enwá:ton' ienhonterò:roke', tánon' tsi kanatakè:ron ó:ni' entkarà:seron' ne Koráhne. Ohiarí:ha 2022 NFB.ca/ONF.ca ne Koráhne nón:we entká:ra'ne', iah thé:nen thaiokaraién:take'. Ken'k ní:kon ia'saterò:rok ne https://www.nfb.ca/film/mary-two-axe-earley nón:we. Tóka' enhséhrheke' ne sénha aiesató:kenhse' nahò:ten' ne CAMPUS, https://help.nfb.ca/contact-the-nfb/ nón:we iahá:se'. Tóka' enhséhrheke' ne saná:takon aontaká:ra'ne', Donna Cowan ia'shehiá:ton's ne [email protected] nón:we.