Monthly Archives: February 2019

.dev for all

Posted by Adam Seligman, VP, Developer Relations

Last week we announced the new .dev top-level domain (TLD) was open for Early Access registrations. As of today, .dev is available to anyone through your registrar of choice (typically $12-$15 for standard priced domains, varies by registrar).

We envision .dev as a home for developers. From tools to programming languages to blogs, .dev is the best place for all the amazing things that you build. Over the past few months, we've launched, or re-launched, many of our own developer sites on the new domain. Here are some of our favorites:

  • Learn how to build a better web at web.dev.
  • Start your open source journey with the right license. Did you know that without the right license, software isn't really open source? Opensource.dev explains why.
  • Learn how to build beautiful native apps on iOS and Android from a single codebase. Visit flutter.dev to learn more.
  • Join the TensorFlow community at tfhub.dev.
  • Analyze and tune your software with performance tracing for Android, Linux, and Chrome. Check out perfetto.dev.
  • Explore Google's open source JavaScript and WebAssembly engine at v8.dev
  • Get your hands on Puppeteer, a Node library that provides a high-level API to control Chrome or Chromium over the DevTools Protocol. Get it at pptr.dev.

But we're not done yet! We've got big plans for .dev, and we'd like to invite you to join us. To start, everyone who applied for a ticket to Google I/O 2019 will get a .dev domain at no cost for one year. If you entered the drawing, check your inbox for your redemption code. We'll be moving more of our existing projects and launching some exciting things on .dev in the months to come. We can't wait to see what you build on .dev -- share what you create with #hellodotdev.

Control access to corporate data on Chrome, Mac, and Windows devices with endpoint verification

What’s changing 

We’re giving admins more control over how devices running endpoint verification can access corporate data in Google Cloud. Specifically, we’ll give admins the ability to:
  • Tag endpoint devices running Chrome as approved or blocked — Admins can use the tag to configure access levels with the Access Context Manager 
  • Decide whether an additional review is needed for newly registered endpoint verification devices before they’re tagged as approved. 
This will bring similar functionality to what’s currently available for mobile device management to desktop devices using Chrome OS or Chrome browser.

Who’s impacted 

Admins only

Why you’d use it 

With the ability to limit G Suite access for devices that use endpoint verification, admins will now get fine-grained control over managing device access beyond just mobile devices.

Now, admins can view the inventory of devices that are access this data, and approve or block access to specific devices based any internal criteria. Examples include, lost devices, which can now be ‘blocked’ from accessing apps, or approving new users who need to access applications as their job titles shift.

How to get started

  • Admins
    •  To set a policy for whether newly registered endpoint verification devices need admin approval, go to Admin Console > Device management > Setup > Device Approvals > Device Approvals
      • Check or uncheck the box to set a policy. This will default to unchecked, meaning that admins will not have to manually approve newly registered devices.
      • Optionally, you can also add an email that approval requests will be sent to.  


    • Note that device access to corporate data can be configured at any time by using the Access Context Manager. 
      •  For desktop devices, Admins will have the option to select Approve or Block, which will tag the device accordingly in the Access Context Manager. 
    • Approve or block actions on devices will generate an audit event within the Admin Console. For more information on audit logs for devices, see here
  • End users: No action needed 

Additional details 

This launch allows you to control access for devices with endpoint verification installed. This includes Chromebooks and other desktop devices running the Google Chrome browser.

Tag newly registered endpoint verification devices as ‘Approved’ or ‘Blocked’ before setting access 

When a new device is registered via Endpoint Verification, admins can turn on access restriction in the Access Context Manager. From there, they can govern device access by selecting ‘Approve’ or ‘Block’.

See image below to see how this will look in the Admin console with the feature ON.

If this policy is OFF, devices will be approved by default and can be blocked later on, for example, if a device is lost or a device is compromised.




Turn individual device access on or off 

Admins can approve or remove access for devices in the Admin Console. A new view at Admin console > Device Management > Device Approvals will list all devices in a pending approval state. From this list, they can be tagged as Deviced/Approved — once devices are tagged, further access policies can be configured in the Access Context Manager.

Admins can also get email notifications for when a device is registered but needs admin approval. See our Help Center to learn how to configure email notifications.

Helpful links 



Availability 


Rollout details 
G Suite editions 
  • Available to all G Suite editions. 
On/off by default? 
  • Manual device verification will be OFF by default and can be enabled at the domain and OU level. 
  • Individual device access controls will be ON by default.

Chrome Beta for Android Update

Hi everyone! We've just released Chrome Beta 73 (73.0.3683.58) for Android: it's now available on Google Play.

You can see a partial list of the changes in the Git log. For details on new features, check out the Chromium blog, and for details on web platform updates, check here.

If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Ben Mason
Google Chrome

Updated UI for Jamboard web home page

Quick launch summary 

To create an interface that’s clearer and easier to navigate, we’re updating the design of the Jamboard home page (jamboard.google.com). This builds on recent updates that made it easier to create and edits jams on the web. You may notice:

  • Material design updates, including updated boxes and increased white space, so you can quickly find what you’re looking for 
  • New buttons to open jams more quickly with fewer clicks 
  • New logos and design elements to increase consistency with other G Suite products and interfaces. 
The new interface will show on the Jamboard web home page at jamboard.google.com.


The new Jamboard UI 

Availability 

Rollout details 

G Suite editions 
Available to all G Suite editions.

On/off by default? 
This feature will be ON by default.

Stay up to date with G Suite launches

Beta Channel Update for Desktop

The beta channel has been updated to 73.0.3683.56 for Windows, Mac, and, Linux.

A full list of changes in this build is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels?  Find out how here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.



Abdul Syed
Google Chrome

Daraiha Greene wants everyone to see themselves in tech

Tech companies like Google create products for the whole world. But when employees don’t reflect the diversity of the global population their products serve, that lack of diversity can be discouraging for people who don’t look like the stereotype of a tech worker.

Googlers like Daraiha Greene are pushing for more diverse representation of people who work in tech, whether it’s in the media, in the business world or at events across the country. That way, the next generation will be inspired to pursue tech careers, no matter their race, gender or background. For our latest She Word, Greene explains how “if you can see it, you can be it.”

How do you describe your job at a dinner party?

I lead strategic partnerships for the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion team. Our biggest mandate is to make sure Google is showing up authentically, both internally and externally, so everyone can have a seat at the tech table.

You play a big role with CS in Media, which advocates for more diverse representation of computer scientists in pop culture. Why do you think representation is so important, especially for women and people of color?

When I was growing up, I was really good at math and science, but I never saw a Black woman doing computer science or technology, or even working in a tech space. Not that they didn’t exist, but I just wasn’t exposed to it. If you are even remotely interested in engineering and computer science, and you constantly see the same image portrayed over and over again, you’re going to start to think that it’s not for you.

I think the media is such a great tool because it reaches so many different people at once. I think it’s important to start there so we can change the culture and perception around tech in a broader, faster way. If you can see it, you can be it.

What projects are you working on with CS in Media right now?

We’re advising and funding a web series called GODCOMPLX. We wrapped the first season already, but now we’re working on the second season. It’s basically the tech version of “Friends,” but with a more diverse ensemble cast. We show how they pursue their careers in tech and computer science, but more importantly, we show them as well-rounded people first.

I also started the CS+X series at Google, where we highlight the intersections between computer science and other fields like music, dance, fashion, or sports. We show kids different careers behind the scenes that have to do with technology and computer science in a field where they already see themselves reflected, where they already feel like they could belong.

You also manage the Digital Coaches program. What’s the mission of that team?

We want to help small and medium business owners and entrepreneurs of color feel like they can also compete in the digital economy. We want to provide them with the tools and resources Google has to help them get there, so that no one feels left behind. I think it’s important to make sure that we have more representation of people, whether it’s women or people of color, starting their own businesses and leveraging companies like Google to succeed.

What advice do you have for women starting out in their careers?

Be open to change. When I was 13, I wanted to be an obstetrician, because I love babies. I was absolutely certain this was going to be my career path. When I got to college, I was majoring in biochemistry, shadowing doctors and going to the NICU, and every time I would see sick babies, I would cry. I finally realized that this was not for me, and I needed to find a new career path. And now that I look back, I’m so glad I was open to change. I never envisioned myself at a tech company like Google, but it happened because I was open and I was flexible.

Daraiha Greene

What’s one habit that makes you successful?

I follow through. I don’t just think about my long-term goals, or what I want to accomplish in shorter periods of time. I create a list, and then take it a step further to write down the tactics I need to implement, in order to achieve each goal. Once I have a clear understanding of the habits I need to unlearn and the obstacles that prevent me from moving forward,  it’s easier to map out my plan and succeed.

What are you passionate about outside of work?

Giving back and inspiring the next generation. My parents got divorced when I was 9, and I experienced a phase of sadness and anxiety. Dancing and acting really helped me get through that time in my life. Dancing was a way to relieve stress and express myself, but acting was a way to not be myself, because I could take on another character and have that escape. I still act and dance to this day.

I started a nonprofit, Rays of Sunlight, because I wanted to create a safe space for kids to cope with life’s challenges through creative expression. We’ll focus on mindfulness, social learning, personal growth, empathy, and leadership. I’m excited to provide just a little more light for our youth, starting July 2019 in Los Angeles.

A new space for Southeast Asian developers in Singapore

Posted by Sami Kizilbash, Developer Relations Program Manager

Last November, Raymond Chan, a data scientist at Chope, attended one of our first ML bootcamps for developers and start-ups in Southeast Asia. Over four days, he gained a deeper understanding of how to use Google Cloud Platform to better structure data from approximately 775,000 records on Chope's real-time restaurant reservation booking platform every day. With this new knowledge, Chope has been able to use that data for more effective and timely decision-making, making it easier for customers to book restaurants.

Last week in Singapore, we opened the Developer Space @ Google Singapore—a space that brings together resources to help Southeast Asian developers, entrepreneurs and community groups grow, plus earn more with their businesses. This is the first physical space dedicated to developers that sits inside a Google office, so developers in Singapore can look forward to benefiting from insights, hands-on mentorship and networking opportunities with various teams working at our Asia Pacific headquarters.

Supporting startups and developers like Raymond, and helping them achieve their full potential is something we're passionate about. In addition to the ML bootcamps which we expect another 800 developers in Singapore to attend by the end of this year, we will run a range of workshops on the latest Google tools and technologies, as well as programs like LeadersLab and Indie Games Accelerator that fuel ecosystem growth. We will also support activities run by community groups like Google Developer Groups, Google Business Groups and Women Techmakers.

With developers and startups from Southeast Asia rapidly driving growth across the region, we can't think of a better place to open this new hub. Come join us throughout the year for an exciting roster of events and meet people who, like Raymond, are looking to build and scale great products. Check out our schedule of events here.

A new space for Southeast Asian developers in Singapore

Posted by Sami Kizilbash, Developer Relations Program Manager

Last November, Raymond Chan, a data scientist at Chope, attended one of our first ML bootcamps for developers and start-ups in Southeast Asia. Over four days, he gained a deeper understanding of how to use Google Cloud Platform to better structure data from approximately 775,000 records on Chope's real-time restaurant reservation booking platform every day. With this new knowledge, Chope has been able to use that data for more effective and timely decision-making, making it easier for customers to book restaurants.

Last week in Singapore, we opened the Developer Space @ Google Singapore—a space that brings together resources to help Southeast Asian developers, entrepreneurs and community groups grow, plus earn more with their businesses. This is the first physical space dedicated to developers that sits inside a Google office, so developers in Singapore can look forward to benefiting from insights, hands-on mentorship and networking opportunities with various teams working at our Asia Pacific headquarters.

Supporting startups and developers like Raymond, and helping them achieve their full potential is something we're passionate about. In addition to the ML bootcamps which we expect another 800 developers in Singapore to attend by the end of this year, we will run a range of workshops on the latest Google tools and technologies, as well as programs like LeadersLab and Indie Games Accelerator that fuel ecosystem growth. We will also support activities run by community groups like Google Developer Groups, Google Business Groups and Women Techmakers.

With developers and startups from Southeast Asia rapidly driving growth across the region, we can't think of a better place to open this new hub. Come join us throughout the year for an exciting roster of events and meet people who, like Raymond, are looking to build and scale great products. Check out our schedule of events here.

Accessibility settings are now easier to access on Docs, Sheets, and Slides

Quick launch summary

It’s now easier to discover accessibility features like screen reader support, braille support, and screen magnifier support in Docs, Sheets, and Slides.

While these accessibility features were previously available, they required additional steps to access the accessibility menu. This change will make these settings more readily available by placing the Accessibility settings in the Tools menu.

Access the Accessibility menu by selecting Tools > Accessibility settings.

The accessibility settings dialog showing screen reader, braille, and screen magnifier support options.
If the screen reader option is selected from the accessibility settings dialog, an Accessibility menu will be displayed at the top of Docs, Sheets, and Slides for easy access.

Availability 

Rollout details 

G Suite editions 
Available to all G Suite editions.

On/off by default? 
This feature will be ON by default.

Stay up to date with G Suite launches

Newsmakers: Five questions with Noemí Ramírez of PRISA Noticias

This year, we’re celebrating innovation in journalism through a series of interviews with changemakers from across the news industry. Through the “Newsmakers” series, you’ll get to know a few of the journalists, newsroom leaders, researchers and technologists who are shaping the future of news. Today, we’re starting our series with Noemí Ramírez, the Chief Product and Customer Officer at PRISA Noticias, the parent company of EL PAÍS, the leading newspaper worldwide in Spanish. She leads the product, analytics and audience development areas at the company.

As an advocate for exploring the intersection of technology and news, Noemí has been instrumental in bringing Perspective, our AI-powered tool that aims to improve conversations in the comments section, to Spanish-language content. Before EL PAÍS, she was the Product Director at PRISA Innovation, a chief editor at El Mundo and worked for Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE), the largest investigative journalism association in the U.S.

Noemí Ramírez

We spoke with Noemí about the power of technology in newsrooms and what qualities are key in the fast-paced world of journalism.

How did you first get started in journalism? If you weren’t a journalist, what would you do?  

I always saw a clear connection between my background in information management and investigative journalism. As a result, I became very interested in the work done by IRE and decided to move to the heartland of America to earn a master’s degree in journalism as a Fulbright scholar at the Missouri School of Journalism. That’s where I had the opportunity to work both with IRE and NICAR(The National Institute for Computer-Assisted Reporting) in the area of Data Journalism—back in the late nineties it was called computer-assisted reporting. I got exposed to the impact that technology has in the storytelling and in the discovery of newsworthy stories.


I feel very attracted to professions that involve a strong level of research, testing hypotheses and supporting or discharging them based on factual evidence. I guess if I wasn’t working in journalism I would probably have pursued a career in disciplines as different as engineering, medical research or anthropology.  


What’s one thing the industry should stop focusing on? What’s one thing that the industry should do more?

When comparing media with other industries, we in the media have a certain tendency to focus on what makes us unique. As good as it is to focus on what makes us stand out, there are many lessons to learn from other sectors, which is tied to developing a more collaborative mindset.

Probably the most obvious one is learning from the tech industry, which has a continuous pace of experimentation and an aim of speeding up delivery of products. Second of all, I  am particularly interested in what drives consumers’ loyalty to powerful brands, both new and old, that put customers first. The media could learn from those companies, as well as from fundraising tactics led by NGOs.


What are some trends in technology for newsrooms that excite you?

The two usual suspects these days: AI and voice-activated interfaces. Machine learning algorithms take data journalism to a whole different level by allowing reporters to unveil the hidden connections between names, companies and other entities that might have been unnoticeable otherwise. There are also other kinds of applications of AI, such as helping manage readers’ conversational flows, identifying toxicity in their comments and contributing to a healthier and a more constructive public debate.

Perspective

When someone types in a comment that’s similar to a toxic comment seen in the past, Perspective flags  that it’s a potential violation of the site’s community guidelines before the commenter presses publish.

Voice interfaces open up exciting opportunities to explore new narratives and build products that are becoming increasingly integrated into our daily routines. These new products will be consumed in a vast array of connected devices, and that means we must develop a deep understanding of our users and create a truly customized experience for them.

What do you think is key to the future of your job and that of the industry?

Adapting to the rapidly changing environment, regaining the trust of the public, building a sustainable business model and getting control of that business model are probably the most important challenges that journalism is facing now and in upcoming years.


What would you say to a student thinking of entering journalism as a future career?


First, it’s important to have a realistic view of what’s going on. Almost every week we read about attacks on the press, traumatic layoffs, people reading misinformation instead of  factual, verifiable stories and media companies struggling to consolidate different revenue streams. I do think, however, that there are also good reasons to believe that the role of independent and quality reporting is needed more than ever, and that there is a future for journalism.

Second, at a time of rapid change, the essential qualities of a  good reporter—curiosity, critical thinking, knowing what to ask and search for—have not changed. In fact, digital media has made those qualities even more important. Journalism students need to learn how the new formats, narratives and new distribution players will help them to do their job: telling good, engaging stories to an increasingly large number of loyal readers.

Finally, bring an open, collaborative mind. Newsrooms have changed, and those that haven’t yet are on the brink of doing so. Nowadays, reporters work with product managers, audience analysts, engineers, video producers, visualization experts and data scientists. The industry is looking for people who combine product skills, technical understanding and business acumen and feel comfortable speaking those different languages.