Tag Archives: students

Wrapping up Google Code-in 2017

Today marks the conclusion of the 8th annual Google Code-in (GCI), our contest that teaches teenage students through contributions to open source projects. As with most years, the contest evolved a bit and grew. And it grew. And it doubled. And then it grew some more...
These numbers may increase as mentors finish reviewing the final work submitted by students.
Mentors from each of the 25 open source organizations are now busy reviewing the last of the work submitted by student participants. We’re looking forward to sharing the stats.

Each organization will pick two Grand Prize Winners who will be flown to Northern California to visit Google’s headquarters, enjoy a day of adventure in San Francisco, and meet their mentors and Google engineers.

We’d like to congratulate all of the student participants for challenging themselves and making a contribution to open source in the process! We’d also like to congratulate the mentors for surviving the unusually busy contest.

Further, we’d like to thank the mentors and the organization administrators. They are the heart of this program, volunteering countless hours creating tasks, reviewing student work, and helping students into the world of open source. Mentors teach young students about the many facets of open source development, from community standards and communicating across time zones to version control and testing. We couldn’t run this program without you!

Stay tuned, we’ll be announcing the Grand Prize Winners and Finalists on January 31st.

By Josh Simmons, Google Open Source

Hash Code 2018 registration is now live — are you up for the challenge?

Are you up for a coding challenge? Team up to solve an engineering problem from Google — registration for Hash Code 2018 is now open at g.co/hashcode!

Last year’s Final Round competitors celebrating a job well done


Hash Code is our flagship team programming competition for students and professionals in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. The 2018 contest will kick off with an Online Qualification Round on Thursday, March 1st. During this virtual round, teams can participate from wherever they’d like, but we’d recommend joining a Hash Code hub (more info below). Top scoring teams from the Online Qualification Round will be invited to Google Dublin in April to go head-to-head for the title of Hash Code 2018 Champion.


Last year, more than 26,000 developers from 100+ countries participated in Hash Code. In the end, it was AIM Tech from Russia who took home the coveted Hash Code trophy during the Final Round at Google Paris.

First place team, AIM Tech, celebrates onstage at the Final Round after being announced the winners of Hash Code 2017


Want to take part in Hash Code? Here’s what you need to know:

The problems are modeled after Google engineering challenges

We want participants to experience what software engineering is like at Google, so we model Hash Code problems after challenges faced by Google engineering teams. Past problems have included optimizing video serving on YouTube, routing Streetview cars through a busy city, and optimizing the layout of a Google data center.


And just like software engineering at Google, there is no one correct solution to Hash Code problems. Instead, each round of the competition is designed as a battle of heuristics: participants work together to develop approximate solutions and then launch and iterate to progressively improve their score. Ingrid von Glehn, a Software Engineer at Google London, adds: “We design the problems to be challenging, but not intimidating. It’s important to us that everyone has fun while taking part.”


Participants work in teams

To compete in Hash Code, you need to form a team of 2 to 4 people. This means it’s not just about what you know individually, but about how you and your team can work together to find better approaches and approximations as you advance through the problem.


Damien, a Software Engineer at Google Zurich, has been a part of Hash Code since the beginning, first as a competitor and now as a volunteer. He advises participants to form well-rounded teams in order to succeed at Hash Code. “Combining different insights and skills can be the key to climbing the scoreboard,” Damien says. “The more diverse your team is, the better off you'll be!”


Want to compete, but don’t have a team yet? Don’t worry! Once you’ve registered for the competition, you can use our Facebook Event and Google+ community to find a great mix of members for your team.


Hubs add extra fun to the Online Qualification Round

Hubs are meetups where teams in the same area can come together to compete in the Online Qualification Round. Hubs add extra excitement to the competition and are a great opportunity for you to connect with other developers in your community.


So far, more than 250 hubs have been registered by universities, Google Developer Groups, coworking spaces, and other organizations across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa.


Don’t see a hub registered near you? It’s not too late to sign up to host a hub in your local area - find out more here!


Ready to accept the challenge? Sign up today!

Registration will stay open until February 26, 2018.



Teams hard at work tackling our wireless router placement problem during 2017’s Final Round in Paris.

Hash Code 2018 registration is now live — are you up for the challenge?

Are you up for a coding challenge? Team up to solve an engineering problem from Google — registration for Hash Code 2018 is now open at g.co/hashcode!

Last year’s Final Round competitors celebrating a job well done


Hash Code is our flagship team programming competition for students and professionals in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. The 2018 contest will kick off with an Online Qualification Round on Thursday, March 1st. During this virtual round, teams can participate from wherever they’d like, but we’d recommend joining a Hash Code hub (more info below). Top scoring teams from the Online Qualification Round will be invited to Google Dublin in April to go head-to-head for the title of Hash Code 2018 Champion.


Last year, more than 26,000 developers from 100+ countries participated in Hash Code. In the end, it was AIM Tech from Russia who took home the coveted Hash Code trophy during the Final Round at Google Paris.

First place team, AIM Tech, celebrates onstage at the Final Round after being announced the winners of Hash Code 2017


Want to take part in Hash Code? Here’s what you need to know:

The problems are modeled after Google engineering challenges

We want participants to experience what software engineering is like at Google, so we model Hash Code problems after challenges faced by Google engineering teams. Past problems have included optimizing video serving on YouTube, routing Streetview cars through a busy city, and optimizing the layout of a Google data center.


And just like software engineering at Google, there is no one correct solution to Hash Code problems. Instead, each round of the competition is designed as a battle of heuristics: participants work together to develop approximate solutions and then launch and iterate to progressively improve their score. Ingrid von Glehn, a Software Engineer at Google London, adds: “We design the problems to be challenging, but not intimidating. It’s important to us that everyone has fun while taking part.”


Participants work in teams

To compete in Hash Code, you need to form a team of 2 to 4 people. This means it’s not just about what you know individually, but about how you and your team can work together to find better approaches and approximations as you advance through the problem.


Damien, a Software Engineer at Google Zurich, has been a part of Hash Code since the beginning, first as a competitor and now as a volunteer. He advises participants to form well-rounded teams in order to succeed at Hash Code. “Combining different insights and skills can be the key to climbing the scoreboard,” Damien says. “The more diverse your team is, the better off you'll be!”


Want to compete, but don’t have a team yet? Don’t worry! Once you’ve registered for the competition, you can use our Facebook Event and Google+ community to find a great mix of members for your team.


Hubs add extra fun to the Online Qualification Round

Hubs are meetups where teams in the same area can come together to compete in the Online Qualification Round. Hubs add extra excitement to the competition and are a great opportunity for you to connect with other developers in your community.


So far, more than 250 hubs have been registered by universities, Google Developer Groups, coworking spaces, and other organizations across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa.


Don’t see a hub registered near you? It’s not too late to sign up to host a hub in your local area - find out more here!


Ready to accept the challenge? Sign up today!

Registration will stay open until February 26, 2018.



Teams hard at work tackling our wireless router placement problem during 2017’s Final Round in Paris.

Showing Students they Can: Apply for CSSI 2018!



Applications for the 2018 Computer Science Summer Institute (CSSI) and the Generation Google Scholarship (both available to students in the US or Canada) open on January 9th. Learn more about both programs below and apply!






What

The Computer Science Summer Institute is a three-week introduction to computer science (CS) for graduating high school seniors who’ve displayed excellent leadership and have a passion for technology. Students will spend three weeks at a Google office, where they’ll learn programming fundamentals directly from Google engineers. In their final week, groups of students will design and develop their very own application (with mentorship from Google engineers). 



The Generation Google Scholarship helps aspiring computer scientists from underrepresented groups excel in technology and become leaders in the field. Selected students will receive 10,000 USD (for those studying in the US) or 5,000 CAD (for those studying in Canada) for the 2018-2019 school year. As part of the scholarship, current high school seniors who are entering their first year of university in Fall 2018 will be required to attend CSSI in the summer of 2018.



Where & When

We offer two types of sessions at CSSI: commuter and residential. At our residential sites, students will live in a dorm for the duration of the three weeks. The residential site is reserved for students who do not have a local Google office nearby. At the residential sites, housing, meals, and transportation will be provided and costs will be covered by Google. Residential sites for 2018 include:



Seattle, WA: July 8th - July 28th 

Pittsburgh, PA: July 8th - July 28th

Cambridge, MA: July 8th - July 28th

Kirkland, WA: July 15th - August 4th 



At the commuter sites, students will be provided a travel stipend and expected to commute to/from the respective Google office for each day of CSSI. Lunch will be provided and covered by Google each day. Students within a specified mileage distance from the respective day-camp offices will automatically be considered for those sites. Commuter sites for 2018 include:



Atlanta, GA: July 9th - July 27th

Austin, TX: July 16th - August 3rd

Chicago, IL: July 9th - July 27th

Los Angeles, CA: July 16th - August 3rd

Mountain View, CA: July 16th - August 3rd

New York City, NY: July 9th - July 27th



There will also be two Saturday activities planned at both the residential and commuter sites that will be covered by Google. This is an excellent opportunity to explore (or further explore if you’re in a commuter site!) the city and to get to know your fellow participants better. 





Who

We are looking for students eager to spend a few weeks immersed in life at Google — tackling interesting technical problems, working collaboratively, and having fun. The program is committed to addressing diversity in the field of computer science and is open to all qualified high school seniors who intend to major in computer science at a four year university in the US (excluding territories) or Canada.



Why

Google is committed to increasing the enrollment and retention of students in the field of computer science. CSSI offers an intensive, interactive, and fun experience that seeks to inspire the tech leaders and innovators of tomorrow. We want students to leave empowered, heading into their first year of college armed with technical skills and a unique learning experience that can only be found at Google. We aim to expose selected students to key programming concepts while enabling them to tackle the challenging problems in CS by creating a safe, comfortable environment to learn, play, break, and build.







Apply

Visit our Google for Education website for more information and to apply. The application deadline is March 2, 2018. Final decisions will be announced in early May.



Questions?

Give us a shout at cssi@google.com or generationgoogle@google.com.


Seeking open source projects for Google Summer of Code 2018

Do you lead or represent a free or open source software organization? Are you seeking new contributors? (Who isn’t?) Do you enjoy the challenge and reward of mentoring new developers? Apply to be a mentor organization for Google Summer of Code 2018!

We are seeking open source projects and organizations to participate in the 14th annual Google Summer of Code (GSoC). GSoC is a global program that gets student developers contributing to open source. Each student spends three months working on a project, with the support of volunteer mentors, for participating open source organizations.

Last year 1,318 students worked with 198 open source organizations. Organizations include individual projects and umbrella organizations that serve as fiscal sponsors, such as Apache Software Foundation or the Python Software Foundation.

You can apply starting today. The deadline to apply is January 23 at 16:00 UTC. Organizations chosen for GSoC 2018 will be posted on February 12.

Please visit the program site for more information on how to apply, a detailed timeline of important deadlines and general program information. We also encourage you to check out the Mentor Guide and join the discussion group.

Best of luck to all of the applicants!

By Josh Simmons, Google Open Source

My Path to Google: Jordan LaCroix, Software Engineer



Welcome to the 17th installment of our blog series “My Path to Google.” These are real stories from Googlers, interns, and alumni highlighting how they got to Google, what their roles are like, and even some tips on how to prepare for interviews.




Today’s post is all about Jordan LaCroix. Read on!









Can you tell us a bit about yourself?
I grew up in the south end of New Bedford, Massachusetts, also called “The Whaling City.” I went to Bristol Community College downtown, and then to the next town over to finish up my bachelors in Computer Science at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.




When I’m not at work, I’m outside the house—backpacking, mountaineering, biking, kayaking, rock climbing, walking the dog, or anything that gives me a reason to get some sunshine.




What’s your role at Google?
I'm a Software Engineer on DoubleClick Bid Manager. Before you see an ad, there's bidding that goes on between a bunch of other ads that want to be seen. We automate that bidding process for advertisers, so they get the best bang for their buck! It takes a lot of manpower to fuel the process, and I love all the coordinating and collaboration.




What inspires you to come in every day?
I always joke and say it’s the free food, but it's really a place I'm proud to work at! I really believe Google will make for a better future.




Can you tell us about your decision to enter the process?
I was ready to throw on my Google onesie long before applying. I went to a no-name school, had no internships, and I thought it wouldn't work out, but I figured it wouldn't hurt to apply.




How did the recruitment process go for you?
I applied on the careers page thinking I wouldn’t hear back. Then I went through the interviews thinking I wouldn't hear back. The day came when I DID hear back, and I recall Jarrod (my recruiter) saying in a sad voice "Jordan, remember I said you should be okay at this point...(dramatic pause), well I'm sorry, but...(a longer dramatic pause) you have nothing to worry about! Congrats."




What do you wish you’d known when you started the process?
It takes time — just relax!




Can you tell us more about the resources you used to prep?
There's a good subreddit (‘cscareerquestions’) which has loads of prep material.




To finish, do you have any tips you’d like to share with aspiring Googlers?
When you get here, remember that the food isn't going anywhere!





Want to learn more about the Engineering Residency? Watch our video, or head over to g.co/EngResidency. Ready to apply to the residency? We're currently accepting applications at https://goo.gl/rhBmj1.

My Path to Google: Ashley Shields, Inside Sales Representative

Welcome to the 16th installment of our blog series “My Path to Google.” These are real stories from Googlers, interns, and alumni highlighting how they got to Google, what their roles are like, and even some tips on how to prepare for interviews.

Today’s post is all about Ashley Shields. Read on!




Can you tell us a bit about yourself?
I grew up in San Diego, California, and I’ve called Austin, Texas, my home for the past four years. I attended Northern Arizona University and studied Business with an emphasis in Hotel and Restaurant Management. After graduation (before coming over to Google), I was on the sales team that opened the largest JW Marriott in North America.
I love staying active in my free time. Austin is a great place to be active, as it has endless trails and a bounty of entertainment. I’m an avid tennis player and participate in local fitness competitions in Austin. I’m also a huge fan of stand-up comedy and concerts. Austin has a ton of unique venues for both, which makes it the ideal city to live in.
Fun facts: I love going to the dentist. I once bought Nick Jonas dinner. I have been featured on two billboards.

What’s your role at Google?
I am currently an Inside Sales Representative for the Google Cloud team covering the Central Florida region. I help identify business needs within a company, and work with our team to create custom IT solutions using the Google Cloud Platform—I’m very passionate about helping customers develop ideas that will grow their businesses and save them money to reinvest in their company and spur customer growth.
My team is based in the Austin office, but I work virtually with my Central Florida teammates (based out of Florida and Atlanta). We use our collaboration toolset, G Suite, to ensure a great customer experience as if we are all sitting together in one office!
Being here is great because Google allows their employees to work on a lot of cool projects; one that I’m passionate about is the culture committee for our Cloud Team in Austin. My favorite project was the Google Gives week, where different types of charities are highlighted every day for a week—it’s an awesome way to give back to such an incredible city. We even raised $4,000 in one day to support a local Austin charity!
Another great project I was able to work on was event planning for the Google Cloud team. I loved being able to work cross-functionally with the marketing team to put on local Cloud events, helping educate current and future customers on the power of Google Cloud. It’s an amazing feeling to see my ideas come to life, as I was able to create and execute events to drive new and current customer business.

What inspires you to come in every day?

There are two important aspects of Google that inspire me to come to work everyday: 1) the people, and 2) the passion. As you can imagine, the people at Google are some of the most brilliant I’ve worked with, and partnering with these individuals every day is a dream! The ideas and teamwork produced in the office are incredible.
Because people are happy to be working here, you are able to thrive off of the positive energy of others. Every day brings something different and exciting, whether it’s a morning meeting, a trip to the micro kitchen or a coffee break at the cafe, you really never tire of the environment. I also get to work with people from all around the world, and I think we really come together when we work towards the common goal of “organizing the world's information and making it universally accessible and useful.”
Right now, I am working on a training program for the new Enterprise Customer Development (ECD) role. The Googlers in this role will be focused on growing and expanding the enterprise business of Google Cloud. Field Sales reps, like myself, will partner with ECDs to research business leads, open up new opportunities for the Google Cloud platform, schedule client meetings, and identify prospects for potential Cloud engagement. Having this brand new role on our team is really exciting, and I’m glad I get to be a part of building out the training curriculum.


Can you tell us about your decision to enter the process?
Google always seemed to be the most incredible place to work — I remember reading articles on Google’s innovative approach to all the different businesses they were looking to enhance. Needless to say I was a bit intimidated when applying because I was so new to the workforce (I only had about a year of experience post graduation).


How did the recruitment process go for you?
The recruitment process was smooth!
My path to Google was a little unique, as I was referred into the company by a former coworker. When I first started with Google, I worked as a contractor for Google Fiber in the early stages as we were beginning to build out the Fiber business. After a year of being a contractor, I was lucky enough to be converted into a full-time position, leading the inside sales team for the Atlanta region.

What do you wish you’d known when you started the process?
My advice to anyone going through the recruitment process is be patient and don’t overthink. Google has come up with a great workflow for hiring the best candidates. The recruiters are working with various teams and candidates, so if they don’t get back to you the second after you send a follow-up email, don’t stress. Once you’ve completed the interview process, just relax and be proud of your accomplishment thus far.
One key thing that I didn’t know at first was that Google is always changing — we have to; that’s what makes us the best at what we do.

Can you tell us about the resources you used to prepare for your interview or role?
Since I was already in previous sales roles, product knowledge and technical preparation was where I focused for my new role on Cloud. Current market research was key—Gartner was a great resource to learn about how the market and our customers viewed Google Cloud, as well as the competition within the Cloud world. For this new Enterprise Customer Development role, technical knowledge of Cloud isn’t required (but is recommended!).
YouTube was also a great resource, from NEXT presentations to quick videos on teams learning “how do I spin up a VM in the cloud.”
My advice for someone new coming to technical sales is to be confident. You’ve most likely been selling your whole life, you just might not be aware of it. The technical aspect of the sales position will come with exposure to different solutions and use cases.

Do you have any tips you’d like to share with aspiring Googlers?
Always bring your best self to the workplace: be present, be engaging, and have fun! If you get a job at Google, they hired you because you displayed great ability to make a difference. This means the possibilities for growth, education, and impact are endless. Be proud of all the accomplishments that brought you to becoming a Googler, and continue to make an impact with all the opportunities that will come your way.



Interested in the Enterprise Customer Development role? Apply now!

My Path to Google: Hee Jung Ryu, Senior Software Engineer, Google Research



Welcome to the 16th installment of our blog series “My Path to Google.” These are real stories from Googlers, interns, and alumni highlighting how they got to Google, what their roles are like, and even some tips on how to prepare for interviews.


Today’s post is all about Hee Jung Ryu. Read on!



Can you tell us a bit about yourself?


I grew up in South Korea, in a district called Ilsan at the Northeast corner of Seoul. I also lived in a town called Vienna, Virginia, in the U.S. for one year when I was thirteen years old, basically to learn English.


I started college at Hanyang University in Seoul, South Korea, but transferred to Cornell University in the U.S. in my sophomore year. I graduated from Cornell with a Bachelor’s specializing in artificial intelligence and Master’s degrees in computer science focused on computer vision and distributed computing, with minors in mechanical engineering concentrating in robotics. I also worked at a robotics lab—albeit briefly—as an undergrad.


I think of myself as a collector of new experiences: scuba diving and surfing (despite my fear of deep water), skydiving, airplane piloting, ziplining, snowboarding, and more! New experiences get me excited and keep me awed and humble, because I realize that there is so much in this world that I want to learn about.



What’s your role at Google?


My official title at work is senior software engineer, and I’m on the Google Research team. I research artificial intelligence (A.I.), specifically at the intersection of Deep Learning and Computer Vision. I also explore the topic of “fairness” in machine learning.



What inspires you to come in every day?


My past five-and-a-half years at Google flew by so quickly because every day at work has been full of exciting projects and conversations. For me, the best part of working at Google is the respect and freedom given to engineers and research scientists. We are always empowered to choose or create our own projects. For example, in my role, I’ve been able to research the topic of building more inclusive machine learning systems (see my research Improving Smiling Detection with Gender and Race Diversity). What could be more exciting than working on something that you are passionate about?


I’ve also had the opportunity to turn one of my ideas, an electronic screen protector, into a reality, which I presented at the 2017 NIPS (Neural Information Processing Systems) conference. In addition, Google has provided me with an abundance of resources, from hardware and software to access to experts in various fields, waiting to kindly share their passion and knowledge with me because I’m part of their Google family.



Can you tell us about your decision to enter the process?


More than anything, the following experience led me to choose Google over other companies and offers: A female lead recruiter from Google came to Cornell’s campus during a fall recruitment season. She had such an energy and charisma, which inspired me and convinced me that Google was the place for me.







How did the recruitment process go for you?


Through Cornell’s on-campus recruiting process, I applied for a job at Google and got an on-campus interview. At the same time, a Googler reached out to me through LinkedIn, offering to refer me to Google, which I agreed to, as well.



What do you wish you’d known when you started the process?


I would have discussed more of my extracurricular activities and interests during the interview process in order to emphasize my passion for pursuing new ideas and experiences.



Can you tell us more about the resources you used to prep?


I reviewed my university course materials on data structures and algorithms and also interviewed with other companies before doing the interview with Google, so I could practice and get more experience interviewing.



What tips you’d like to share with aspiring Googlers?


Don’t be afraid to teach yourself something new. I think that being able to teach yourself about a new field quickly can help you succeed in the fast-paced, constantly changing world of technology, especially when you are at the forefront of a research subject, like A.I.. There’s rarely someone else who can teach you what you want to know because we’re all exploring and discovering new aspects of the technology at the same time. So you have to be the one to trailblaze and truly grow by teaching yourself and others along the way.




To learn more about Google Research, https://research.google.com/. Ready to explore roles at Google Research? Go to https://research.google.com/workatgoogle.html

Google Code-in is breaking records

It’s been an incredible (and incredibly busy!) three weeks for the 25 mentor organizations participating in Google Code-in (GCI) 2017, our seven week global contest designed to introduce teens to open source software development. Participants complete bite sized “tasks” in topics that include coding, documentation, UI/UX, quality assurance and more. Volunteer mentors from each open source project help participants along the way.

Total registered students has already surpassed 2016 numbers and we are less than halfway to the finish! We’re thrilled that high school students are embracing GCI like never before.

Check out some of the statistics below (current as of Thursday, December 14):
  • Total registered students: 6,146
  • Number of students who have completed at least one task: 1,573 (51% of those students have completed more than 3 tasks, earning them a GCI t-shirt)
  • Total number of tasks completed: 5,499
  • Most tasks completed by one student: 39

Top 5 Countries by Tasks Completed

Countries Represented by Mentors and Students



Of course, GCI wouldn’t be possible without the effort of the more than 725 mentors and organization administrators. Based in 65 countries, mentors answer questions, review submissions, and approve tasks for students at all hours of the day -- and sometimes night! They work tirelessly to help encourage and guide the next generation of open source contributors.

Every year we express our gratitude to the mentors and organization administrators. We are particularly grateful for them given how many more students are participating in GCI this year. Thank you all, and hang in there!

By Mary Radomile, Google Open Source

My Path to Google: Julius Adebayo, Google AI Resident

Welcome to the 14th installment of our blog series “My Path to Google.” These are real stories from Googlers, interns, and alumni highlighting how they got to Google, what their roles are like, and even some tips on how to prepare for interviews.

Today’s post is all about Julius Adebayo. Read on!



Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

I grew up in Nigeria, and came to the US for college. I studied mechanical engineering in undergrad, but started to drift towards machine learning (ML) around my last year. Afterwards, I ended up pursuing a master’s degree in computer science, focused on machine learning, and another in technology policy. In general, I am interested in research that tries to provide guarantees that deployment of machine learning in the real-world will be safe and reliable. My focus has been in studying bias, interpretability, and privacy/security all within an ML context. I also enjoy thinking about the intersection of machine learning and policy, especially how current advancements will affect daily life down the line. Outside of school and work, I enjoy listening to Jazz and Nigerian music in all its glory. I like playing soccer, and watching the NBA. Lately, I have become more interested in trying to spread machine learning knowledge to places in West Africa where machine learning expertise is not abundant.



What’s your role at Google?

I am one of the current residents in the Google AI Residency Program. The goal is to collaborate with researchers and engineers on the Google Brain team to do deep learning research.  Deep learning research is new to me, and I am actually coming to it as a skeptic. There is a famous quote attributed to Von Neumann that says, "With four parameters I can fit an elephant. Give me five and I can make it wiggle its tail." The point of that quote is you typically want models that don't have too many parameters because you could make such models do anything. However, deep learning models tend to violate that requirement. Since being here, I have come to appreciate working with neural networks. There is a vibrant community here that is actively working to address several problems with the current models, especially in regards to security, potential bias, and stability of machine learning models. The work I am doing now is focused on assessing the performance of neural network explanation methods. (This link is closely related.)



What inspires you to come in every day?

The Google Brain team has several researchers and engineers who are working on really interesting projects. Talking to other residents and researchers, I find that I leave every conversation having learned something new. The breadth and depth of research on the team is incredible and it is quite fun to be in an environment like that.



Can you tell us about your decision to enter the process?

I found out about the residency program through a friend. As someone working at a startup doing ML, it was impossible to not hear about deep learning on a daily basis. I figured the residency would be a way to try and get to the cutting edge of work in this area as fast as possible. The Google Brain team has several researchers doing really interesting work. I remember reading some papers from ICLR, and noticed that a few of the papers I enjoyed reading came from researchers on the team.


How did the recruitment process go for you?

The recruitment process was quite smooth. I felt like I was aware of what was required at each stage, and I found the recruiters to be accommodating to my requests or questions. I was also given an opportunity to talk to a few researchers on the team.



What do you wish you’d known when you started the process?

Google can be overwhelming, especially given the concentration of expertise on the team. I would be more open to asking questions and reaching out to people doing interesting work.


Can you tell us about the resources you used to prepare for your interview or role?

The residency interview had a coding and research portion.
I had gone through software engineering interviews before, so my preparation there was using the whiteboard type experience I already had in that context. For the research angle, I went through a few deep learning papers that I found interesting, and tried to understand them. A few of the papers were discussed extensively in some of my interviews. I also spent some time reviewing past research I had done, so I could explain it well to others.


Do you have any tips you’d like to share with aspiring Googlers?

Apply for the Residency Program now at g.co/airesidency/apply!